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VOLUME 1 ISSUE 1

Special Edition

FALL 2013

Tsa La Gi

CONTENT
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MEET THE STAFF


Staff Writers:

Meet the Staff Master Plan sets tone for NSUs future Hastings and NSU continue partnership Beards rise in popularity with NoShave November

Master Plan sets tone for NSUs future


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ASHLEE JOHNSON Sydney Asbill Latasha Atcity Jessica Brooks Northeastern State University embraces change with the creation of a Master Plan, the first in the universitys history. This is a high-level, long-range vision for the three campuses that comprise our university, said David Koehn, VP of Business and Finance. The Master Plan will be used to assist in developing the resources to improve and supplement our campus facilities to support firstrate academic and research programs along with student housing and services. The Master Plan is comprised of five phases; discovery, analysis, idea generation, refinement and documentation. Currently, it is in phase five and scheduled to finalize in December. One of the recurring concerns discussed during public forums and campus meetings was the dangerous interaction between pedestrian walking traffic and vehicle traffic on campus, said Tim Foutch, VP of Operations. Minimizing this interaction by relocating parking lots and decreasing the number of roadways that intersect the campus will address this concern. Many projects have been discussed throughout the

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6-7 Emergency Management volunteers work to keep Cherokee County safe during storms 8-9 Seminary Hall reflects Northeastern State Universitys rich history along with successes 10 Furry friends populate NSU 11  NSU royalty continues campus traditions 12-13 Rookie Bridge Camp continues to reign as 24-year tradition for incoming freshman  14 15 Exhibit highlights World War Codetalkers Photo tour offers education and fun

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Jennifer Clark

Kathy Drake

Tori Gilmartin

Audra Hurley

Isaac Jamison

Ashlee Johnson

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16-17 Beekeeping pastime works wonders for member of Northeastern State Community

Michael Landrum

Casey Owens

Tricia Price

Tsa La Gi magazine is produced by Northeastern State Universitys Media Studies Public Writing students, under the direction of Dr. Dana Eversole. Layout and Design: Ashley Rogers
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course of creating the Master Plan, including new sports facilities, dorms and the renovation of existing buildings. On the Tahlequah campus, many questions have arose about the future of currently closed buildings. Wilson Hall will likely become an academic or classroom facility and pending the outcome of the Master Lease process, Wyly Hall would be razed and new housing built in its place, said Foutch. Shawnee Street Theatre is still under review. Foutch added the final decisions on these buildings have not been made. Students are eager for the projects listed in the Master Plan to be finalized. I hope that NSU follows through with the housing projects, said Erin Edmundson, Tulsa junior. I think it is the most urgent issue they need to fix. Funding of the proposed projects is a big concern of students. Many wonder if tuition and student fees will be raised. Future projects will be funded through a combination of dedicated capital funds, state capital funding provided by the Legislature, fundraising efforts and reserve funds, said Koehn. These projects, pending funding, could begin as early as the summer of 2014. A draft of the Master Plan is available for viewing on the schools website. For more information, email johns124@nsuok.edu.

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Hastings and NSU continue partnership


JENNIFER CLARK A revival of the old territorial government occurred in Tahlequah on Wednesday, January 24, 1936, when former United States congressman William Wirt Hastings reigned as Principal Chief of the Cherokees for one day. Hastings was given this appointment to clear up the title to the land on which the proposed Indian hospital was to be built. The land had been deeded to the City of Tahlequah by the Cherokee Nation for a park, but there was a legal error in the property to the Federal Government. Because of his personal efforts, both as a member and official of the Cherokee Nation, the hospital was named W. W. Hastings Indian Hospital.
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In 1936 the original W.W. Hastings Indian Hospital cost $330,000 to construct 34,000 square feet, employed 49 personnel, and housed 75 beds. Other than a new wing in 1964 to keep pace with the growing need of the patient population, the W.W. Hastings Hospital served the Indian patient population well, until 1978 when the concern of the Principal Chief of Cherokees, Ross O. Swimmer, and federal officials that the present W. W. Hastings Hospital was inadequate for present and future needs. Because the congress had become fiscally cautious about construction funding for the Indian Health Service, Chief

