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FOR AUSTRaLIaN MUSEUmS aND GaLLERIES

Version 1.1 December 2010

NATIOnAL STAnDARDs

Produced collaboratively by: ACT Museums and Galleries, Arts Tasmania, Collections Council of Australia Ltd, History Trust of South Australia, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Museum and Gallery Services Queensland Ltd, Museums & Galleries NSW, Museums Australia (Victoria), Western Australian Museum
NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. 1.1 1

National Standards for Australian Museums and Galleries Version 1.1 December 2010 Produced collaboratively by: ACT Museums and Galleries Arts Tasmania Collections Council of Australia Ltd History Trust of South Australia Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory Museum and Gallery Services Queensland Ltd Museums & Galleries NSW Museums Australia (Victoria) Western Australian Museum

The Ian Potter Foundation has supported the National Standards for Australian Museums and Galleries by funding the development, copyediting and design of this document.

ISBN 978-0-9870745-0-8 Published in Melbourne, Australia, by The National Standards Taskforce c/– Museums Australia (Victoria) PO Box 385 Carlton South Victoria 3053 Australia email: mavic@mavic.asn.au Design and layout by Dimity Mapstone

ACT Museums & Galleries

ARTS TASMANIA

This document is intended to be freely available to all of Australia’s many museums and galleries. It may be accessed at http://www.collectionsaustralia.net/sector_info_item/107. For the sake of consistency, organisations using this document are asked to retain the exact wording of the Principles, Standards and benchmarks used in the National Standards when integrating them into their own training materials, policies and guiding documents. Please note the version number of this document, as the version numbering will change, together with some content, when this document is updated.

Disclaimer The information in this document is provided only for the purposes of outlining and providing information regarding museum practices. It is not specialist or legal advice and it is not to be relied on as a substitute for the advice of a qualified museum specialist or legal practitioner. The members of the National Standards Taskforce and their respective representatives do not make any representation as to the completeness or reliability of this document and do not accept any liability for loss or damage caused by or in connection with using, acting on or placing reliance on this document or any of the other materials it publishes. Before acting on any matter, take advice from an appropriately qualified museum specialist and a legal practitioner.

...................................................... ‘A valuable and practical resource for all museums’ —Council of Australian Art Museum Directors (CAAMD) EnDORsemenTs ‘An essential guide for all museum practitioners’ —Council of Australasian Museum Directors (CAMD) The National Standards for Australian Museums and Galleries have also been endorsed by the boards of: ACT Museums and Galleries Arts Tasmania Collections Council of Australia Ltd History Trust of South Australia Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory Museum and Gallery Services Queensland Ltd Museums & Galleries NSW Museums Australia (Victoria) Western Australian Museum .......................

..................................... 44 Principle B3: The museum is committed to its current and potential audiences................. 8 Shaping the National Standards over time ....................................COnTenTs .................................................................................................................................................................................................................... and to achieve the museum’s purpose ........................................................................................................ 50 Part C: Developing a significant collection ... 11 Standards and different types of museums ........................................................................................................................................................................... 73 Appendix B The National Standards Taskforce ..... 74 Appendix C Key acronyms .................. 9 Using the National Standards ............................................. 77 Appendix D Glossary ...................... 63 Appendixes Appendix A What is a museum? .................... 56 Principle C1: The museum’s collection represents the significant stories and interests of its diverse and changing communities ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 1.................................................................................................................... share and discover significant stories......................................................................................................................................................................................... 79 Appendix E Resources .......................................... 56 Principle C2: The museum preserves its significant collections for future generations ....................................................................................................................................................1 CONTENTS 5 ....................................................... 91 Appendix F Provide feedback ...................................................................................... 14 Summary of Principles and Standards ....................................................................................105 NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V................................................... programs and services ................................................................................... 6 Introduction .............. 40 Principle B1: The museum is used.............................................................. 8 Developing the National Standards .............................................................. 40 Principle B2: The museum presents its most significant collection items............................................................... 11 Small collections ................................................................. and caters for their needs and interests through its communications..................................................................... supported and valued by diverse communities as a worthwhile place where people can express............................................... well-managed facility that presents a positive public image........................................................................................................... stories and themes through engaging exhibitions and programs ..................................................................................... 8 Structure and scope of the National Standards ........................................................................................ 17 Principle A2: The museum is effectively managed............................................................................... 12 National and state/territory institutions ......................................................................................................... 10 Museum development and accreditation programs ......................... 36 Part B: Involving people .............................................. 17 Principle A1: The museum has a sound legal and management framework that follows recognised museum ethics and protocols ................ ideas and objects ........... 23 Principle A3: The museum manages its workers to make the best use of their skills and knowledge...... sustainable and publicly accountable ............................................................... 11 Volunteer-managed museums ............ 15 Part A: Managing the museum ........................................................ Acknowledgements ..... 12 The Standards Content overview .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 11 Museums within larger organisations ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 32 Principle A4: The museum is a secure..............................................

The Ian Potter Foundation has supported the National Standards for Australian Museums and Galleries by funding the development.. Some Taskforce members have trialled the National Standards through their own programs. for her structural editing and work in crafting this document.... their boards and their staff to this important new endeavour..... at the 2007 Museums Australia conference in Canberra NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. for her design of the PDF version of the National Standards.. by giving of their time and by meeting the costs of airfares...... Sarah-Jane Rennie and Roxanne Fea Museums Australia (Victoria) – represented by Erica Sanders (meeting facilitator)... for hosting the National Standards online...... The Taskforce that has developed the National Standards for Australian Museums and Galleries has been a genuine collaboration between nine organisations from across Australia: • • • • • • • • • ACT Museums and Galleries – represented by Peter Haynes and Mark Van Veen Arts Tasmania – represented by Jai Paterson Collections Council of Australia Ltd – represented by Margaret Birtley (meeting facilitator) and Claire McClelland (research on references) History Trust of South Australia – represented by Kate Walsh and Amanda James Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory – represented by Sue Bassett and Malene Bjornskov Museum and Gallery Services Queensland Ltd – represented by Ann Baillie and Lisa Jones Museums & Galleries NSW – represented by Lyndel Wischer.. AcKnOwLeDgemenTs Members of the National Standards Taskforce have contributed over $55.. and for her savvy transformation of the Standards into their online format................. The Taskforce wishes to acknowledge the support given by its nine participant organisations.. Bridget Forbes and Euan McGillivray Western Australian Museum – represented by Clare-Frances Craig and Joanne Hyland..... Kitty Owens.....1 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 6 . using the CAN content management system Collections Australia Network (CAN). or have addressed the Standards in developing or implementing their own activities. for including two sessions on the National Standards.. The Taskforce wishes also to thank: • • • • • Barbara Wels....000 to this project.... expenses associated with meetings and teleconferences..... and editorial costs. and for facilitating the launch of the exposure draft of the Standards. and Joy Suliman for her guidance on the online format for this document Museums Australia... copyediting and design of this document.. 1.......... in consultation with the Taskforce Dana Rowan.. for editorial consultancy services Dimity Mapstone...

and Museum and Gallery Services Queensland Ltd. Forty-three individuals and organisations provided comments in response to the exposure draft of the Standards. for hosting Taskforce teleconferences Joy Suliman. and encouragement. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. for their feedback and suggestions. Members of the taskforce in 2009 and 2010 contributed additional resources and amendments to web listings for existing resources through teleconferences and via the National Standards for Australian Museums & Galleries maNexus group. to provide input. Sweet Technology. The Standards were trialled in the Bathurst region (NSW) in late 2007 and the six organisations involved also provided valuable feedback. 1. so as to maximise the relevance of the National Standards to all Australian museums and galleries. Museums Australia. for hosting face-to-face meetings of the Taskforce the Collections Council of Australia Ltd.• • • • • Maisy Stapleton. and Darren Peacock. Chief Executive Officer. and Patricia Sabine.1 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 7 . The contribution of the museum sector to this project is also acknowledged.com/group/NSFAMG The Taskforce has taken great care to consider as wide a range of perspectives as possible. for reviewing the Standard relating to digitisation the Council of Australian Art Museum Directors (CAAMD) and the Council of Australasian Museum Directors (CAMD). This group is a place to discuss the ongoing development of the National Standards for Australian Museums & Galleries. and to make use of feedback.ning. President. Museums & Galleries NSW. which was made available online in May 2007. Anyone may take the opportunity to suggest updates and comment on proposed additions and revisions. support and guidance Museums Australia (Victoria) and Museums & Galleries NSW. Version 1. CAN.1 has been developed to ensure that resources listed in the document are current. Thank you to everyone who has actively contributed to this project by offering suggestions. for attending some Taskforce meetings. constructive input. If you would like to make a suggestion please join the the National Standards group at http://manexus.

...... museums and galleries operating within government agencies. and it is envisaged that in the future they will also be used by networks of like-minded museums....or territory-funded. museums and galleries that operate as not-for-profit bodies in their own right...... attracting support.. The museum and gallery community in Australia is diverse and includes large federally funded... this document uses the term museum when referring to any organisation that meets the Museums Australia definition of a museum (see Appendix A). as well as by individual organisations.. as do their staffing levels and levels of volunteer support......... and achieving their other organisational objectives... The funds and facilities that these myriad organisations have to work with vary.... NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V..... InTRODUcTIOn DEVELOPING THE NATIONAL STANDARDS The National Standards Taskforce (see Appendix B) has developed the National Standards for Australian Museums and Galleries in consultation with the museum sector and with reference to current museum practice. whether on a paid basis or as a volunteer (see Glossary). existing core standards........ The result is an up-to-date set of agreed Standards that are broad in their scope and are designed to be an accessible tool for museums nationwide. and museum development and accreditation programs.. universities...... local government... The National Standards have been developed with the aim of supporting Australian museums and galleries in carrying out their day-to-day activities.......1 INTRODUCTION 8 .. The term worker refers to any person working in a museum....... from universities to sports clubs. and volunteer-managed organisations. ShApIng The NATIOnAL STAnDARDs OveR TIme The National Standards Taskforce will continually review this document so that it remains relevant to the needs of Australian museums. or to monitor their use at a national level.. For the sake of simplicity and consistency. The development of the National Standards has been guided at all times by a recognition of this diversity. or not-for-profit organisations (such as religious institutions). They have already been incorporated into several state-based museum development and accreditation programs. Museums and galleries exist in every imaginable Australian setting: from small regional towns through to busy city centres. There is no plan to deliver the Standards through a national accreditation scheme... The National Standards for Australian Museums and Galleries are focused on key areas of activity common to organisations that care for collections and provide collection-based services to the community...... institutions.. meeting their responsibilities to their various stakeholders. and state.... 1..

resource management and future planning. as the Standards continue to be developed (see Appendix F). Benchmarks identified in this document can be incorporated into a museum’s planning in manageable stages. ‘Developing a Significant Collection’ focuses on collection management and conservation. and reporting on their experiences. Importantly. ‘Involving People’ addresses the role of the museum in engaging and involving visitors and the wider community. STRUcTURe AnD SCOPE Of The NATIOnAL STAnDARDs The National Standards have been developed around nine guiding Principles. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.Collecting organisations of all kinds are invited to use the National Standards framework as a practical point of reference. 1. Contact details for Taskforce members in each state and territory are provided on the website of Collections Australia Network (CAN). plans and procedures that will allow them to manage their activities effectively and to achieve their goals. contributing their insights. and are encouraged to continue providing feedback. the host site for the National Standards. Extra layers of information are provided in the form of tips and resources/ references. and can help museums to identify priorities and develop policies. with each being articulated through a series of Standards and benchmarks. from governance to day-to-day operations.1 INTRODUCTION 9 . as resources become available. the Standards offer museums opportunities for development in the longer term. and in Appendix F. The Standards are structured in three parts. ‘Managing the Museum’ is concerned with various facets of museum management.

. Identify what can be done towards meeting specific Standards.. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.. With Standards clearly set out. The review process may vary in length.. • Gain leverage to enhance access to funding.. state/territory or federal government...... different levels of government. The document can provide a rigorous context for funding applications.....1 USING THE NATIONAL STANDARDS 10 ........ with varying levels of resources. as well as forward planning with reference to government strategies and policies....... facilities and staffing...collectionsaustralia... Staff. The National Standards may be used to: • • • Understand principles and standards of vital importance to museum development and management.. nine Principles and thirty-nine Standards within the document capture and explain core industry standards and practices...... The document has potential to allow museums to better identify.. developed or improved... Benchmarks.. 1.. The three parts.. The document may be useful for advocacy to governing bodies... and departments.... • Promote achievements within the museum.. or simply one area of operation... It is understood that museums will use or address the National Standards for Australian Museums and Galleries in a range of ways. Museums operate in many different ways and in many different settings... The document contains Standards relating to promotion and networking. • Help make the museum more sustainable. tips and resources provide guidance on attaining or researching specific Standards.... celebrate and promote benchmarks they have met.. UsIng The NATIOnAL STAnDARDs • Advocate for resources to meet Standards........ The document embodies the principle of a sustainable museum sector and therefore could support or measure a museum’s commitment to this aim... Review the museum..... depending on whether all parts are under consideration.net/sector_info_item/107. the document allows museums to discover areas of operation that could be initiated..... communicate. It may be accessed at http://www.. • Raise the museum’s profile with local.. volunteers or external reviewers might use one or all parts and/or Standards as a basis for a review of operations.. This document is intended to be freely available to all of Australia’s many museums. regarding museum needs such as equipment. • Identify areas to improve.

‘Managing the Museum’. Increase community confidence in the capacity of the museum. Many sectors within the community access industry standards. the National Standards can be used to self-assess current operations and identify future directions for the museum. museums may choose to focus on a particular aspect of the Standards that best reflects their operations or relates to an area of operation that has been identified for improvement. ‘Developing a Significant Collection’). each program maintains its own approach and aims in being responsive to the specific context. Being state-based. STAnDARDs AnD DIffeRenT TYpes Of mUseUms The nine Principles of the National Standards reflect the minimum areas in which museums should normally be working. their services and their development over time. MUseUm DeveLOpmenT AnD AccReDITATIOn pROgRAms In a number of states. delivered by Museums & Galleries NSW and Museum and Gallery Services Queensland Ltd. needs and interests of the local museum sector. Volunteer-managed museums For volunteer-managed museums. In some cases. recognition and status within its local community. ‘Involving People’). the Standards may NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. In particular. The document may assist museums in long-term strategic planning and in positioning themselves within their local community. the government agency may want to focus on collection management (as outlined in Part C. and so national standards for museums may provide an avenue for better and broader community recognition and support of museums.1 USING THE NATIONAL STANDARDS 11 . Small collections A government agency with a small art collection may not have a great capacity to interact directly with the broader community through that collection (as per Part B of the Standards. Alternatively. 1.• • Enhance the museum’s credibility. and Part B. the National Standards are incorporated in existing programs such as the Standards Program for Sustainable Community Museums. The programs use the National Standards to support museums in identifying their strengths alongside aspects that require further improvement. and Museums Australia (Victoria)’s Museum Accreditation Program (MAP). The programs range from those that aim to accredit a wide variety of participating museums through to those that focus on providing a developmental process for the volunteer museum sector. Instead. the History Trust of South Australia’s Museums Accreditation and Grants Program (MAGP). ‘Involving People’. Part B may present some new opportunities that complement or enhance existing activities. A heritage building or site with a very small collection of objects and a strong program of public events may find that its operations are better reflected in Part A.

social and cultural plans. This area is addressed particularly in Part A of the National Standards.or long-term plans to improve the museum. such as human resources and financial matters. These could be incorporated into short. some activities. it is easier to articulate them to governing bodies. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. and other sources of support. or to guide the development of a new museum.highlight new possibilities.1. funding bodies. The Standards can also be used to communicate to government the importance of specific industry requirements and common terminology. 1. Once these needs have been identified. Similarly. Museums within larger organisations For museums operating within a local government framework. planning is often required to fit in with local government strategic. committees of management. will be managed by other departments. For those working under the umbrella of a larger organisation such as local government. The Standards can also be used to identify training needs and skills gaps within the workforce of a volunteer-managed museum.1 (‘The museum operates within an appropriate legal framework’) and A2. a university or a not-for-profit entity. where benchmarks such as A1.2 (‘Occupational health and safety (OH&S) obligations are fulfilled’) may be reflected in local government–wide processes rather than those managed solely by the museum.6. the Standards may be used to outline to senior management the necessity of certain processes to the sound operation of the museum. the National Standards can be used as part of an induction process for new staff. and for others (e.g. new board members) who may not be familiar with museum operations.1 USING THE NATIONAL STANDARDS 12 . National and state/territory institutions For state/territory and federally funded museums. a state/territory or federal government agency. ‘Managing the Museum’.

The STAnDARDs .

.1 CONTENT OVERVIEW 14 . 1. this document presents five levels of information: • • • • • Principles: the core principles of museum practice addressed by the National Standards Standards: the criteria to be met as museums put the Principles into action Benchmarks: points of reference to assist museums wishing to demonstrate that they are working towards meeting specific Standards Tips: practical pointers and suggestions relating to specific benchmarks Books and online publications and/or web pages: print publications and online resources relevant to the museum activities encompassed by individual benchmarks (for use in conjunction with Appendix E.........COnTenT OveRvIew ................ developed by Museums Australia Appendix B: The National Standards Taskforce – information about the nine organisations represented on the National Standards Taskforce Appendix C: Key Acronyms – a list of acronyms used in this document Appendix D: Glossary – concise definitions of key terms used in this document Appendix E: Resources – full bibliographical details for all print publications and online resources referenced in this document........................ all online resources are hyperlinked) The first five appendixes contain at-a-glance reference information: • • • • • Appendix A: What Is a Museum? – extended definition of a museum.. The National Standards for Australian Museums and Galleries are structured in three parts: • • • Part A: Managing the Museum Part B: Involving People Part C: Developing a Significant Collection For each of these areas of activity.................. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V...........

Principle B1: The museum is used.. • The museum dedicates appropriate spaces to all activities.. Principle A2: The museum is effectively managed... rights and responsibilities of the museum and its workers. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. • The museum complies with Australian federal. moveable heritage.... Principle A4: The museum is a secure.. and heritage places and fabric. and recruits and appoints suitable people for specific roles. well-managed facility that presents a positive public image.1 SUMMARY OF PRINCIPLES AND STANDARDS 15 SUmmARY Of PRIncIpLes AnD STAnDARDs PART A: MAnAgIng The mUseUm PART B: InvOLvIng peOpLe .. programs and services. ideas and objects. Supporting Standards • The museum has security of tenure for its premises... • The museum identifies and assesses risks and has strategies in place to manage them. responsibilities. • The museum works to formal. • The museum has a governing or managing body that takes overall responsibility for the museum.. Principle A1: The museum has a sound legal and management framework that follows recognised museum ethics and protocols.... and to achieve the museum’s purpose... • The museum defines and communicates the duties..... share and discover significant stories... 1......... by-laws and regulations. current forward plan that covers all aspects of museum operations.. • The museum uses sound financial management and reporting practices and procedures.... • The museum acknowledges that museum work involves special skills.. • The museum conserves... Supporting Standards • The museum defines its key roles and tasks.. state/territory and local laws. Principle A3: The museum manages its workers to make the best use of their skills and knowledge....... Supporting Standards • The museum is properly constituted.. written policies and procedures that cover its management. Supporting Standards • The museum has a written Statement of Purpose.... supported and valued by diverse communities as a worthwhile place where people can express.. sustainable and publicly accountable... national and state/territory protocols relating to museum practice. • The museum operates in accordance with a recognised code of museum ethics......... and is financially viable. • The museum uses an effective information and records management system. and gives workers opportunities to acquire or enhance these skills.. • The museum abides by international..... protects and documents its assets.... and reflect its Statement of Purpose.. maintains... • The museum maintains contact with relevant peak bodies and networks... • The museum has a viable.....

Supporting Standards • The museum makes decisions on preventive conservation based on current conservation advice and practices. • The museum has an effective system to record and retrieve information about its collection. • The museum carries out its activities as part of a broader community and contributes to community events. activities and events actively encourage lifelong learning.1 SUMMARY OF PRINCIPLES AND STANDARDS 16 PART C: DeveLOpIng A sIgnIfIcAnT cOLLecTIOn . • The museum’s exhibitions. 1. • The museum has identified. Principle C1: The museum’s collection represents the significant stories and interests of its diverse and changing communities. Supporting Standards • The museum develops its collection to reflect its unique purpose and the significant stories and interests of its diverse and changing communities. • The museum provides information to help visitors locate the museum and find their way around while they are there. Supporting Standards • The museum selects significant collection areas. • The museum offers visitors a welcoming experience. • The museum has regular opening hours. based on what is most relevant to its purpose and audiences. programs and services. • The museum promotes its collection.Supporting Standards • The museum includes a range of people in its operations and programs. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. all potential threats to its collection. Principle C2: The museum preserves its significant collections for future generations. • The museum actively strives to create and maintain an appropriate and stable environment for its collection. stories and themes through engaging exhibitions and programs. • The museum’s exhibitions. Principle B2: The museum presents its most significant collection items. activities and events are based on sound research and current museological practices. storage and handling methods minimise risks to its collection. key attractions. • The museum knows the significance of its collection. • The museum makes its collection accessible in digital formats and in online environments. and is able to respond to. as resources permit. programs and services. • The museum makes decisions about conservation treatments based on current conservation advice and practices. • The museum aims to have unconditional legal ownership of its collection. • The museum’s display. Principle B3: The museum is committed to its current and potential audiences. and its workers respond appropriately to visitor enquiries and feedback. and caters for their needs and interests through its communications. stories or themes to highlight. Supporting Standards • The museum knows who its current and potential audiences are and has strategies to attract and retain them. • The museum’s public programs are as accessible as possible to people of all ages and abilities.

