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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 130
SENATE REPORT
NATION PAGE 6
CAP STAYS
UNBEATEN
SPORTS PAGE 11
GARDEN SMALL:
FRUIT IN A POT
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 19
BENGHAZI ATTACK WAS PREVENTABLE
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With changes to the state’s fund-
ing formula for public schools
intended to give more money to
districts with high numbers of
economically disadvantaged,
English-learners or foster chil-
dren, some local districts are con-
cerned it will hit their schools’
budgets hard.
This is mostly true for school
districts funded by local property
taxes, called basic aid, say some
school officials. The South San
Francisco Unified School District
is afraid it will be one such loser.
The district could be set back $5
million to $8 million this year
with the new formula, said Trustee
Philip Weise.
“We’ve been in contact with
Worry grows
about school
funding plan
Millions could be taken away
from county’s basic aid districts
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The possible sale of six
Daughters of Charity Health
System hospitals has local offi-
cials cautiously optimistic about
the future of Daly City and coast-
side facilities that provide a large
piece of the county’s health care to
the indigent and residents further
away from the main medical cen-
ter.
But with news of the proposed
sale barely announced this week,
Potential hospital sale has
officials in holding pattern
County promised $11.5 million for
seismic retrofit for Daly City facility
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Foster City will be narrowing in
Thursday night on a plan to devel-
op 66 affordable senior housing
units if the Planning Commission
approves the nonprofit MidPen
Housing Corporation’s use permit
and environmental impact report
for its portion of the Foster Square
site.
The city sold off its remainder of
the long-vacant 15-acre site near
City Hall last November to the
blanket developer the New Home
Company for $30 million with the
condition that a senior housing
complex would be constructed.
The site will be distributed
piecemeal to different developers
and eventually turned into 200 for-
sale condos, about 134 to 155
assisted living units, 66 afford-
able senior housing units, retail
space and parking structure at the
site adjacent to City Hall.
At the time of the sale, the EIR
for the General Plan was approved.
The Planning Commission has
since determined that the specifics
for MidPen’s proposal are consis-
tent with the original EIR and do
not require further review, said
Community Development
Director Curtis Banks. MidPen
will now begin the process of
securing financing.
The City Council urged
MidPen’s development to take
precedence and undergo an expedi-
Foster City to speed affordable housing plan
Developer progressing with senior housing on city’s 15-acre site
SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL
Interim Community Development Director Rory Walsh, Councilman David Lim, Mayor Robert Ross and Interim
City Manager Larry Patterson discuss a recently released audit report of the city of San Mateo’s Community
Development Department.
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo’s self-imposed audit
of its Community Development
Department culminated with the
release of a report that revealed
struggles with a thinly stretched
staff, poor communication and
uneven service for those looking
to conduct business with the city.
The City Council will review the
265-page report prepared by
Zucker Systems to assess imple-
mentation tactics during a study
session Feb. 18.
Some of the 224 recommenda-
tions the council will consider
include overall departmental struc-
tural changes, establishing meas-
urable performance standards,
integrating new technologies,
implementing changes to the
building and planning divisions,
recruiting staff for vacant and new
positions and remodeling the
front counter to be more hos-
pitable to the public.
“These recommendations pro-
vide a road map for making
improvements to the Community
Development Department that will
improve customer service, lead to
better communication with the
community and enhance collabo-
ration between departments,”
Mayor Robert Ross said in a press
release.
After a breakdown in staff and
council communication that land-
ed the city entangled in a lawsuit
over the opening of a 7-Eleven in
a residential neighborhood, offi-
cials opted to undergo an inde-
pendent management audit of the
department in September.
Community Development
includes planning, code enforce-
ment, building and neighborhood
improvement and housing divi-
sions.
The recession brought a lack of
business to the department and the
city having to tighten its belt by
cutting 17 staff positions, said
Audit reveals city struggles
Officials reveal strategies to improve Community Development Department
Rendering of Foster City’s Foster Square site.
See HOUSING, Page 8
See AUDIT, Page 20 See SETON, Page 20
See MONEY, Page 8
Ohio woman offers beer,
smokes as lost dog reward
DAYTON, Ohio — An Ohio woman
made fliers offering a case of beer and a
pack of cigarettes as a reward for find-
ing her lost dog — and it worked.
Twenty-three-year-old Abigail Miller
of Dayton offered the unusual reward
after her two dogs escaped through an
open gate on Jan. 2.
She found one of them at a local ani-
mal shelter a few days later, but the
other, a Husky named Zoro, remained
missing.
The Dayton Daily News reports that
Miller came up the reward because she
could afford it and figured it would
attract attention.
She was right. The man who called
and told Miller where to find her dog
turned down the reward, but she says
she’s going to offer him some food
from the sandwich shop where she
works.
Upland razes tent
city populated by homeless
UPLAND — Acity in San Bernardino
County has bulldozed a tent city that
had been populated by several dozen
homeless people for about nine
months.
The Sun newspaper reports crews
worked Tuesday to clear tents, blan-
kets, chairs from the nearly five-acre
site.
Upland obtained a temporary
restraining order last week, allowing
city officials to give a 72-hour notice
to evict the group. The city said the
camp had grown to more than 100 peo-
ple and nearby businesses claimed it
was a public nuisance.
Jeff Zwack, Uplands’ development
services director, says the city had to
intervene as the property is tied up in
bankruptcy proceedings, and there is
no clear owner.
Local church leaders say they believe
Upland is trying to push the homeless
problem out of the city rather than find-
ing a solution.
Rare tortoises
branded to curb poaching
LOS ANGELES — Southern
California conservationists are carving
up the beautiful golden shells of rare
tortoises to protect them from poach-
ers.
The ploughshare tortoise is on the
brink of extinction after decades of
intense collecting, hunting and habitat
destruction. Anonprofit turtle center in
Ventura County is engraving 2-inch-
high identification codes on the backs
of the animals so that they can be easi-
ly identified if sold on the international
black market.
“It’s heartbreaking that it’s come to
this but it’s the right thing to do,” Paul
Gibbons, managing director of the
Turtle Conservancy’s Behler
Chelonian Center, told the Los Angeles
Times.
Two turtles flown in from Taiwan were
marked Tuesday. They were seized there
in 2008 and the female laid eggs in
November. The eggs are being incubat-
ed, but it’s unclear whether they are fer-
tile, Gibbons said.
The center hopes to mark all 360
ploughshares in captive breeding pro-
grams around the world and 300 in the
wild.
The shells of two confiscated
ploughshares were engraved at the
Singapore Zoo in December.
So far, no marked tortoises have
shown up in illegal markets.
The engraving lasts for the life of the
tortoise, which is roughly 160 years.
The ploughshare is the world’s rarest
tortoise and each one can sell for tens
of thousands of dollars on the Asian
black market, conservationists said.
Dozens of other turtle and tortoise
species also are endangered.
In October, the Turtle Conservancy
helped mark the shells of 150 Burmese
star tortoises in Myanmar.
Last week, more than 8,000 pig-
nosed turtles were found hidden in suit-
cases at an Indonesian airport. They
were believed headed for China and
Singapore.
In December authorities at a Thai air-
port checking unclaimed luggage arriv-
ing from Bangladesh discovered 432
protected tortoises and 52 black pond
turtles, valued at about $110,000.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Singer Sade is 55.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1944
During World War II, Gen. Dwight D.
Eisenhower formally assumed com-
mand of the Allied Expeditionary
Forces in London.
“Goodwill is the only asset that
competition cannot undersell or destroy.”
— Marshall Field, department store founder (1834-1906)
Talk show host Dr.
Laura Schlessinger
is 67.
Model Kate Moss
is 40.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Carly,a papillon,performs agility tricks during a news conference to announce the line up for the 138th Westminster Kennel
Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden in Manhattan.
Thursday: Sunny. Highs around 70. East
winds 10 to 20 mph... Becoming north-
east 5 to 10 mph in the afternoon.
Thursday night: Clear. Lows in the mid
40s to lower 50s. East winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s to
lower 70s. East winds 10 to 15 mph
decreasing to around 5 mph in the after-
noon.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the mid 40s to lower
50s. Northeast winds around 5 mph.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
Saturday night through Sunday night: Partly cloudy.
Lows in the upper 40s. Highs in the mid 60s.
Martin Luther King Jr. Day through Tuesday:
Mostly clear. Highs in the mid 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1547, Ivan IV of Russia (popularly known as “Ivan the
Terrible”) was crowned Czar.
I n 1883, the U.S. Civil Service Commission was estab-
lished.
I n 1920, Prohibition began in the United States as the
18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution took effect, one
year to the day after its ratification. (It was later repealed by
the 21st Amendment.)
I n 1935, fugitive gangster Fred Barker and his mother,
Kate “Ma” Barker, were killed in a shootout with the FBI at
Lake Weir, Fla.
I n 1942, actress Carole Lombard, 33, her mother Elizabeth
and 20 other people were killed when their plane crashed
near Las Vegas, Nev., while en route to California from a
war-bond promotion tour.
I n 1957, three B-52’s took off from Castle Air Force Base
in California on the first non-stop, round-the-world flight
by jet planes, which lasted 45 hours and 19 minutes.
I n 1964, the musical “Hello, Dolly!” opened on Broadway,
beginning a run of 2,844 performances.
I n 1969, two manned Soviet Soyuz spaceships became the
first vehicles to dock in space and transfer personnel.
I n 1978, NASA named 35 candidates to fly on the space
shuttle, including Sally K. Ride, who became America’s first
woman in space, and Guion S. Bluford Jr., who became
America’s first black astronaut in space.
I n 1989, three days of rioting began in Miami when a
police officer fatally shot Clement Lloyd, a black motorcy-
clist, causing a crash that also claimed the life of Lloyd’s
passenger, Allan Blanchard. (The officer, William Lozano,
was convicted of manslaughter, but then was acquitted in a
retrial.)
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
UNWED GLADE DAINTY PICKUP
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: Sales at the abacus store were —
ADDING UP
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NURGT
ALOGT
TINISS
HEFRAT
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Hot Shot, No.
3,in first place;Gorgeous George,No.8,in second
place; and Gold Rush, No. 1, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:41.294.
0 5 2
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Mega number
Jan. 14 Mega Millions
7 8 9 24 29 25
Powerball
Jan. 15 Powerball
2 3 7 16 35
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
0 7 1 9
Daily Four
5 5 9
Daily three evening
9 21 34 43 46 21
Mega number
Jan. 15 Super Lotto Plus
Author William Kennedy is 86. Author-editor Norman
Podhoretz is 84. Opera singer Marilyn Horne is 80. Hall of
Fame auto racer A.J. Foyt is 79. Singer Barbara Lynn is 72.
Country singer Ronnie Milsap is 71. Country singer Jim
Stafford is 70. Movie director John Carpenter is 66. Actress-
dancer-choreographer Debbie Allen is 64. Rock musician Paul
Webb (Talk Talk) is 52. Rhythm-and-blues singer Maxine
Jones (En Vogue) is 48. Actor David Chokachi is 46. Actor
Richard T. Jones is 42. Actress Josie Davis is 41. Rock musi-
cian Nick Valensi (The Strokes) is 33.
3
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
2
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Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal
Foster City
Vandalism. A large “M” was painted on a
green PG&E box at the intersection of Shell
and Metro Center boulevards before 12:53
p.m. Monday, Jan. 13.
Burglary. A laptop and three bottles of
wine were taken from a vehicle on Compass
Lane before 8:54 a.m. Monday, Jan. 13.
Grand theft. A catalytic converter worth
$4,000 was taken from woman’s SUV on
Castor Street before 1:47p.m. Tuesday, Jan.
10.
Vandalism. Graffiti was reported on the a
boathouse on Shell Boulevard before 2:28
p.m. Monday, Jan. 6.
Vandalism. The front and rear bumpers of a
vehicle were keyed on Meridian Bay Lane
before 11:02 a.m. Monday, Jan. 6.
REDWOOD CITY
Suspi ci ous person. A person reported
hearing noises that sounded like someone
breaking into his vehicle on Hopkins
Avenue before 5:07 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 14.
Burglary. The driver’s side rear window of a
car was smashed and a purse was taken that
had four passports on Sycamore Court
before 8:01 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 14.
Suspi ci ous person. A few people were
reportedly ringing the doorbell of a home on
Newport Circle before 12:36 p.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 14.
Police reports
SLRobbed
ANikon Camera was reported stolen on
El Camino Real in Redwood City before
1:52 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 4.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
ASan Carlos PetSmart worker and her hus-
band are in the legal doghouse after alleged-
ly using dog owners’ boarding services as a
way to gauge when they would be away vaca-
tioning and their vacant homes prime tar-
gets for burglary.
Prosecutors say Ashley Kirk and Juan
Ortega-Ramos, both 24 and of San Jose,
used the scheme several times to steal elec-
tronics, jewelry and cars including a
Porsche from a Portola Valley home. Kirk,
who worked in the store’s PetsHotel board-
ing service department, would figure out
when the dog owners were on vacation and
pass on the information to Ortega-Ramos
who would commit the robberies, according
to Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman Rebecca
Rosenblatt.