Swimmer approached then-Senator Henry Bellmon about a new Indian Hospital that would be built in Tahlequah and would, as a cost-saving measure share certain services with the local municipal hospital. Because of the unique progressive concept the congress appropriated 17.8 million dollars to build a new 135,000 square-foot hospital. The new W.W. Hastings Hospital opened February, 1984, said Freda Vann, administration assistant. With a staff of 289 personnel, a modern inpatient area of 60 beds and a vastly expanded ambulatory service program, reflecting the commitment of Chief Swimmer to plan for the

future of the hospital. In 1979, NSU opened its College of Optometry, making it one of 14 schools in the United States to offer a doctorate degree in that field. The building was completely renovated and now provides a centralized facility for the majority of the operations of the College. An extensive expansion to the facility, which houses two lecture rooms and an auditorium, was completed in the fall of 1999, said Sandy Medearis, Admissions. The College of Optometry is equipped with many new resources for students to learn and practice on patients who come in to get the eyes checked. Newly equipped examination rooms have been set up for contact lens, Vision therapy and Specialty Care patients with the latest in low vision treatment.

Beards rise in popularity with No-Shave November


CASEY OWENS Winter approaches. After an unseasonably hot summer, meteorologists have predictably braced for an unforgivably cold winter paired with an abnormal abundance of precipitation. Facial hair, an ancient and timetested natural remedy to combat the harsh winter winds, has regained its place in culture. I think that we, as a culture, are trying to keep manliness alive, said Kaleb Niles, Broken Arrow junior. This is one of the most attainable personifications of our stance on a generation of men that dont act like men. Niles said he believes every man should do a one-year facial hair growing stint at least once in his life. By doing so, he said he believes men learn more about your themselves, as well as the world around them. The most predominant misconception of a non-bearded individual toward a bearded one is that those with facial hair are trying to hide something, said Niles. My facial hair is a form of expression that gives people a better glimpse of me. As day breaks across campus, a five o clock shadow looms on the faces of many. The appeal of sparing the razor and spoiling the face has reached its peak. Some see the opportunity as a temporary liberation of grooming duties, while others have basked in the liberation indefinitely. beards bring a joy to people here and there, and that those of us who choose to wear one take on an obligation of beardsmanship; to bear the itchy burden in heat and cold, through gravy and mayflies and everything else for the general enjoyment of all. Woods said the effect of his beard in public strongly depends on the attire he is wearing. If he has just left work, he tends to get a lot of smiles. If he is out on his motorcycle people tend to avoid eye contact. Facial hair has had a rough history in the professional world and can have detrimental effects on job placement. An un-manicured face has become a bane to the corporate world; a bearded man has become equal to a common vagrant. Self-expression has become a crime, the punishment, unemployment or an extensive chain of interviews. A lot of people associate facial hair with dirtiness, but thats simply not true, said Aaron Cockrell, Warner junior. Many facial hair bearers shampoo and condition their beard so there should be no assumption of filth. The world has reached a crucial stage. In a time when the push for equality is at its peak the bearded masses should push for acceptance on a professional level. So long as the archaic view toward the bearded man exists, selfexpression will forever be at risk.
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The influence of my beard on students is varied, said Dustin Woods, adjunct instructor of communications. At the beginning of the semester Im pretty sure they dont know what to think, but then it does seem to make me more approachable when they know me better. No-Shave November, a trend in recent years, has become a right of passage for some. The event draws many rarely haired chins to a scruffy apex. For many participants, the change of appearance will continue while others shave for reasons of employment. To me, having facial hair means I dont have to shave or buy shaving products, at least thats originally why I started growing it out, said Woods. I have since come to realize that

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Emergency Management volunteers work to keep Cherokee County safe during storms
ISAAC JAMISON Storms in Oklahoma are dangerous and potentially deadly. In the spring tornados and floods are constant threats. The Tahlequah community has two assets to help mitigate these threats. Were not storm chasers, were storm spotters, big difference, said Steve Ford, Emergency Management volunteer and Telecommunications Engineer at Northeastern State University. Theres really no difference, technically, says Scott Pettus, fellow volunteer and Assistant Athletic Director at NSU. The only real difference is storm spotters stay within a specific area, while storm chasers will seek out the most violent storms in all areas of the U.S. Ford pointed out the same difference except highlights the technicality. These opposite viewpoints share a common passion for storms which makes it easy for them to work together. They began working together after meeting 24 years ago while both were volunteering for Emergency Management. Pettus said he and Ford talk almost daily about po6