.... TIPS The ‘wind-up clause’ may be in the museum’s: • constitution • terms of reference • collection policy...1..1 The museum is properly constituted.......... PRINCIPLE A1 THE mUSEUm HaS a SOUND LEgaL aND maNagEmENT FRamEWORK THaT FOLLOWS REcOgNISED mUSEUm ETHIcS aND pROTOcOLS STANDARD A1. The entity is normally the legal owner of the museum’s collection.. chapter 2 (2008) There is a ‘wind-up clause’ outlining procedures should the museum be ‘wound up’ or dissolved.2 BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Simpson... Collections Law. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V..... Incorporation Acts exist in each state and territory. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Our Community.. Code of Governance for the Australian Community Sector (2008) BENCHMARK A1.3 Simpson.. an incorporated body........ BENCHMARK A1.......1...... such as an incorporated association...... Museums registered as deductible gift recipients (DGRs) must include specific wording to define their ‘wind-up’ procedures in their constitution.... The museum operates within an appropriate legal framework... TIPS For example. BENCHMARK A1.... Collections Law. a company or a government agency (which may provide terms of reference for a museum committee) or • be constituted by an Act of Parliament...PART A: MAnAgIng The mUseUm ........... 1.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 17 . a museum needs to: • have its own constitution or • be part of a properly constituted body...1 TIPS To be considered properly constituted.. chapter1 (2008) The body responsible for the governance of the museum is a legally constituted entity........1..

chapter 2 (2008) The governing body ensures that the roles and responsibilities associated with running the museum are clearly defined and allocated. Guide for Meetings and Organisations.2. Just a Tick (1999) NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. vol.1.4 The ‘wind-up clause’ states that the collection would be disposed of according to recognised museum ethics.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 18 . Cultural Gifts Program Guide (2009) WEB PAGES Australian Government.2 The museum has a governing or managing body that takes overall responsibility for the museum. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS ICOM. History and Science Museums (1999) STANDARD A1. Collections Law. TIPS An induction process helps new members of the governing body to learn about their responsibilities. TIPS Appropriate guiding documents include: • a constitution or other organisational framework • terms of reference • an Act of Parliament. Australian Taxation Office (ATO). BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Fishel.1 The museum’s guiding document defines the roles of the governing body and its office-bearers. The Book of the Board (2008) Reynolds. BENCHMARK A1. It may be appropriate for the governing body to have an audit committee to oversee external and internal audit processes.2 Simpson. ICOM Code of Ethics for Museums (2006) MA. 2 (2005) BENCHMARK A1. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS DEWHA. 1. Code of Ethics for Art.2. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Renton. Deductible Gift Recipient Essentials BENCHMARK A1.

The museum subscribes to.4. relevant professional associations and networks. Guide for Meetings and Organisations.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 19 . 2 (2005) STANDARD A1. and records minutes of its meetings. STANDARD A1.3. BENCHMARK A1. Industry councils: • CAAMD • CAMD. WEB PAGES Our Community.3 Renton. works to a formal agenda. Boards.2. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. or keeps in touch with. The names of these and other organisations relevant to the Australian museum sector are given in full in Appendix C.3 The museum maintains contact with relevant peak bodies and networks.1 The governing body formally adopts for the museum either the Museums Australia or the ICOM code of museum ethics. 1. BENCHMARK A1. Committees and Governance Centre The governing body meets regularly. vol.1 TIPS Relevant associations and networks include: National peak bodies: • ACNT • AICCM • ARC • CCA • FAHS • MA. Networks: • ATDW • CAN. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS BENCHMARK A1.4 The museum operates in accordance with a recognised code of museum ethics. • NAVA State-based organisations: • HTSA • M&G NSW • M&GSQ • PGAV • RGANSW • RGAQ.

BENCHMARK A1.5 The museum abides by international. national and state/territory protocols relating to museum practice. TIPS BENCHMARK A1. Ongoing Responsibilities (2005) NAVA. 1.5 MA.1 All museum policies.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 20 . Performing Arts (2007) Australia Council for the Arts. Visual Arts (2007) Australia Council for the Arts. procedures and programs are developed and carried out with reference to relevant.5. and heritage places and fabric. Continuous Cultures. Writing (2007) ICOM.4. current protocols.3 See Glossary for a definition of workers. History and Science Museums (1999) The code of ethics is referred to and followed by the governing body and by all museum workers. Museum Methods (2002). ICOM Code of Ethics for Museums (2006) Robertson. Craft & Design Sector (2009) NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. moveable heritage. Code of Ethics for Art. Code of Ethics and Code of Practice (2005) MA. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Australia Council for the Arts. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS ICOM. STANDARD A1.4. ICOM Code of Ethics for Museums (2006) BENCHMARK A1. section 1. which is also included in workers’ induction and training materials. Music (2007) Australia Council for the Arts. Oral History Handbook (2006) AICCM. The governing body and all workers have easy access to the code of ethics. The Code of Practice for the Professional Australian Visual Arts.2 MA. TIPS There are protocols relating to: • museum practice • moveable heritage • heritage places and fabric • Indigenous arts and cultures • the return of cultural objects.

Standards And Guidelines: an Edirectory ICOM. Burra Charter (1999) MA. TIPS Laws and regulations vary from state to state. while different by-laws may apply in different local government jurisdictions. areas of activity that have legal implications include: • advertising and publishing (in addition to copyright. legal issues could include moral rights.6.5. Respecting Culture (2001) Australia ICOMOS. Fighting the Illicit Traffic of Cultural Property Workers are given appropriate information to assist them in understanding. In the museum context. or firearms • insurance • managing heritage buildings and fabric • managing staff • managing volunteers • market research • occupational health and safety (OH&S) • operation of steam boilers and pressure vessels • operation of vehicles. Code of Ethics for Art. or defamation) • building works • classification of content of exhibitions and other programs • financial management • handling/working with dangerous goods. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. STANDARD A1. History and Science Museums (1999) BENCHMARK A1.1 The museum’s policies and procedures show an awareness of the laws and regulations that apply to its collection. BENCHMARK A1.2 WEB PAGES ATSILIRN. Museum Methods (2002). including forklifts • protection of built and moveable cultural heritage • records management • sales and/or service of food and/or liquor • urban planning • working with children. and working with regard for. ATSILIRN Protocols Australian Government. MA. Valuing Art.6 The museum complies with Australian federal. state/territory and local laws. hazardous materials. 1. by-laws and regulations. site. protocols relevant to Indigenous arts and cultures.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 21 . Movable Cultural Heritage Collections Council of Australia. management and programs. and other relevant protocols. section 8 Mellor & Janke. DEWHA.

Laws and legal principles in the following areas can also have relevance for museums: • equal opportunity • freedom of information • intellectual property • privacy • public liability • racial vilification • sedition • universal access. DEWHA. Office of the Privacy Commissioner. Online Resources: Museums and Galleries NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. Heritage Laws and Notices Simpsons Solicitors. Freedom of Information Australian Government. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Australian Government.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 22 . Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. 1. National Privacy Principles (2008) Australian Copyright Council. Galleries and Museums: an introduction to copyright (2006) Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act 1986 (Cwlth) WEB PAGES Arts Law Centre of Australia website Australian Government.

4) • collection policy. scope or speciality • underlying philosophy • core functions • physical area • communities • audiences. reCollections (1998).1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 23 . written policies and procedures that cover its management.1). 9–13 MA. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.1 The Statement of Purpose outlines the museum’s: • focus. TIPS The Statement of Purpose is guided by the concepts embodied in the Museums Australia definition of a museum (see Appendix A of this document).1 The museum has a written Statement of Purpose. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. pp.1. A2. ‘What Is a Museum?’ (see Appendix A of this document) STANDARD A2. section 1.3) • code of ethics (see Standard A1.3 Colbert.2 The museum works to formal.1 The museum’s governing body adopts relevant written policies and procedures for the museum. including deaccession policy (see Standard C1. BENCHMARK A2. Strategic Planning Manual (1998) HCC. and reflect its Statement of Purpose. SUSTaINabLE aND pUbLIcLY accOUNTabLE STANDARD BENCHMARK A2. chapter 4. responsibilities. TIPS Essential documents: • Statement of Purpose (see Standard A2. 1. Caring for Our Culture (1998) Moore. Core collection-related policies and procedures: • conservation policy • preventive conservation policy • interpretation policy.2.1) • vision statement • forward plan (see Standard A2. programs and services. Museum Methods (2002).PRINCIPLE A2 THE mUSEUm IS EFFEcTIVELY maNagED. Purpose (1998) MA.

2) • whistleblower policy. and updated as required. including recordkeeping and records management policies • occupational health and safety (OH&S) policy • privacy policy • research policy • succession plan • sustainability policy • visitor services policy • volunteer policy (see Standard A3.2.5) • education and lifelong learning policy • exhibition policy and schedule • fraud policy • fundraising and sponsorship policy • information management policy. Museums and Sustainability (2002) Petersen & Movable Heritage Reference Group.4 Policies and procedures are reviewed regularly. BENCHMARK A2. Movable Heritage Principles (2000) Söderlund Consulting. Other useful documents and policies (relevance will depend on the nature of the museum): • access policy • artistic commissions policy • children’s activities policy or working with children policy • commercial activities policy • conflict of interest policy • contractors and artists policy • disaster preparedness and response plan (see Standard C2.2 BENCHMARK A2. pp. It can be useful to cross-reference your museum’s policies and guiding documents.3 BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS NAA. 1. reCollections (1998). chapter 4. Relevant museum policies and procedures are made public.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 24 . The governing body and museum workers have copies of relevant current policies and procedures. BENCHMARK A2. state/territory and local government arts and heritage policies are also useful points of reference. Museum Methods (2002). Caring for Our Culture (1998) Note: Federal. How to Develop a Recordkeeping Policy (2004) MA.1 MA. Be Prepared (2000) HCC. 9–13 MA.1 & 4.2. sections 3. TIPS NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.2.

chapter 4. STANDARD A2. Museum Methods (2002).1 Legal and operational records are kept of the museum’s programs. BENCHMARK A2.5 Examples include: • a state/territory government forward plan or arts strategy • a local government cultural development plan.2 BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.3.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 25 .3. reCollections (1998). TIPS BENCHMARK A2.16 The forward plan sets realistic time frames and identifies how and where the resources needed to achieve each goal will be obtained. including: • strategic plan • business plan • corporate plan. It may be appropriate to consult relevant stakeholders when policies or procedures are reviewed. Caring for Our Culture (1998).3. pp. BENCHMARK A2.4 BENCHMARK A2. 1–3 The forward plan is informed by the relevant policies and strategies of government and of other organisations. Museum activities clearly reflect the goals outlined in the forward plan. STANDARD A2.3 The museum has a viable.3 Heathcote/Sisley. A Checklist for Planning a Regional Gallery (2000) Colbert.1 The forward plan reflects the museum’s Statement of Purpose. and is revised if the museum’s priorities and needs change. 17–24 MA. Museum Methods (2002).3.4. section 1. current forward plan that covers all aspects of museum operations. activities and workers.3 BENCHMARK A2. 1.3. BENCHMARK A2. section 1. The forward plan is reviewed regularly. Strategic Planning Manual (1998) HCC. TIPS A forward plan can take several forms. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. pp.4 The museum uses an effective information and records management system.

TIPS Records can be physical (paper) and/or electronic or digital. Operational records to keep might include: • annual reports • financial records • evidence of key decisions affecting policies and ongoing operations (e.g. meeting minutes, and resolutions of the governing body) • key administrative files • personnel files. BENCHMARK A2.4.2 Museums affiliated with government may have recordkeeping responsibilities under relevant local, state/territory and/or national legislation. Material that documents a museum’s own history is also worthwhile retaining. For instance: • documents • photographs • audio and video recordings • media coverage • other evidence of museum events and community participation • brochures • catalogues and other exhibition support materials • invitations • merchandise samples. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Bettington et al., Keeping Archives (2008) NAA, Keep It for the Future! (2007) Standards Australia, AS ISO 15489-2004 (2004) MA, Museum Methods (2002), section 3.10 WEB PAGES AGIMO, Better Practice Checklists and Guides An effective system is in place to manage, and retrieve information from, the museum’s records.

TIPS Records should be: • appropriately organised and clearly labelled • duplicated / backed up, as appropriate • kept in accordance with operational policies and guidelines • kept up to date • stored at a central location • kept secure.

NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. 1.1

PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 26

BENCHMARK A2.4.3

BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA (Vic), Small Museums Cataloguing Manual, 4th Edition (2009) Standards Australia, AS ISO 15489-2004 (2004) An annual report is produced and made available to the public.

TIPS The annual report of a museum that is part of a larger organisation may be included in that of the parent body or organisation. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS CCA, Towards Sustainability Indicators for Museums in Australia (2010) MA, Museum Methods (2002), section 3.10

STANDARD A2.5 The museum uses sound financial management and reporting practices and procedures, and is financially viable. BENCHMARK A2.5.1 An annual financial plan or budget covers all aspects of the museum’s operations and programs and reflects priorities in the forward plan.

TIPS Longer-term financial planning is also encouraged. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

RAA, Creative Volunteering (2003), pp. 32–9 BENCHMARK A2.5.2 Records are kept of all income and expenditure.

TIPS Records might include: • bank statements • details of grants received and acquitted • tax invoices • till and other receipts. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

Renton, Guide for Meetings and Organisations, vols 1 & 2 (2005) BENCHMARK A2.5.3 All mandatory financial requirements are fulfilled.

TIPS For example, by: • meeting the mandatory requirements and regulations of the Australian Taxation Office • acquitting grants on time.
NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. 1.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 27

BENCHMARK A2.5.4

Financial controls are in place to prevent error and fraud.

TIPS Useful controls include having: • financial records prepared and verified annually by a suitably qualified person • procedures and training for workers, to help ensure that sales and other financial transactions are handled appropriately • a fraud policy. BENCHMARK A2.5.5 WEB PAGES AFP, Reduce the Risk of Armed Robbery ICAC, Cash Handling Income is generated by the museum’s operations.

TIPS Income sources might include: • admission fees • fundraising • merchandise sales • research fees • venue hire. Funding might include: • grants • government, local government, or other financial support towards wages or operational costs • sponsorship. In-kind support might include: • work carried out by volunteers • donated materials or resources • donated services. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Colbert, Strategic Planning Manual (1998), pp. 10–12

STANDARD A2.6 The museum identifies and assesses risks and has strategies in place to manage them. BENCHMARK A2.6.1 Risk management is part of the museum’s strategic and financial planning, through up-to-date policies, procedures and strategies.

TIPS Risks can affect a museum’s: • brand • buildings • business
NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. 1.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 28

Risk Management Fact Sheet BENCHMARK A2. TIPS It is essential that museums have up-to-date OH&S policies and procedures in place. and training in. so regional variations may apply. • • • • • • • • • • • collection finances governing body legal status performance reputation resources site viability visitors workers. OH&S legislation is specific to each state and territory. OH&S-related incidents. 1.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 29 .2 Occupational health and safety (OH&S) obligations are fulfilled. for reporting issues of concern. A fraud policy and relevant financial training for staff may be useful. 15–19 M&GSQ. AS/NZS 4360:2004 (2004) Volunteering Australia. and advise workers that they can refuse to undertake work they consider unsafe • use risk assessment forms • use action sheets • use report forms. Strategies for ensuring that OH&S obligations are met could include the following (please note that some of these strategies are compulsory under state/territory legislation): • take all necessary steps to ensure that working conditions for museum workers are not unsafe. Annual budgets should include provision for the ‘excess’ component in insurance policies. or accidents) • consult directly with workers on matters relating to their health and safety. OH&S policies and procedures (including how to manage and report issues of concern. hazardous or inadequate • ensure that safety precautions are signed off by relevant workers • appoint an OH&S officer or committee • provide workers with relevant information on. pp. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS M&G NSW.6. incidents. Risk Management and School Excursions (2007) Standards Australia & Standards New Zealand. or another formal process. or accidents • conduct regular drills on emergency evacuation procedures NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. Running the Risk? (2003).

6. and in some circumstances it is appropriate to insure the museum’s collection. Collections Law. value and photograph: • significant collection items • key items of equipment • other infrastructure. chapter 11 BENCHMARK A2.g. • • • provide adequate training and supervision for workers operating objects or exhibits that are ‘activated’ or demonstrated as part of the museum’s programs (e. or specific items within it. buildings. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Kelly. Craft & Design Sector (2009) Simpson. and the collection. BENCHMARK A2. TIPS Certificates and licences may be needed for: • electrical wiring • firearms • food and alcohol sales and service • forklifts • hazardous materials • machinery NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS NAVA.6. it is useful to identify. workers. chapter 39 All required certificates and licences have been obtained and are kept current. visitors. a steam engine) have in place formal procedures whereby the museum responds to any reports by workers about the need for additional safety precautions in relation to activated objects or exhibits keep all required safety accreditation and maintenance records in relation to activated objects or exhibits (including safe operating procedures documentation.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 30 . Travelling Exhibitions (2002). 1. and maintenance logbooks). Hands Off? (1993) WEB PAGES WorkSafe Victoria website Adequate and appropriate insurance cover is maintained for the site.3 Conole. Hallett & Grant. TIPS Insurance to cover the museum’s governing body is sometimes necessary. The Code of Practice for the Professional Australian Visual Arts. the governing body.4 For insurance and recovery purposes. Heritage Artefacts – Hands On.

Museum Methods (2002). 1. • • • rail safety steam boilers and pressure vessels vehicle registration. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. The Duty of Care to the Public NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. section 1.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 31 .4 Simpsons Solicitors.

BENCHMARK A3. tasks and projects.1.3 The governing body includes an appropriate mix of skills and experience. 1.2 BENCHMARK A3. aND TO acHIEVE THE mUSEUm’S pURpOSE STANDARD A3. so as to gain the skills and knowledge required of these roles? A museum may find it useful to develop a succession plan. Museum Methods (2002). BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA.1.1.PRINCIPLE A3 THE mUSEUm maNagES ITS WORKERS TO maKE THE bEST USE OF THEIR SKILLS aND KNOWLEDgE. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA.4 See Glossary for a definition of workers.1 BENCHMARK A3. sections 1. using appropriate selection processes and criteria.9 & 1. who have the skills and knowledge appropriate to these roles? • Are there current workers who could be trained up. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS M&G NSW.9 Efforts are made to ensure that the museum will have suitably skilled workers to meet its future needs. BENCHMARK A3. section 1. TIPS Questions to consider include: • What is the length of time that specific individuals are likely to stay in management.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 32 . Museum Methods (2002). governance or other specialised roles? • Are there current museum workers. or mentored. New workers are actively recruited for specific roles.1. or individuals outside the organisation. An organisational chart outlines all reporting and supervisory structures. and recruits and appoints suitable people for specific roles.5 NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. Volunteer Succession Planning: A Practical Guide WEB PAGES Standards Australia website Note: Standards Australia is developing standards for workforce planning.1.1 The museum defines its key roles and tasks.10 There are position descriptions or task sheets defining key roles and tasks of all workers. TIPS BENCHMARK A3.

. BENCHMARK A3. as required. chapter 5.7 Additional workers are called on for special projects.1. reCollections (1998). These experts might include: • accountants • actors • artisans • artists • auditors • conservators • editors • graphic designers • performers • presenters • printers • researchers • speakers • taxidermists • tradespeople • writers. TIPS A museum might engage external experts as: • commissioned artists • consultants • contractors • volunteers. pp. State/territory-based equal opportunity legislation offers museums scope to actively recruit for diversity in the workplace. TIPS Relevant points include: • experience • skills • qualifications • interests. TIPS Australian employers are required by law to adhere to the principle of equal opportunity. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Kelly et al. transparent. Energised.1. Engaged. 1. 23–49 WEB PAGES Volunteering Australia website Appointment procedures are fair. and consistent with legal requirements.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 33 . NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. Everywhere (2002) BENCHMARK A3.6 HCC.