Authorities arrested the
pair, then dating, in
September 2013 after the
silver Porsche 991S
found in the 1100 block
of Shoreway Road in
Belmont traced back to a
vehicle stolen earlier that
day. That home on
Hillbrook Drive in
Portola Valley had also
been burglarized.
The couple bailed out but was arrested
again Monday on $500,000 warrants on
suspicion of several other burglaries after
sheriff’s investigators spent five months
looking at just how far the crime spree
extended, Rosenblatt said.
Ultimately, the couple were linked to bur-
glaries in Foster City, Portola Valley,
Woodside and Redwood City.
Both Kirk and Ortega-Ramos each pleaded
not guilty Tuesday to
eight counts of residen-
tial burglary, one count of
possessing stolen prop-
erty, two counts of car
theft and being Norteño
gangmembers. The cou-
ple also asked for court-
appointed attorneys and
did not waive their right
to a speedy prosecution.
They return to court Jan.
28 for a preliminary hearing and remain in
custody on $500,000 bail.
If convicted, they face about 15 years
prison, said District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
DA says PetSmart vacation
calendar used for burglaries
Ashley Kirk Juan
Ortega-Ramos
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Administrators in the San Mateo Union
High School District are seeing a 5 percent
raise this year.
At a meeting Monday night, the district
voted unanimously to give administrators a 5
percent raise for this school year, costing
$363,500. The 5 percent amount coincides
with the raise teachers’ received in October
2013 since the district follows a “Me Too”
funding model, said Kirk Black, associate
superintendent of human resources and
administrative services. The district employs
about 60 confidential workers and classified
management, which include directors, prin-
cipals, assistant superintendents and others.
“We’re in a position where we can afford
to increase their pay,” said board President
Linda Lees-Dwyer. “They’re hard working
and do a really good job. We have strong
administrators.”
The “Me Too” model, Black said, is effi-
cient since there is less time spent bargain-
ing, but there’s less flexibility for salaries
this way.
Back in October 2013, the district voted
4-1 to give teachers a 5 percent raise for this
school year, costing $2,367,500. The
negotiations started at the end of the last
school year, but the San Mateo Union High
School District Teachers Association and
the district decided to postpone the talks
until the state’s new Local Control Funding
Formula was clearer since this would affect
the district’s budget.
Administrators received a 2 percent raise
last year, Black said.
San Mateo Union High School District administrators get 5 percent raise
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Four homes burglarized in San Bruno
San Bruno police responded to a string of
four home burglaries from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m.
and in each case, police determined there was
forced entry in the rear of the homes that were
ransacked.
Numerous items were reported missing
including laptops and jewelry. In one case, a
firearm was stolen, according to police.
The first crime was reported 3 p.m. on the
1400 block of Crestwood Drive. The second
was reported at 3:04 p.m. on the 2500 block
of Evergreen Drive. The third was reported at
3:23 p.m. on the 500 block of Madison
Avenue and the fourth was reported at 9 p.m.
on the 100 block of Madison Avenue, accord-
ing to police.
Anyone with information pertaining to
this investigation is urged to contact the San
Bruno Police Department at (650) 616-7100
or sbpdtipline@sanbruno.ca.gov.
Information regarding these cases can be
left anonymously.
Pacifica police seek man
suspected of fatal hit-and-run crash
Police are asking for the public’s help in
tracking down a suspect who fatally struck a
pedestrian in Pacifica Tuesday evening.
Officers responded to a report of a vehicle
vs. pedestrian crash in the first block of
Palmetto Avenue at about 7:40 p.m., police
said. Police said the reporting party informed
dispatch that the vehicle involved in the inci-
dent fled the scene.
When officers arrived, a man around 50
years old was found in the road. The victim,
whose name has not yet been released, was
pronounced dead at the scene.
The suspect vehicle is only described as
gray or dark colored, possibly a Monte
Carlo, Charger or similar type car. It was last
seen heading north on Palmetto Avenue,
police said.
Anyone with information about the crash
is asked to call (650) 738-7314 or anony-
mously at (650) 359-4444.
New flu deaths reported in Napa,
Contra Costa and Monterey counties
The death toll from this year’s flu season
continued to rise Wednesday with reports
from health officials of three new flu-related
deaths in the Bay Area and two in Monterey
County.
The recent reports brought the total number
of flu-related deaths reported in the Bay Area
to 21, most of them linked to the H1N1 strain
of the virus, also known as the “swine flu.”
That figure is probably low, however,
because the California Department of Health
only requires hospitals to report deaths of
patients under 65 years old.
Napa County reported its first confirmed flu-
related death today, an 84-year-old man with
multiple medical issues, according to county
spokeswoman Elizabeth Emmett.
San Francisco mayor calls for end of
Sunday parking meter enforcement
Ayear after San Francisco began activating
city parking meters on Sundays, Mayor Ed
Lee said Wednesday that he wants to scrap the
program.
Lee will formally announce his desire to
abolish Sunday parking meter enforcement
during his State of the City address on Friday
morning. “I was never a big fan of metering
people on Sundays,” the mayor said.
He said the proposal came about as a way to
bring in money for the Muni system, which
was badly underfunded.
“We’re figuring our way out of that, so why
not stop nickel-and-diming people on
Sundays?” Lee said.
He noted that a city transportation task
force has come up with some other revenue-
generating plans, including asking voters to
approve a transportation bond measure that
would appear on the November ballot.
He said his office has gotten constant com-
plaints about the Sunday metering since
enforcement began on Jan. 27, 2013.
“It hasn’t stopped, it hasn’t ended since the
day the city and Muni imposed it,” Lee said.
“People are still not used to it.”
Police, CHP look for missing man
The California Highway Patrol and Daly
City police are searching for an elderly at-
risk man who was last seen at his Daly City
home at about 8 p.m. Tuesday.
CHP Officer Kevin Bartlett said Daly City
police have issued an alert and are asking
anyone who might have seen 71-year-old
Ishwar Patel to call police.
Patel is described as an Indian man with
black hair and dark eyes. He is about 5 feet 6
inches tall and weighs about 180 pounds.
Patel suffers from a medical condition and
may be disoriented, Bartlett said. Anyone
who comes into contact with Patel is asked to
call police at (650) 991-8119.
Local briefs
5
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
STATE GOVERNMENT
• State Sen. Jerry Hi l l , D-
San Mat eo, introduced
Wednesday legislation that
would require the Cal i f orni a
Publ i c Ut i l i t i e s
Commi s s i on to consider the
safety records of natural gas and
electricity companies when set-
ting customer rates and developing regulations.
Hill’s legislation, Senat e Bi l l 900, would also
require the CPUC to consider safety in developing regu-
lations, require the CPUC’s Saf et y and
Enforcement Di vi s i on to examine and report on a
utility’s safety performance whenever a utility asks for
a rate increase, require the Safety and Enforcement
Division to assess whether the utility effectively ana-
lyzed safety when developing a proposal for a rate
increase and require the CPUC to consult with agencies
such as the state fire marshal and the Bui l di ng
Standards Commi ssi on in making new regulations
about new energy technology placed on homes and
businesses, according to Hill’s office.
REGIONAL GOVERNMENT
• The San Mat eo Count y Transport at i on
Authori ty, which manages local transportation tax
funds created by Measure A, unanimously elected
Karyl Mat sumot o as chair of its board of directors.
Matsumoto is the SamTrans Board representative and
the mayor of South San Francisco.
David Canepa was unanimously elected vice-chair
of the TA board. He is the mayor of Daly City.
Matsumoto and Canepa were elected at the TA board
meeting Jan. 9.
The TA board is comprised of seven individuals. Two
members on the body represent the San Mat eo
County Board of Supervi sors, four members geo-
graphically represent cities from San Mateo County and
one member represents SamTrans.
By Jonathan Fahey
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Solar panel installer
SolarCity is turning to retail
investors for cash. The company said
Wednesday that it plans to sell securi-
ties directly to individuals and others
interested in investing in its rooftop
solar systems.
The move is a novel way for the San
Mateo company to finance the enor-
mous cost of installing panels on
thousands of roofs — a typical resi-
dential system costs $25,000 —
while appealing to retail investors
who are on the hunt for better rates of
return than they can find in savings
accounts and government bonds.
The securities will likely be similar
to bonds or certificates of deposit. But
instead of being backed by SolarCity,
they would be backed by hundreds or
thousands of contracts with rooftop
solar customers. Wall Street has long
created such products, called securiti-
zations, which bundle assets such as
mortgages or other loans into securi-
ties that can then be bought and sold.
Now SolarCity wants to offer its
own version through its website.
SolarCity Corp. CEO Lyndon Rive
said in an interview that he expects
the company will offer several types
of products that investors could hold
for different lengths of time, or even
trade. He expects eventually to raise
“billions” of dollars this way.
“We are constantly asked, ‘When are
you coming to my state?’ or ‘When are
you coming to our country?’ People
everywhere want to participate in this
transformation,” says Rive. “With our
investment platform, even if we can’t
put panels on everyone’s roof today,
we can still give many of them an
opportunity to participate in solar’s
growth.”
SolarCity said Wednesday that it has
purchased privately held financial
technology company Common Assets
LLC to provide the investment plat-
form. SolarCity shares rose $2.85 or
4.4 percent, to $68.40 in trading
Wednesday afternoon.
SolarCity pays to install and main-
tain rooftop solar systems for homes
or businesses in exchange for month-
ly payments for the power that the
panels produce. The company has
raised money to pay for these systems
several different ways.
SolarCity turns to retail investors for cash
SolarCity pays to install and maintain rooftop solar systems for homes or businesses
in exchange for monthly payments for the power that the panels produce.
By Juliet WIlliams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — California offi-
cials sought Wednesday to reassure
congressional Republicans that the
state will be able to match billions of
dollars in federal funding for the state’s
high-speed rail project, including a
$180 million payment due in April.
Funding for the $68 billion bullet
train system is in legal limbo after two
court rulings last year, one of which
prevented the state from selling $8.6
billion in bonds that it had intended to
use to pay its share of the project. The
federal government has awarded $3.5
billion in grants to the project, includ-
ing $2.5 billion in federal stimulus
money, which requires a dollar-for-dol-
lar match and must be spent by 2017.
Rep. Jeff Denham, a Republican from
the Central Valley, called Wednesday’s
hearing of the House Subcommittee on
Railroads, Pipelines and Hazardous
Materials to investigate whether the
federal government should continue
funding the project while California’s
money is tied up. Denham, who has
sought to block further funding, noted
that the omnibus budget bill Congress
was to begin voting on Wednesday
contains no money for high-speed rail.
“It’s clear that the federal govern-
ment will not be the source of more
funding,” he said at the hearing, which
was held in Washington and carried
live online. Denham said he would
introduce legislation this week seek-
ing to suspend any further federal pay-
ments for California’s high-speed rail
project.
California to owe feds $180M for high-speed rail
6
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Report: Recidivism fell
before prison realignment
SACRAMENTO — California’s
recidivism rate dropped in the
years before Gov. Jerry Brown’s
realignment law took effect, even
though six of every 10 offenders
returned to prison, the corrections
department said in a report released
Wednesday.
The report said 61 percent of
felons released between July 2008
and June 2009 committed new
crimes within three years.
High as that might be, it was
down from 67 percent for inmates
released in 2005 and 2006, when
California had one of the nation’s
highest recidivism rates.
Corrections officials could not
say how the latest rate compares
with other states, but Corrections
Secretary Jeff Beard called the
decline encouraging.
Under realignment, which took
effect in October 2011, the state
began keeping lower-level offend-
ers in county jails instead of send-
ing them to state prisons. The
move came in response to a federal
court order to reduce prison over-
crowding.
Researchers said that change did
not significantly affect the new
report because it tracked offenders
released before realignment. Beard
said in a statement that he is confi-
dent rates will continue to decline
as the state and counties spend
more money on rehabilitation pro-
grams.
Court: Feds can target
California pot clinics
SAN FRANCISCO — An appeals
court has ruled that California med-
ical marijuana dispensaries have no
protection under state law from fed-
eral drug prosecutions.
The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals ruled Wednesday that
California’s law allowing marijua-
na use with a doctor’s recommenda-
tion doesn’t shield dispensaries,
their landlords and customers from
criminal charges and government
lawsuits. All uses of marijuana are
illegal under federal law, even in
states that have legalized pot.
The ruling upholds three lower
court rulings and follows previous
decisions by federal appeals courts
and the U.S. Supreme Court.
By Kimberly Dozier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Both highly
critical and bipartisan, a Senate
report declared Wednesday that the
deadly assault on the American
diplomatic compound in
Benghazi, Libya, could have been
prevented. The account spreads
blame among the State
Department, the military and U.S.
intelligence for missing what now
seem like obvious warning signs.