tential severe weather and they share a common bond as weather geeks. As the lead spotters for Cherokee County anytime there is a warning and the weather service is tracking a storm in the county, Ford and Pettus go out and locate the storm and give realtime information to the weather service. They do not however chase storms outside the county. Were the eyes of the weather service, their feet on the ground, said Ford. Ford also said what he and his partner do is not for the untrained. There is a process these guys go through each year to stay up-todate on training. I would go to the annual weather spotter training, said Ford. It usually starts in midJanuary and ends in late March. That is not the only training he receives annually. According to Ford, it takes two more years before youre allowed to go out and spot by yourself. Weve taken graduate-level classes for the meteorological society to be able to do this,

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said Ford. Because he and Pettus are the lead spotters for the county, they are also required to attend additional spotters classes.

that does not mean he has not chased his share of storms. I used to chase storms from 1971 to 1991 on my own, said Ford. In 1991 I

Ford, born and raised in Muskogee, said he was about 15 when he saw his first tornado and began tracking storms more than 34 years ago. Even though he makes a distinction between storm chasers and storm spotters,

got involved with Emergency Management. Born in Miami, Okla.., Pettus has also lived in Quapaw, Okla., Joplin, Mo., and Coffeyville, Kan. He saw is first tornado at age 11 and said he had to overcome his fear of dan-

gerous storms on his path to becoming a spotter. Pettus said he kept a poster-sized picture of a tornado that hit Miami in 1974 and the image haunted him for years. I would become physically ill when there were storms in the area, said Pettus. After alerting listeners on the radio about a potential dangerous storm in Tahlequah in 1984, Pettus says he realized he had to learn more about severe weather and how tornados formed not only for his own safety, but also to help others. Fast-forward 19 years and Pettus says he and Ford have been through hundreds of storms together. Pettus says the most exciting storm they have experienced in their tenure would be a storm which spawned a tornado that they were able to spot from beginning to end a few years ago. They were requested by Delaware County to help spot as the storm passed through that county. When we arrived, a fireman asked me if I was the EM spotter who had been on the storm and I replied yes and he thanked me and told me I saved a lot of lives tonight, said Pettus. Pettus also said the fireman indicated to them the only information they were able to receive was through their radio traffic.

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The fireman were able to warn residents in the area a tornado was bearing down on the community. Saving lives and knowing others appreciate what their efforts has been rewarding for the team. That was a very humbling experience and brought home just how important it is to do what we do, said Pettus. The team has experienced their fair share of danger throughout their adventures as well. The most terrifying experience I have had was during a tornado that came across the lake near Sequoyah State Park several years ago, said Pettus. As Steve Ford and I were attempting to get into position, we got directly under-

neath the updraft of a developing tornado in a very wooded area and we were nearly pushed off the road. According to their mission statement, the function of Emergency Management is to minimize the effects of future disasters through mitigation, planning, training and response efforts. In their role with Emergency Management Ford and Pettus are not only lead spotters, but they also update the county on flooding, handle preparation for a terrorist attack or any crisis event that might take place in Cherokee County. Our job is to prepare people for a crisis event, minimize any damage, and help with recovery, said Ford. Im also the training officer for Emergency Management. The agency has two part-time employees but Ford and Pettus are not

among them. They perform these services and take these risks without compensation. They are not reimbursed for fuel, vehicle repairs or equipment. With the danger of storms, floods, and potential crises it can be hard to understand why they would want to take such risks. Its a great way to give back to the community, said Ford. In this case, Ford gives the less technical answer and Pettus does the opposite. I made a commitment nearly 30 years ago to do what I could to educate the public on severe weather, says Pettus. It is my community service and I approach it with professionalism, while being respectful of the dangers that exist.
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Seminary Hall reflects Northeastern State