National Standards for Involving Volunteers in Not-for- Profit Organisations (2001) New workers receive an induction on their specific roles and tasks. sections 1. 2009 Standards Australia. TIPS Paid workers should be provided with a written Conditions of Employment document and this should reflect federal and state requirements. BENCHMARK A3. STANDARD A3. AS 4121-1994 (1994) There are enough workers to meet day-to-day management and program requirements. 1.1 Written statements define the duties.1.2 BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Volunteering Australia.2 The museum defines and communicates the duties. both of which should acknowledge the efforts of volunteers and explain how the museum counts volunteer hours. with other relevant resources. Best Practice for Artists and Publicly Funded Galleries.8 BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS National Association for the Visual Arts (NAVA). BENCHMARK A3. A volunteer policy might also cover: • information about who volunteers report to • information about insurance for volunteers • induction procedures and training opportunities.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 34 . Willing and Able (2002) MA. The responsibilities and rights of volunteers may be detailed in a volunteer policy or a volunteer agreement. Museum Methods (2002). AS 4122-2000 (2000) Standards Australia. Model Code of Practice for Organisations Involving Volunteer Staff (2005) Bowbridge & Creyton.10 Volunteering Australia. TIPS NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.9 & 1. BENCHMARK A3. rights and responsibilities of the museum and its workers.2. All of this information could be brought together in a human resources manual. conditions of engagement. rights and responsibilities of: • the museum • paid workers • volunteer workers. and on the organisation.2.

3.1 The museum considers the skills required for its current and future activities. and the code of ethics under which the museum operates. BENCHMARK A3. and gives workers opportunities to acquire or enhance these skills. BENCHMARK A3. pp. can provide helpful information on their skills. Experienced workers are encouraged to act as mentors. Peak bodies.3. TIPS A suitable technique for this may be a skills audit. websites and other sources • formal inductions • mentoring • supporting workers to attend refresher courses. and networks. reCollections (1998). TIPS Training can take many forms. chapter 5.2 Performance evaluations. and conferences. Manuals. STANDARD A3.3. identifies gaps. A museum may partly meet the induction needs of new workers by providing them with a comprehensive and user-friendly induction kit or manual that contains all of the museum’s relevant current policies. and other resources on museum practice.3 The museum acknowledges that museum work involves special skills. support excellence in the museum sector by providing many opportunities for workers and others to exchange ideas and to access training. as well as those who work behind the scenes). and the code of ethics that the museum follows.3 BENCHMARK A3. both for workers and for members of a museum’s governing body.3.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 35 . Keep in mind the training needs not only of paid museum workers but also of members of the museum’s governing body.3. and its costs are subsidised by the museum where possible. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.5 Up-to-date records are kept of training programs attended by museum workers. 23–49 M&G NSW. seminars and workshops presented by peak bodies.4 BENCHMARK A3. Volunteer Succession Planning: Skills Audit Appropriate training is provided for workers. professional associations. TIPS The work of mentors can complement or follow on from formal training. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS HCC. 1. New workers should sign a statement declaring that they have read and understood the museum’s policies and procedures. are available for workers as reference material. BENCHMARK A3. including: • providing access to industry journals. and of volunteers (those who work ‘front of house’. and plans training for current workers.

storing and processing collection items). meetings. storage and loading. Improving Access to Heritage Buildings (1999) Accessible Arts.2. Efforts are made to have visitor orientation.2 The museum dedicates appropriate spaces to all activities. public research areas. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Martin.1 TIPS A museum also needs to ensure that hazardous materials are properly stored.1. administration. WELL-maNagED FacILITY THaT pRESENTS a pOSITIVE pUbLIc ImagE STANDARD A4. including the storage and display of the collection. protects and documents its assets. BENCHMARK A4. it may be appropriate to set aside space for cultural requirements (e. maintains. BENCHMARK A4. or a land title. Access Audit STANDARD A4.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 36 .2 BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Museums & Galleries Foundation of NSW & NSW Heritage Office. 8.3. defined areas wherever possible. laboratories and workshops also have suitable. Museum Methods (2002).g. Shops.1 STANDARD A4. for its site.1 The museum has security of tenure for its premises. collection management. displays. wherever possible. BENCHMARK A4. The museum has a current lease. 1. BENCHMARK A4.3 The museum conserves. or correspondence confirming its right to the ongoing use of the site for a reasonable period into the future. section 1. Just because It’s Old (2004).PRINCIPLE A4 THE mUSEUm IS a SEcURE. pp. In some museums. 23–4 MA. and food preparation take place in appropriate spaces.2 Efforts are made to have the museum physically accessible to people of all ages and levels of ability.2.1 TIPS Buildings should be: NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. The museum premises provide a suitable and safe environment for all of the museum’s operations. or for ceremonial use.

and develops and maintains these places according to conservation principles. Museum Methods (2002). fixtures and in situ collections of heritage significance. Just because It’s Old (2004). pp. garden.3 The museum draws on appropriate advice about its sites.3. clear of rubbish and in good repair.3. buildings. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Museums & Galleries Foundation of NSW & NSW Heritage Office. Security in Museums. TIPS Fire safety measures should include: • emergency procedures • fire drills • fire-extinguishers • ‘No Smoking’ signs and/or designated smoking areas • regular maintenance of fire safety equipment • smoke alarms.4 The museum meets fire safety standards. grounds. 3. Archives and Libraries (2003). BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Resource. 11–14 NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. BENCHMARK A4. gardens and equipment • having a designated maintenance person or team.2 Australia ICOMOS. Guidelines for Environmental Control in Cultural Institutions (2002) Regular maintenance and building inspections ensure that the museum’s site.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 37 . BENCHMARK A4. section 1. buildings and equipment are kept tidy.3.and vermin-proof. TIPS Useful strategies include: • having maintenance schedules for buildings. 1. pp. gardens. Burra Charter (1999) BENCHMARK A4. grounds. 18–24 MA.2 • • • • solid and stable dry well ventilated insect. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS HCC.

Security in Museums. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS ACF & ACGA. Museums and Sustainability (2002) Up-to-date registers are kept.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 38 .g. 1–2.3.3.5 The museum uses appropriate security measures. Archives and Libraries (2003). TIPS Strategies to consider: • conserve water in gardens and kitchens • conserve energy by switching off appliances and power points when not in use • provide recycling bins (or access to off-site recycling facilities) • dispose appropriately of hazardous waste (e. paint) • adopt passive energy design for new building works or site maintenance programs (e.BENCHMARK A4. A sustainability policy may help to define and guide the museum’s approach to these issues. TIPS For example: • alarms • exit procedures • fences • gates • locks • movement sensors • security patrols • systems for issuing. The GreenGallery Guide (2008) BENCHMARK A4. TIPS Assets and equipment might include: • buildings • cameras • computers • furniture and fittings • heating–air conditioning plant • telephones.g. 1. pp. external blinds. insulation. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. copying and returning keys. listing all museum assets and equipment. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Resource.7 MA. 6–10 BENCHMARK A4.3.6 Facilities are managed with consideration for the sustainability of natural resources. fax machines and photocopiers • tools and maintenance equipment. or replacing trees).

BENCHMARK A4. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.3.1 PART A: MANAGING THE MUSEUM 39 . 1. TIPS Commercial uses might include: • commercial filming or photography on. or of. the premises • the lease of buildings on the premises • the selling of merchandise.8 There is a written policy on the commercial use of the museum’s assets.

. education.. life experiences. Keep in mind that there are a whole range of barriers to people getting involved..... SUppORTED aND VaLUED bY DIVERSE cOmmUNITIES aS a WORTHWHILE pLacE WHERE pEOpLE caN EXpRESS.. sections 1. Introduction to Access (2007) Landman et al..... BENCHMARK B1...1 The museum includes a range of people in its operations and programs.PART B: InvOLvIng peOpLe . 2006 Census Data by Location PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 40 NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V...1 & 8. employment status...2 Yin-Lo. Culturally Diverse Audience Development (2001) Jones.... ‘Access for All’ Toolkit (2004) MA......... Gay and Lesbian Policy Guidelines for Museum Programs and Practice (1998) WEB PAGES ABS..1 ... Culture and Place (2000) MA. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS M&G NSW... Consider targeting those who are not already represented in the museum’s audiences.. including cultural background.. Community. SHaRE aND DIScOVER SIgNIFIcaNT STORIES.... IDEaS aND ObJEcTS STANDARD B1.... 8. Diversity. Museum Methods (2002). income and special interests.. gender.. Cultural Diversity Policy (2000) MA. in terms of the benefits to the museum of involving people with different skills..3.. working hours. You might look at this from a range of viewpoints: for example..... Ongoing Responsibilities (2005) Lang.. and concerns about feeling welcome.. social inclusion and equity are other factors to take into account...... Many Voices Making Choices (2005) MA. disability........ management and workforce of the museum.1 TIPS Museums can gain a sense of the diversity in the wider community by researching statistics on age....... cultural background... Efforts are made to represent the diversity of the museum’s community in the governing body. and networks. PRINCIPLE B1 THE mUSEUm IS USED... Continuous Cultures.1. 1.... Women’s Policy for Museum Programs and Practice (2000) MA.....

arts and environmental groups NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. 7–35. Suggested strategies for approaching community members include: • flyers • media appeals • newsletters • public notices • visits to new residents. Indigenous and cultural/linguistic groups • service groups. 1. access advocacy organisations.g. sections 1. 5–6.3 Representatives and members of local and/or specialist organisations and communities are invited to contribute their knowledge. and marketing boards).2 Community members are involved in a diversity of roles and activities. It can also be useful to create and maintain lists of community contacts. 17 DCITA. and activities.BENCHMARK B1. clubs. aged care and disability facilities. Museum Methods (2002). tourism.1. pp.1. future reference.1 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 41 . economic. education bodies. 55 M&G NSW.3 & 6. part 2. insights and expertise to museum planning. local council representatives. Significant Events (2001). businesses. for invitations.2 Winkworth & Dickman. and programs. collection development. Tourism with Integrity (1999). child-care and youth groups. TIPS Potential roles include: • advisers • donors • Friends • hosts for special events • interpreters • interviewees for oral history • members of the governing body • museum members • partners • researchers • speakers • special guests • sponsors and supporters • tour guides • volunteers. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. p. part 3. TIPS Organisations and communities might include: • government departments or agencies (e. Volunteer Succession Planning: A Practical Guide BENCHMARK B1. pp.

pp. scientists. Research on marketing efficiency suggests that it is most useful to focus on reaching and influencing those audience segments first. Significant Events (2001). it may be useful to work together to create a formal memorandum of understanding. 6. educators.1. TIPS Grouping the audience into meaningful segments will allow you to design efficient and effective strategies for reaching them. 14–40. 1. A practical way to gain input is through informal meetings. parents and caregivers. Ongoing Responsibilities (2005) NAVA.2 Winkworth & Dickman.4. Visual Arts (2007) Australia Council for the Arts. part 3. part 2. in museum activities. pp. Taking the Time (1998). Performing Arts (2007) Australia Council for the Arts. sections 6. Continuous Cultures. Craft & Design Sector (2009) MA. Some audience segments will be more likely to respond to your efforts. historians. Consider meeting times that respect participants’ other commitments. pp. Music (2007) Australia Council for the Arts.1 & 8.1 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 42 . 8. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Australia Council for the Arts.4 MA. 5–6 MA (Qld). including artists.2. or of event or exhibition teams • contributing their own displays and activities • identifying significant material held in the collection • providing advice and information relevant to their history and culture. and levels of ability. 13–59 WEB PAGES ATSILIRN. • individuals. Depending on the organisation or community. age groups. Museum Methods (2002). Contributions might involve: • being members of advisory committees. ATSILIRN Protocols Efforts are made to address the interests and needs of different audiences. Writing (2007) BENCHMARK B1. The Code of Practice for the Professional Australian Visual Arts. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.

Interpretation Policy Template (2007) Winkworth & Dickman. Ham. 7–35. TIPS Community events can include: • celebrations • commemorations • festivals • regular calendar events (e. part 2. part 2.g. BENCHMARK B1. or market days) • special events.1 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 43 . pp. Housego & Weiler.1 The museum participates in community events. part 1. pp. 3–4 STANDARD B1. Significant Events (2001). pp. 1–2 NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. pp. Consider these occasions when planning the museum’s annual program of activities.2. Tasmanian Thematic Interpretation Planning Manual (2005) MA (Vic). 1. an annual show. 6–7. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Winkworth & Dickman. Significant Events (2001). part 3.2 The museum carries out its activities as part of a broader community and contributes to community events.

STORIES aND THEmES THROUgH ENgagINg EXHIbITIONS aND pROgRamS STANDARD B2. themes and stories. pp.PRINCIPLE B2 THE mUSEUm pRESENTS ITS mOST SIgNIFIcaNT cOLLEcTION ITEmS. 7.1 . Housego & Weiler. Australian Historic Themes (2001) BENCHMARK B2.1 The museum selects significant collection areas. Significant Events (2001). pp.2 Jones. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Australian Heritage Commission. Interpretation Policy Template (2007) Winkworth & Dickman. based on what is most relevant to its purpose and audiences. BENCHMARK B2.1 The museum’s significant collection areas. part 2. stories or themes to highlight. Some museums may find it useful to draw on: • a statement of cultural heritage significance • a regional history • regional thematic studies. using a variety of collection items. part 2. displays and activities are changed to attract and interest new audiences and repeat visitors.1. Significant Events (2001). Useful documents to develop might include: • an exhibition policy and schedule • an interpretation plan or strategy. 1. as well as by the museum’s Statement of Purpose. TIPS Plans for changing displays and activities should be outlined in documents such as: • exhibition proposals • exhibition or display plans • exhibition or display schedules • programs or schedules of other activities and events. 7–40 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 44 NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. Sharing Our Stories (2007) Ham. themes or stories are outlined in a written policy or plan. Tasmanian Thematic Interpretation Planning Manual (2005) MA (Vic). 11–13 Exhibitions. TIPS This process can be informed by research into the museum’s collection and buildings. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Winkworth & Dickman.1. key themes and/or chapters in regional history.

1 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 45 . activities and events are based on sound research and current museological practices. to museum audiences.2 The museum’s exhibitions. Significant Events (2001). BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA.4 Winkworth & Dickman. pp. Tourism with Integrity (1999). from the past up to the present day. Housego & Weiler. Significant Events (2001). and the collection. 3–4 The significance of the museum’s objects. pp. themes and collection areas. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Winkworth & Dickman. Significant Events (2001). NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. buildings and site is explained to the public. Ongoing Responsibilities (2005) Winkworth & Dickman.1.BENCHMARK B2.1. 7–13 DCITA. exhibition themes.3 A variety of methods are used to present stories. part 2. Continuous Cultures. part 3. and from a range of perspectives. pp. 18–22. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Ham. TIPS Possible methods include: • demonstrations • education kits • exhibitions (on-site or off-site) • multimedia • oral histories • performances • publications • special activities • talks • tours • websites • workshops.5 Efforts are made to research and interpret significant stories. pp. Oral History Handbook (2006) BENCHMARK B2. BENCHMARK B2. Tasmanian Thematic Interpretation Planning Manual (2005) Robertson. pp. part 2. 2–43 STANDARD B2.1 Research and scholarship are shared with the wider community through publications or other means. part 2. 32–4 BENCHMARK B2. 1.2.1.

including display techniques and explanatory labels. Museum Methods (2002).4 BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. TIPS Doubt can be acknowledged with qualifying phrases such as ‘It is believed that’.2 All information and interpretation is well researched and sources are appropriately acknowledged. National Privacy Principles (2008) Rouette.3 MA. 10. sections 1. section 1. BENCHMARK B2. TIPS Replicas.1. Galleries and Museums (2005) BENCHMARK B2.2. props and reproductions can be identified as different from original objects by various means.BENCHMARK B2. Special case exception: education.2.1 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 46 .2. 5.3 & 10. collections. Replicas. Exhibitions (2007) Dakin. 10. Galleries and Museums: An Introduction to Copyright (2006) Australian Copyright Council.17 WEB PAGES Interpretation Australia website It is made clear to visitors that replicas. reproductions and props are not original objects.6. 10. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Australian Copyright Council. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. TIPS This includes acknowledgement of rights such as copyright and the right to privacy.2.1. Office of the Privacy Commissioner. or by the use of circa with dates.4 Museum interpretation acknowledges differing points of view and any uncertainty about facts. libraries. Museum Methods (2002). (2007) Australian Government. 1. props or reproductions can be useful in some museum settings: • when it is not safe to display originals • if originals no longer exist • as part of hands-on activities or other approaches to interpretation.2. 5.

3 The museum’s exhibitions. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS HREOC. 5.1 Information developed for visitors is accessible and clear. including: • audio tours / downloads • displays • DVDs • guided tours • publications • websites. A museum can keep creating new points of interest and meaning by changing the ways in which objects are grouped. World Wide Web Access (2002) MA. activities and events actively encourage lifelong learning. a photo of a room might accompany a specific piece of furniture) • support or contradict other historical evidence (e.g. a brochure or other interpretive materials (e. so that they present different themes or stories.13.2 WEB PAGES AGIMO. Museum Methods (2002). 5. Museum Methods (2002). section 10. Hughes & Moscardo.1 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 47 . stories and ideas.4.5 & 5. 1.3. Print and Publication Guidelines BENCHMARK B2. Better Practice Checklists and Guides Ballantyne. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. Exhibition Design Accessible Arts. an original building plan and a description of the building) • convey ideas presented in exhibition text. Interpretive Signage W3C. themes. Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) Objects on display are arranged to convey significant collection areas.2 STANDARD B2.g. sections 1. TIPS Objects can be grouped or arranged to convey their significance.3. or to: • help provide context for each other (e. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. TIPS There are many options for presenting information. by demonstrating how an object was used).7 Accessible Arts.g. BENCHMARK B2.

BENCHMARK B2. TIPS Consider the types of learning experiences offered to visitors and workers. Dierking & Foutz. well organised and concise. esp. pp.1 & 5. Matthews. Museum Methods (2002). Excellence and Equity (2008) Falk. 3–4 Hein.4 Resource. and abilities. Learning in the Museum (1998) Durbin. part 3.. Significant Events (2001).3.. Knowledge Quest (2004). Dierking. Experiences might include learning that is: • informal • formal • curriculum-based • tailored to different learning styles. 59–64 MA.3. Everywhere (2002). Engaged. In Principle. cultural backgrounds. sections 5. pp. pp. Museum Methods (2002). Museum Methods (2002). Interpretation Policy Template (2007) Activities and events include learning experiences suited to people of different ages.3 MA (Vic).. ‘Adult Learners’. pp. Inspiring Learning for All (2002) Winkworth & Dickman.1 & 6. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Hirzy. 1.1 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 48 . Energised. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. Many Voices Making Choices (2005) Kelly et al. 25–9.1 & 5. The Engaging Museum (2005) Landman et al. sections 5. pp. sections 6. Developing Museum Exhibitions for Lifelong Learning (1996). 70–2 WEB PAGES Griffith University. U3A Online NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. 45–51 Kelly et al.3 BENCHMARK B2.3 Displays are well designed and text is clear.4 BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. ‘Contemporary Theories of Learning’. in Practice (2007) Black.

Energised.. pp. Nina.. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. Knowledge Quest (2004). TIPS Ways to actively involve visitors might include: • blogs • information brochures to assist people in caring for their own collections • dress-ups • family or group activities • interactive exhibits • making and doing • opportunities for discussion • opportunities to bring in their own collection items • touch trolleys. 45–51 Kelly et al. Engaging Museum Audiences. Museum Methods (2002). section 7.3. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Kelly et al. Engaged.BENCHMARK B2.6 Simon.3. 1. Everywhere (2002). 2009 Evaluations of exhibitions.5 Activities and events give visitors opportunities to respond and get involved.1 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 49 . pp.2 WEB PAGES EVRSIG website NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. activities and events are used to improve programs and inform future planning. 59–64 BENCHMARK B2.

and of types of visitors. BENCHMARK B3. pROgRamS aND SERVIcES STANDARD B3.1.1. Galleries and Exhibition Spaces (2006) BENCHMARK B3. weekly. Galleries and Exhibition NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Australian Bureau of Statistics.1 The museum knows who its current and potential audiences are and has strategies to attract and retain them. 1. Museum Methods (2002).2 EVRSIG & MA. schools and/or year levels. aND caTERS FOR THEIR NEEDS aND INTERESTS THROUgH ITS cOmmUNIcaTIONS. monthly and/or yearly basis. Profiling Your Visitors (2004) MA. TIPS Understanding visitation patterns helps museums to meet visitors’ needs by providing enough staff and activities to match typical demand at specific times.1 Records are kept of visitor numbers. seniors and tour groups) • special needs groups. Information about types of visitors can be based on tallies of numbers of: • adults • children • people from specific Australian postcode areas • international visitors • booked groups and types of booked groups (e. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Dickman. TIPS Visitor tallies might be compiled on a daily.PRINCIPLE B3 THE mUSEUm IS cOmmITTED TO ITS cURRENT aND pOTENTIaL aUDIENcES.1 WEB PAGES AMARC. Don’t forget to count online visitors. Information Paper: Towards Comparable Statistics for Cultural Heritage Organisations (2008) Dickman. Visitor Research Made Easy for Museums. Audiences Records of visitor numbers are evaluated to help the museum understand visitation patterns and to assist in planning for the future.1 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 50 . Visitor Research Made Easy for Museums. section 7.g. and by scheduling programs and events when target audiences are most likely to attend.