For the first time in the much-
politicized aftermath, the report
also points at Ambassador Chris
Stevens, who was killed in the
attack. It says that the State
Department ended a deal with the
military to have a special opera-
tions team provide extra security
in Libya, and that Stevens twice
refused an offer to reinstate the
team in the weeks before the Sept.
11, 2012, attack.
The military also takes criticism
in the report for failing to respond
more quickly on the night of the
assault.
On the 11th anniversary of the
9/11 terror attacks in the U.S.,
armed militants stormed the diplo-
matic outpost in Benghazi, set-
ting the building on fire. Stevens,
information technology special-
ist Sean Smith, and CIA security
contractors Tyrone Woods and
Glen Doherty, both former Navy
SEALs, were killed over the course
of two battles that night.
Stevens died of smoke inhala-
tion after he was taken to a “safe
room” in the besieged compound.
The Obama administration first
described the assault as a sponta-
neous mob protest of an anti-
Islamic, American-made video.
Such a protest did occur at the U.S.
Embassy in Cairo earlier that day.
Republican critics say the admin-
istration was reluctant to deal pub-
licly with a terror attack weeks
before the presidential election.
Officials corrected their descrip-
tion days after the attack, but by
then it had become a hot political
issue that has continued to dog the
administration.
On that issue, the report dives
into the contentious initial talk-
ing points issued by the intelli-
gence community, which helped
fuel Republican allegations of an
Obama administration cover-up of
militant links to the violence.
“Intelligence analysts inaccu-
rately referred to the presence of a
protest at the U.S. mission facili-
ty before the attack based on open
source information and limited
intelligence, but without suffi-
cient intelligence or eyewitness
statements to corroborate that
assertion,” the report said, adding
that U.S. intelligence then took
too long to correct the error.
The senators also take the
administration to task for failing
to bring the attackers to justice
more than a year later. They say
the U.S. has identified several
individuals responsible but can’t
capture them because of limited
intelligence capabilities in the
region and limited cooperation by
local governments.
Intelligence Committee
Chairman Dianne Feinstein, a
Democrat, said she hoped the
report would put to rest conspiracy
theories about the attacks.
Republican Vice Chairman
Saxby Chambliss said the report
showed that despite a deteriorat-
ing security situation in
Benghazi, the U.S. government
did not do enough to prevent the
attacks or to protect the diplomat-
ic facility. And Republican com-
mittee member Susan Collins of
Maine called on the administra-
tion to punish those responsible.
“A broken system overseen by
senior leadership contributed to
the vulnerability of U.S. diplo-
mats ... in one of the most danger-
ous cities in the world,” she said
in the report. “And yet the secre-
tary of state has not held anyone
responsible for the system’s fail-
ings.”
U.S. intelligence ultimately
blamed the violence on militants
who overran the temporary U.S.
mission and, hours later, fired
mortars at the nearby CIA annex
where the Americans had taken
shelter.
Senate panel: Benghazi
attack was preventable
Around the state
“A broken system overseen by senior leadership contributed to the
vulnerability of U.S. diplomats ... in one of the most dangerous cities in the world. ...
And yet the secretary of state has not held anyone responsible for the system’s failings.”
—Republican committee member Susan Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — California home
prices rose in December while
tight inventories kept a lid on
sales, a research firm reported
Wednesday.
The median sales price for new
and existing houses and condo-
miniums was $365,000 last
month, up 1.4 percent from
$360,000 in November and up
22.1 percent from $299,000 a
year ago, San Diego-based
DataQuick said.
It was the 22nd straight month
of annual gains, including the last
13 months with gains above 20
percent.
There were 34,949 homes sold,
up 4.5 percent from November but
down 12.1 percent from the year-
ago period. It was the lowest
December tally in six years.
Price increases have cooled
somewhat after a torrid run during
the first half of 2013 but higher
prices have failed to lure many
potential sellers from the side-
lines, limiting choices for buyers
and further driving up prices.
The state had a 3.6-month sup-
ply of unsold single-family
homes in November, more than
the three-month supply a year ear-
lier but still far below the five- to
seven-month supply that is con-
sidered normal, according to the
latest figures from the California
Association of Realtors.
In the San Francisco Bay Area,
the median sales price was
$548,500 in December, down 0.3
percent from $550,000 in
November but up 23.9 percent
from $442,750 a year earlier,
DataQuick said.
Prices in the nine-county region
have held steady since summer,
but December marked the 21st
straight month of annual increas-
es and 14th straight month of
annual increases above 20 per-
cent.
There were 6,714 homes sold in
the region, up 0.8 percent from
November but down 12.7 from
December 2012. Sales typically
increase from November to
December.
California home prices rise in December, sales sag
NATION 7
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever been
entrusted to make
final arrangements
for a funeral?
Those of you
who’ve had this
experience know
that important decisions are required and
must be made in a timely manner. The next
of kin is many times required to search for
information about the deceased which may
not be easily accessible, and must answer
questions without the time to think things
out. Even though your Funeral Director is
trained to guide you every step of the way, it
is still best for you to be prepared with the
proper information if the need should arise.
Ask your Funeral Director what info is
needed before you meet with him/her.
Making funeral arrangements can be very
simple, or can become difficult at times if
you are not prepared. A good Funeral
Director is experienced in leading you with
the necessary requirements, and will offer
details that you may not have thought about
or previously considered as an option.
Allowing him/her to guide you will make
the arrangements go by quickly and easily.
A number of items should be considered
in preparation for the future:
1. Talk to your loved ones about the
inevitable. Give them an indication on what
your wishes are regarding the type of funeral
you want, burial or cremation, etc., and ask
them their feelings about plans for their own
funeral. This is only conversation, but it is
an important topic which will help break the
ice and prevent any type of confusion when
the time comes.
2. Talk to your Funeral Director. Write
down a list of questions and make a phone
call to your Funeral Director asking how to
be prepared. He/she will gladly provide
detailed information and can mail this
information to you for your reference.
Asking questions doesn’t cost anything and
will help you with being organized.
3. Make an appointment and Pre-plan a
Funeral. Many more people are following
through with this step by making Pre-Need
Arrangements. Completing arrangements
ahead of time makes this process more
relaxed, and putting these details behind you
will take a weight off your shoulders. Your
wishes will be finalized and kept on file at
the Mortuary. Your Funeral Director will
even help you set aside funding now as to
cover costs at the time of death. Families
who meet with us at the CHAPEL OF THE
HIGHLANDS are grateful for the chance to
make Pre-Need Arrangements. With their
final details in place it helps to make matters
more calming for surviving loved-ones.
4. Enjoy Life. There are those who dwell
on situations that can’t be controlled.
Taking time to stop and look around at
beauty in the world and appreciate good
things can be therapeutic. If you need to use
a negative statement, try re-wording it into a
positive. Change “I had a lousy day today”
into “Today was demanding, but it made me
appreciate my better days.” As the song
goes: “Accentuate the positive; Eliminate
the negative; Latch on to the affirmative.”
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Accentuating The Positive
Can Eliminate The Negative
Watch PenTV: Comcast 26 · Astound 27 · AT&T U-verse 99
Streaming Online at www.pentv.tv
Peninsula Television is a registered 501c3 organization.
Peninsula Television
Serving San Mateo County since 1999
Newest Episodes:
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The peninsula’s natural resources
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By Andrew Taylor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A $1.1 trillion spend-
ing bill for operating the government until
just before next fall’s election steamed
through the battle-weary House on
Wednesday over tepid protests from tea
party conservatives, driven by a bipartisan
desire to restore painful cuts in domestic and
defense programs and show disaffected vot-
ers that Congress can do its job.
The bill swept through the House on a
359-67 vote and was on track for a big
Senate vote by week’s end. Republicans
voted for the bill by a 2 1/2-1 margin, and
just three Democrats were opposed.
The measure funds virtually every agency
of government and contains compromises
on almost every one of its 1,582 pages. It
covers the one-third of government spend-
ing subject to annual decisions by Congress
and the White House, programs that have
absorbed the brunt of budget cuts racked up
since Republicans reclaimed control of the
House three years ago.
Excluded are the giant benefit programs
like Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and
food stamps that run on autopilot and are
increasingly driving the government deeper
into debt.
Tea party Republicans, chastened after
sparking a 16-day partial shutdown of the
government in October in a kamikaze
attempt to derail President Barack Obama’s
health care law, appeared resigned to the
bill.
“I don’t think there’s going to be a lot of
opposition,” one tea party leader, Rep. Raul
Labrador, R-Idaho, said before the vote.
“The die has been cast for the next year on
budget fights.”
To buy time for the Senate debate,
Congress on Wednesday sent President
Barack Obama a three-day funding bill in
time to avert a scheduled shutdown at mid-
night. The Senate cleared that measure by an
86-14 vote and Obama quickly signed it into
law.
The bill increases core agency spending
by $26 billion over the fiscal 2013 year that
began Oct. 1, after last year’s automatic
spending cuts took them to $986 billion.
But it’s $31 billion less than Congress
passed last March before automatic cuts
known as sequestration took effect.
The Pentagon faces a tight squeeze even as
it avoids what would have been another $20
billion wave of automatic cuts. The
Pentagon’s core budget is basically frozen at
$487 billion after most accounts absorbed
an 8 percent automatic cut last year. Adding
$6 billion to Obama’s war request provides
some relief to readiness accounts, however,
though active duty troop levels would still
be cut by 40,000 to 1.36 million. It includes
$85 billion for overseas military opera-
tions, a slight cut from last year.
Domestic programs generally fare better
and are kept, on average, at levels agreed to
last year before the automatic cuts of 5 per-
cent kicked in across the board. Those
broadly applied cuts, called sequestration,
were triggered by Washington’s inability to
follow up a 2011 budget deal with additional
deficit savings.
House passes $1.1T bill to fund government
By Sean Murphy and Brady McCombs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OKLAHOMA CITY — In less than a
month, two federal judges have struck
down state bans on gay marriage for the
same reason, concluding that they violate
the Constitution’s promise of equal treat-
ment under the law.
Although that idea has been the heart
of the gay marriage debate for years, the
deci si ons i n deepl y conservat i ve
Oklahoma and Utah offer new momen-
t um for l i t i gant s pressi ng t he same
argument in dozens of other cases
across the country. And experts say the
rulings could represent an emergi ng
legal consensus that will carry the issue
back to the Supreme Court.
The judge who issued Tuesday’s decision
in Oklahoma “isn’t stepping out on his
own,” said Douglas NeJaime, a professor
of law at the University of California,
Irvine. “He’s doing what a colleague in
another court did not long ago.”
The more judges who issue such rulings,
the more authority other judges feel to
render similar decisions, said NeJaime,
who expects decisions soon from federal
courts in Virginia and Pennsylvania.
An attorney for the plaintiffs in the
Oklahoma case said the most important
question is whether the Supreme Court
agrees to decide the legality of gay mar-
riage bans now or whether the justices
bide their time.
Gay marriage rulings in Oklahoma, Utah build momentum
REUTERS
U.S. House Speaker John Boehner, center, returns to his office after a vote on the House floor
to approve a spending bill.
LOCAL/WORLD 8
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Egyptian election official says turnout high
CAIRO — Egypt’s top election official declared
Wednesday that turnout was high in a national referendum,
but a boycott by a wider-than-expected range of ultra-con-
servative Islamists raised the prospects of continued
polarization.
The majority of Egyptians who converged at the polls
appeared to support the charter, which was likely to pass
in voting Tuesday and Wednesday amid an intense media
campaign in its favor and a tight security grip silencing
its opponents. The interim government was seeking a
high turnout as a mandate for its vision of the country’s
future.
The constitution is a key piece of a political roadmap
toward new elections for a president and a test of public
opinion about the coup that removed Islamist President
Mohammed Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood from
power last July. It is a heavily amended version of a con-
stitution written by Morsi’s Islamist allies and ratified in
December 2012 with some 64 percent of the vote but with
a nationwide turnout of just over 30 percent.
Mexico gov’t faces vigilante monster it created
APATZINGAN, Mexico — Vigilantes who have chal-
lenged the government’s authority in lawless Michoacan
state held onto their guns on Wednesday as federal author-
ities struggled to rein in a monster they helped create: cit-
izen militias that rose among farmers and lime-pickers to
fight a drug cartel.
Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong called
Monday for the vigilantes to drop their arms and go
home. But a new agreement with the so-called self-defense
groups left them holding onto their territory and their
guns, including high-caliber assault rifles that can only
be used by the military under Mexican law.
elected officials in Sacramento about the
negative impacts on the district,” he said.
“Most of the basic aid districts that are
impacted seem to be in San Mateo County
because of the property tax rates up here.
We’re not in same boat as Hillsborough,
which is a rich basic aid district.”
Back in August 2013, the Burlingame
Elementary School District projected it
would be losing approximately $140,000
in the 2013-14 school year switching off of
the former revenue limit program.