AUDRA HURLEY Seminary Hall stands in all its glory of Romanesque and red brick as the icon of Northeastern State University. Its history is a long, rich epic of how NSU has come to what it is today. Its a story much older than the university, which celebrated its centennial last year, and older even than the current Seminary Hall, which dates to 1889, said Lawrence Beimiller, Chronicle for Higher Education reporter. In 1847, more than 10 years after the Cherokee people arrived to what is now Oklahoma, Principal Chief John Ross began the project of two institutions to encourage young adults to pursue higher education. The male and female seminaries opened in May of 1851. The schools flourished until financial turmoil forced the female seminary to close in 1859 and remained closed throughout the Civil War. The institution got a second chance in 1871 and reopened its doors. The institution continued until Easter Sunday in 1887 when a tragic fire burned the building beyond repair, only leaving the porchs brick columns and a few walls still intact. The reconstructed columns were erected as a monument to the Seminary in Park Hill. The Cherokee territory decided to rebuild and laid the cornerstone of the new Seminary in Tahlequah in 1888. The Cherokee Female Seminary opened its doors in 1889 as the largest structure erected by a Native American nation. 200 female students began their studies in a variety of subjects ranging through mathematics to Bible studies. It was the first and finest institution of higher learning for women west of the Mississippi River and included classrooms, dorm rooms, hospital rooms and a chapel, said Cherokee Nation Cultural Affairs. Students followed a
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Universitys rich history along with successes


Agnew stated in his synopsis for the Oklahoma Historical Society. Residential accommodations were provided by private boarding houses, and less affluent students pitched tents on campus. The school grew slowly, particularly after the nations entry into World War I in 1917. For 50 years, more than 3,000 young women attended the Female Seminary. The education they received helped enrich their identities as Cherokee women. Seminary Hall, a shining monument to Cherokee history and culture, continues to be revered as the original building and the nucleus around which the northeastern State University campus was built. In the 1930s its educational structure changed to offering other degrees outside of education. It became the Northeastern State College. World War I put pressure on the school to stay open while enrollment rates dropped but it resurfaced after the G.I. Bill. Seminary Hall was expanded in the late 1940s i n t o what we see today. The school flourished for nearly 40 years until 1974 when state legislature dubbed the school Northeastern Oklahoma State University, later shortened to NSU. By that time the post-World War II baby boom had crested, and enrollment, which had approached six thousand students in the late 1960s, declined, said Agnew. The curriculum, which had slowly expanded in the schools first half century, underwent rapid transformation. New programs
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daily schedule, leaving them little free time. Cherokee Nation Cultural Affairs said they held music recitals, staged plays and pub-

son was known for requiring girls to come up to the front of the classroom to explain how they had solved math problems as well as for leading them on long

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lished their own magazine, Cherokee Rose Buds. The curriculum and structure was based on other seminaries such as the Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in South Hadley, Massachusetts. This prestigious institution was the first higher education school west of the Mississippi River. Alumnae of the era recalled having endured a strict education, said Beimiller. Principal Wil-

brisk walks. Beimiller said in the dining room, the girls manners were corrected by faculty members or older students. In 1909, Oklahoma became a state and responsible for education. In light of this, the State seized the Cherokee Female Seminary and transformed it into Northeastern Normal, a school to train teachers. Northeastern offered tuition-free classes to prepare students for teacher certification tests, Brad

reflecting changes in society were added, including criminal justice, Indian studies, engineering physics, social work, and management courses. Agnew said in 1979 the College of Optometry opened, making Northeastern one of 14 schools in the United States to offer a doctorate in that field. These programs and a national trend to make college more accessible reversed the decline in enrollment. Today, Seminary Halls rich history reflects the success of NSU campus as 6,000 students attend the university. Prospective students visit the Tahlequah campus and RiverHawk ambassadors explain its interesting history and facts. For example, on the sidewalk leading out of

the west side of the building part of the slab says Cherokee Icebox. This historic mark was once a cellar used to store food that needed to be kept cold when the building was used as the Cherokee Female Seminary. A few yards in front of Seminary Hall, stands two columns with a plaque stating their origin. The reconstructed statues are from the Male Seminary that burned in 1910 and from the original Female Seminary in Park Hill. Student superstition is if you walk between the columns you will have bad luck; a reminder to the tragic history of which these bricks withstood. Seminary Hall remains an icon to Northeastern State University. It is a living testament to the hard work and dedication to those who have made the university the success it is today.
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Furry friends populate Northeastern State University


TORI GILMARTIN
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During the day Northeastern State University is full of students heading to class, lunch or even work, but during the evening hours different species roam the grounds. Jon Asbill, director of Capital Projects and Planning at Northeastern State University said there are numerous types of wildlife which roam the campus. The types of critters one might find running around campus at night vary from skunks, raccoons, possums, deer, squirrels and sometimes even snakes.