2. 7.2. 46–51 WEB PAGES ABS. and ideas for drawing in other potential audiences. 3–4 DCITA. Museum Methods (2002). part 3. 7. 2006 Census Data by Location Accessible Arts. 7.1.2. and this information is evaluated and used in planning.1. Why not draw on tourism data and the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)? An awareness of why some people do not come to the museum can be very useful too.3 & 7.3 Spaces (2006) MA.1. Significant Events (2001).2 & 7. 3.4 Winkworth & Dickman. based on factors such as: • age • cultural background • education • gender • special interests. Galleries and Exhibition Spaces (2006) BENCHMARK B3. sections 5.2.5 Note: Guidance may also be obtained from the Museums Australia (MA) Evaluation & Visitor Research Special Interest Group (EVRSIG). 7. 1. The forward plan includes strategies to attract existing audiences as repeat visitors.4 MA. 6.5 Winkworth & Dickman. 2.1. 5.1 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 51 . key attractions.3. TIPS Strategies might develop out of research to identify the types of activities and events likely to attract particular audiences. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Dickman. Significant Events (2001). pp.2 The museum promotes its collection.1. 7. part 3.3 & 7. Visitor Research Made Easy for Museums. BENCHMARK B3. Museum Methods (2002). sections 2. pp. Museum Methods (2002). programs and services. sections 2. Tourism with Integrity (1999). NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. Accessing the Arts STANDARD B3. pp. 3–4 Visitors are invited to give feedback about their museum experience.1. 7. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA.2.

24–33 DCITA. Museum Methods (2002). Significant Events (2001). Collections Australia Network User Manual (2005) MA. town or city. Strategies and Planning CAN. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. General Website Standards CAN. pp. pp.3 Winkworth & Dickman. Wikis and Podcasts Explained CAN.BENCHMARK B3.1 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 52 .3 The museum provides information to help visitors locate the museum and find their way around while they are there.1 A range of promotional tools are used to make potential audiences aware of the museum and to encourage them to visit.1 The museum works with relevant authorities to have road signs installed in the surrounding suburb. state/territory and/or local government departments. Museum Methods (2002). Tourism with Integrity (1999). TIPS Promotional tools include: • advertising • brochures • direct mail • flyers • information in tourism brochures • media releases • newspaper articles • public talks • radio and/or television interviews • websites. 1. section 2. TIPS Explore your options through federal. 50–5 BENCHMARK B3. Tools for Building Websites Promotional material is up to date.2. BENCHMARK B3. part 3.3. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.2 WEB PAGES CAN. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Havlicek. Engaging Your Audience in Social Media – Blogs.3 STANDARD B3. to help people find the museum. section 2.2.

4. WEB PAGES NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. and at times that suit both the visitor and the museum. It also covers conceptual orientation in relation to displays (e. and directions to various areas of the museum). section 1. TIPS The term ‘orientation’ can refer to physical orientation (e.4 The museum has regular opening hours.3. BENCHMARK B3. providing visitors with way-finding aids. A roster is in place to make sure enough workers are on duty to maintain the museum’s regular opening hours and/or prearranged appointment times. introducing visitors to key concepts and messages).2 BENCHMARK B3. it needs to do so reasonably often. TIPS You can use Collections Australia Network (CAN) and the Australian Tourism Data Warehouse (ATDW) to promote your museum. There is orientation information to help visitors find their way around the museum and understand what there is to see and do there. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. BENCHMARK B3. and information about access and facilities for people with disabilities. Online Directory Information signs at the site include the museum’s name. 1.1 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 53 . Museum Methods (2002). STANDARD BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. opening hours.g. Orientation methods include: • audio guides • brochures • computers or touch screens • maps • signage • tours. entry fees and contact details. section 2.g.1 TIPS BENCHMARK B3.10 Contact details are publicised so that visitors can access the museum by appointment if they wish to.2 Where a museum opens only by appointment.3.4. Museum Methods (2002).3 WEB PAGES Australian Government.1 B3.

BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. 1. comfortable and pleasant.1 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 54 .2 DCITA. sections 2. 46–9 BENCHMARK B3. pp. Museum Methods (2002).5.5. key objectives.1 & 2. Museum Methods (2002). Tourism with Integrity (1999).4 BENCHMARK B3.1 & 2. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA.3 All face-to-face.5 Group and tour bookings are managed effectively. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. Museum Methods (2002). 46–9 BENCHMARK B3. Tourism with Integrity (1999).5.10 Facilities for visitors are safe.5. pp. and activities. TIPS Facilities might include: • adequate lighting • cloakroom • eating areas • lockers • parents’ room • seating • toilet facilities or directions to the closest facilities • well-planned public spaces.5. and its workers respond appropriately to visitor enquiries and feedback. telephone and email enquiries and complaints are managed efficiently and courteously. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Accessible Arts.2 Visitors are given an appropriate welcome. sections 2. BENCHMARK B3. Access Audit NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. section 1. Museum Methods (2002).5 The museum offers visitors a welcoming experience.2 Staff and volunteers have a customer focus and are well informed about the museum’s purpose. section 2.2 DCITA.1 BENCHMARK B3. ATDW website CAN website STANDARD B3.

Wyatt-Spratt & Haley. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS M&G NSW. people with disabilities. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS M&G NSW. but it is also about: • sensory accessibility • intellectual access • cultural access • emotional and attitudinal access. Knowledge Quest (2004). older people. and people with special needs. Knowledge Quest (2004). 45–51 Kelly et al.STANDARD B3. Energised. TIPS Access is often thought about only in terms of physical accessibility. 1. pp. 51–4 Accessible Arts. Wyatt-Spratt & Haley. 59–64 BENCHMARK B3. Everywhere (2002).6 The museum’s public programs are as accessible as possible to people of all ages and abilities. 51–4 Informed..6. 59–64 Wyatt-Spratt. Everywhere (2002). Exhibition Design WEB PAGES Arts Access Australia website NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. Energised.6.. pp. Engaged. pp. BENCHMARK B3. 45–51 Kelly et al.1 There are regular evaluations to check the accessibility of the museum’s public programs to people of all ages and abilities.1 PART B: INVOLVING PEOPLE 55 . pp. pp. Engaged.2 Wyatt-Spratt.. Introduction to Access (2007) Kelly et al.. Introduction to Access (2007) Kelly et al. Access All Areas (1999). Access All Areas (1999). pp. appropriate strategies are used to overcome any access limitations for young children.

... 4th Edition (2009). 1.1..... PRINCIPLE C1 THE mUSEUm’S cOLLEcTION REpRESENTS THE SIgNIFIcaNT STORIES aND INTERESTS OF ITS DIVERSE aND cHaNgINg cOmmUNITIES STANDARD C1.. Other collection areas may require an active program to address gaps (e.. ‘Rethinking the Collection’ (2006) The collection policy and procedures explain procedures and criteria with regard to: • access • acquisitions • cataloguing • conservation • copyright issues • deaccessioning • disposal • documentation • loans • oral history • resource... under-represented time periods.... and the communities it serves.1 The museum develops its collection to reflect its unique purpose and the significant stories and interests of its diverse and changing communities..... BENCHMARK C1......... NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V...... key topics......... For instance. local groups...1 PART C: DEVELOPING A SIGNIFICANT COLLECTION 56 .. Small Museums Cataloguing Manual.1... sub-collections and ‘closed collections’ (such as those of house museums) may mean that little or no new material is ever added..2 BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Commonwealth of Australia..... Collecting Cultural Material: Principles for Best Practice (2009) MA (Vic). p18 Winkworth & M&G NSW...... Collections tend to develop at different rates.... themes or stories). TIPS An outline of the following benchmarks might appear in the preamble to the museum’s collection policy....... BENCHMARK C1..PART C: DeveLOpIng A sIgnIfIcAnT cOLLecTIOn .. education or secondary collections • storage.g.. Collection Policy Template (2006) Winkworth & M&G NSW.. the nature of some bequests..... which might also refer to the histories and cultures of the diverse local communities (including Indigenous and culturally and linguistically diverse communities) represented within the collection..1 Key collection areas are based on the museum’s Statement of Purpose...... themes and stories...

deaccessioning and care of the collection are informed by significance assessments. ‘Rethinking the Collection’ (2006) MA. TIPS Remember to ask donors everything you can about items when you acquire them. K.1 MA. Museum Methods (2002). TIPS Access in this context is about how people can access the collection and its records.2.2. 4th Edition (2009). and to update them as new information becomes available. research to inform significance assessments of selected objects should be undertaken. It can be useful to cross-reference your access policy with policies and guiding documents such as a preventive conservation policy and codes of ethics. p18-19 C1. TIPS It is useful to date significance assessments. Where object files have not been established for the collection.2 The significance of selected individual collection items is investigated and documented. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Russell. section 3. BENCHMARK C1. History and Science Museums (1999) MA (Vic). and keep in mind that access is a principle that applies to a range of issues.2 The museum knows the significance of its collection. to which you progressively add research on the object. Significance (2009) BENCHMARK C1.1 NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.3.3 The museum aims to have unconditional legal ownership of its collection. STANDARD C1.1 PART C: DEVELOPING A SIGNIFICANT COLLECTION 57 . You might have a general museum access policy to refer to. 1. Collection Policy Template (2006) Winkworth & M&G NSW. Small Museums Cataloguing Manual.1 Decisions about acquisitions. Code of Ethics for Art. an object file is begun. R & Winkworth. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS ICOM. Records are kept of the transactions accompanying each acquisition. Oral History Handbook (2006) STANDARD Winkworth & M&G NSW. At the point of acquisition. ICOM Code of Ethics for Museums (2006) Robertson. BENCHMARK C1.

3. BENCHMARK C1.4 The museum has an effective system to record and retrieve information about its collection.3 BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS M&G NSW. A museum that owns its collection is able to make all decisions affecting that collection. TIPS A set of twenty data fields that is recognised by INTERPOL is Object ID. Collecting cultural material: principles for best practice M&G NSW. Planning and Implementing a Collection Management System (CMS) (2005) NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.1 The paper. it has a plan in place to gain title to it or an appropriate written agreement that is reviewed regularly. 1. TIPS Unconditional ownership of the collection is important for: • allocating resources • planning long-term collection development • planning displays • prioritising collection-care activities • ensuring long-term preservation. Loans STANDARD C1. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Collections Trust.4.3. Small Museums Cataloguing Manual. newspaper clippings. significance assessments). Acquisition and Numbering MA (Vic).1 PART C: DEVELOPING A SIGNIFICANT COLLECTION 58 . electronic or digital collection documentation system includes: • an accession register (including a unique numbering system) • a catalogue (including a minimum dataset and an agreed nomenclature) • object or artist files (research notes.2 BENCHMARK C1. BENCHMARK C1. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS DEWHA. pp14 & 58 Donors must sign donation forms. TIPS Some objects may need to be co-managed by the museum and a community group. Cataloguing Objects (2010) Dewhurst. If the museum does not have unconditional ownership of a collection item. 4th Edition (2009).

Small Museums Cataloguing Manual. Guidelines for the Preservation of Digital Heritage (2003) WEB PAGES JISC Digital Media. Pathways CAN. Bibliography of Digital Standards (2006) Webb. 1. BENCHMARK C1. TIPS It is useful to have a written procedure for this. Powerhouse Museum Object Name Thesaurus (2009) WEB PAGES AIATSIS.1 PART C: DEVELOPING A SIGNIFICANT COLLECTION 59 . Principles for Creating and Managing Digital Heritage Collections (2007) McClelland.5 The museum makes its collection accessible in digital formats and in online environments. Image Digitisation of Local History Collections NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. via the process of digitisation. 4th Edition (2009) M&G NSW. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS CCA. Cataloguing Powerhouse Museum. Thesauri and Vocabularies for Cataloguing J.5. TIPS Digital collections may include materials that are either ‘born digital’ or. BENCHMARK C1. Learn about the Getty Vocabularies Object ID website Australian Pictorial Thesaurus Records of the collection are safely stored and backup copies are made at regular intervals. Paul Getty Trust. as resources permit. STANDARD C1. Basic Guidelines for Image Capture & Optimisation JISC Digital Media.4. ‘made digital’.2 MA (Vic). Digital Standards Bibliography Version 3 (2009) CCA.1 Digital collections are created and maintained using recognised principles and standards. Still images: Managing your digital resources SLIS.

ICOM Code of Ethics for Museums (2006) Dakin. BENCHMARK C1.5. TIPS Standards include those relating to: • documentation • cataloguing • arrangement and description. Australian Indigenous Digital Collections: First generation issues (2008) Australian Copyright Council.3 Legal requirements are addressed.5. procedures. A user’s Guide to the Flexible Dealing Provision for Libraries. Educational Institutions and Cultural Institutions: Section 200AB of the Copyright Act 1986 (2008) Nakata.2 Digital collections are managed in keeping with the standards. Policies include: • collections policy • conservation/preservation policy • sustainability policy. before any digitisation process begins. policies and records management systems used for the museum’s other collections.1 PART C: DEVELOPING A SIGNIFICANT COLLECTION 60 . Galleries and Museums: An Introduction to Copyright (2006) CCA. Digital Standards Bibliography Version 3 (2009) Hudson & Kenyon. Galleries and Museums (2005) NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. 1. Digital materials need to be ‘future proofed’. Protocols may relate to: • ethics • culture-specific sensitivities • rights management. Copyright and Cultural Institutions (2006) ICOM. TIPS Legal requirements include adhering to the laws of: • privacy • copyright • intellectual property • moral rights. along with ethical and other protocols. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Australian Libraries Copyright Committee and the Australian Digital Alliance. This has implications for computer hardware and software.BENCHMARK C1.

4 MA. 1. History and Science Museums (1999) WEB PAGES Arts Law Centre of Australia website Arts Law Centre of Australia. in relevant formats. Digital Standards Bibliography Version 3 (2009) Standards Australia. Care and Handling Guidelines for Digitisation of Library Materials Digital collections are presented to the public in ways that meet accessibility standards and are compatible with adaptive technologies.5. BENCHMARK C1. ATSILIRN Protocols Australian Copyright Council. Museums and Galleries: Obligations in the Age of Digital and Moral Rights ATSILIRN. future re-use and ongoing preservation. to allow for continuing access. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS BENCHMARK C1. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. TIPS The accompanying information may include: • acknowledgements • captioning • metadata • permissions and restrictions (associated with rights management).5 BENCHMARK C1.5. Code of Ethics for Art. Q&A’s for galleries and museums CAN.5. Still Images: Managing your digital resources SLIS.1 (2007) WEB PAGES Canadian Heritage Information Network & Australian Museums & Galleries Online. Copyright and Intellectual Property Digital collections are managed with sufficient accompanying information. AS ISO 19005. Digital Standards Bibliography Version 3 (2009) NLA. Image Digitisation of Local History Collections Digitisation procedures are designed and managed so as to minimise the risk of damage to collection items.6 CCA. Capture Your Collections JISC Digital Media.1 PART C: DEVELOPING A SIGNIFICANT COLLECTION 61 . BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS CCA.

but it is also about: • sensory accessibility • intellectual access • cultural access • emotional and attitudinal access. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Accessible Arts.0 NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. Good Practice Guide for Developers of Cultural Heritage Web Services W3C. Accessibility for websites UKOLN.1 PART C: DEVELOPING A SIGNIFICANT COLLECTION 62 . TIPS Accessibility in the online environment is about making sure you present information in ways that take into account people’s different abilities. Digital Standards Bibliography Version 3 (2009) WEB PAGES CAN. 1. Access is often thought about only in terms of physical accessibility. Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2. requirements and technology access. Print and Publication Guidelines CCA.

1 Preventive conservation principles are reflected in the museum’s policies and procedures.2 MA. BENCHMARK C2.PRINCIPLE C2 THE mUSEUm pRESERVES ITS SIgNIFIcaNT cOLLEcTIONS FOR FUTURE gENERaTIONS STANDARD C2. (1993) A preventive conservation strategy is in place. reCollections (1998) National Parks Service. where appropriate • an integrated pest management (IPM) program • procedures for dealing with mould or pest infestations • OH&S issues. TIPS This strategy is informed by an initial risk assessment and an understanding of significance. for instance: • building works • exhibitions • public programs. Code of Ethics and Code of Practice (2005) BENCHMARK C2. Conserve-o-gram Preservation of Museum Collections.1. Preservation Needs Assessment Report Template 2007–2008 (2007) NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.1 HCC. policies and procedures.1. dust and pollution • shelter for significant outdoor exhibits. Museum Methods (2002). 1. if reduced light levels are desirable for some objects. What is Collections Care? (2009) AICCM.1 PART C: DEVELOPING A SIGNIFICANT COLLECTION 63 . For instance. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Museums Galleries Scotland. what strategies could be used to keep exhibition text visible or accessible in that setting? BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS AICCM.1 The museum makes decisions on preventive conservation based on current conservation advice and practices. section 4. restoration and preservation • priorities • measures to reduce light levels on light-sensitive collection items • a cleaning regime and roster for display and storage areas • regular inspections for damp and pests. TIPS Conservation is considered as an integral part of all museum activities. and might include: • definitions of conservation. It makes sense to consider the broader museum setting and purpose too.

Developing a Conservation Plan for Community Museums (2006) WEB PAGES NLA. TIPS The AICCM website provides a guide to ‘Finding Conservators’.2. Conservation Resources STANDARD C2. Caring for Your Heritage Powerhouse Museum. wood. each having different conservation requirements and risks. Preservation Needs Assessment Surveys Powerhouse Museum.g. Conservation Resources The preventive conservation strategy is based on reputable museum conservation information and advice.3 MA (Vic).1 PART C: DEVELOPING A SIGNIFICANT COLLECTION 64 . Collections will include items composed of different materials (e.2 The museum actively strives to create and maintain an appropriate and stable environment for its collection. BENCHMARK C2. BENCHMARK C2.1 Approaches to storage and display show appropriate understanding of the collection’s condition and the environmental requirements of individual items. TIPS Environmental considerations include: • dust and other pollutants • humidity • light levels • temperature levels and fluctuations. paper.4 WEB PAGES AICCM website Preventive conservation guidelines and training are readily available to all museum workers. 1.1. BENCHMARK C2. Preserving Australia’s Documentary Heritage (2004) WEB PAGES AICCM. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. These issues are also essential considerations for touring exhibitions. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS NLA.1. textiles and metals).

and looking good.4 BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS M&G NSW. section 4.3 TIPS Appropriate equipment includes: • boxes or crates • gloves • trolleys.g. The National Trust Manual of Housekeeping (2006) MA. House Keeping in Your Museum or Gallery (2008) Staniforth et al. Cleaning Regime M&G NSW.2 The collection storage and display areas are cleaned regularly and kept tidy and free of rubbish. The National Trust Manual of Housekeeping (2006) M&G NSW. chapter 3 Ling.3 HCC.2. Basic Handling of Paintings (1993) Conditions in exhibition and storage areas are regularly monitored. TIPS Information on issues affecting specific collection items (e. M&G NSW. Condition Reports Appropriate equipment and training are available to ensure that the collection is handled and moved in an appropriate manner. 1. Secure (1998) Allen... particular conservation needs. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS M&G NSW. BENCHMARK C2. General Tips on Good Handling Techniques (2008) CCI. TIPS Having a regular maintenance schedule in place helps to keep exhibitions and displays free of pests and other hazards. or incidents such as pest infestation or water damage) can NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.2. Safe. Solid.2. recorded and assessed in light of the collection’s conservation requirements. reCollections (1998). Condition Reporting and General Conservation Guidelines for Touring Exhibitions (1992) BENCHMARK C2. Museum Methods (2002). BENCHMARK C2.1 PART C: DEVELOPING A SIGNIFICANT COLLECTION 65 . House Keeping in Your Museum or Gallery (2008) Staniforth et al. and damage or potential damage is reported and followed up.