“In this new system, we lose,” Trustee
Gregory Land said at a meeting this past
summer. “It solves some problems in our
state, but has consequences for districts like
us.”
Chris Thomsen, a trustee for the Sequoia
Union High School District, said the impact
of the new formula is primarily on funding
for charter schools because the district is
basic aid.
“There’s no impact this year because it’s
implemented gradually and it’s not a big
story immediately since it’s a pretty small
piece of the budget,” he said. “Funding lev-
els will go up for charter schools that serve
needier populations and the other issue is
specifics haven’t actually been set.”
The new Local Control Funding Formula
was signed into law July 1, 2013, and
changed the state funding formula for K-12
schools to help boost the academic achieve-
ment of disadvantaged students. The state
budget for the 2013-14 fiscal year provides
about $55.3 billion in local and state rev-
enue for K-12 education and two-year com-
munity colleges. That’s an increase of more
than $8 billion over the 2011-12 level
under the state’s school funding formula
known as Proposition 98. The new formula
will send $2.1 billion more to school dis-
tricts that have high numbers of students
from lower-income families, who have lim-
ited English proficiency or are foster chil-
dren. During the first year, the formula gives
school districts more control over state aid
by eliminating earmarks for state-mandated
programs, except for special education
funding.
As part of the new formula, school dis-
tricts, county offices of education and char-
ter schools are required to develop, adopt
and annually update a three-year Local
Control and Accountability Plan, begin-
ning on July 1, using a template adopted by
the California State Board of Education on
or before March 31. Sequoia is held to this
LCAP process and will be forming a com-
mittee of parents and staff to give input into
the budgeting process by the end of the
month or early February, said
Superintendent Jim Lianides.
Other local basic aid districts aren’t so
concerned about the new formula, including
the Belmont-Redwood Shores Elementary
School District. Superintendent Michael
Milliken said the new formula won’t affect
the district’s bottom line and he noted he
thinks it’s a very positive move to help
more disadvantaged students in California.
Meanwhile, Gary Waddell, deputy super-
intendent for the San Mateo County Office
of Education, said his office has been work-
ing on how to best support districts in
thoughtful planning processes that contin-
ually improve the learning conditions for
their students, including an information and
planning session at the Office of Education
last week.
“While the California State Board of
Education is considering this item at their
meeting this week, our schools and districts
have engaged in some strategic thinking
around how they will address the eight state
priorities (for LCAP) that are outlined in the
LCFF legislation,” he wrote in an email.
“While the LCFF has different implications
for revenue limit and basic aid districts, the
focus for all districts at this juncture is
awaiting the state board action on the tem-
plate and guidance so that we can begin to
work collaboratively and build on the posi-
tive work that is already underway and
engage in thoughtful, intentional planning
around where that work might be continual-
ly improved and enhanced in the service of
our students.”
The eight priorities for LCAP planning
include student engagement, student
achievement, school climate, basic servic-
es, implementation of the new Common
Core Standards, other student outcomes,
parental involvement and course access.
Waddell notes the formula is a solid con-
cept and a positive step forward in aligning
instructional planning and budgeting
processes.
“The challenge with any change as large
as this one lies in the details,” he wrote.
“Our districts are eager to receive the tem-
plate and guidance from the state Board of
Education, once approved, to begin this
new type of planning and programmatic
design. This work has already prompted
positive conversations around reflection
and planning as we build thoughtful plans
that reinforce the best of what is currently
happening, our best thinking about how we
can expand and enhance service to those
students that need them the most, and work
collaboratively in the interest of our stu-
dents and communities.”
For more information on the new formula
visit cde.ca.gov/fg/aa/lc.
Continued from page 1
MONEY
tious planning process to ensure it’s able to
apply for federal assistance by the March
deadline, said Assistant City Manager Steve
Toler.
“That’s kind of how that whole [project]
is lined up in the development agreement.
The council decided it was such a vital com-
ponent … that basically everything in that
project is in the timelines of when afford-
able housing starts. Once the affordable
housing starts, then the rest of the develop-
ment will start,” Toler said.
Providing affordable housing to the city’s
aging population is essential in a town
where a one-bedroom apartment runs an
astonishing $2,500 per month, Toler said.
“This component of the entire project
that’s going to be a senior focused commu-
nity, these 66 units that MidPen is going to
build, is very vital to our city. … It is a good
public social policy to provide affordable
housing units,” Toler said.
The Association of Bay Area
Governments sets guidelines for the number
of affordable housing units each city is
responsible for providing. Foster City’s
Regional Housing Needs Allocation is for
430 units by 2022. The ability for Foster
City to uphold their obligation became
increasingly difficult after Gov. Jerry Brown
dispersed the state’s various redevelopment
agencies and the city has since been left to
look elsewhere for financial assistance.
“Despite the fact that the state of
California took millions of dollars from
Foster City that would have been used to
provide affordable housing, we have contin-
ued to look at creative ways to meet our
affordable housing obligations,” Mayor
Charles Bronitsky wrote in an email.
MidPen is headquartered in Foster City
and thrilled that the council has shown ded-
ication to supporting both the aging and
income-restricted population, said MidPen
President Matt Franklin.
“[MidPen is] based in Foster City so we’re
particularly proud of what the city’s doing
here which is that they really stuck to their
stated policy commitment to provide and
encourage the development of housing
that’s affordable for people who live in
Foster City,” Franklin said.
Once the environmental impact report is
approved, MidPen will undergo an exten-
sive financing endeavor that depends upon
three main sources. Foster City will be con-
tributing a $4.75 million loan to be repaid
over 55 years. Contingent on approval of
the San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors, the county will likely con-
tribute about $2.75 million sourced from
the state’s dispersing of redevelopment
agency funds, Toler said.
MidPen will apply for a competitive fed-
eral tax credit program in March to fund the
bulk of its project, Toler said.
As a large Bay Area affordable housing
developer, the company is extremely expe-
rienced in navigating the application
process, Franklin said.
“We’re very familiar with the [federal tax
credit] program and we’re confident that this
is a winning application. The city and the
county both have really stepped forward and
made significant contributions to the
financing,” Franklin said.
If approved, it will secure funding in June
and is required to start construction by the
end of the year, Franklin said. The project is
estimated to take between 16 and 18
months. It will begin to take rental applica-
tions six or seven months prior to opening.
Affordable housing opportunities are typi-
cally oversubscribed and interested parties
will likely be chosen through a lottery,
Franklin said.
Future residents could qualify if their
income is 30 percent to 50 percent of the
area median income and can expect to pay
about $545 to $941 for a one-bedroom
apartment, according to MidPen officials.
To the legally allowable extent, the coun-
cil and MidPen have decided to give priority
to Foster City residents.
“There’s a lot of folks who’ve lived and
worked in Foster City and San Mateo
County their whole lives and of course
many seniors make transitions in their liv-
ing environments as they reach their elder
years. I think a really important goal for the
city is to make sure they have a place [sen-
iors] can afford,” Franklin said. “Without
the provisions of these types of units, you
run a great risk that these folks will be
priced out of the area.”
For more information about the MidPen
Housing Corporation visit www.midpen-
housing.org.
For updates on the development of the
Foster Square site visit www.fostercity.org.
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
HOUSING
Around the world
OPINION 9
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
By Ben Tripousis
F
or the past 150 years, Caltrain has
provided passenger rail service
along the Peninsula corridor, link-
ing communities from San Francisco to
San Jose. It’s the oldest continuously oper-
ating rail line in the West, and remains one
of the most important passenger rails lines
in the San Francisco Bay Area.
As we commemorate this milestone, the
California High-Speed Rail Authority is
working in partnership with Caltrain, the
Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board and
regional stakeholders to ensure that this
venerable rail line is well positioned to
keep pace with increasing ridership
demands while also preparing it for high-
speed service.
Less known is the significant impact the
partnership will have in helping the state
meet its goals for reducing greenhouse gas
emissions by 2020 and beyond. In his pro-
posed budget, Gov. Jerry Brown plans to
allocate a portion of state cap-and-trade
revenue for the high-speed rail program as
part of the state’s long-term air pollution-
reduction plan. Some have criticized put-
ting cap-and-trade money into high-speed
rail because they believe — wrongly —
that the project won’t reduce air pollution
soon enough. In fact, high-speed rail’s
plan to electrify the Caltrain line will
reduce emissions in advance of the deadline
imposed by Assembly Bill 32. Further,
high-speed rail will play an important role
in helping to meet the bill’s requirements
to continue to lower
greenhouse gases well
beyond 2020.
High-speed rail is col-
laborating with Caltrain
staff on the Caltrain
Modernization Plan,
which, among other ben-
efits, will lay the founda-
tion for high-speed rail
service along the San Francisco-San Jose
corridor. The plan calls for investing $600
million in high-speed rail funding to fully
electrify the Peninsula Rail Corridor,
enabling Caltrain by 2019 to replace diesel
trains with a clean, electrified fleet that will
eventually operate in a blended service
with high-speed rail.
The program electrifies the Caltrain line
between the station at Fourth and King
streets in San Francisco and the Tamien
Station in San Jose. Electrification also
will reduce power consumption and lower
noise for those living and working nearby.
At the same time, Proposition 1A, the
High-Speed Rail Act of 2008, is providing
Caltrain with $105 million for a “Positive
Train Control” (PTC) electronic safety sys-
tem that will monitor and, if necessary,
control train movement in the event of
human error. PTC will equip Caltrain with
federally mandated safety technology
essential for high-speed rail. The system
integrates command, control, communica-
tions and information systems to signifi-
cantly reduce the likelihood of collisions.
It also allows trains to travel safely at
higher speeds. This phase of the project
involves installing a fiber optic backbone
along the Caltrain right-of-way so that sig-
nals, trains, dispatchers and other compo-
nents of the railroad operations can com-
municate seamlessly. The installation work
has started in San Jose and will progress
north to San Francisco.
Finally, the high-speed rail project plays
a critical role in another key Bay Area
transportation project: San Francisco’s
Transbay Transit Center. The center is a
multi-modal transportation hub that will
centralize the region’s transportation net-
work and extend the Caltrain line into the
San Francisco Financial District. The cen-
ter will be used by both Caltrain and high-
speed rail, connecting San Francisco to the
rest of California with effective and effi-
cient rail service.
California’s high-speed rail program not
only represents the largest and most ambi-
tious infrastructure project of its kind in
the country. It is a project that is building
strategic partnerships, such as the one with
150-year-old Caltrain, which will modern-
ize passenger rail service throughout the
state for decades to come.
Ben Tripousis is the Northern California
regional director for the California High-
Speed Rail Authority.
Ode to the tech worker
Editor,
I just want to give a shout-out to all the
tech workers and the local tech industry in
general. Thank you for being the econom-
ic engine that runs San Mateo County.
Thank you for the billions of dollars you
pay in federal, state and now new federal
health care taxes. Thank you for paying
for our public schools through the proper-
ty taxes on that new house you just pur-
chased. Thank you for your business to me
personally, as a good number of you are
my clients. San Mateo County is very for-
tunate that the tech industry was founded
and has made its home on the Peninsula.
You have contributed more to my home-
town financially than any other industry
in my existence.
Don’t worry about the boneheads in San
Francisco who are boycotting your buses,
they are just an offshoot of the Occupy
movement who are mad that you make
more money than they do and that you can
afford, through your hard work, a home to
call your own in their city. Remember,
this is the city that lost the Niners.
We on the Peninsula appreciate you and
we welcome your jobs and the taxes you
pay. We appreciate the money you spend
in our local restaurants, shops and busi-
nesses. Keep in mind we don’t believe in
socialist housing and we surely don’t mind
those environmentally friendly buses that
you carpool in. San Mateo County: tech
friendly. Tell a friend.
Christopher Conway
San Mateo
High-speed rail
evictions hurt families
Editor,
Gov. Jerry Brown’s scheme to divert
hundreds of millions of dollars from true
“cap and trade” greenhouse gas reducing
projects to his legacy “High-Speed Rail
Boondoggle” must be stopped — call your
state reps today. High-speed rail is ruth-
less and currently using every available
dollar to evict helpless Central Valley
families through “eminent domain”
power.
If it were your family that didn’t want to
move/sell your farm, how would you feel
being evicted for a “Train-to-Nowhere”
that will never be built? Independent
Superior Court Judge Kenny recently ruled
that Proposition 1Apromises to voters
(i.e. private investors, business invest-
ment, environmental review, etc.) were all
violated by the High-Speed Rail
Authority, so no bonds could be issued.
Using scare cap-and-trade money on a
boondoggle train that won’t be built,
instead of true greenhouse gas projects
like electric/natural gas vehicles, solar
power, is done to kowtow to powerful
buildings and trades/labor unions and is
wrong — even Senate President Darell
Steinberg is against this farce.
Mike Brown
Burlingame
High-speed rail: Partnering with Caltrain
Awash with fear
A
pparently, California will never
see rain again. Don’t blame me.