The most problematic for the university are skunks. Currently, the building with the worst skunk infestation is the Optometry building. A family of skunks lives under the building at the moment. I can usually catch between one to fiver per week, the ones that I find the most are skunks, and they give us the most problem because of the smell, said Larry Henley, Landscaping and Grounds Super. Asbill said luckily no one has ever gotten hurt while trying to catch the animals during his ten-

ure with NSU. Sometimes the animals themselves do get hurt though. Sometimes we will have deer trying to jump the track fence and they dont realize how high the fence is or once they get over they dont realize how far the drop is, said Asbill. Henley said last year a black bear appeared on the intramural field, but quickly fled. He said luckily no one came in contact or got hurt. Once the stray animals have been caught they are taken to the outskirts of town where they are let go. Weve have had many crazy encounters with animals over the years from deer bouncing off the University Center to a raccoon falling from the ceiling on to a desk, we see it all, said Asbill. So if you are ever roaming around campus at night, you better be careful because you never know what type of little furry friend you might run in to. Living on campus students may also run into some sort of critter. I lived on campus for four years, said Sarah Fletcher, Muskogee alumna. One time I found a huge roach crawling around in my room. Fletcher also said there was a time, after students returned from Christmas break, when a mouse was discovered after it was found in someones food supply. It is not possible to know what is roaming around campus unless it is found directly and captured to get it out of harms way.

NSU royalty continues campus traditions


SYDNEY ASBILL Jordan Brittian, LaTasha Atcity, and Alexandria Zachary all currently hold titles at NSU. Jordan Brittian is NSUs Homecoming Queen 2013, LaTasha Atcity is Miss NSU 2014 and Alexandria Zachary is Miss Black NSU 2013. Jordan Brittian, Noble senior, was one of the several ladies running for homecoming queen this fall. She has attended NSU for four years and is an Elementary Education major. Her plans are to graduate in Dec. 2014. Her future goal is to obtain a masters degree in administration and would like to teach second grade close to Noble. My candidacy experience was an overall excellent experience, said Brittian. My sisters really pulled through and helped me campaign and really encouraged me throughout the week. I really enjoyed getting to know the other candidates on a more personal level. On homecoming day, I was very nervous but excited. Brittian said she never imagined her name would be called as the 2013 Homecoming Queen. Im very honored and still excited to have this title, said Brittian. The entire campaign and winning has been one of the best and one of my favorite experiences at Northeastern. LaTasha Atcity, Tahlequah junior, began her journey as Miss NSU this Nov. when she was crowned Miss NSU 2014. She plans to achieve a Masters of Arts and develop a non-profit benefiting youth. My main plan for this year is bringing awareness to my platform, said Atcity. I want to do everything in my power to try and spread inspiration and motivation to disadvantaged youth in this community. Atcity said she plans to organize different events to help raise money and bring awareness to disadvantaged youth. For this next year I want to help the youth in this community realize that fear is the enemy of their future and that they are the one thing standing in the way of their success, said Atcity. My hope for the coming months is
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to get the community involved with my platform so together we can make a difference in our school systems, in our homes, and overall in our community. I cant express the enthusiasm I have in knowing, how this community will join together to make a change and in the end make a difference. Alexandria Zachary, St. Louis senior, became the reigning Miss Black NSU last year. She is a psychology major and plans to graduate May 2014. She would like to pursue graduate study and earn her Ph.D in Clinical Psychology specializing in Schizophrenia. Zachary said she would like to be involved in research that may assist in distinguishing any differences between childhood schizophrenia and adult schizophrenia. I chose to run for Miss Black NSU because it was my first year here and I wanted to be actively involved with multicultural student activities, said Zachary. The whole pageant process was a great experience. Shortly after the pageant I was contacted by a student Health and Wellness Ambassador to assist in recruitment for the Walk in Her Shoes event. I became an ambassador myself that spring and worked with them until last fall. These women have all achieved an accomplishment far beyond their wildest dreams. Each are continuing an NSU tradition by holding these titles.
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Rookie Bridge Camp continues its reign