Detecting Infestations: Facility Inspection procedure and checklist (1996) Storage and display environments are improved and upgraded as resources become available. the key here is to ensure that improvements are made as a result of this knowledge. Two examples of follow-up are: • making changes to display and storage areas • seeking advice from a qualified conservator.4 CCI. Guidelines for Environmental Control in Cultural Institutions (2002) MA. Storage and Display Guidelines for Paintings (1993) NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Museums Galleries Scotland. Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation. cyclone or other disaster) and to add this information to records of the museum’s history. Museum Methods (2002). BENCHMARK C2. Product and Suppliers List STANDARD C2. 1. display materials and techniques are used for collection items on display. it is important to document key events that have impacted on the collection (e. chapters 1 & 2 CCI. What is environmental monitoring? (2009) University of Melbourne.1 PART C: DEVELOPING A SIGNIFICANT COLLECTION 66 .5 HCC. Conserve-o-gram: Safe Plastics and Fabrics for Exhibit and Storage (2004) HCC. reCollections (1998). chapter 7 (2001) WEB PAGES Powerhouse Museum. a leak. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS National Park Service. be recorded in object files and on databases.3.1 Appropriate supports. Although collecting and recording relevant information about environmental conditions is vital.3 The museum’s display.2. For future reference. Bushfires: protect your precious possessions (2003) BENCHMARK C2. section 4. Indoor Display of Industrial Collections (1998) CCI. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS National Park Service.g. in light of ongoing assessments of the museum environment and the collection’s needs. Museum Handbook. storage and handling methods minimise risks to its collection.

reCollections (1998).3 BENCHMARK C2.BENCHMARK C2. section 4.1 PART C: DEVELOPING A SIGNIFICANT COLLECTION 67 . BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS HCC.6 CCI. Storage and Display Guidelines for Paintings (1993) M&G NSW.1 Appropriate advice is sought from qualified conservators before any conservation or restoration treatments are carried out. Box Making for Collection Items Archival-quality materials are used for storage and display where appropriate and wherever possible.4 The museum makes decisions about conservation treatments based on current conservation advice and practices. chapter 3. Guidelines for Commissioning Conservation Treatment for Cultural Objects NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.3. Burra Charter (1999) HCC. and any interventive conservation work on collection items is performed by qualified conservators.4.4 Methods include: • ensuring items are not stored directly on the floor • using dust covers for larger items • using supports for fragile items. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS MA. 1–18 STANDARD C2. BENCHMARK C2. pp.6 Collection items are rotated on and off display in accordance with their conservation needs.3. TIPS Appropriate storage may include: • boxes • cabinets • shelving. Museum Methods (2002). reCollections (1998) AICCM. Museum Methods (2002). BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS AICCM. 1.3. BENCHMARK C2. section 4.2 Appropriate methods and materials are used for collection storage. Code of Ethics and Code of Practice (2005) Australia ICOMOS.

AICCM, Remedies Gone Wrong The condition of any collection item requiring conservation is recorded and considered, and a treatment proposal prepared, before any interventive conservation work is carried out. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS M&G NSW, Condition Reports Every item selected for conservation work has a statement of significance to justify the cost of the work and to guide procedures. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

BENCHMARK C2.4.2 BENCHMARK C2.4.3

Russell, R & Winkworth, K Significance 2.0 (2009) BENCHMARK C2.4.4 MA, Museum Methods (2002), section 3.2 Clegg et al., Safe in the Shed (2001) Records are kept of all conservation treatments (or restoration activities), including the materials used, who carried out the treatment, and any physical changes to the object.

TIPS Photographs and pencil sketches can be used to show the object before and after conservation treatment. BENCHMARK C2.4.5 Suitable storage and display environments are chosen for treated collection items, with the aims of maintaining their stability, and long-term preservation.

TIPS Returning a collection item to an inappropriate environment will undermine the benefits of any conservation treatment that item has received. STANDARD C2.5 The museum has identified, and is able to respond to, all potential threats to its collection. BENCHMARK C2.5.1 All current and potential threats to the collection are identified through regular risk assessments.

TIPS These might be conducted or reviewed on an annual or seasonal basis. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

ICOM, ICOM Code of Ethics for Museums (2006) MA, Museum Methods (2002), section 3.2

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BENCHMARK C2.5.2 BENCHMARK C2.5.3

Söderlund Consulting, Be Prepared (2000), pp. 15–21 MA, Code of Ethics for Art, History and Science Museums (1999) HCC, reCollections (1998), chapter 4, pp. 65–9 MA, Caring for Our Culture (1998) Potential threats to the collection are removed or reduced. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Söderlund Consulting, Be Prepared (2000), pp. 21–4 The disaster preparedness and response plan is informed by a current risk assessment and is regularly reviewed.

TIPS

Be sure to consider all aspects of the museum in the disaster preparedness and response plan, including: • activities and special events • buildings • the collection • exhibitions • people. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

Söderlund Consulting, Be Prepared (2000), pp. 35–53 Dorge, Valerie & Jones, Building up an Emergency Plan: A Guide for Museums, (1999) The disaster preparedness and response plan includes an up-to-date list of contacts for emergencies.

BENCHMARK C2.5.4

TIPS Relevant contacts might include: • individuals • members of the museum’s governing body • museum workers • organisations • service providers.

BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Söderlund Consulting, Be Prepared (2000), pp. 25–33, 66–9 Workers have training in disaster preparedness and are familiar with the museum’s disaster preparedness and response plan.

BENCHMARK C2.5.5

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BENCHMARK C2.5.2 BENCHMARK C2.5.3

Söderlund Consulting, Be Prepared (2000), pp. 15–21 MA, Code of Ethics for Art, History and Science Museums (1999) HCC, reCollections (1998), chapter 4, pp. 65–9 MA, Caring for Our Culture (1998) Potential threats to the collection are removed or reduced. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Söderlund Consulting, Be Prepared (2000), pp. 21–4 The disaster preparedness and response plan is informed by a current risk assessment and is regularly reviewed.

TIPS

Be sure to consider all aspects of the museum in the disaster preparedness and response plan, including: • activities and special events • buildings • the collection • exhibitions • people. BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

Söderlund Consulting, Be Prepared (2000), pp. 35–53 Dorge, Valerie & Jones, Building up an Emergency Plan: A Guide for Museums, (1999) The disaster preparedness and response plan includes an up-to-date list of contacts for emergencies.

BENCHMARK C2.5.4

TIPS Relevant contacts might include: • individuals • members of the museum’s governing body • museum workers • organisations • service providers.

BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Söderlund Consulting, Be Prepared (2000), pp. 25–33, 66–9 Workers have training in disaster preparedness and are familiar with the museum’s disaster preparedness and response plan.

BENCHMARK C2.5.5

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BOOKS AND ONLINE PUBLICATIONS Söderlund Consulting. 1.1 PART C: DEVELOPING A SIGNIFICANT COLLECTION 71 . disaster preparedness. TIPS Blue Shield Australia encourages museums to support its MayDay program by using the month of May each year as the occasion for training in. Be Prepared (2000). and review of. 53–5 WEB PAGES AICCM website Blue Shield Australia CAVAL Collaborative Solutions website NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. pp.

1.AppenDIXes A B C D E F What Is a Museum? The National Standards Taskforce Key Acronyms Glossary Resources Provide Feedback NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.1 APPENDIXES 72 .

communicates and exhibits... conserve and communicate material evidence of people and their environment.. and makes objects and information accessible in actual and virtual environments.. The Museums Australia Constitution (2002) defines a ‘museum’ as an institution with the following characteristics: A museum helps people understand the world by using objects and ideas to interpret the past and present and explore the future..... Museums Australia recognises that museums of science...........au/site/what_is_a_museum. (b) institutions holding collections of and displaying specimens of plants and animals.... In its Code of Ethics [2006]... the tangible and intangible evidence of people and their environment. aquaria and vivaria. the International Council of Museums (ICOM) describes a museum as: a non-profit making permanent institution in the service of society and of its development. Source: Museums Australia. not-for-profit organisations that contribute long-term value to communities...... researches.. for purposes of study. (c) science centres. history and art may be designated by many other names (including Gallery and Keeping Place)......... In addition.. continuation and management of tangible or intangible heritage resources (living heritage and digital creative activity)..... A museum preserves and researches collections.... open to the public.1 APPENDIX A: WHAT IS A MUSEUM 73 .. archaeological and ethnographic monuments and sites and historical monuments and sites of a museum nature that acquire. herbaria...... education and enjoyment.. conserves........... 1. Museums are established in the public interest as permanent.php Appendix A WhAT Is A mUseUm? NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V......... (d) cultural centres and other entities that facilitate the preservation..... the following may qualify as museums for the purposes of this definition: (a) natural. What Is a Museum? (web page) http://museumsaustralia.  (e) such other institutions as the [Museums Australia National] Council considers as having some or all of the characteristics of a museum....org. such as botanical and zoological gardens. which acquires....

. encompassing four major domains: archives.. and cultural heritage management... The National Standards for Australian Museums and Galleries have been developed by a National Standards Taskforce representing the Australian museum sector. Established to ensure the nationwide sustainability of collections.com.act. the Council consults with key stakeholders to resolve common issues and to promote the value of the sector. the visual arts.... CFC was established in 1997 to manage and develop a number of the ACT’s major cultural assets..... ACT Museums and Galleries is a unit of the Cultural Facilities Corporation (CFC). Appendix B The NATIOnAL STAnDARDs TAsKfORce ACT Museums and Galleries http://www.... through the following organisations: http://www...gov. Taskforce members have been drawn from all states and territories..... conserving and presenting significant aspects of the ACT’s cultural heritage.... social history. Arts Tasmania also provides the secretariat for the Tasmanian Arts Advisory Board.1 APPENDIX B: NATIONAL STANDARDS TASKFORCE 74 ..au ACT Museums and Galleries represents: • Canberra Museum and Gallery • the Nolan Collection • ACT Historic Places (Lanyon.. ideas and creativity. providing activities such as exhibitions. The Corporation’s responsibilities span the performing arts.... Calthorpes’ House and Mugga-Mugga). understanding.collectionscouncil... public programs and education programs..au Collections Council of Australia Ltd The Collections Council of Australia Ltd (CCA) is the peak body for Australia’s collections sector... ACT Museums and Galleries delivers a range of cultural services to the community..... The Council was initiated and is supported by the Cultural Ministers Council... 1........arts... The Council provides the secretariat for Blue Shield Australia. in its peer assessment and policy development work........... Arts Tasmania administers grants and loans through a number of programs and initiatives: • Assistance to Individuals • Assistance to Organisations • Small Museums and Collections Program • Artsbridge.gov.. inspiration... Design Island and Amplified. The Council’s vision is for collections in Australia to be a source of knowledge.au Arts Tasmania is the state government agency responsible for policy and planning for arts and culture in Tasmania.museumsandgalleries.. libraries and museums..tas... Arts Tasmania http://www........... NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.. a committee established to complement the International Committee of Blue Shield in protecting the world’s cultural heritage when it is threatened by armed conflict or natural disaster..... and collecting. galleries.

org. M&GSQ is supported by the Queensland Government. and provides services to foster excellence in. The MAGNT collections encompass Aboriginal art and material culture. Southeast Asian and Oceanic art and material culture. galleries and keeping places. interpretation and public presentation of South Australia’s history and material culture. http://www.history. the natural sciences and Northern Territory history. state and territory governments. museums.au/nreta/museums Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory The Northern Territory’s premier cultural institution. the National Motor Museum and the South Australian Maritime Museum – and by assisting South Australia’s community museums and historical societies to preserve and present their local and specialist histories and collections.au Museum and Gallery Services Queensland Ltd Museum and Gallery Services Queensland Ltd (M&GSQ) promotes. craft. the Museum Shop and a café. The HTSA is a statutory authority of the South Australian Government. a theatre. training and professional development. through the Australia Council for the Arts.nt. galleries and keeping places are relevant. M&GSQ provides a range of programs and services in the areas of information and advice.magsq.sa. educational facilities for school groups. an initiative of Australia’s federal. is located in Darwin. place the art. The collections.com.gov. the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory (MAGNT). M&GSQ strives to ensure a future where museums. culture. http://www.1 APPENDIX B: NATIONAL STANDARDS TASKFORCE 75 . and the Australian Government. through Arts Queensland. The HTSA achieves its mission through its three museums – the Migration Museum.http://www. M&G NSW plays a pivotal role in nurturing sustainable museums and galleries within the community. and valued by their communities. http://mgnsw.gov.au History Trust of South Australia The History Trust of South Australia (HTSA) is responsible for the preservation. enriching experiences for the people of NSW. and promotes the achievements of Queensland museums and galleries. interpretation and collection development associated with them. accessible. maritime archaeology. MAGNT is supported by the Northern Territory Government. supports. a touring gallery. visual arts.au Museums & Galleries NSW Museums & Galleries NSW (M&G NSW) is the key development agency for the museum and gallery sector in New South Wales. the Visual Arts and Craft Strategy. and aims to ensure the ongoing provision of enjoyable. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. and the research. and exhibition development and touring. history and natural history of the Northern Territory in both an Australian and an international context. 1. The MAGNT complex consists of five major permanent galleries.

and by Museum Victoria. Its role is to develop an agreed strategic direction (leading). The Western Australian Museum is a statutory authority within the Western Australian State Government Portfolio for Culture and the Arts. numbering more than three million specimens/artefacts.1 APPENDIX B: NATIONAL STANDARDS TASKFORCE 76 . are the primary focus of research by the museum’s own staff and others. for people with museum interests.gov. MAP staff have been closely involved in developing the National Standards. including three in country areas. The museum comprises eight sites. but particularly through a program of exhibitions and publications’. http://www.au Museums Australia (Victoria) Museums Australia (Victoria) (MA (Vic)) is the Victorian branch of Museums Australia – a membership organisation providing national and state/territory services. and the professional services it provides to the Victorian museum community include: • advice on museum matters • information resources • grants for museum projects • museum accreditation • opportunities for networking • professional development opportunities (including seminars and workshops). NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.museum.asn. Central to the museum’s mission are its services to regional communities. delivered through the Museum Assistance Program (MAP). http://www.au Western Australian Museum The Western Australian Museum was established in 1891 (as the Perth Museum) and its current collections. to broker supportive relationships (facilitating) and to develop and deliver programs and services (providing) for the sector.The mission of M&G NSW is to support the strategic position and relevance of museums and galleries. The museum’s stated aim is ‘to advocate knowledge about the collections and communicate it to the public through a variety of media. MA (Vic) represents over five hundred members. MA (Vic) is supported by the Victorian Government agencies Arts Victoria and Heritage Victoria. M&G NSW is supported by Arts NSW and by the Australian Government. through the Australia Council for the Arts. and national networks.mavic.wa. 1.

Water. 1........................... Information Technology and the Arts DEWHA Department of the Environment........................... ABS Australian Bureau of Statistics ACF Australian Conservation Foundation ACGA Australian Commercial Galleries Association ACNT Australian Council of National Trusts AFP Australian Federal Police AGIMO Australian Government Information Management Office AIATSIS Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies AICCM Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material AMARC Australian Museum Audience Research Centre ARC Australasian Registrars Committee ATDW Australian Tourism Data Warehouse ATO Australian Taxation Office ATSILIRN Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Library and Information Resource Network Australia ICOMOS International Council on Monuments and Sites (Australia) CAAMD Council of Australian Art Museum Directors CAMD Council of Australasian Museum Directors CAN Collections Australia Network CCA Collections Council of Australia Ltd CFC Cultural Facilities Corporation DCITA Department of Communications...1 APPENDIX C: KEY ACRONYMS 77 ........................ Heritage and the Arts (formerly DCITA) DGR Deductible gift recipient EVRSIG Evaluation & Visitor Research Special Interest Group FAHS Federation of Australian Historical Societies Appendix C KeY AcROnYms NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V....

1.1 APPENDIX C: KEY ACRONYMS 78 .HCC Heritage Collections Council HREOC Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission HTSA History Trust of South Australia ICAC Independent Commission Against Corruption ICOM International Council of Museums IPM Integrated pest management M&G NSW Museums & Galleries NSW M&GSQ Museum and Gallery Services Queensland Ltd MA Museums Australia MAGNT Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory MA (Qld) Museums Australia (Queensland) MA (Vic) Museums Australia (Victoria) NAA National Archives of Australia NAVA National Association for the Visual Arts NLA National Library of Australia NSLA National and State Libraries Australasia OH&S Occupational health and safety PGAV Public Galleries Association of Victoria RAA Regional Arts Australia RGANSW Regional Galleries Association of New South Wales RGAQ Regional Galleries Association of Queensland SLIS Swinburne Library Information Systems U3A University of the Third Age W3C World Wide Web Consortium NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.

..... Code of Ethics for Art...0 (2009) HTSA..... Glossary of Terms (web page) Organisations Collections Council of Australia Ltd Deakin University History Trust of South Australia Museum and Gallery Services Queensland Ltd Museums & Galleries NSW World Commission on Environment and Development NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V....... Wherever appropriate.. Keeping Archives (2008) Canadian Heritage Information Network & Australian Museums & Galleries Online. Collections Management Policy – April 2001 (2005) ICOM website INTERPOL website MA.1 APPENDIX D: GLOSSARY 79 ........ History and Science Museums (1999) MA.. Strategic Planning Manual (1998) Collins Australian Internet-Linked Dictionary (2004) Dickman... A Plain English Guide to Previous Possessions. terms are defined according to their meaning in the museum context.. Careers in Museums (1995) AICCM.. Code of Ethics and Code of Practice (2005) Australia ICOMOS....... For the sake of consistency and simplicity.... New Obligations (1996) NSW Heritage Office. Capture Your Collections (website) Colbert...... Abasa.. Department for Environment and Heritage... Visitor Research Made Easy for Museums.... reCollections (1998) Russell & Winkworth. Objects in Their Place (1999) Object ID website Rouette............. Burra Charter (1999) Bettington et al.... Museums and Sustainability (2002) MA..Appendix D GLOssARY .. Significance 2.. sourced from the publications and organisations listed below.... this Glossary draws as much as possible on existing definitions...... Exhibitions (2007) South Australian Government.. 1.. SOURces Publications and web pages All sources are identified in full in Appendix E... Galleries and Exhibition Spaces (2006) HCC.

and stored for long-term usage. bequest or transfer.Access Providing access means making a museum. Archival image A digital image (also referred to as a master image) that has been captured at the most appropriate quality or resolution. through purchase. its buildings. Accession register A book – used at the first stage of the accessioning process – in which objects are recorded as they are added to a museum’s collection. its collection and its programs physically and/or virtually available. Acquisition policy See Collection policy. specimen or artwork that has been acquired by a museum for its collection is considered a heritage asset. sites and equipment.g. CD or DVD – or on an independent hard drive. and are accessed only for the production of copies. donation. while also fulfilling the museum’s other responsibilities (e. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. financial or historical research purposes (b) the name given to the repository in which an archival collection resides (c) an organisation (or part of an organisation) whose main function is to select. Asset A document. ensuring the preservation and security of its collection. Other kinds of museum assets include buildings. 1. AICCM The Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material is the national organisation for conservators and others interested in the preservation of cultural material. administrative. and intellectually engaging. preserve and make archival records available for use. Archives The term archives encompasses: (a) records of organisations and individuals that have been selected for indefinite retention on the basis of their continuing value for legal. and the safety of visitors and workers). Accession The process of registering and cataloguing an object into a museum’s collection. Archival images are normally stored in an offline mode – on tape.1 APPENDIX D: GLOSSARY 80 . Cataloguing follows. to the widest possible range of people. picture. manage. artefact. Adaptive technologies Devices or technologies (such as voice-recognition software) that can assist people with disabilities to access information and/or technology. Acquisition The process of gaining legal possession of an item for a museum collection.

rules or expectations developed to help people and organisations to make appropriate. 1988 and 1999.g. for artworks). industry or specialisation. local residents. age. Burra Charter The Australia ICOMOS Charter for the Conservation of Places of Cultural Significance. physical dimensions. because of their interests or demographics. achievement or progress.) Born digital Term used to describe information expressed in a digital format from the point of its creation. (Short for web log. provenance. ethical decisions in relation to behaviour and practices within a specific profession. securing. school students. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. The Charter was revised in 1981.1 APPENDIX D: GLOSSARY 81 . web pages. relevant information about an object in a museum collection. conserving and disposing of collection items.g. These details are recorded on cataloguing worksheets or onto a computer database. tourists. and may plan to attract them through specific programs designed to meet their needs. adopted in Burra. Forms of visual or literary expression created using digital technology or digital media are borndigital materials. The museum may target its potential audiences. Collection The body of acquired objects held in title by a museum. lending. and wordprocessed documents. Collection management A term encompassing all of the practices and procedures implemented by a museum in acquiring. storing.Audiences Current People who visit a museum (including online visitors). in 1979. use. Benchmark A reference point or criterion against which to measure performance. title (e. documenting. 1. A museum’s current audience may be segmented into audience groupings (e. Cataloguing The process of recording and filing/storing all known. Other examples include websites. and special interest groups). Business plan See Forward plan. retirees. Potential People who do not currently visit the museum but are thought likely to attend in the future. maker. etc. families. South Australia. such as its origin. accessing. email messages. physical description (materials and/or techniques used in its making). Blog An online journal that is frequently updated by its creator and is usually open for contributions from the general public. handling. Code of ethics A formal set of principles.

with the least possible intervention. Inappropriate use of benefits or advantages that the individual gains through this association. storage and display of objects. training and experience. Sometimes museums set aside an exhibition space for exhibitions of this type. its future use. Conservation treatment The physical treatment of collection items to prolong their existence by preventing or slowing down deterioration. culture.Collection policy A written statement guiding a museum’s aims. role. and composition. history. whose members have something in common (e. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. of any size. See also Preservation. policy framework. but tend to specialise in the treatment of one type of object or material.g. or of privileged information that he or she has access to. and the handling. are potential consequences of conflict of interest. A conservation policy generally covers conservation needs and priorities. handling. storage and display are all encompassed within conservation.1 APPENDIX D: GLOSSARY 82 . putting at risk the reputation of all concerned. publicly available statement of a museum’s charter. The collection policy also identifies the kinds of materials a museum will collect and the conditions or terms governing acquisitions. ideas or activities to a wider audience. experiences. if appropriate. 1. Conflict of interest A situation where the interests of an individual working for. through specialised education. in accordance with an ethical code such as the AICCM Code of Ethics and Code of Practice. The purpose of conservation is to study. interests or locality). record. Issues around treatment. practices and procedures in regard to conserving its collection. any materials and methods used in a treatment should allow it to be reversible and should allow for the possibility of future treatments. Treatment is undertaken only after an assessment of the current condition of an item. ideas. and after the preparation of a treatment proposal. or representing. Conservation policy A written statement guiding a museum’s aims. treatment. restore the culturally significant qualities of an object. Community access exhibitions Exhibitions designed to enable a diverse range of individuals and community groups to present their artworks. an organisation compete with that organisation’s interests. Community A social group. Conservator A professional whose primary occupation is the practice of conservation and who. and/or especially encourage exhibitions by marginalised or minority groups. culture. Constitution A written. formulates and implements all the activities of conservation. Where possible. Preventive conservation and Restoration. Through their training. goals. its significance. retain and. conservators have an understanding of the principles of the conservation of most materials. knowledge. and available resources and expertise. Conservation All action aimed at safeguarding cultural material for the future. practices and procedures in managing its collection.