I’ve washed the car — now twice.
I’ve reached for short sleeves rather than
sweaters. I’ve left the dogs in the backyard
for extended periods of time without any
barrier to the possibly
rainy elements. I’ve
planned outdoor activ-
ities on weekends.
I’ve mocked the polar
vortex. I even went to
work without a jacket
and purposely opted
against sticking an
umbrella in the trunk,
just in case.
In other words, I’ve
done my part to taunt the weather gods
who, for whatever reason, refuse to bring
it. Possibly, they are using reverse psy-
chology and purposely refusing to deliver a
wee bit of moisture upon this western land.
This is good news for those of us whose
hair has just enough wave to frizz at the
first sign of mist and have a tendency to
inadvertently step in puddles while wearing
heels or long pants. Excuses to hide the
winter indulgences under a bulky sweater
rather than sucking in the gut in summery
garb is also a plus. The truth is, though, we
need some rain. Any rain. Maybe not quite
El Niño or La Niña or any of those other
exotic-sounding weather children that jus-
tify flood insurance mandates and tsunami-
themed disaster movies. But a splash here
and there isn’t too greedy.
Obviously, though, it is. Winter is all
but officially canceled which means a cou-
ple of things: I’d like my daylight savings
hours back. The state is going to be the
next snowbird state when the AARP contin-
gent grows weary of Florida’s weirdness.
And it’s just a matter of days, hours even,
until the governor declares a drought and
we all go back to dead lawns, buckets under
the bathtub faucets and giving neighbors
the stink eye for washing their vehicles
with a garden hose in the driveway.
The city of Sacramento has gotten ahead
of the curve by already enacting strict water
restrictions under what is labeled a “stage 2
water shortage plan.” This level falls just
below Defcon 1 and means capital folks are
now told to cut back on their usage by 20
percent and 30 percent and abide by limits
on usage or else risk the wrath of the water
police who come bearing warnings, cita-
tions and — the worst — water class.
Perhaps if one also lights up a fire the same
day, the smoke class imposed for Spare the
Air violations can cancel out water class
for failing the rationing. Call it a wash —
just not on one of those no-wash days!
The rest of the state isn’t far behind
Sacramento’s knuckling down on water
wastefulness so let’s not wait for an official
decree. Beginning today, let’s all do better.
First, cut back on the bathing and shower-
ing. Invest in tubs of hand sanitizer and
dry shampoo. Always wear deodorant. After
a couple days of layering, no smell is get-
ting through that buildup.
Stop filling up the plastic bottle from the
tap or asking for ice. Opt for soda or gin.
Not together. And not with ice. In fact,
don’t even dirty a glass. Drink straight
from the bottle. When someone calls you
an alcoholic counter with, “No, I’m an
environmentalist.” Once the naysayer gets
a whiff of four-days-without-soap-and-
water, they’ll really believe the claim.
Wipe down the car with glass cleaner.
Swear off instant hot chocolate and pasta
— anything that requires boiling water,
actually. Learn to dry swallow pills. Make
the clothes presentable with fabric freshen-
er and wrinkle release sprays. Eat off paper
plates. In other words, pretend you’re in
West Virginia.
Someday the skies will part again but
right now most Californians likely have a
heavy level of drought.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat”
runs every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be
reached by email: michelle@smdailyjour-
nal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200 ext.
102. What do you think of this column?
Guest
perspective
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 16,481.94 +108.08 10-Yr Bond 2.88 +0.02
Nasdaq 4,214.88 +31.87 Oil (per barrel) 94.45
S&P 500 1,848.38 +9.50 Gold 1,241.20
By Bernard Condon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — It was a stock market
squeaker.
After piercing its all-time high in
early trading, then yo-yoing below
and above that level several times dur-
ing the day, the Standard and Poor’s
500 index on Wednesday managed to
eke out a record at the close, besting
the old one by just two-hundredths of a
point.
Financial and technology companies
had some of the biggest gains. Bank
stocks rose after Bank of America
reported that its profit surged to $3.44
billion in the fourth quarter. Apple was
up nearly 2 percent.
Investors have been worried stocks
would stall in the new year after a surge
of nearly 30 percent in the S&P 500
last year. The first few trading days in
2014 seemed to confirm their fears. As
of the close of trading Monday, the
S&P 500 was down 1.6 percent.
But a combination of positive eco-
nomic reports and strong earnings on
Wednesday sent all three major indexes
higher.
The S&P 500 gained 9.50 points, or
0.52 percent, to 1,848.38. The last
closing high was 1,848.36 on Dec. 31,
2013. With Wednesday’s rise, the index
is now basically flat for the year. In
2013 the S&P 500 closed at record
highs 45 times.
The Dow Jones industrial average
closed up 108.08 points, or 0.7 per-
cent, to 16,481.94. It is 94.72 points
from its closing high, just one good up
day away. The Nasdaq composite rose
31.87 points, or 0.76 percent, to
4,214.88. The tech-heavy index is still
16 percent below its high during the
dot-com bubble more than a decade
ago.
Bank of America climbed 2.3 percent
after it reported a jump in earnings. The
loans on its balance sheet continue to
improve, and the bank’s provision for
credit losses fell to $336 million, from
$2.2 billion in the same period a year
earlier. Even its mortgage division,
which took huge losses after the hous-
ing bubble popped, improved.
Apple rose 2 percent, and Microsoft
by 2.7 percent. Apple CEO Tim Cook
said the company had sold a record
number of iPhones in China, Taiwan
and Hong Kong in the last three
months of 2013. On Friday, Apple
plans to start selling its iPhone in
China through China Mobile, the
world’s largest cellphone carrier.
Seven of the 10 industries in the S&P
500 closed higher, led by telecommu-
nications, information technology and
financial services. The three were each
up more than 1 percent.
Whether stocks can climb more in
the coming days depends partly on cor-
porate earnings reports now coming
out for the fourth quarter of last year.
Companies reporting on Thursday
include Goldman Sachs, Citigroup,
American Express and Intel.
After years of squeezing more and
more profit out of every dollar of rev-
enue, companies will have to lift that
top line to hit their earnings targets for
this year, said Joseph S. Tanious, glob-
al market strategist at JPMorgan. But
he’s optimistic. “You will see strong
revenue growth,” he said.
Tanious said a 4 percent to 6 percent
increase in S&P 500 earnings per share
this year shouldn’t be “too difficult.”
Financial analysts expect S&P 500
earnings per share to increase 5.6 per-
cent for the fourth quarter, and 9.8 per-
cent for all four quarters of the new
year, according to S&P Capital IQ.
Revenue growth for both periods is
expected to be half the earnings
growth.
Stocks were also pushed higher
Wednesday by some encouraging eco-
nomic reports.
S&P 500 finishes above all-time closing high
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the New York
Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
MeadWestvaco Corp., up $1.72 to $37.38
The packaging company plans to trim costs by up to $125 million yearly by the end
of 2015 through job cuts and other initiatives.
Dick’s Sporting Goods Inc., up $1.14 to $56.39
Credit Suisse delivered an upgrade to the sports retailer, citing new focus from
management and strong private-label sales.
NQ Mobile Inc., up $1.71 to $15.63
The software company will power the next Sprint ID,a package of apps,ringtones,
and other services used on Android smartphones.
Nasdaq
Netflix Inc., down $7.58 to $330.38
AnewrulingmayallowInternet providers tochargehigher fees,possiblyincreasing
costs at the streaming video service.
The ExOne Co., down $5.41 to $56.85
Some international customers deferred orders from the 3-D printer company until
at least 2014, leading to a round of cuts to analysts’ earnings estimates.
NuVasive Inc., up $2.88 to $36.66
The medical device company raised its revenue expectations for 2013, saying its
growth exceeded the broader spine market.
Allscripts Healthcare Solutions Inc., up $1.19 to $16.71
The electronic health records company issued an upbeat outlook for the next few
years.
Datalink Corp., up $4.09 to $14.96
The data infrastructure and services company said fourth-quarter results should
come in ahead of its earlier forecasts.
Big movers
Yahoo CEO lets go top lieutenant in surprise move
SAN FRANCISCO — Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer is cut-
ting loose her top lieutenant in a possible sign that the
Internet company’s efforts to revive its long-slumping
advertising sales aren’t paying off.
Wednesday’s surprise announcement of the departure of
Yahoo’s chief operating officer, Henrique de Castro, repre-
sents a setback for Mayer, who signed him to a $58 mil-
lion deal just 15 months ago to help her lure more adver-
tisers to a company that has been struggling to compete
against Google Inc. and Facebook Inc. in the race for
online marketing dollars.
Yahoo Inc. decline to comment on the reasons for de
Castro’s abrupt exit. Mayer didn’t name his replacement.
Fed: U.S. economic growth healthy over holidays
WASHINGTON — AFederal Reserve survey shows eco-
nomic growth remained healthy in most U.S. regions in
late November and December, helped by gains in consumer
spending and factory output.
Nine of the Fed’s 12 banking districts described growth
as moderate, according to the Beige Book survey released
Wednesday. That’s up from seven districts in October
through early November. And two of those districts said
growth had accelerated since the previous report.
Only two districts -- Boston and Philadelphia -- said
growth was modest, while Kansas City said it “held
steady.”
J.C. Penney to cut 2,000 jobs, close 33 stores
NEW YORK — Struggling department-store operator
J.C. Penney announced it will cut 2,000 jobs and close 33
stores as it tries to get back on the path to profitability.
The news raises concerns that Penney’s holiday season
sales were not what the company hoped for and that the
chain needs to do even more to recover from a turnaround
plan that has had disastrous results.
Business briefs
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Netflix’s Internet
video service thrives on drama and sus-
pense, but not the kind triggered by a legal
ruling that threatens to affect the company’s
growth and pricing.
The intrigue stems from an appeals court
decision overturning Federal
Communication Commission regulations
that prodded high-speed Internet providers
to treat all online services equally, includ-
ing video transmissions that placed higher
demands on their networks.
The dismantling of that FCC rule, known
as “Net Neutrality,” raises the possibility
that Netflix may someday have to pay addi-
tional fees to Internet service providers to
ensure that its video continues to stream
smoothly.
Netflix Inc. could still refuse to pay if the
cable and telecommunications companies
selling most of high-speed Internet access
demand more money. But that option would
risk diminishing the quality of Netflix’s
video streaming to the frustration of its 31
million U.S. subscribers who pay $8 per
month for the service.
The potential fallout rattled investors
Wednesday as Netflix’s stock shed $7.58, or
2.2 percent, to close at $330.38. At one
point in the day’s trading, the shares had
fallen more than 5 percent.
Netflix declined to comment on the fallout
from the Net Neutrality decision.
Internet access ruling raises Netflix worries
By Jennifer C. Kerr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Kids gleefully snapped
up virtual pet food, gems or other items
while playing games on their mobile
devices, while the bills from Apple Inc.
mounted, often without parents’ knowl-
edge. Now, the tech giant has agreed to
refund the money.
Following tens of thousands of con-
sumer complaints, the Federal Trade
Commission said Wednesday that Apple
will pay at least $32.5 million to settle a
federal case involving those in-app pur-
chases. Apple also must change its billing
practices to make it more obvious that an
actual purchase is taking place during the
course of the game or app.
Just how could a kid buy these things
without mom or dad’s knowledge and run
up bills into the hundreds of dollars or
more?
Agame-player wants to advance to a new
level or buy coins, a chest of gems or
treats for a virtual pet. It takes a click, and
then the app asks for a password. The child
turns to a parent, who punches it in.
Apple will refund at least
$32.5 million in app case
<<< Page 13, Warriors get
the help their need with trade
Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014
KERSHAW BREAKS THE BANK: THE DODGERS AND THEIR ACE AGREE TO A SEVEN-YEAR, $215 MILLION DEAL >> PAGE 13
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Capuchino’s Brianna Deckman shoots over Aragon’s Briana Reynolds during the Mustangs’
59-42 win.The victory improved Capuchino’s record to 3-0 in PAL SouthDivision play.
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTACLARA— From the moment Glenn
Dorsey stepped off the plane last spring and
met spirited 49ers defensive line coach Jim
Tomsula, he understood San Francisco’s win-
ning vibe that he had seen from afar with
Kansas City in the AFC.
Dorsey wanted to be a part of it, and little
did the Niners know how crucial a stabilizing
force he would be or how important the deci-
sion was to bring him in for depth on the
defensive line.
“Even when I got off the plane and talked to
Coach Tomsula, this is the time that we pre-
pared for, the time that he told me when I got
here: ‘Hey, this is what we’re going to be
doing. We’re going to work toward it and
hopefully keep it going,”’ Dorsey recalled.
Ever since nose tackle Ian Williams went
down with a season-ending ankle injury dur-
ing a Week 2 loss at Seattle, Dorsey has deliv-
ered with a steady presence in the middle for
coordinator Vic Fangio’s imposing, smother-
ing unit.