TRICIA PRICE In 1989, NSU made a decision which has impacted incoming freshman for 24 years. An extended orientation camp ran by NSU students called Rookie Bridge Camp was formed. RBC has become a staple at NSU. Many other university camps have been built on the same principles because of RBCs success. Dr. Chuck Ziehr, former professor at NSU, said the idea of RBC was said to have originated with Sam Smith, a former Auxiliary Services employee at NSU. Ziehr first volunteered in 1997 and is synonymous with RBC. Since 1989, the program has introduced more 7,000 students to NSU. The locations of the camps have changed multiple times, said Sarah Johnson, Rookie Bridge Camp adviser. Some of the songs are new and a few of the games are new. For the most part though, RBC has remained the same for 24 years and we want to keep it that way. The goals of RBC have been to introduce incoming students to campus and academic life while offering the opportunity to make friends. It is also supposed to make the transition into college much easier and more effective. Johnson said that she went to RBC in 2003 and it made a large impact on her life. She later became a volunteer, a director and now she oversees the camp as a university advisor and coordinator for student activities. There are many traditions that have evolved from the first year of RBC such as the Trust Walk, skongs, a mix between a skit and a song, and the painted rocks that are switched at camp to symbolize starting a new chapter in life. Randy Cox, former volunteer and director, said that these traditions are what keep RBC going strong. He said that if it werent for the underlying values of
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as 24-year tradition for incoming freshman


NSU, RBC would have never been as successful as it is. You are more likely to get involved and enjoy college is you make friends and RBC is a perfect venue to make new friends, said Whitney Reece, former two year volunteer. The relationships made here normally last for years, if not the rest of a students life. The two-day camp involves staying overnight at a campsite and floating the Illinois River. RBC is organized by a board of three student directors working with 10 emeritus volunteers and about 65 firstand second-year volunteers. It is a rigorous application process that includes an interview and first-hand look at every applicants silly side. Reece said that she always looks forward to the application process because it shows how badly students at NSU want to help the legacy of RBC, and more importantly NSU, flourish in the years to come. The great thing about RBC is that it is run by the students for the students, said Sarah Fletcher, former volunteer and color group leader. Not just anybody can work RBC. The best of the best at NSU are the students making the difference at RBC. Jake Proctor, former two year volunteer, said that RBC changed his life and he always looked forward to changing other students outlook on life and watch them transition into young, successful adults. Jayne Sarnoskie, current emeritus of RBC, said she knows RBC 2014 will be one of the most successful years in NSUs history because of all of the progress that has been made throughout the past few years. She said that it will be a year to remember for RBC. Next year will mark RBCs 25th anniversary. Although the camp dates are not set, the applications have been sent for directors and the planning for Rookie Bridge Camp 2014 is about to commence. Traditions will live on and memories will be made as RBC helps another class of incoming freshman transition into RiverHawks.
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Exhibit highlights World War Codetalkers