Museums often engage contractors for their specialised skills and knowledge. See also Volunteer and Workers. Copyright The exclusive right. an original literary. including upgrades when necessary. and to encourage positive customer/ visitor experiences. Core documents and policies The main documents and policies that guide and inform a museum’s activities. Corporate plan See Forward plan. Deaccession The process by which an object in a museum’s collection is removed from the collection. to support or carry out a specific project or service. Customer focus Planning and managing museum programs and services so as to meet the needs and interests of the people who will be accessing them. and who seeks to communicate related information.Contractor A person or a firm that supplies labour. Digital imaging The process of creating and/or manipulating digital images. to produce copies of. services or materials to an organisation. taking a digital photograph of a painting. Digital material produced by digitisation can be referred to as ‘made digital’ (as distinct from ‘born digital’). For example. practices and procedures in respect of deaccession. and to otherwise control. for a fee and on terms set out in a written agreement or contract. granted by law for a specified number of years. Deductible gift recipient (DGR) A fund or organisation that can receive tax-deductible gifts through the Australian Taxation Office Deductible Gift Recipients scheme. or scanning a catalogue record.1 APPENDIX D: GLOSSARY 83 . Digital archiving See Archival image. museums must ensure that all legal requirements are met and that the objects are made ready for disposal in an appropriate and ethical way. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. Deaccession policy A written statement guiding a museum’s aims. Curator A person who works with collection items and associated material to develop a museum’s collection and/or exhibitions. Digital preservation The long-term maintenance of digital files on digital storage media. This is normally a short-term arrangement. ideas and values to the public. are both digitisation activities (also referred to as image capture). Digitisation The process of converting information into a digital format. When deaccessioning objects. musical or artistic work. 1. A museum’s deaccession policy is usually part of its collection policy.

and can be carried out at various stages of a program. words. gender. income. Disposal The formal removal of an item from a museum collection after a deaccessioning decision has been made. An exhibition/display plan could include an interpretation or exhibition/ display policy. practices and procedures in relation to the maintenance of long-term displays. together with ways to remove or reduce these risks. are all useful for museums in planning programs to address the needs and interests of diverse communities. Evaluation Evaluation is a process to assess the merit or value of an activity against particular criteria. disability and special interests. and exhibition proposals. The policy would ideally be much broader than a statement about programs for schools and should incorporate ideas about lifelong learning for all visitors. Doubt can be acknowledged by using qualifying wording such as ‘It is believed that’ or ‘Some people think that’ on labels or in other interpretive information. Doubt Sometimes a museum may not have supporting research or facts to corroborate its interpretation of objects or events. philosophy. Diversity Term used in relation to communities made up of different and varied groups. education level. in respect of current and potential visitors. images. Exhibition/display plan A written plan for the exhibitions and displays a museum will present over a period of time. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. audiovisual techniques and other methods combined to communicate an idea. The plan lists actions to be taken to minimise all risks. supplies and equipment. It includes emergency contacts for assistance. Disposal must occur in accordance with the procedures and conditions outlined in the deaccession policy. Factors such as age. Education kit Information and activities compiled for school or other groups to use in conjunction with a visit to a museum or an exhibition. visitor research is used to assess visitors’ perceptions of the merit of a museum’s programs and services. In the museum context. Using the term circa (or c. so as to inform planning and decision making. Ethics See Code of ethics. practices and procedures in providing programs related to education. Exhibition Objects. Education policy A written statement outlining a museum’s aims. interactive units. or as a learning resource. theme or story for public interest and enjoyment. display plans. 1. for example 3–5 years.Disaster preparedness and response plan A document that identifies potential risks or sources of damage to a museum’s collection and facilities. employment status. cultural background.) with dates is another strategy. to report on and if necessary improve its effectiveness. an exhibition schedule. and actions to be taken in dealing with specific emergency situations. in exhibitions or other programs.1 APPENDIX D: GLOSSARY 84 .

audiences and stakeholders in mind – so it is used as a generic designation in this document. 1. structural materials. outcomes. For museums. See also Members and Volunteer. it facilitates NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. continuation and communication to society of the world’s natural and cultural heritage. Governance The process by which a formal authority. who usually contribute through an independently constituted organisation (such as an incorporated association). actions and affairs of a museum. such as a board. Types of forward plan include: Business plan A plan that outlines an organisation’s goals. Governing body The group of people who are responsible for the policies. Each heritage place has its own fabric or physical material. a museum council. Strategic plan A document produced by an organisation (or a division or department of an organisation) that defines a desired future and the means to bring it about. areas. pathways. INTERPOL Founded as the International Criminal Police Commission. See also Copyright. fittings or fixtures. tangible and intangible’ (source: ICOM website). Image capture See Digitisation. INTERPOL is ‘the world’s largest international police organization. monuments and buildings. such as sites. this type of forward plan guides success in terms of the organisation’s political. to be cared for. with 186 member countries.g. and the demands of a competitive environment. which may include natural elements. to which they pay an annual subscription fee. oversees and directs the policies. trust or board). sub-surface material. social and technological setting. Corporate plan A comprehensive forward plan that covers the whole of the organisation and may incorporate all other plans for its management and development. building interiors. and how those resources will be sourced or developed. the work program and the resources (particularly financial) required to achieve them.1 APPENDIX D: GLOSSARY 85 . priorities and decisions of a museum (e. structures. ICOM The International Council of Museums is ‘the international organisation of museums and museum professionals which is committed to the conservation. functions. financial. Created in 1923. for future generations. present and future. and retained. Heritage places and fabric Places of significance. Intellectual property An intangible asset such as a copyright or patent. surface treatments. The term covers the many different types of such plans that can be developed – with different purposes. landscapes. Friends Supporters of a museum.Forward plan A written plan that sets out what a museum aims to achieve in the future.

cross-border police co-operation. education programs. describing the smallest discrete unit of record material. The loans policy is normally part of a museum’s collection policy. authorities and services whose mission is to prevent or combat international crime’ (source: INTERPOL website). 1. Membership can deliver privileges such as discounts and access to news. accumulated items form a record series. or agencies. information and special events. Modes of interpretation include tours. exhibitions. being portable. appointed or established through a legal process. digital representation data (where appropriate). Metadata usually includes information about the intellectual content of the item.1 APPENDIX D: GLOSSARY 86 . and supports and assists all organizations. Unlike a Friends group. See also Friends and Volunteer. Members Supporters of a museum who contribute through paid subscriptions to a program that is managed by the museum and is intended to encourage interest and involvement in its activities and issues. and security or rights management information. other collecting organisations. collections and places. social media and websites. Moveable heritage may be closely related to the significance of heritage places. publications. In the museum context. Moveable cultural heritage. fashion and use. the term is commonly used with respect to digital collections. artworks and other objects. pictures. is especially vulnerable because it can easily be sold. specimens. Moveable cultural heritage A term used to describe any portable natural or manufactured object of heritage significance. A universal standard for metadata is the Dublin Core. Key collection areas The main types of objects. Legally constituted entity An organisation or governing body that is formed. practices and procedures in relation to inward and outward loans. Item A generic term that covers museum collection items including documents. or borrows from. Metadata Data about data. material or themes that a museum collection focuses on. Master image See Archival image. Loans policy A written statement outlining a museum’s aims. a members group does not exist independently of the museum it is associated with. Loans Items a museum lends to. or information assembled in relation to an item in order to provide access to it. Item is also a specific archival term. Marketing plan A type of written plan that focuses on identifying current and potential audiences and finding strategies to reach and attract them to a museum by addressing their interests and needs. private collectors. Interpretation A process involving both the museum and its visitors in understanding and communicating the meaning and significance of objects. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. artefacts. relocated or thrown away during changes in ownership.

museum. Podcast A method of publishing audio files on the internet so that people can download them onto computers or personal digital audio devices and listen to them whenever they want to. in the activities they do there. Preservation Different professions and organisations use this term in different ways. the art trade. computer terminals or tour guides. cultural heritage. insurance industry. signage. preservation may include transfer to another medium. physical orientation involves finding his or her way around a museum site. Object ID ‘An international standard for describing cultural objects. The purpose of preservation is to study. providing public access. 1. and valuers of art and antiques. practices and procedures in relation to specific activities. maintain an object in an unchanging state. Examples of operational plans include a workforce management plan. Preservation may involve controlling the environment and conditions of use.Museum See Appendix A. moving image and sound. and may include treatment in order to.1 APPENDIX D: GLOSSARY 87 . and public liability and other insurance. brochures. a disaster preparedness and response plan. Operational plan A type of written plan for developing or maintaining the infrastructure a museum needs in order to achieve its potential. people in a place of work. Conceptual orientation is a term used in relation to displays or exhibitions. Museums can help by providing tools such as maps. used in creating and managing a major change in an organisation’s staffing structure. In the case of archival material. (b) All action aimed at safeguarding cultural material for the future. police and customs agencies. record. art trade and art appraisal organisations. with the NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. These issues may affect. or a safe-working plan. as nearly as possible. education and interpretation. Policy A written statement guiding a museum’s aims. cultural material. The Object ID project was initiated by the J. used in managing the activated display of heritage (or contemporary) machinery. or prevent damage to. It has been developed through the collaboration of the museum community. or could potentially affect. Paul Getty Trust in 1993 and the standard was launched in 1997. For the visitor. Occupational health and safety (OH&S) A legal framework identifying and regulating health and safety issues in the workplace. Scotland Yard and Interpol. such as collection management. and addressing issues such as the licensing of operators. Orientation The way visitors find their way around a museum. conservation. retain and restore the culturally significant qualities of an object. where the museum might present key concepts and messages in exhibition text or through other forms of interpretation. or anywhere else they go as part of their work. It is being promoted by major law enforcement agencies. including the FBI. Here are two common definitions: (a) All action taken to slow deterioration of. OH&S. and insurance companies’ (source: Object ID website).

g. demonstrations. or reintegration (repair) using new materials (e. Issues around treatment. See also Replica. infilling holes or areas of loss). disaster preparedness and response. talks.1 APPENDIX D: GLOSSARY 88 . Prop An object – not in itself a collection item – that is used to support or help present collection items in a museum display or exhibition. Promotional methods Methods of promoting a museum and its activities. conservation). Props are not subject to the same considerations as collection items (e. activity sessions. tours. workshops. Reproduction An exact or close imitation of a work of art. or for use or exchange to support the conservation of the formally acquired museum collection.g. display/exhibition. especially on a smaller scale. See also Replica. Reproduction and Resource. while preservation (as per definition (a) above) refers to treatment-based activities. Museums use a range of names for these kinds of adjunct collections. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. public talks. including advertising. See also Conservation and Restoration. transport and use. Procedure An established way to approach or undertake an activity. Note: The terms conservation and preservation are often used interchangeably. as in a publication or document or on an exhibition wall panel (e.g. multimedia. and reformatting/duplication. storage and display are all encompassed within preservation. direct mail. in education programs. Restoration may involve the reassembly of displaced components. and radio or television interviews. integrated pest management (IPM). Preventive conservation involves developing and following policies and procedures in relation to: appropriate environmental conditions. packing. See also Conservation and Preservation. media releases. Examples of props include mannequins and objects intended for visitors to touch or use. handling and maintenance during storage. including on-site and off-site displays and exhibitions. Preventive conservation All action undertaken to prevent the deterioration of cultural material and collections. education or secondary collection Objects that do not meet a museum’s acquisition criteria but are acquired and maintained for use as display props. brochures and flyers. ‘The book contains excellent colour reproductions of Monet’s paintings’). generally two-dimensional.g. Restoration The actions taken to return cultural material (objects) to a known or assumed earlier state. Public programs All the ways a museum communicates with the public. Resource. education or secondary collection. Replica An exact or faithful copy of an object. websites.least possible intervention. publications and events. removal of extraneous matter (such as later additions or concretions). web presence. 1. handling. ‘The ship is an exact replica of the original Golden Hind’). See also Reproduction. performances. listings in local or regional tourism brochures. newspaper articles. The term is usually used in reference to three-dimensional objects (e. This document uses conservation as the overarching term.

1. and training needs. aesthetic. workers. Succession planning is part of managing an organisation’s human resources with the future in mind. in order to identify their strengths. See also Contractor. policy or practice. Succession / succession planning Succession is the act. values or tenets that support an organisation’s specific approach. Significance The historical. remove and/or minimise risks. process or right by which one person succeeds to the office of another. Strategy Plan or technique for achieving set aims or objectives. buildings. areas where they could develop further and/or move into different roles. Workers. and their meanings for communities. Vision statement A written description of what an organisation will be if it succeeds in implementing its strategies and achieves its full potential.Risk assessment The review and identification of all potential hazards. and sources of danger or loss. Strategic plan See Forward plan.1 APPENDIX D: GLOSSARY 89 . It involves evaluating the skills. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. that could affect a museum’s collections. enabling the development of sound and reasoned judgements and statements about the importance of objects and collections. present and future generations. and to deal effectively and responsibly with unforeseen events. visitors. Statement of Purpose A short summary of a museum’s overarching aim. scientific or social values that a museum object or collection has for past. Risk management Having policies and procedures in place to assess. assets and operations. Standard An accepted or approved level of excellence or quality. Underlying philosophy The beliefs. and planning ways to effectively meet these needs should such roles have to be filled by new people. site. Sustainability ‘Forms of progress that meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs’ (source: World Commission on Environment and Development). Significance assessment The process of studying and understanding the meanings and values of a museum object or collection. Staff A group of people employed by an organisation. Skills audit The process of formally identifying the skills and knowledge that workers have. knowledge and personal qualities needed for key roles in management and on governing bodies.

Volunteer policy A written statement guiding a museum’s aims.Volunteer A person who. Workers The personnel of a museum. the future of the collection is secured according to recognised museum ethics and codes of practice. Staff and Volunteer. 1. See also Friends. knowledge. contributes his or her time. See also Contractor. Staff and Workers. rights and responsibilities. training. safety and security. insurance. coordination. mentoring. This type of policy covers activities and issues such as recruitment. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. skills and effort to a museum. without remuneration. part-time or full-time. recognition. practices and procedures for managing volunteers. in the event of the museum’s permanent closure (or ‘winding up’).1 APPENDIX D: GLOSSARY 90 . employed or voluntary (paid or unpaid). ‘Wind-up clause’ A statement in a museum’s constitution or other legal framework to ensure that.

pdf Can be accessed at http://aarts.1 APPENDIX E: RESOURCES 91 ....au/uploads/Print_%26_ Publication. ATSILIRN Protocols (website) Accessible Arts.. Access Audit.artslaw..d... The majority of the resources listed here are freely available online... Australia Council for the Arts. Perth.au/ index0c51.gov.. NSW. 2nd edn.pdf May be available in libraries.. Performing Arts: Protocols for Producing Indigenous Australian Performing Arts.. n. NSW. Accessible Arts.. 2007 Australia Council for the Arts...atsilirn. the Australian setting.au http://www.org http://www.australiacouncil. Condition Reporting and General Conservation Guidelines for Touring Exhibitions. The resources detailed on the following pages have been chosen with accessibility.. 2nd edn..gov. 2007 Where to find it May be available in libraries.au/uploads/Access_Audit... Exhibition Design. Surry Hills...... National Exhibitions Touring Structure for Western Australia.au/resources/accessing-the-arts Can be accessed at http://aarts..APPENdix E ResOURces .d. Accessible Arts.artsaccessaustralia..artonthemove.. pdf NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. n... NSW. Errol J. and can be purchased at http://museumsaustralia. Walsh Bay.. in mind.com.. Accessing the Arts (web page) Accessible Arts. This list of print and online publications.. Vic......com.au/atsilirn/protocols.. NSW... both within Australia and worldwide.au/site/publications.. and URLs have been included.. Walsh Bay. MA.php http://www1. websites and web pages provides complete bibliographic details for the references listed in abbreviated form elsewhere in this document..asn..d.. Accessible Arts...pdf http://www. Museums and Galleries: Obligations in the Age of Digital and Moral Rights (webpage) Australia Council for the Arts.html?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1 Can be accessed at http://aarts.. and can be purchased at http://www..... The URLs are current at the time of publication.. NSW...net.au/UserFiles/File/Skills%20pub %20order%20(GST). 1995 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Library and Information Resource Network (ATSILIRN). pdf http://aarts...... Accessible Arts. North Fitzroy. and the breadth and diversity of our museum sector. Careers in Museums: A Directory.. Print and Publication Guidelines.pdf Can be accessed at http://www..com.. Resource Abasa. Surry Hills...artslaw. Information resources relevant to Australia’s museum sector are available from a wide range of organisations... 1.....au/legal/ Can be accessed at http://www.gov..net.au/uploads/Exhibition_ Design. Allen.. n.aiatsis.australiacouncil. Walsh Bay. Music: Protocols for Producing Indigenous Australian Music..org.. 1992 Arts Access Australia website Arts Law Centre of Australia website Artslaw Centre of Australia. Susan.. Accessible Arts....au/__data/ assets/pdf_file/0016/32353/Performing_arts_protocol_guide..au/__data/ assets/pdf_file/0003/32367/Music_protocol_guide. Australia Council for the Arts.net..net.