This group is determined
to return to Seattle this
weekend for the NFC
championship game and
produce a different result
after an embarrassing 29-3
defeat on Sept. 15 at noisy
CenturyLink Field.
While Dorsey wasn’t
around for last season’s
Super Bowl heartbreak, he understands there
is unfinished business associated with the 34-
31 loss to the Baltimore Ravens that cost San
Francisco the franchise’s sixth champi-
onship.
This postseason run is “very close” to what
Dorsey envisioned when he joined the 49ers
last March on a two-year contract that could
pay him up to $7 million with incentives.
Williams earned the starting nose tackle
job out of training camp with Dorsey a versa-
tile backup, then Williams went down with a
Dorsey important
addition for 49ers
Glenn Dorsey
See 49ERS, Page 16
By Tim Booth
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RENTON, Wash. — Russell Wilson and
the Seahawks offense haven’t exactly pro-
duced impressive numbers during the past
month.
But ask Wilson and coach Pete Carroll if
there are worries heading into Sunday’s NFC
championship game against San Francisco
and, while they say they would like to see
more consistency, they say the numbers
aren’t the important thing.
“We’re always looking for more and he is
too and all that,” Carroll said. “But as long
as our football team is playing well and
we’re playing within the formula and we’re
playing good defense, we’re running the
football, we’re playing on (special) teams,
and we’re taking care of the ball and getting
it, we’re going to have a really good chance
to win. And that’s what’s most important to
us. It’s not about the stats and all that.”
Seattle advanced to the NFC champi-
onship game despite getting a career-low
passing performance from Wilson, who
threw for 103 yards in the Seahawks’ 23-15
win over the Saints. It was the fourth time in
the past five games that Wilson failed to top
200 yards passing and the Seahawks had
less than 300 yards of total offense.
The Seahawks were helped by a huge day
from Marshawn Lynch, running for 140
yards and two touchdowns in his best game
since Week 10. And the passing numbers
against New Orleans were skewed by the
awful weather conditions with strong winds
and heavy rain making throwing the foot-
ball a challenge.
But the lack of consistency by the pass-
ing game versus New Orleans, against a
team Wilson had carved up earlier in the sea-
son, only heightened fan worries heading
into Sunday.
“We’ve played some really good defenses
and they’ve made some plays. There’s defi-
nitely room for improvement, especially on
my part and that’s the thing I look forward
to every week,” Wilson said. “I always
think I can get better and there’s tons of
throws in there that I can make and I know I
Seahawks don’t see any
problems with offense
See SEAHAWKS, Page 16
A
nyone else getting tired of the
buildup to the NFC championship
game between the San Francisco
49ers and Seattle Seahawks?
Whether in the newspapers, TVor the
radio, you can only break down the
matchups so many different ways and any
analyst worth his salt will simply say the
same thing as the last expert.
Things have gotten so bad, if you will, a
couple of columnists have latched onto
the “Colin Kaepernick is a bad boy” story
line and Tuesday’s
big story was Jim
Harbaugh’s wife
deriding his choice of
pants on the sideline.
(On a side note,
apparently Harbaugh
will ditch his $8
Walmart pleated
khakis for a more
expensive, flat-front
pair of slacks. You’re
welcome).
As the sports editor
at the Daily Journal,
I’m often asked who I think will win any
given game. Considering I’m a 49ers fan
and the people asking me are usually 49ers
fans, what am I supposed to say? My heart
says 49ers win Sunday, but my head is not
so sure.
The bottom line is both San Francisco
and Seattle are really good teams. Easily
the best two teams in the NFC. Both
defenses are terrifying, Seahawks running
back Marshawn Lynch and 49ers Frank
Gore are two of the toughest runners in the
NFL. Seattle’s Russell Wilson and San
Francisco’s Colin Kaepernick are two of
the quarterbacks whose NFL stock is on
the rise and potential seems limitless.
So who will win Sunday? I’m not going
to make a prediction. I’ll use a cliche I
hear high school coaches use all the time:
the team that makes the least number of
mistakes will be victorious.
Just play
the game
See LOUNGE, Page 16
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
If there was one word to describe the first-
half play of the Capuchino girls’ basketball
team against Aragon Wednesday evening, it
would be “sloppy. ”
The Mustangs were sloppy with their
passing, defense and just about everything
else that had led them to a 12-2 record over-
all and 2-0 in Peninsula Athletic League
South Division play.
“We had a slow start,” said Capuchino
coach Mike Dozier. “We went in at halftime
and (I) told the girls it’s not so much them
(Aragon), it’s us.”
The talk must have worked because
Capuchino came out in the second half and
looked like a different team. Everything was
much more crisp as the Mustangs swarmed
the ball defensively. The Mustangs turned
up the defensive intensity and that got their
fast break going. After the two teams were
tied at 26 after two quarters of play, the
Mustangs outscored the Dons 36-16 over
the final two quarters to record a 59-42 vic-
tory.
The win moves the Mustangs to 3-0 in
PAL South play and 13-2 overall.
“Second half, defensively we were much
better,” Dozier said. “Defense is where we’ll
hang our hat this year. ”
That defense jump-starts the Capuchino
offense. When the Mustangs can get out on
the break, they were hard to stop. Setting up
in the half-court offense, however, was a dif-
ferent story.
“We’re to small to go half court,” Dozier
said. “We don’t want to trade punches.”
Yet that is precisely what happened in the
first half as Aragon (0-3 PAL South) used its
height in the frontcourt to control the
boards and a tenacious defense of its own to
force the Mustangs into a number of
turnovers and Dons’ steals.
The game could not have been any closer
in the first half as both teams raced up and
down the court. Brianna Deckman, who fin-
ished with 14 points for Capuchino, scored
the first basket of the game, but Aragon tied
it on a pair of Maya Collins free throws.
Cap girls move to 3-0
See MUSTANGS, Page 14
12
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS 13
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — The Golden State Warriors
have been searching for a suitable backup to
point guard Stephen Curry since veteran
Jarrett Jack signed with Cleveland as a free
agent last summer.
They had hoped Toney Douglas could help
fill the void, but he couldn’t .
Now they’re counting on Jordan Crawford
for more production.
The Warriors acquired Crawford and
reserve MarShon Brooks from the Boston
Celtics on Wednesday, sending Douglas to
the Miami Heat in a three-team trade.
“I think getting a guy like Crawford
allows us to rest Steph a little bit more with-
out the fear of blowing ballgames,”
Warriors coach Mark Jackson said before
his team hosted Denver.
The Heat sent seldom-used center Joel
Anthony, two draft picks and cash consider-
ations to the Celtics in a move that creates
financial flexibility for the two-time defend-
ing NBA champions and bolsters Boston’s
rebuilding project.
Miami gave the Celtics its 2015 protected
first-round pick — originally acquired from
Philadelphia — and 2016 second-round
pick. If the 76ers don’t make the playoffs
the next two seasons, the 2015 pick will be
a second-round selection.
“The picks keep piling up and piling up.
We’ve got a lot of flexibility moving for-
ward,” first-year Celtics coach Brad Stevens
said before Boston beat Toronto 88-83.
Warriors general manager Bob Myers said
Celtics GM Danny Ainge, a long-time
friend who helped him get the job with
Golden State, approached him about the
trade. But it wouldn’t have come together
without the Heat, Myers said, because the
Warriors weren’t willing to part with any of
their core players.
“We were obviously looking to upgrade
our bench,” Myers said. “Clearly, we’ve
struggled in that category. ”
The deal gives Golden State more scoring
punch behind Curry after the defensive-
minded Douglas had struggled to provide
much support.
Crawford is averaging 13.7 points and
5.6 assists this season, but he became
expendable with Boston expecting All-Star
point guard Rajon Rondo to return soon
from a right knee injury that has kept him
out since last January. Crawford, who will
be playing for his fourth team in four sea-
sons, also is shooting 41.4 percent from
the field and 31.8 percent from 3-point
range.
“He’s dangerous. That’s the word I like to
use,” Myers said.
Brooks had two up-and-down years with
the Nets before splitting time with Boston
and the Maine Red Claws of the NBA
Development League this season. He’s aver-
aging 3.1 points in 10 games with the
Celtics.
Jackson said Brooks would have an
opportunity to earn a spot with Golden
State, though he’ll most likely spit time
with the team’s D-League affiliate in Santa
Cruz.
After inking free agent Andre Iguodala,
the Warriors had hoped Douglas could serve
as the primary ball-handler behind Curry the
way Jack did brilliantly last season.
But Douglas missed a month because of a
stress reaction in his left shin and couldn’t
find a rhythm when he returned. He averaged
3.7 points, 0.8 assists and 11 minutes in 24
games.
“We need (Crawford) to hold the fort
down, to be a playmaker. We need him to
score. We need him to facilitate and get that
second unit going,” Jackson said. “The
opportunity is going to be there, but we do
not need him to be Jarrett Jack.”
For the Heat, the gains are largely finan-
cial.
Trade lands Warriors much-needed backup PG
By Beth Harris
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Clayton Kershaw agreed
Wednesday to a $215 million, seven-year
contract with the Los Angeles Dodgers, a per-
son familiar with the negotiations told The
Associated Press, a deal that makes the two-
time Cy Young Award winner baseball’s first
player with a $30 million average salary.
The person spoke on condition of
anonymity because the agreement had not
yet been announced.
Kershaw receives the most lucrative deal
for a pitcher, breaking the mark of $180 mil-
lion set by Justin Verlander last March for his
seven-year contract with Detroit.
Kershaw would have been eligible for free
agency after the upcoming season if the new
deal hadn’t been reached. He was eligible for
salary arbitration, and those figures were set
to be exchanged on Friday. He was coming
off a two-year, $20 million deal that included
$200,000 in bonuses in 2012, a $500,000
escalator to his 2013 base salary, and
$300,000 in bonuses last year.
General manager Ned Colletti said last
week that both sides had been negotiating.
“It’s our desire to sign him here for a very
long time,” Colletti said.
The average salary of $30.7 million tops
the previous high of $27.5 million, set by
the New York Yankees’Alex Rodriguez as part
of a 10-year agreement from December 2007.
While Roger Clemens had a contract with a
listed salary of $28 million with the Yankees
in 2007, he joined the team in June and actu-
ally made $17.4 million.
The Dodgers had baseball’s second-highest
payroll at the end of the regular season last
fall — more than $236 million.
Kershaw’s agreement, first reported by
ESPN.com, is baseball’s seventh of $200
million or more. Among current contracts, it
trails only the agreements of Rodriguez,
Cincinnati first baseman Joey Votto ($251.5
million over 12 years), Los Angeles Angels
first baseman Albert Pujols ($240 million
over 10 years) and Seattle second baseman
Robinson Cano ($240 million over 10
years).
Dodgers, Kershaw agree to 7-year, $215 deal
SPORTS 14
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Kelsey Alonzo drained a 3-pointer to put the
Mustangs up 5-2, but a 3 from Collins tied it.
That trey ignited a 7-0 Aragon run, turning a 5-
2 deficit into a 9-5 lead.
It was short-lived, however, as the Mustangs
ended the first quarter on a 7-3 run to tie the score
at 12. Taylor Brazil, who finished with a game-
high 16 points for Cap, converted a three-point
play at the quarter buzzer for the tie.
It was more of the same in the second quarter.
Aragon eventually built a five point lead, 22-
17, following another 3 from Collins with 4:04
left in the half, but the Mustangs closed with a
9-4 run to tie the score at 26 going into half-
time.
The second half was all about the Mustangs’
tenacity — as well as its bench. Brittany
Deckman, who finished with 10 points, had to
sit most of the third quarter with three fouls, but
her replacement, Xenia Collins, came off the
bench to more than filled the void.
Collins wasn’t expected to light up the score-
board. Instead, she gave the Mustangs what
they lacked in the first half — consistent
rebounding. Collins pulled down six rebounds
in the second half.
“[Collins] did a fantastic job off the bench,”
Dozier said.
The same could be said of the play of Ani
Uikilifi and Nani Merafuentes. Uikilifi pulled
down seven rebounds for the game and scored
six second-half points, while Merafuentes
replaced sister Alonzo and took over ball-han-
dling chores after Alonzo missed most of the
second half with a bloody nose following a col-
lision.
The second half saw the Mustangs take con-
trol of the game. They more than held their own
on the boards and while they still had trouble
taking care of the ball at times, they also made
life tough for Aragon, coming up with 13 steals
— nine in the fourth quarter alone.
Capuchino opened the second half with back-
to-back 3s by Brazil from the left corner for a
32-26 lead and the Mustangs never trailed
again.
Aragon cut its deficit to three, 34-31, follow-
ing a pair of Briana Reynolds free throws, but
the Mustangs went into the final eight minutes
with a 40-33 advantage.
And then the Mustangs stepped on the gas and
raced past the Dons. Capuchino outscored
Aragon 19-9, despite seeing the Dons cut their
deficit to three points, 40-37, following back-
to-back, coast-to-coast layups from Alyssa
Mangaoang.