MICHAEL LANDRUM During World War I and World War II, American Indian Code Talkers cyphered thousands of battlefield messages saving thousands of lives. Code Talkers served proudly and their actions proved critical in various campaigns throughout the wars. Given the location and population of American Indians not only at NSU but the local community an exhibition such as Native Words, Native Warriors is a great way to educate people about what the American Indian Code Talkers had to endure in their lives, said Susan Woitte, Information Literacy Liberian. Code Talkers were comprised of 19 American Indian tribes spanning throughout these two wars. Navajo Code Talkers were the most common and largest tribe to utilize Code Talkers with more than 420 members. During World War I Cherokee, Choctaw, Comanche, Cheyenne, Osage and Yankton Sioux were the first Code Talkers. It is exciting to have such an exhibit such as Native Words, Native Warriors here at NSU because this exhibit shows the importance of our native languages, said Chris Smith, Student Coordinator for the Indigenous Scholar Development Center. Code Talkers are communication specialists in their own way. By utilizing various American Indian languages, Code Talkers created a new way in which messages where delivered by using their own dialects, syntax and tone qualities to describe locations and equipment. Americas enemies could never have deciphered the coded messages that were sent. Being able to create a new way to communicate is very similar to what Sequoyah had done when he created the Cherokee Syllabary, said Smith. Except the Code Talkers were able to create something out of their own language to help win wars. Smith said he felt that was a pretty impressive feat. Starting January 25, 2014 the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service will visit NSU to display Native Words, Native Warriors. The Code Talkers were a secret for many years and was told to be kept secret, said Woitte. Woitte said it was not until 1968 when the Code Talkers program was declassified by the military. That goes to show just how important these men were to our nation, said Woitte. The 10-week exhibition is to honor and tell the story of the American Indian Code Talkers. The importance of the exhibition is very important not only to NSU but to our community as well, said Woitte. During the 10-week exhibit, NSU will also feature various events which compliment the exhibit. Kicking off these events is a presentation and book signing by Dr. William C Meadows, author of Comanche Code Talkers of World War II on January 30. We are trying to make this exhibition as informative and educational as possible, said Dr. Jennifer McCann, Director of the Indigenous Scholar Development Center. Additionally Cherokee Nation will honor veterans with a Cherokee Veterans Day ceremony on Feb. 14. Continuing the festivities will be a presentation and book signing with Dr. Tom Holm, author of Code Talkers and Warrior: Native Americans and World War II, on March 4. Bringing in authors who have talked to Code Talkers and experienced their stories will hopefully bring in people and help inform them about the Code Talkers, said Dr. McCann Laura Tohe poet, scholar and author of Code Talker Stories will also be featured in a presentation and book signing April 7. Native Words, Native Warriors Exhibit will be at the John Vaughan Library second-floor balcony beginning January 25 and will be on display until April 7. All events are free and open to the public. For more information on the exhibition call Susan Woitte at 918-444-3276 or email woitte@nsuok.edu.
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Photo tour offers education and fun


JESSICA BROOKS Students at NSU are offered many opportunities to travel to other areas of the country and world and learn. One of these travel opportunities takes students to Seattle, Wash., to take photographs of the landmarks and culture of the diverse city and its surrounding areas. The Seattle Photo Tour is for not only students, but those that just want the travel opportunity and the chance to learn more about photography. The trip lasts seven days and teaches students photography skills while traveling around the city. The photo tour is a three-hour media studies course, for those who have taken an introductory-level photography course. I decided to go on this trip to enhance my photography skills, said Angela Walker, Tahlequah senior. The big attraction for me was what the trip encompassed: from learning equipment needs, preparing for photographs, experimenting with different kinds of photography, learning how to cull through the massive amounts of photos I took, learning how to frame and/or matte them and learn how to organize a show. Mike Brown, instructor of visual communications and media studies, is the mastermind behind the Seattle Photo Tour. I took a lot of photos and some of my favorites were of people from the area, said Lenea Patterson, College of Liberal Arts administrator. There were so many interesting places to visit it was hard to fit everything on my todo list in a week. Some of the attractions students want to experience and photograph is Pikes Market, which is a large outdoor fish market. For those seeking more historic photographs, there is the Seattle Underground, which is a tour of the historic original Seattle. I really enjoyed going on this trip, said Walker. There are some moments that Ill treasure forever, and ironically enough they were not captured on camera but in my heart. Walker said she took photos ranging from parades, crazy street scenes, night shots, to scenic and food phoF O R M O R E G R A P H I C D E S I G N

tos. She said her favorite part was photographing the people, and capturing wildlife or split-second reaction shots were a learning experience. The most recent tour took place this summer and the students enjoyed not only the photography aspect of the tour but also experiencing and capturing the culture that Seattle has to offer. I was really intrigued by the size and diversity of the city, said Patterson. There are so many subcultures within the city and there are so many interesting people. Browns said his desire is to put different things in front of the students so they dont just see Tahlequah. His main objective for this class is to give them new experiences photographically and otherwise. One of the students in the class would help use social media to get information out, particularly about the gallery show the tour will do, said Brown. The students got to display and sell their photographs at an exhibit with four photos per student. The group also has a Facebook page where students who went on the tour can post all of their photos from the trip. I absolutely loved this experience and the time I was able to share with my classmates, said Patterson. I would love to be able to attend more photo tours in the future. For more information on the most recent tour, visit www.facebook.com/NSUPhototour.
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Beekeeping pastime works wonders for