2009 Australian Government. 1999 Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). Writing: Protocols for Producing Indigenous Australian Writing. Deductible Gift Recipient Essentials (web page) Australian Government. Burwood. Australia ICOMOS. Water. Special case exception: education. Heritage and the Arts Collecting Cultural Material: principles for best practice. Heritage Laws and Notices (web page) Can be accessed at http://www. 2006 Australian Copyright Council.gov. Information Paper: Can be accessed at http://www. 2006 Census Data by Location (web page) Where to find it Can be accessed at http://www. Strawberry Hills. Department of the Environment.au/nonprofit/pathway.gov. Galleries and Museums: An Introduction to Copyright [Information Sheet G068v05].police. Reduce the Risk of Armed Robbery (web page) Australian Government..abs.aspx http://www. Australia Council for the Arts. Department of the Environment.gov.copyright..pdf Can be accessed at http://www. Canberra. Visual Arts: Protocols for Producing Indigenous Australian Visual Arts.au/__data/ assets/pdf_file/0018/32373/Writing_protocol_guide. NSW.au Can be accessed at: http://www.gov. NSW.copyright.org. NSW.Resource Australia Council for the Arts.pdf http://www. libraries.gov. Richmond. Australian Copyright Council. ACF. 2nd edn.pdf Can be accessed at http://www. Vic. ABS.org.gov. Australia Council for the Arts.au/product. Vic. Carlton. 2007 Australian Federal Police (AFP).org/publications/ charters/ http://www. php?productid=16955 http://www.au/uploads/res/ GreenGallery_final. Burra Charter. Water.arts. asp?pc=001/004/006 http://www. The GreenGallery Guide. 2008 Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF) & Australian Commercial Galleries Association (ACGA).gov.1 APPENDIX E: RESOURCES 92 . Q&As for galleries and museums (web page) Australian Copyright Council. 2nd edn.nsf/ productsbytopic/CDE2F0E77ED2DEDDCA257501000C37E2?Op Towards Comparable Statistics for Cultural enDocument Heritage Organisations. 1. 2007 Australia Council for the Arts. Surry Hills.au/admin/ cms-acc1/_images/18893892484c8dbfeea4241.act. Surry Hills.pdf Can be accessed at http://australia.au/find-an-answer/browse-by-whatyou-do/gallery-museum-curators/ Can be purchased http://shop.gov. collections.au/__data/ assets/pdf_file/0004/32368/Visual_arts_protocol_guide.acfonline.environment.australiacouncil.html NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. ACT.ato.icomos. Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA). ACT.org. Commonwealth of Australia.org.copyright. Canberra.au Australian Bureau of Statistics. Vic. Australian Copyright Council. Australian Taxation Office (ATO).au/heritage/laws/index.australiacouncil.censusdata.abs.. Online Directory (website) Australian Government.au/community-safety/for-actbusinesses/robbery-and-theft/reducing-the-risk-of-armedrobbery. 2007 Australia International Council on Monuments and Sites (Australia ICOMOS). [2008] Australian Copyright Council.au/__data/assets/pdf_ file/0010/89605/hoci-collecting-cultural-material-5may2009. pdf http://www.directory. & ACGA.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.

au/materials/types/ guidelines/view/6582 Can be accessed at http://www.org.org. php?option=com_content&view=article&id=38&Itemid=37 Can be accessed at http://www. Remedies Gone Wrong (webpage) Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS).au http://www. Better Practice Checklists and Guides (web page) Australian Government.pmc.org. Canberra. edn.au/heritage/movable http://www.gov.environment. Preservation Needs Assessment Report Template 2007–2008.au/heritage/ ahc/publications/commission/books/pubs/australian-historicthemes.au NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.gov.gov.au/docs/ AICCMBusinessDocs/CodePracticeEthics. Pathways: Gateway to the AIATSIS Thesauri (website) Australian Museum Audience Research Centre (AMARC).au/docs/ AICCMBusinessDocs/PresNeedsTemplate.aiccm. Canberra.au/index. AICCM. 2008 Australian Heritage Commission. 1.agimo. Canberra.htm http://www. Guidelines for Commissioning Conservation Treatment for Cultural Objects. Department of the Environment.aiatsis. Movable Cultural Heritage (web page) Australian Government. rev. Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.org. Canberra. Freedom of Information (web page) Australian Government.pdf http://www. 2005 Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material (AICCM).aiccm.pdf Can be accessed at http://www.org. AICCM.d.aiccm.au/thesaurus/ http://www. Australian Government.au/foi http://www. Audiences (web page) Australian Pictorial Thesaurus (website) Where to find it http://www. Caring for Your Heritage (web page) Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material (AICCM). Information Management Office (AGIMO).aiccm.aiccm.gov.net. Canberra.au/index.Resource Australian Government.au/practice/delivery/checklists Can be accessed at http://www. Australian Historic Themes: A Framework for Use in Heritage Assessment and Management. Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material (AICCM).1 APPENDIX E: RESOURCES 93 .gov.pdf http://www. n.amonline. AICCM.gov. [2007] Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Materials (AICCM). Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA). 2001 Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material (AICCM) website Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material (AICCM).php?option=com_content&vie w=category&id=3&Itemid=30 http://www1.aiccm.privacy.au/index. National Privacy Principles [Private Sector Information Sheet 1A].gov. Australian Heritage Commission.picturethesaurus. Water. Code of Ethics and Code of Practice.environment.org.au/amarc/research/audiences. Office of the Privacy Commissioner.php?option=com_content&vie w=section&id=8&Itemid=74 Can be accessed at http://www.

Keeping Archives.au http://tourism. & NSW Ministry for the Arts.collectionsaustralia. and can be purchased at http://www. Graham.blueshieldaustralia. Kim.ca/publications/ ccinotes/enotes-pdf/3-2_e. Australian Society of Archivists.gc. Canadian Heritage.edu.ca/publications/ ccinotes/enotes-pdf/10-3_e. Canadian Heritage. 1998 Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI).caval.collectionsaustralia. Detecting Infestations: Facility Inspection procedure and checklist. Roy. Storage and Display Guidelines for Paintings. John & Winkworth. 1.pdf Can be accessed at http://www. Ottawa. Thomas.atdw.uq. Qld. Rowena & Smith. Canadian Heritage. Indoor Display of Industrial Collections.Resource Australian Tourism Data Warehouse (ATDW) (website) Ballantyne.pdf http://hosting.com. Gianna (Queensland University of Technology). Hughes. 2001 Colbert. Mark. London. Karen & Moscardo. Sydney. Capture Your Collections: A Digitisation Course for Remote and Regional Museums and Galleries (website) CAVAL Collaborative Solutions website Clegg. 1998 Collections Australia Network (CAN) website Where to find it http://www.ca/publications/ ccinotes/enotes-pdf/10-13_e.cci-icc.net/capture/ http://www. Willing and Able: Recruiting.org.collectionsaustralia. Communications Canada. Melbourne.au/signage/ May be available in libraries.au/ Can be accessed at http://www. Strategic Planning Manual: National Guidelines for Museums. Ottawa.cci-icc. Eberhard. 1993 Canadian Heritage Information Network & Australian Museums & Galleries Online.net/ NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. NSW Heritage Office.edu.pdf Can be accessed at http://www.collectionsaustralia. and can be purchased at http://www. Ottawa. 2005 Blue Shield Australia (web page) Bowbridge. Clive (eds).gc. Kylie.com. 2008 Black.au Can be accessed at http://www.gc. Pyrmont. Fortitude Valley. Interpretive Signage: Principles and Practice (website) Bettington. Petersen. Loo. Ottawa 1996 Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI).net/sector_ info_item/67 http://www. Graham.cci-icc.gc. 2002 Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI). Jackie. Managing and Retaining Volunteers in Museums and Galleries.magsq.com/books/The-EngagingMuseum-isbn9780415345576 http://www.cci-icc.routledgebusiness. Jennifer. NSW.au/_dbase_upl/ w_a_1-5. The Engaging Museum: Developing Museums for Visitor Involvement.pdf Can be accessed at http://www. Parramatta.pdf Can be accessed at http://www. 3rd edn. Nina & Creyton. MA.net/sector_ info_item/18 Can be accessed at http://www.org. Safe in the Shed: Caring for Historic Farm Machinery. Galleries and Keeping Places.ca/publications/ ccinotes/enotes-pdf/15-4_e.1 APPENDIX E: RESOURCES 94 . MA (Qld) & Regional Galleries Association of Queensland. Basic Handling of Paintings.au/onlinestore/publicationshardcopy/keeping-archive-3rd-edition May be available in libraries. Graham. Routledge. 1993 Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI).archivists. NSW.

au/ standards+and+guidelines. Vic. Principles for Creating and Managing Digital Heritage Collections. Pymble.uk/index. Engaging Your Audience in Social Media – Blogs. General Website Standards (web page) Collections Australia Network (CAN). 2005 Where to find it http://www.org. 2009 Collections Council of Australia (CCA).com. HarperCollins Australia. 2007 Collections Council of Australia (CCA).au/publications/books/b123. Wikis and Podcasts Explained (web page) Collections Australia Network (CAN). 2007 Collins Australian Internet-Linked Dictionary.collectionscouncil. Strawberry Hills. 6th edn. Accessibility for websites (webpage) Collections Australia Network (CAN). Version 3. 1. 2008 & ongoing Collections Trust. Lawrie.collectionsaustralia.org.Resource Collections Australia Network (CAN). Heritage Artefacts – Hands On. Cambridge. Standards And Guidelines: an Edirectory.net/sector_info_item/108 May be available in libraries.%20July%202009.htm NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. Scienceworks.1 APPENDIX E: RESOURCES 95 .collectionsaustralia.%20Version%20 3. Adelaide.net/sector_info_item/33 Can be accessed at http://www. 2010 Collections Trust. Australian Copyright Council.net.collectionscouncil. Adelaide. Hands Off? Activating Heritage Artefacts – The Conservation and Safety Issues. Margaret Harrison. Galleries and Museums: A Copyright Guide – a Practical Guide. 1993 Dakin.org.aspx Can be accessed at: http://www. Spectrum: The UK Museum Documentation Standard.collectionslink.com..collectionstrust.net/sector_info_item/30 http://www.collectionsaustralia. CAN.net/sector_info_item/32 http://www. Helen. Collections Council of Australia. Digital Standards Bibliography. Hallett.collectionscouncil.com.uk/ spectrum May be available in libraries Can be accessed at http://www. Collections Council of Australia.au/ Portals/0/Digital%20standards%20bibliography. Cataloguing Objects Collections Trust.assetDisplay/title/Cataloguing%20Objects%20% 20/assetId/164 Can be accessed at http://www. Spotswood. Adelaide.collectionsaustralia. and can be purchased at http://www. Andrew (eds). 3rd edn.net/sector_info_item/29 http://www. NSW.net/sector_info_item/98 http://www.collectionsaustralia. Martin & Grant.au/sector_info_item/28 http://www.pdf http://www. Copyright and Intellectual Property (web page) Collections Australia Network (CAN).pdf Can be accessed at http://www.collectionsaustralia. 2004 Conole.collectionsaustralia. cfm?ct=assets. Museum Documentation Association.au/ Portals/0/Principles%20for%20creating%20and%20managing% 20digital%20heritage%20collections. Thesauri and Vocabularies for Cataloguing (web page) Collections Australia Network (CAN). Strategies and Planning: How to Maximise Your Online Presence (web page) Collections Australia Network (CAN). London. Tools for Building Websites (web page) Collections Council of Australia.0. NSW. SA.net/sector_info_item/95 http://www.collectionsaustralia.copyright.

Canberra. Annandale. Developing Museum Exhibitions for Lifelong Learning. Arts Victoria. Stationery Office. Canberra.au/content/Public/ Research_and_Resources/Visitor_Research_Made_Easy.collectionsaustralia. A Checklist for Planning a Regional Gallery. Tourism with Integrity: Best Practice Strategies for Cultural and Heritage Organisations in the Tourism Industry. Lanham.au/evrsig/projects.federationpress. Orange. Lynn D. sector_info_item/13 DCITA. George E. Susan (eds). 1999 Department of Environment. rev.net/sector_info_item/20 Can be accessed at http://www.au/bookstore/book.museumsaustralia.au/__data/assets/ pdf_file/0011/12035/cgp-guide-june09.collectionsaustralia. Information Technology and the Arts (DCITA). Cultural Gifts Program Guide: DEWHA. NSW.net/sector_ info_item/71 Can be accessed at http://www.vic. Learning in the Museum.pdf Can be accessed at http://www.shtml?com mand=Search&db=^DB/CATALOG.org.. Building up an Emergency Plan: A Guide for Museums. Canberra. Collections Australia Network User Manual.collectionsaustralia. 2007 Fishel. asp?isbn=9781862876897 http://www3. CAN. and can be purchased at http://www. 2006 Dorge.com/Catalog/SingleBook.arts. 2002 NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.db&eqSKUdata=0759109761 May be available in libraries. Altamira Press.arts. Sharron.1 APPENDIX E: RESOURCES 96 . Irma.routledge. RGANSW.org.edu.net/sector_ info_item/7 Can be accessed at http://www. John H. Alan Sisley. Dierking.au/03/u3a Can be accessed at http://www.griffith.nsw. In Principle.amol. Profiling Your Visitors: A Collaborative Initiative for Australian Cultural Institutions.. Gail (ed.com/books/Learning-in-the-Museumisbn9780415097765 Can be accessed at http://discover. and can be purchased at http://www. Canberra. html (will be moving in the near future to the main Museums Australia website: http://www. Maryland.gov. CAN.altamirapress. The Book of the Board: Effective Governance for Non-profit Organisations. MA.au/client_ images/404023. 1996 Evaluation & Visitor Research Special Interest Group (EVRSIG) website Evaluation & Visitor Research Special Interest Group (EVRSIG) & Museums Australia (MA). cfm?ct=assets.amol. David.gov. Museum Meanings. Federation Press. NSW. 2000 Hein.). Learning Innovations Series.net/ Heritage Collections Council (HCC).assetDisplay/title/Building%20an%20Emergency %20Plan%3A%20A%20Guide%20for%20Museums/assetId/479 May be available in libraries http://archive.org. Galleries and Exhibition Spaces. Sydney. U3A Online: A Virtual University of the Third Age (website) Havlicek.pdf May be available in libraries. 2005 Dickman. 1999 Durbin. DCITA. 2004 Falk.. Routledge. 2nd edn. Sydney.Resource Department of Communications. and can be purchased at http://www. South Melbourne.au) May be available in libraries.rpg. Getty Conservation Institute. 2008 Griffith University. Richard. in Practice: Museums as Learning Institutions. rev. Water. edn.uk/index.au/evrsig Can be accessed at http://archive. Guidelines for Environmental Control in Cultural Institutions. Heritage & the Arts (DEWHA).aspx Can be accessed at http://www.org. & Foutz.collectionsaustralia. 2005 Heathcote. London. 1998 Where to find it Can be accessed at http://www. 1. Visitor Research Made Easy for Museums. 2009 Dewhurst. Vic.com. Valerie and Jones.collectionslink.gov. London. Los Angeles. Planning and Implementing a Collection Management System (CMS). Basil.

WA.htm Can be accessed at http://www. 2008 History Trust of South Australia (HTSA). Emily & Kenyon. University of Melbourne. Still images: Managing your digital resources (webpage) Jones.icac. American Association of Museums.au/readingroom/ bestpracticeforartistsandpubliclyfundedgalleries Can be accessed at http://www. Fighting the Illicit Traffic of Cultural Property (web page) International Council of Museums (ICOM). & Museums Australia (NSW). 2000 Jones.museum http://archives.1 APPENDIX E: RESOURCES 97 . Shar.net.icom.au/SHARE_REPORT_ 2007_email_RGB. Best Practice for Artists and Publicly Funded Galleries [draft for public comment]. & Museums Australia (WA).Resource Heritage Collections Council (HCC). 1.html Can be accessed at http://icom.visualarts.ntwa.sa.gov. ICOM Code of Ethics for Museums.uk/stillimages/advice/basicguidelines-for-image-capture-and-optimisation/ http://www. 2007 Where to find it Can be accessed at http://www.aspx?Product_ code=I277 Can be accessed at http://www. 2007 Hudson. Excellence and Equity: Education and the Public Dimension of Museums. Canberra. Museum Studies Unit. Andrew T.au/preventing-corruption/knowingyour-risks/cash-handling/4909 http://icom. ICOM.nsw. 2005 Hollister.pdf NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.gov.au/disability_rights/ standards/www_3/www_3.museum/illicit_traffic. World Wide Web Access: Disability Discrimination Act Advisory Notes.). Ellen Cochran (ed.aam-us.ac. University of Sydney. 141]. 2002 Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC). International Council of Museums (ICOM). Paris. & MA. NSW. Potts Point. Melbourne. Canberra. Washington DC. 2006 Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission (HREOC). HREOC.ssrn. Northbridge. 1998 Hirzy.uk/stillimages/docs/category/ managing-your-digital-resources/ May be available in libraries Can be accessed at http://www. Sydney. reCollections: Caring for Collections across Australia.net/sector_ info_item/3 May be available in libraries. Basic Guidelines for image capture (webpage) JISC Digital Media.html http://www. rev.jiscdigitalmedia. Shar (ed.au http://www. Adelaide. Melbourne Law School. Community.org/Purchase/ProductDetail.gov.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.au/history/ about_us/collections_policy. edn. Cash Handling (web page) International Council of Museums (ICOM) website.pdf http://www. HTSA. Culture and Place: A Local Government Handbook for Museums. Copyright and Cultural Institutions: Short Guidelines for Digitisation [Legal Studies Research Paper no. Virginia.museum/code2006_eng.history. DCITA. Collections Management Policy – April 2001.asn.).. Sharing Our Stories: Guidelines for Heritage Interpretation. National Trust of Australia (WA). NAVA. and can be purchased at http://iweb.interpol.interpretationaustralia.com/abstract=881700 Can be accessed at http://www.hreoc. West Perth. Sydney.int http://www. 2006 INTERPOL website Interpretation Australia website JISC Digital Media.com.collectionsaustralia.

net. n. & National Museum of Australia.pdf Can be accessed at http://www. Energised.netsvictoria.mla.net.uk/what/raising_ standards/improvement/~/media/Files/pdf/2004/access_for_ all_toolkit. ‘Access for All’ Toolkit: Enabling Inclusion for Museums. Where to find it http://www. Perth. Canberra.au/p/643033/solid-safe-secure. 2002 Landman. Margaret. Canberra. Landman.au/Uploads/ Documents/2593/knowledge-quest.au/ Portals/0/Summit%20Working%20Papers_8%20AugustFinal.visualarts. ‘Bibliography of Digital Standards’. NAVA. Caroline.australianmuseum. Peta & Tonkin. Sydney.pdf NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.pdf Can be accessed at http://www. Canberra. Australian Council of National Trusts.html Can be accessed at http://www. Peta. and can be purchased at http://www. 2001 Moore. Sara. Sydney.gov. Risk Management Fact Sheet. 1999 Mellor.artonthemove.1 APPENDIX E: RESOURCES 98 . Fortitude Valley. Everywhere: Older Australians and Museums.au/UserFiles/File/Skills%20pub %20order%20(GST). Improving Access to Heritage Buildings: A Practical Guide to Meeting the Needs of People with Disabilities.au/heritage/ ahc/publications/commission/books/pubs/improving-accessheritage-buildings. Travelling Exhibitions: A Practical Handbook for Metropolitan and Regional Galleries and Museums.pdf May be available in libraries. Eric. Learn about the Getty Vocabularies (web page) Kelly. Art on the Move. 2004 Kelly. Lynda. Doreen & Janke. 2006. Savage. 1998 Museum & Gallery Services Queensland (M&GSQ). M&GSQ. National Exhibitions Touring Support (NETS) Victoria.gov. Australian Museum. Safe. Melbourne. Ted. [2002] Kelly.edu/research/conducting_research/ vocabularies Can be accessed at http://australianmuseum. 2005 Lang. Museums. in Summit on Digital Collections: Working Papers. Paul Getty Trust.ashx May be available in libraries. Adelaide. NSW. & Australian Heritage Commission.au/_dbase_upl/fact_ sheet_risk.com.com. Claire. Susan. 41–52 Martin. Fishburn. Respecting Culture: Protocols for Working with the Australian Indigenous Visual Arts and Craft Sector. Libraries and Archives. Gillian. Engaged. Susan. Lynda & Tonkin. & National Museum of Australia. 2004 Ling. Kiersten.environment. pp.org/publications/ Can be accessed at http://www. 1.naa. Knowledge Quest: Australian Families Visit Museums. CCA. Purpose: An Australian Regional Gallery and Venue Development Guide. Terri. National Archives of Australia.pdf Can be accessed at http://www. Secure: Building Archives Repositories in Australia.collectionscouncil. Savage.au/ Uploads/Documents/2595/many-voices. Potts Point. Libraries and Archives Council.au/ Uploads/Documents/2591/fullreport.getty. 2nd edn.au/advicecentre/ valuing-art-respecting-culture May be available in libraries. 1998 McClelland. Lynda. Solid. Qld.gov. Gillian.pdf Can be accessed at: http://www. Australian Museum.net. Valuing Art. Susan.australianmuseum. and can be purchased at http://eshop. Australian Museum. Griffin. Sydney. Kelly.Resource J. Janette & Tonkin.pdf Can be accessed at http://magsq.net.com. Many Voices Making Choices: Museum Audiences with Disabilities. Canberra. Canberra. Birmingham. & National Museum of Australia. and can be purchased at http://www.d.