The Mustangs quickly righted the ship, how-
ever, getting three straight buckets to push their
lead to nine, 46-37.
All told, Capuchino went on a 11-0 run, with
Brazil scoring five straight points to cap it, put-
ting the Mustangs in firm control, 51-37 with
4:04 left.
The only question left was by how much
would the Mustangs win.
“[We] played hard. Cap is a very good team,”
said Aragon coach Annette Gennaro-Trimble.
“We were right there. My girls work very hard.
Unfortunately, the record doesn’t show it.”
Mangaoang led the Dons with nine points.
Collins finished with eight, and Reynolds and
Jen Horita had six points each.
Continued from page 11
MUSTANGS
Boys’basketball
Carlmont 50, San Mateo 31
The Scots earned their first league win of the
season behind a team-high 15 points from
Michael Costello, a senior guard, who nailed
four 3-pointers in the process. Senior center
Michael Scallan added 10 points for Carlmont
(1-2 PALSouth, 5-10 overall).
San Mateo (1-2, 6-7) was led by senior Alex
Mostafavi, who scored 15 points.
Carlmont outscored the Bearcats 12-0 in the
third quarter to take control.
Sequoia 50, Hillsdale 45 OT
The Cherokees picked up their first PALSouth
win of the season, beating the Knights in extra
time.
Junior wing Chris Bene paced Sequoia (1-2
PAL South, 4-5 overall) with a team-high 23
points.John Crowell added 11. Hillsdale’s Chris
Houle led all scorers with 24 points.
Hillsdale (2-1, 7-6) led 31-29 after three quar-
ters, but Sequoia outscored the Knights 8-6 in
the fourth to force overtime.
Burlingame 83,Woodside 33
The Panthers scored 29 points in the first
quarter and never looked back in routing the
Wildcats.
Burlingame (3-0 PALSouth, 12-3 overall) had
four players score in double figures, led by
Kevin Abuyaghi’s team-high 17 points. Nick
Loew added 15 points, Frankie Ferrari had 14
and Justin Gutang finished with 11.
Woodside (1-2, 6-9) was led by Kevin
Kahriman’s 17 points.
Girls’basketball
Mills 45, Menlo-Atherton 30
The Vikings remained undefeated in PAL
South play with a convincing win over the
Bears, handing M-Aits first PALloss of the sea-
son.
Mills (3-0 PALSouth, 9-6 overall) led just 16-
15 at halftime, but pulled away in the second
half, outscoring M-A(2-1, 10-4) 30-15 in the
final two quarters.
Sophomore center Julia Gibbs had a huge
game for the Vikings, scoring a team-high 21
points, shooting 10 of 17 from the field.
Carlmont 47, San Mateo 32
The Scots also remain unbeaten in PALSouth
play with the victory over the Bearcats.
As has been the case all season, Anisah Smith
paced Carlmont (3-0 PAL South, 14-1 overall)
with 21 points. Sabrina Miller added 10 in the
win for the Scots.
San Mateo (0-3, 3-10) was led by Mimi Chen
and Alyssa Cho, who each scored eight points.
Sacred Heart Prep 47, Mercy-SF 46
The Gators opened West Bay Athletic League
play with an important win over the Skippers
Wednesday night.
The difference in the game came in the third
quarter, where SHP (1-0 WBAL, 10-5 overall)
outscored Mercy 12-11.
Senior guard Meghan Holland was huge for
the Gators, scoring a game-high 22 points.
Boys’soccer
Sacred Heart Prep 3, Menlo School 1
The Gators took early control of the West Bay
Athletic League standings with the win over its
rival Wednesday afternoon.
Isaac Polkinhorne gave SHP (3-0 WBAL, 4-
4-1 overall) a 1-0 lead in the first half off an
assist from Philip Petrakian.
Menlo tied it with a goal in the second half,
but Petrakian set up Ricky Grau for the game-
winning goal and Will Mishra added some insur-
ance with a penalty-kick score for the Gators.
Women’s college basketball
CSM 70, Las Positas-Livermore 50
Kay Cooper scored 12 points as the Lady
Bulldogs won their conference home opener
Wednesday night.
Cooper was one of 13 Bulldogs to score. Mia
Maffei and Kate Larson each added 10 points.
CSM (2-1 Coast Conference North, 10-7
overall) faces conference co-leader Chabot (2-0,
6-10) Friday night in Hayward.
Local sports roundup
SPORTS 15
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 19 18 .514 —
Brooklyn 15 22 .405 4
New York 15 23 .395 4 1/2
Boston 14 26 .350 6 1/2
Philadelphia 13 25 .342 6 1/2
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 27 11 .711 —
Atlanta 20 18 .526 7
Washington 18 19 .486 8 1/2
Charlotte 16 24 .400 12
Orlando 10 29 .256 17 1/2
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 30 7 .811 —
Chicago 18 19 .486 12
Detroit 16 22 .421 14 1/2
Cleveland 14 25 .359 17
Milwaukee 7 31 .184 23 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 31 8 .795 —
Houston 26 14 .650 5 1/2
Dallas 23 17 .575 8 1/2
Memphis 19 19 .500 11 1/2
New Orleans 15 23 .395 15 1/2
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Portland 29 9 .763 —
Oklahoma City 28 10 .737 1
Denver 20 18 .526 9
Minnesota 18 20 .474 11
Utah 13 27 .325 17
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 27 13 .675 —
Golden State 25 15 .625 2
Phoenix 22 16 .579 4
Sacramento 14 23 .378 11 1/2
L.A. Lakers 14 25 .359 12 1/2
Wednesday’sGames
Chicago 128, Orlando 125,3OT
Philadelphia 95, Charlotte 92
Washington 114, Miami 97
Boston 88,Toronto 83
Sacramento 111, Minnesota 108
Memphis 82, Milwaukee 77
Houston 103, New Orleans 100
San Antonio 109, Utah 105
Phoenix 121, L.A. Lakers 114
Portland 108, Cleveland 96
Denver 123, Golden State 116
L.A. Clippers 129, Dallas 127
Thursday’sGames
Brooklyn vs. Atlanta at London, England, noon
New York at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Houston, 6:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 46 29 15 2 60 132 102
Tampa Bay 47 28 15 4 60 136 113
Montreal 47 26 16 5 57 118 111
Toronto 49 24 20 5 53 136 149
Detroit 46 20 16 10 50 118 127
Ottawa 47 21 18 8 50 134 146
Florida 46 18 21 7 43 109 141
Buffalo 46 13 27 6 32 83 129
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 48 34 12 2 70 156 115
Philadelphia 47 24 19 4 52 125 132
Washington 47 22 17 8 52 140 141
N.Y. Rangers 48 24 21 3 51 119 126
New Jersey 48 20 18 10 50 112 118
Columbus 46 22 20 4 48 129 131
Carolina 46 19 18 9 47 111 130
N.Y. Islanders 48 18 23 7 43 132 156
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 49 30 8 11 71 177 135
St. Louis 45 32 8 5 69 163 100
Colorado 46 29 12 5 63 135 117
Minnesota 49 25 19 5 55 118 122
Dallas 46 21 18 7 49 132 141
Nashville 48 20 21 7 47 113 143
Winnipeg 48 20 23 5 45 133 146
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 48 35 8 5 75 161 119
San Jose 47 29 12 6 64 150 117
Los Angeles 47 28 14 5 61 120 96
Vancouver 47 24 14 9 57 123 115
Phoenix 46 21 16 9 51 135 143
Calgary 47 16 25 6 38 105 148
Edmonton 49 15 29 5 35 128 174
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Wednesday’sGames
Toronto 4, Buffalo 3, SO
Pittsburgh 4,Washington 3
Vancouver at Anaheim, late
Thursday’sGames
Detroit at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m.
Nashville at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Montreal at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m.
San Jose at Florida, 4:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Edmonton at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Boston at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Winnipeg at Calgary, 6 p.m.
Vancouver at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
THURSDAY
Girls’ soccer
Hillsdale at San Mateo,South City at Jeffer-
son, Mills at El Camino, Half Moon Bay at
Oceana, Westmoor at Capuchino, 3 p.m.;
Notre Dame-Belmont at St.Ignatius,3:15 p.m.;
Sequoia at Woodside, Aragon at Carlmont,
Burlingame at Menlo-Atherton, 4 p.m.
Wrestling
Terra Nova at Sequoia, El Camino at Half
Moon Bay, South City at Capuchino, Aragon
at Menlo-Atherton, Hillsdale at Woodside,
Oceana at Mills, 7 p.m.
Boys’ basketball
Serra at Valley Christian, 7:30 p.m.
Boys’ soccer
St. Ignatius at Serra, 3:15 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Castilleja at Mercy-Burlingame, 6:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
Boys’ soccer
Westmoor vs. South City at Skyline College,
Hillsdale at Mills,Terra Nova at Jefferson, Ca-
puchino at El Camino,3 p.m.; Crystal Springs
at Harker, Sacred Heart Prep at Pinewood, 3
p.m.; Menlo School at King’s Academy, 3:30
p.m.;Aragon at Menlo-Atherton,Burlingame
at Sequoia,San Mateo at Half Moon Bay,Carl-
mont at Woodside, 4 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Sacred Heart Prep at Pinewod, 6 p.m.; Hills-
dale at Capuchino,San Mateo at Aragon,Mills
at Burlingame,Sequoia at Woodside,Menlo-
Atherton at Carlmont, Oceana at Half Moon
Bay,Westmoor at South City,Terra Nova at El
Camino, 6:15 p.m.; Menlo School at Mercy-
SF, 6:30 p.m.; Valley Christian at Notre
Dame-Belmont, 7:30 p.m.
Boys’ basketball
Menlo School at Priory,6:30 p.m.;King’s Acad-
emy at Crystal Springs, Sacred Heart Prep at
Pinewood, 7:30 p.m.; San Mateo at Argon,
Hillsdale at Capuchino, Mills at Burlingame,
Sequoia at Woodside, Menlo-Atherton at
Carlmont, Oceana at Half Moon Bay, West-
morr at South City, Terra Nova at El Camino,
7:45 p.m.
SATURDAY
Boys’ basketball
Bellarmine at Serra, 7:30 p.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
NBA
BOSTONCELTICS—Assigned G Rajon Rondo to
Maine (NBADL).
CHICAGOBULLS —Recalled G Marquis Teague
from Iowa (NBADL).
GOLDENSTATEWARRIORS—Sent GToneyDou-
glas to Miami, who sent C Joel Anthony, a 2015
first-round draft pick, a 2016 second-round draft
pick and cash considerations to Boston. Boston
sent Gs Jordan Crawford and MarShon Brooks to
Golden State.
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Recalled G Lorenzo
Brown from Delaware (NBADL).
NFL
MIAMI DOLPHINS—Named Bill Lazor offensive
coordinator.
MINNESOTAVIKINGS — Named Mike Zimmer
coach.
NEWYORK GIANTS — Fired tight ends coach
Michael Pope andrunningbacks coachJerald
Ingram.
NEWYORKJETS—Signed C Jacolby Ashworth,S
Brandon Hardin and DB Nick Taylor to reserve/fu-
ture contracts.
WASHINGTONREDSKINS—Promotedtight ends
coach Sean McVay to offensive coordinator.
NHL
NHL PLAYERS ASSOCIATION — F Jamie Lan-
genbrunner announced his retirement.
ANAHEIMDUCKS —Recalled G Frederik Ander-
sen from Norfolk (AHL).
EDMONTONOILERS—Traded G Devan Dubnyk
to Nashville for F Matt Hendricks.
LOS ANGELES KINGS —Assigned F Tyler Toffoli
to Manchester (AHL).Traded G Ben Scrivens to Ed-
monton for a 2014 third-round draft pick.Recalled
G Martin Jones from Manchester.
MONTREAL CANADIENS — Assigned D Matt
Grassi from Hamilton (AHL) to Wheeling (ECHL).
NEWYORKISLANDERS—Loaned F Ryan Strome
to Bridgeport (AHL).
NEWYORKRANGERS—Assigned G Scott Stajcer
from Hartford (AHL) to Florida (ECHL) and G Jason
Missiaen from Hartford to Greenville (ECHL).
OTTAWA SENATORS — Reassigned F Jean-
Gabriel PageautoBinghamton(AHL).
BASEBALL
National League
MILWAUKEEBREWERS—SignedLHPZachDuke
to a minor league contract.
WASHINGTONNATIONALS—Announcedafour-
year working agreement with Harrisburg (EL).
AmericanLeague
BOSTONREDSOX—Agreed to terms with RHP
Burke Badenhop on a one-year contract.
CLEVELAND INDIANS —Signed LHP Josh Out-
man to a one-year contract.
TEXAS RANGERS —Agreed to terms with LHP
Neal Cotts on a one-year contract.
TRANSACTIONS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — New baseball union
head Tony Clark says players won’t
agree to terminating contracts as part
of discipline for drug violations.