KATHY DRAKE After a long day at NSU, Brenda Bradford, university archives assistant, casually drives the winding 35 minute commute home to Baron, Okla. where she is greeted by her dogs, including a stray that has recently adopted her family. She goes inside to change from work clothes and emerges dressed in a white suit from head to toe. Almost looking as if she is dressed for a toxic spill, Bradford heads to the back corner of her yard to inspect a stack of boxes. During the day, Bradford works in the John Vaughan Library and takes classes toward earning a masters degree. While her professional demeanor might allow her to blend in on campus, it is her hobby away from campus that is all abuzz. Bradford is a recreational beekeeper and entrepreneur of local honey. Im actually super pumped about the whole beekeeping thing in general, said Bradford. My great grandpa used to raise bees. Of course, he was one of those that walked out there with nothing [protecting him]. I dont have any memory of him ever being stung. Bradford is not as fearless as her great grandfather so she wears the protective beekeeping suit and veil to avoid stings. She said her son, Billy, sits near the hive and lets the bees walk up his arm. None of the family has been stung. Ive wanted to do this for years, said Bradford. I intend to do it for the rest of my life. Currently, Bradford has one active hive and has four more in the works. The one hive produced 50 pounds of honey its first season, whereas the average is 25 to 30 pounds. She wants to have enough honey to supply her family and still have enough left to sell. While Bradford cannot claim her honey is organic due to the possibility of pesticides on neighboring land, she wants to keep her beekeeping as natural as possible. I dont want to do anything to my bees, said Bradford. Im going to trust t h e m . There was a guy in Arkansas that gave me what I thought was some really sound advice: Bees have been around here forever. Give them a home to live in and get out of their way. Beekeeping has been around for thousands of years. Cave paintings depicting the collection of honey date as far back as 15,000 B.C. The medicinal properties of honey and other bee products were known in ancient times and are gaining in popularity today. The regurgitation process of bees adds beneficial bacteria and also reduces the moisture content, allowing honey to basically never go bad. Honey has antiseptic properties and is claimed to remedy even staph infections, including MRSA. A common use for honey is aiding in seasonal allergy relief. Bradford said an oldtimer told her to eat local honey from bees within a two-mile radius for allergies. She said she started giving her asthmatic son a spoonful of honey every day for a few weeks and noticed such a difW W W . D E S I G N F R E E B I E S . O R G

member of Northeastern State community


insect. It is warm blooded.In the dead of winter they are 95 degrees in the brood nest. They are collectively warmblooded. They feed their young a kind of milk [called] royal jelly. Ziegler said almost everything about bees parallels with mammals. They are like an organism rather than individuals, said Ziegler. Individuals have no regard for their life. Its like an animal that comes apart in the daytime and comes back together at night. If you look at bees ference that she stopped his allergy shots. Bradford also puts it in her coffee every morning as a natural sweetener. Its really a nice feeling in the morning pulling out a jar that came from my own hive, said Bradford. Bradford has been beekeeping for a short time and gets her knowledge from books and others that have been beekeeping for a while. Someone that has a lot of experience is Lloyd Ziegler. With several decades under his belt, he is a wellseasoned beekeeper whose first experience with bees was in the Peace Corps in the 70s in Sierra Leone, Africa. Ziegler is a member of the Northeast Oklahoma Beekeepers Association and does several speaking engagements around the U.S. and often travels to Africa with organizations that teach and educate the local people on beekeeping as a way to earn an income for their family. At one time, Ziegler had up to 200 hives, but has slowed down to about 40 to 50 hives. The hive is really one creature much more than it is many individuals, said Ziegler. If you look at it from a standpoint of not looking at individual insects, but how the whole thing works together, it really resembles a mammal more than it does an
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that way, then you can be a better beekeeper. Being a better beekeeper is what Bradford is aspiring to be. She turns to those with knowledge and experience for guidance and has handy the bee bible that an old-timer told her was a musthave. I know one thing, I absolutely love beekeeping and Im not going to quit. I think weve got a beautiful little relationship going and its going to be a wonderful journey.

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Northeastern State University Public Relations Writing 600 N Grand Ave Tahlequah, OK 74464

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