d. Woolloomooloo.au/docs/ justbecause.pdf Can be accessed at http://mgnsw. M&G NSW.pdf Can be accessed at http://mgnsw. NSW. Cataloguing [Fact Sheet]. Museums & Galleries NSW (M&G NSW). & NSW Heritage Office.au/uploaded/Cataloguin g%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf Can be accessed at: http://mgnsw. Museums & Galleries NSW (M&G NSW).pdf Can be accessed at: http://mgnsw.heritage. n. 2005 Museums & Galleries NSW (M&G NSW).gov.org. M&G NSW.org. NSW.org. Just because It’s Old: Museums and Galleries in Heritage Buildings. NSW. Acquisition and Numbering [Fact Sheet].com/ pdf/publications/phm-thesaurus-sept09. General Tips on Good Handling Techniques. Powerhouse Museum Object Name Thesaurus. Woolloomooloo.d. Parramatta. 1.org. Woolloomooloo. Woolloomooloo.au/uploaded/resources/ Fact%20Sheets/Preventative%20Conservation/FS_Handling_ Techniques. Haymarket. n.au/uploaded/ Cleaning%20Regime. Volunteer Succession Planning: Skills Audit.d. Risk Management and School Excursions [Fact Sheet]. NSW. Introduction to Access [Fact Sheet].1 APPENDIX E: RESOURCES 99 . 2007 Museums & Galleries NSW (M&G NSW) Loans M&G NSW Woolloomooloo. 2007 Museums & Galleries NSW (M&G NSW).pdf Can be accessed at http://mgnsw.pdf Can be accessed at http://mgnsw.au/uploaded/Acquistion %20Fact%20Sheet. M&G NSW. Where to find it Can be accessed at: http://www. Woolloomooloo. NSW.pdf Can be accessed at: http://mgnsw. 2008 Museums & Galleries NSW (M&G NSW). NSW.au/uploaded/Introductio n%20to%20Access. M&G NSW. 2009 Museums & Galleries Foundation of NSW & NSW Heritage Office.au/uploaded/resources/ Fact%20Sheets/Collection%20Management/Loans. House Keeping in Your Museum or Gallery [Fact Sheet].powerhousemuseum. NSW. M&G NSW. NSW Museums & Galleries NSW (M&G NSW). NSW. Woolloomooloo. M&G NSW. Woolloomooloo. NSW. Woolloomooloo. NSW.org. Boxmaking [Fact sheet].org.nsw. Condition Reports [Fact Sheet]. 2001 Museums & Galleries NSW (M&G NSW).PDF NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. n. Museums & Galleries Foundation of NSW.org.org.au/uploaded/ VolunteerSuccessionPlanning.pdf Can be accessed at: http://mgnsw. Museums & Galleries NSW (M&G NSW). 2005 Museums & Galleries NSW (M&G NSW).Resource Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences.pdf Can be accessed at: http://www. Woolloomooloo.au/uploaded/ ConditionReports. Woolloomooloo.pdf Can be accessed at: http://mgnsw.pdf Can be accessed at: http://mgnsw.org.pdf Can be accessed at http://mgnsw. Woolloomooloo. Cleaning Regime [Fact Sheet]. M&G NSW.au/uploaded/ VolunteerAudit. M&GNSW.au/uploaded/Box%20 Making%20Fact%20Sheet. Woolloomooloo. M&G NSW.au/uploaded/ RiskManagement. NSW.org. Trustees of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences.d.org. Volunteer Succession Planning: A Practical Guide [Fact Sheet].au/uploaded/ Housekeeping%20Fact%20Sheet.d. n.org. 2004 Museums & Galleries NSW (M&G NSW). NSW.pdf Can be accessed at: http://mgnsw. M&G NSW. n. M&GNSW. NSW. Museums & Galleries NSW (M&GNSW).

museumsaustralia.au/services/smallmuseums-cataloguing-manual Can be accessed at http://www.mavic. The effects of storage and display materials on museum objects. 2000 Museums Australia (Queensland) (MA (Qld)). Canberra..pdf May be available in libraries.org. A Plain English Guide to Previous Possessions. Small Museums Cataloguing Manual. Taking the Time: Museums and Galleries. What Is a Museum? (web page) Museums Australia (MA).au/site/publications. Ongoing Responsibilities: Principles and Guidelines for Australian Museums Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage. 2009 Museums Galleries Scotland (MGS).asn. MA.org.au/ userfiles/file/Policies/glama.collectionsaustralia.au/site/what_is_a_museum. 2002 Museums Australia (MA). Vic. MA. Carlton South.org. Fitzroy. MA. 1999 Museums Australia (MA). MA.au/ userfiles/file/Policies/culturaldiv. Edinburg. Vic.collectionsaustralia.net/sector_ info_item/17 Can be accessed at http://www.museumsaustralia.museumsaustralia. 1. 1998 Museums Australia (MA). Canberra.php Can be accessed at http://www. MA. MGS.org.org. Women’s Policy for Museum Programs and Practice.pdf Can be accessed at http://www. 1998 Museums Australia (MA). 2002 Museums Australia (MA).assetDisplay/title/The%20effects%20 of%20storage%20and%20display%20materials%20on%20 museum%20objects/assetId/119 NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.asn.org..au/ userfiles/file/Policies/women.org. Museums and Sustainability: Guidelines for Policy and Practice in Museums and Galleries. Qld. Canberra. and can be purchased at http://www.net/sector_ info_item/25 Can be accessed at http://www. Code of Ethics for Art. Galleries and Keeping Places. 2000 Museums Australia (MA). History and Science Museums.collectionslink.museumsaustralia. Gay and Lesbian Policy Guidelines for Museum Programs and Practice. Developing a Conservation Plan for Community Museums.Resource Museums Australia (MA). MA. Vic.uk/ index. Vic.pdf Can be accessed at http://www. Cultural Protocols and Communities – a Resource Guide. Cultural Diversity Policy.au/assets/MA_ Conservation_Plan.cfm?ct=assets. Museum Methods: A Practical Manual for Managing Small Museums and Galleries.org.org. MA.museumsaustralia. 2nd edn.museumsaustralia. Canberra. Canberra. 2006 Museums Australia (Victoria) (MA (Vic)). 1998 Museums Australia (Victoria) (MA (Vic)).pdf Can be accessed at http://www. Continuous Cultures.au/site/ page21. Fortitude Valley. Caring for Our Culture: National Guidelines for Museums.. [1996] Museums Australia (MA). MA. php Can be accessed at http://www. 4th edition.1 APPENDIX E: RESOURCES 100 . MA (Vic).au/ userfiles/file/Policies/sustainability. Canberra. New Obligations.pdf Can be accessed at http://mavic. 2009 Where to find it Can be accessed at http://www. MA.au/ userfiles/file/Policies/ccor_final_feb_05. 2nd edn.php Can be accessed at http://www.pdf May be available in libraries http://www. MA (Qld). Carlton South.museumsaustralia. North Fitzroy. Canberra.museumsaustralia. 2005 Museums Australia (MA).

html Can be accessed at http://www. Washington DC. 2008 National Archives of Australia (NAA).visualarts.uk/ index. 2007 National Association for the Visual Arts (NAVA).com. MGS. Conserve-o-gram Preservation of Museum Collections. NAVA.au/digital/care_handling.ourcommunity. 2004 National Association for the Visual Arts (NAVA).jsp NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.heritage.lib.pdf May be available in libraries.museum/object-id/ http://www. Edinburg.icom. Committees and Governance Centre (web page) Where to find it Can be accessed at http://www. Martin et al. Preservation Needs Assessment Surveys (web page) National Library of Australia (NLA). 1. Edinburgh.nla. NSW. Boards. Objects in Their Place: An Introduction to Movable Heritage.collectionslink.nla.edu.Resource Museums Galleries Scotland (MGS).gov.gov.collectionslink.pdf Can be accessed at http://naa. MGS.nps. National Parks Service.assetDisplay/title/What%20is%20 environmental%20monitoring%3F/assetId/120 Can be accessed at http://epress. Washington DC.nps.au/sites/default/ files/BPAPFG_040509_0. NAVA. NSW. Sydney NSW. What is environmental monitoring?.org. & NSW Ministry for the Arts. cfm?ct=assets. 1999 Object ID website Our Community. Canberra.cfm?ct=assets.net. National Parks Service. 2nd edn. NLA. 2009 Museums Galleries Scotland (MGS). 2004 National Parks Service. Sydney.pdf Can be accessed at http://www.gov.gov/history/museum/ publications/conserveogram/18-02. 2004 National Parks Service Museum Handbook Part I Chapter 7 Museum Collection Storage. NAA. Conserve-o-gram Safe Plastics and fabrics for Exhibit and storage. How to Develop a Recordkeeping Policy.au/Images/recordkeeping%2 0policy%5B1%5D_tcm2-4809. Best Practice for Artists and Publicly Funded Galleries.gov/history/museum/ publications/conserveogram/01-01.au/docs/ objectsinplace. The Code of Practice for the Australian Visual Arts and Craft Sector.au/shop/publications/codeofpractice fortheaustralianvisualartsandcraftsector2ndedition Can be accessed at https://www. Parramatta. NAA.assetDisplay/title/Advice%20Sheet:%20What%20 is%20collection%20care%3F/assetId/116 Can be accessed at http://www.gov. Canberra.pdf Can be accessed at http://www.pdf Can be accessed at http://www.naa. Preserving Australia’s Documentary Heritage: A Starter Kit for Community Groups.visualarts.au/dspace/ bitstream/handle/2100/809/Aug%2023%20Final%20Report. Washington DC.nsw. National Parks Service. and can be purchased at http://www. Care and Handling Guidelines for Digitisation of Library Materials (webpage) National Library of Australia (NLA).html http://www.gov.gov.uts. Sydney.gov/history/museum/ publications/MHI/CHAP7.net. Potts Point. 1993 National Parks Service. Australian Indigenous Digital Collections: First Generation Issues. and can be purchased at http://eshop.pdf Can be accessed at http://www.pdf http://archives. 2009 National Library of Australia.pdf http://www.au May be available in libraries.au/boards/boards_main.nps. Canberra. What is Collections Care?. 2004 National Archives of Australia (NAA).1 APPENDIX E: RESOURCES 101 . 1999 NSW Heritage Office.au/services/ starterkitcommunity.org. 2009 Nakata.nla. NSW Heritage Office.uk/index.au/chg/assess. Keep It for the Future! How to Set up Small Community Archives..

NSW. Adelaide. and can be purchased at http://www.org/files/ MW319B8NLZ/Carry%20Out%20Business%20Planning.environment.comlaw.au/catalogue/shopexd. Kylie Significance 2. Archives and Libraries. Canberra. 1. Conservation Resources (webpage) Powerhouse Museum Products and Suppliers List. Guide for Meetings and Organisations. 2003 Reynolds.org. 2002 Resource: The Council for Museums.ohaa. London. MA (Vic). Nicholas. Port Adelaide. 2005 Renton. Commonwealth of Australia.collectionslink.pdf Can be accessed at http://www.php May be available in libraries.pdf NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. 2007 Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act 1986 (Cwlth) http://www. vol.thomson.mavic.powerhousemuseum. Parramatta. Kate. NSW.nsw. Simpsons Solicitors. John & Movable Heritage Reference movable. Archives and Libraries: A Practical Guide. Roslyn & Winkworth. Guide for Meetings and Organisations. SA.au/servlet/Web?s=3309033&act ion=downloadResource&resourceID=1127111427 May be available in libraries. 8th edn. and can be purchased at http://www. Sydney. Just a Tick: A Best Practice Survival Guide for Committees and Boards of Management.heritage.volunteeringsa. Regional Arts Australia. 2004 May be available in libraries. 2000 Powerhouse Museum.. Lawbook Company.net. NSW Heritage Office. Inspiring Learning for All.com/pdf/ preservation/products_and_suppliers.0: A Guide to Assessing the Significance of Collections. Exhibitions: A Practical Guide for Small Museums and Galleries. Carlton South. 2005 Resource: The Council for Museums. Guide for Voluntary Associations.powerhousemuseum.inspiringlearningforall. Shane. Guide for Meetings. Beth M. 2007 Russell. vol. nsf/0/4AE22E1FA6EB2EE8CA256FB9002265F2/$file/ ProtecMovCultHer86WD02.org..uk/ Can be accessed at http://www. Security in Museums. Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences. 2. Resource. Unley.Resource Where to find it Can be accessed at http://www. 2006 Rouette.au/wp-content/ uploads/chapter-1-types-of-institutional-structures. ACT. Archives and Libraries. and can be purchased at http://www. Resource.au/exhibitions_book Can be accessed at http://www.asp?id=295 Regional Arts Australia (RAA). Establishing a Legal Structure [draft chapter for Museum Law.com. London. au/ComLaw/Legislation/ActCompilation1.volunteeringaustralia. Sydney.assetDisplay/title/Security%20in%20Museums% 2C%20Archives%20and%20Libraries%3A%20A%20Practical%20 Guide/assetId/332/fileDownload/true May be available in libraries. Volunteering SA. Creative Volunteering: Carry Out Business Planning. cfm?ct=assets. Movable Heritage Principles. 1. 5th edn. Sydney. asp?id=299 Can be accessed at http://www. Oral History Association of Australia (South Australian Branch).au/docs/info_ Petersen.pdf May be available in libraries.gov.au/heritage/ publications/significance2-0/ Can be accessed at http://www.thomsonreuters. 1999 Robertson.asn. 2009 Simpson. Nicholas.pdf Can be accessed at http://www.au/catalogue/shopexd.simpsons.com. Oral History Handbook.uk/index.gov.pdf Group. & NSW Ministry for the Arts. Lawbook Company.au/publications.com/collection/ preservation/?page_id=3 Can be accessed at http://www.gov. 8th edn.1 APPENDIX E: RESOURCES 102 . 2003 Renton. Sydney. and can be purchased at http://www. Georgia. 2nd edn].com.gov. Haymarket. and can be purchased at http://www. Vic.

com/shop/Script/ Details. Wellington. Standards Australia.simpsons. AS 4122-2000: General Conditions of Contract for Engagement of Consultants.d.au/documents/ museums/museumlaw/the_board. NSW.pdf Can be accessed at http://www. and can be purchased at http://shop.simpsons.com.1 / Amdt 1/2007-11-13: Document Management – Electronic Document File Format for Long-Term Preservation.asp?DocN=stds000012497 Can be purchased at http://www.net/sector_ info_item/2 http://www. Sydney. Sydney. Butterworth-Heinemann. Simpsons Solicitors. Sydney. Simpsons Solicitors.gov.uk/products/manual-ofhousekeeping/236 http://www. Victorian Public Libraries (website) Where to find it Can be accessed at http://www. 1. 2nd edn].saiglobal. 1994 Standards Australia.standards.org. Glossary of Terms (web page) Standards Australia website Standards Australia.au/heritage/glossary.environment.saiglobal. AS ISO 15489-2004: Records Management Set.saiglobal.pdf Can be accessed at http://www. 2004 Simpsons Solicitors. Canberra. Part 1: Use of PDF 1. Online Resources: Museums and Galleries (web page) Söderlund Consulting.au/online-resources/online-library/ museums-galleries/ Can be accessed at http://www.collectionsaustralia. AS 4121-1994: Code of Ethics and Procedures for the Selection of Consultants. html#language http://www.htm NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V. AS ISO 19005. 2000 Standards Australia. Be Prepared: Guidelines for Small Museums for Writing a Disaster Preparedness Plan.au/downloads/Victorias_Virtual_ Library_Digital_Collection/manual.com/shop/Script/ Details. Oxford.pdf http://www. 2004 Staniforth. Homebush. & Standards New Zealand.saiglobal. Standards Australia.com/shop/Script/ Details.sa. 2004 Standards Australia.asp?DocN=AS0733759041AT May be available in libraries. Standards Australia. Standards Australia. Insurance. AS/NZS 4360:2004: Risk Management. Department for Environment and Heritage. Simpsons Solicitors. 2007 Standards Australia & Standards New Zealand.com/shop/Script/ Details. Simpsons Solicitors.asp?DocN=AS539054883337 Can be purchased at http://www.vic. Simpsons Solicitors. n.com/shop/script/ Details.au Can be purchased at http://www.com. Shane. DCITA. The Museum Board [draft chapter for Museum Law. Sydney. Sarah.nationaltrust. et al.org.d. 2006 Swinburne Library Information Systems (SLIS). Sydney. n.simpsons.au/wp-content/ uploads/duty-of-care-to-public. Standards Australia International. The Duty of Care to the Public.simpsons.gov. Sydney. Image Digitisation of Local History Collections.1 APPENDIX E: RESOURCES 103 .libraries.com.com.Resource Simpson.4 (PDF/A-1).asp?DocN=AS0733784178AT Can be purchased at http://www.saiglobal.. 2000 South Australian Government. The National Trust Manual of Housekeeping: The Care of Collections in Historic Houses Open to the Public.au/wp-content/ uploads/39-insurance.asp?DocN=AS965342895372 Can be accessed at http://www. Sydney.

2nd edn. 2001 Volunteering Australia. Neridah.org/images/0013/ 001300/130071e.pdf Can be accessed at http://www. Volunteering Australia.net/sector_ info_item/15 Can be accessed at http://mgnsw.org.au/uploaded/resources/ Staff%20Papers/Culturally_Diverse_Audience_Development.org. Australia Council. 2001 Where to find it http://www. Kylie & Museums & Galleries NSW (M&G NSW). M&G NSW. au/uploaded/resources/Staff%20Papers/Culturally_Diverse_ Audience_Development.ac.Accessibility (webpage) Volunteering Australia website Volunteering Australia. Sharron.org/html/s02_article/article_ view. Volunteering Australia.org/WAI http://www.au http://www.volunteeringaustralia.pdf Can be accessed at http://mgnsw. Woolloomooloo.w3.asp?id=124&nav_cat_id=163&nav_top_id=61 Can be accessed at http://www.w3. Surry Hills. National Standards for Involving Volunteers in Not-for-Profit Organisations. Culturally Diverse Audience Development: Issues and Practical Strategies. 2003 Webb.volunteeringaustralia. NSW.au/uploaded/Collection %20Policy%20Template.pdf Can be accessed at http://unesdoc. Guidelines for the Preservation of Digital Heritage. 2006 WorkSafe Victoria website World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).unesco. Significant Events: A Museums and Galleries Training Program.Good Practice Guide for Developers of Cultural Heritage Web services. NSW.au/ publications/order_publication?a=33609 Will be available in the near future at: http://mgnsw. 1999 Yin-Lo. Wyatt-Spratt.org. Kylie & Dickman.1 APPENDIX E: RESOURCES 104 . 2001 Winkworth.org/TR/WCAG20 Can be accessed at http://www.australiacouncil. 2006 Winkworth.ukoln. Melbourne. Kylie & Museums & Galleries NSW (M&G NSW). Model Code of Practice for Organisations Involving Volunteer Staff [Information Sheet]. NSW. Woolloomooloo. 2003 Winkworth.uk/interop-focus/gpg/Accessibility/ http://www. Woolloomooloo. NSW.org Can be accessed at http://www. Qld.Resource UKOLN.collectionsaustralia. Running the Risk? Risk Management Tool for Volunteer Involving Organisations.volunteeringaustralia.volunteeringaustralia. pdf/uploaded/Collection%20Policy%20Notes. MA (Qld) & RGAQ Fortitude Valley. Cheryle.org/files/ A9V142T7RU/Running%20the%20Risk.0 (web page) Wyatt-Spratt. Access All Areas: Guidelines for Marketing the Arts to People with Disabilities. Pam & Haley. M&G NSW.pdf http://www. Colin. UNESCO. and can be purchased at http://www. pdf May be available in libraries. Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2. ‘Rethinking the Collection’: M&G NSW Collection Policy Explanatory Notes [Fact Sheet].worksafe.pdf NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V.vic. Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) (web page) World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). 1. Melbourne.gov. 2005 Volunteering Australia. Paris.gov. Jane. Collection Policy Template [Fact Sheet]. Melbourne.org/ files/7GHOWN9C10/VA%20Model%20Code%20June%202005. Volunteering Australia. M&G NSW.

. ideas and information? Please contact the National Standards Taskforce representative in your state or territory.. Training & Professional Development Museum & Gallery Services Queensland http://www.mavic.. Sector Development Museums & Galleries NSW http://mgnsw...ning..au South Australia Amanda James Senior Community History Officer History Trust of South Australia http://www. Development Service Western Australian Museum http://www....tas....com and join the National Standards for Australian Museums and Galleries Group http://manexus..com. New South Wales Sarah-Jane Rennie Manager..au Victoria Megan Cardamone Manager... Museum Accreditation Program Museums Australia (Victoria) http://www......au APPENDIX F PROVIDE FEEDBACK NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES – V..com/group/NSFAMG Keen to help keep the Standards relevant and current by contributing your feedback.wa......... Would you like to start or join discussions about the Standards with others in the museum sector? Sign up to http://manexus.........au Queensland Ann Baillie Manager.museum..gov...ning. 1....gov.....asn.au Tasmania Veronica Macno Curator....arts...org..magsq.....history........gov....au Western Australia Clare-Frances Craig Manager.....1 APPENDIX F: PROVIDE FEEDBACK 105 . Roving Curator Program Arts Tasmania http://www.........sa.