Clark took over as executive direc-
tor of the Major League Baseball
Players Association following
Michael Weiner’s death in November
and expects talks on possible
changes to the drug agreement to start
before spring training.
Commissioner Bud Selig proposed
last March that drug penalties be
toughened, but Weiner had said any
alterations would be discussed for the
2014 season.
Clark also anticipated players will
agree before the upcoming season to
ban home plate collisions and to
allow expanded instant replay, which
also requires a deal between Major
League Baseball and the umpires’
union.
Since the start of the 2006 season,
MLB’s drug agreement has called for
50-game suspensions for a first posi-
tive test for performance-enhancing
drugs, 100 games for a second and a
lifetime ban for a third.
Some players have agreed with
Selig’s call for harsher penalties, and
some spoke out after shortstop
Jhonny Peralta finished a 50-game
suspension, left Detroit as a free agent
and agreed to a $53 million, four-year
contract with St. Louis.
“It pays to cheat... Thanks, owners,
for encouraging PED use,” Arizona
pitcher Brad Ziegler tweeted in
November.
Players won’t
allow deals
to be voided
16
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Last year, a lot of the criticism of
Kaepernick surrounded his multitude of tat-
toos. This playoff season, it was his “mock-
ing” of Carolina quarterback Cam Newton.
Since entering the league, Newton has
chosen the “Superman pose” as his end zone
celebration. One in which he pretends to
tear apart his shirt to expose Superman’s
“S” underneath it.
Sunday after scoring during the 49ers’ 23-
10 win over Carolina, Kaepernick started to
rip open his shirt, only to pretend to button
it up before doing his own end zone celebra-
tion of “Kaepernicking,” where he kisses
his bicep.
Since that little incident, one online —
reporter? Blogger? — used it to call
Kaepernick and the 49ers the “bad boys” of
the NFL.
I literally laughed out loud. You’ve got to
be kidding. Kaepernick is the not the first
— nor will he be the last — football player
to mock another in the end zone.
Let’s face it. This is a new era of NFL quar-
terbacks. Young and brash, players like
Kaepernick and Newton view themselves as
more than just quarterbacks. Watch any
number of running backs or wide receivers
who score. Very seldom do you see any of
them simply hand the ball to the referee or
go with the old-school spike. Those posi-
tion players have their end zone routines,
why not quarterbacks who score?
Besides, I don’t mind a little theatrics in
the end zone. What gets me are all the cele-
brations after mundane plays. The jump-up-
and-signal-first-down celebrations are the
worst, followed by the sack dances of defen-
sive players.
I wouldn’t miss seeing those celebrations
fall by the wayside.
***
The Burlingame Panther Booster Club is
offering a little incentive for those fans who
show up early to the quad games Friday
night when Burlingame hosts Mills.
The first 25 fans who show up at the
beginning of each of the four games will
receive a free order of nachos from the BHS
Athletic Booster Snack Shack.
That’s right, be one of the first 25 fans at
the frosh-soph girls’ game (3:15 p.m.), the
frosh-soph boys’ game (4:45), the varsity
girls’ game (6:15 p.m.) and the boys’ varsi-
ty game (7:45 p.m.) will get free food.
I don’t know how they’ll determine that
after the first 25 fans at the start of the first
game, but I’m just the messenger.
And by the way — players, cheerleaders,
coaches and administrators are not eligible.
What about sports reporters?
Nathan Mollat can be reached by phone: 344-5200
ext. 117 or by email: nathan@smdailyjournal.com.
You follow him on Twitter@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
season-ending ankle injury on a cut block by
Seattle right guard J.R. Sweezy.
Dorsey watched the 49ers during last year’s
postseason, noticing “a team that fights, a
physical team on both sides of the ball, spe-
cial teams.”
“Everybody works well together,” he said.
“We have a mindset that we’re going to work
hard no matter what. The weather, whatever it
might be, whoever the opponent might be,
guys just have it in their mind just to come
out and grind it out no matter what.”
His teammates learned in a hurry about
Dorsey’s dedication, watching him emerge in
a defense defined by its hard hits and work
ethic behind the scenes. That was among the
first things Tomsula talked about with Dorsey
during his visit last year.
“He’s the kind of guy everybody should
have on their team,” fellow lineman Ray
McDonald said. “I saw the way he worked this
offseason. He works real hard at his craft and
it’s showing up on the field.”
The 28-year-old Dorsey doesn’t seem to
mind a degree of anonymity and won’t create
the kind of fanfare associated with line mates
McDonald or Justin Smith.
Regardless, Fangio said they all feed off
each other.
“Those guys just follow along. And if they
don’t, they’re going to get chastised,”
Fangio said. “Ray is the next leader and he’s
right there with Justin and he’s a workout war-
rior, too. So, I think that’s a big thing that
played a big part in Glenn Dorsey coming
along and having his best year. He threw him-
self right in there with those guys from Day
1, almost the day after he signed and was here
all offseason. And it’s paying dividends for
him now.”
That first impression with Tomsula 10
months ago, not to mention last season’s
Super Bowl berth, went a long way in
Dorsey’s decision.
“Of course,” he said. “Everybody watches
the 49ers play, even getting off the plane and
getting here and meeting everybody, you
kind of can sense it, that everybody in here is
going to fight till the end. During a season,
nobody prepares to go home. It’s just a mind-
set that you’re going to have a long season
and play in the postseason. It’s fun, and I’m
enjoying it.”
Continued from page 11
49ERS
will make. So I have no worry about that. I
think the ultimate goal is for us to win foot-
ball games and to be explosive and make
the clutch play when we need to make the
clutch play. ”
Ultimately, it’s Wilson’s job to be a care-
taker of the ball and not take undue risks in
the passing game. That’s what Carroll
wants from his quarterback, and Wilson fol-
lows, sometimes to the point of frustration
by fans. Carroll was asked this week if he
thought Wilson was being too conserva-
tive.
“No, I really haven’t,” he said.
Carroll believes that because being too
aggressive can sometimes lead to turnovers
and no one values possession more than
Seattle. That’s why the Seahawks led the
NFLthis season with a plus-20 turnover dif-
ferential — they were extremely aggressive
on defense and cautious on offense.
“I never play scared. I never have, I never
will,” Wilson said. “I think that for me, in
terms of decision-making, I always try to
make the smart decision.”
What Seattle has really been missing over
the past five weeks is the ability to estab-
lish a passing game down the field beyond
intermediate routes.
According to information from STATS
Inc., Seattle has completed just 2 of 16
passes with one touchdown and two inter-
ceptions on passes that have traveled more
than 21 yards in the past five games. Even
the intermediate passing game of throws
between 11 and 20 yards is lacking, with
Wilson going 13 of 24.
Seattle’s never been a team to make an
excessive number of throws downfield, but
it was always part of the game plan. In each
of the first 13 games this season, Wilson
had at least one completion on a pass of 21
or more yards. He was first shut out in Week
14 at San Francisco, which coincided with
Seattle’s offensive sputtering.
“I feel like early in the season we took a
lot of shots downfield and the defenses have
taken notice to that and are trying to limit
that,” wide receiver Jermaine Kearse said. “I
feel like we just have to continue to stay at
it, continue to practice our game plan and
just let the plays come to us.”
Continued from page 11
SEAHAWKS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon
Clowney and Texas A&M quarterback Johnny
Manziel headline a record number of underclass-
men entering the NFL draft heading into
Wednesday night’s deadline.
At least 90 players who had college eligibili-
ty remaining are expected to enter the draft,
shattering last year’s record number of 73.
“It’s a humongous number, so the first reac-
tion is it makes you step back a little bit,” said
NFL Network draft analyst Daniel Jeremiah, a
former scout with the Baltimore Ravens,
Cleveland Browns and Philadelphia Eagles.
“What I’m hearing is that the agents always
have to make the sales pitch to get these to
come out. This year, what I’ve been told is the
sales pitch is that all your money right now is
coming from the second contract, so you need
to come out early so you can get to that second
contract a year earlier ... and apparently it’s
been pretty effective.”
ESPN analyst Mel Kiper Jr. released a mock
draft Wednesday in which 23 of the 32 first-
round picks were early entries. Kiper had
Manziel going first overall and included
Clowney, UCF quarterback Blake Bortles and
Clemson wide receiver Sammy Watkins as top-
five picks. Jeremiah’s list of the top 50 draft
prospects includes early entries in the top three
spots: Clowney at No. 1, Watkins at No. 2 and
Auburn offensive tackle Greg Robinson at No.
3.
“It’s going to be a huge number of underclass-
men that go high and have long careers,”
Jeremiah said. “And there are going to be some
other guys who don’t get drafted and will be in a
tough spot and would have been better served to
go back to school. It works both ways.”
Record number of underclassmen entering NFL draft
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
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By Sean Conway
TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY
When people visit our home, they
must pass through a large portion of
the garden before arriving at the front
door. Around this time of year, the
first question I get asked once they
get inside is: “How come your garden
isn’t dead? It’s winter!”
What prompts this question are the
elements of my garden I call “winter
interest” plants. These are plants
with patterned or exfoliating bark,
evergreen foliage, interesting archi-
tectural form or colorful berries.
Winter interest plants keep a garden
interesting, preventing it from look-
ing completely dormant.
In my Northeast garden, the winter
season typically lasts from mid
December until mid-April. This year,
“winter” technically arrived in the
fall and brought with it freezing tem-
peratures and early snow, thanks to a
large southern dip in the jet stream.
My garden is somewhat mature,
having been cultivated for close to
60 years by two different owners. It is
divided into several distinct areas.
The area up around the house com-
prises about a half an acre. More than
two-thirds of the plants and trees in
this area are evergreen in nature.
These plants make up a diverse
group and include everything from
ground covers and perennials to
shrubs and trees. There are both nee-
dled and flat-leaved conifers, broad-
leaved evergreens such as rhododen-
drons, laurels and hollies, vines, and
even an elegant native magnolia that
doesn’t drop its leaves until late
spring. The one thing these diverse
elements have in common is they all
hold onto their leaves over the win-
ter, making the garden seem “alive”
even on the coldest days. A garden
containing nothing but deciduous
plants just can’t do that.
Somehow over the years, the word
“evergreen” became associated with
spruce trees and arborvitae. While it
is true that both of those commonly
planted stalwarts are evergreens,
there are dozens and dozens of other
evergreen plants that can be incorpo-
rated into a landscape.
One of my favorite evergreens
helps my garden look interesting all
winter and is a real workhorse. It
looks good almost all year and does
so without needing to send up a
flower stalk in order to be noticed. In
fact, since it is a fern, the whole
plant goes unnoticed during the
spring and summer months when
other plants are putting on their
annual displays.
Ferns as a whole get sold short in
the gardening world, but they are
some of the most useful plants for the
garden. Many tolerate periods of
drought while still looking elegant,
and they look good planted alone or
in large swaths.
Lining the walkway to my front
door is one of my favorite ferns,
Polystichium polyblepharum, or
Japanese tassel fern. Don’t let the
plant’s Latin name put you off. This
evergreen fern, native to Japan, is
one beautiful plant!
Japanese tassel fern begins its
growing cycle in the early spring by
unfurling fuzzy brown, tightly curled
fronds referred to as croziers. While
the plant’s fronds unfurl the tips lay
backwards creating what looks like
“tassels.” After about a week, depend-
ing on temperatures, the fronds grow
through this phase and unfurl fully
into a 12-inch long frond, dark green
in color with a “shiny” upper surface.
They are not bothered by pests and
can tolerate a fair amount of sun,
although they prefer to grow in dap-
pled sunlight or light shade.
They look good all summer, but it
isn’t until other plants start dying
down in the autumn that the Japanese
tassel fern really starts to stand out.
The sturdy green fronds pay no atten-
tion to cold weather and short, dark
days.
Mine flank the walkway to our
front door like an honor guard on duty
until spring. When spring finally
does arrive, the year old fronds fall
away and new ones emerge from the
crown of the plant, starting the cycle
again.
If you want to keep your garden
interesting all winter long, consider
planting evergreens. And if that word
conjures images of boring pre-
dictability, you might be surprised by
what you’re missing.
Even in winter, your garden can flourish
Magnolias keep their foliage through the cold season,making
them a great ‘winter interest’ element in your garden.
18
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
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FEBRUARY 1 – MARCH 31, 2014
39876
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Rebarts Interiors
247 California Dr., Burlingame
990 Industrial Rd #106, San Carlos
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By Kim Cook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
With the advent of tablets, cell-
phones and e-readers, could the book-
lined home library go the way of the
formal dining room?
Not a chance, designers and retailers
say.
Digital and print books can co-
exist, says House Beautiful’s editor in
chief Newell Turner.
“When there’s an endless river of
(digital) content, the words, text and
images we choose to print and bind
into a physical book will make (it)
even more special,” he said.
And books, in their variety of
shapes and sizes, can be art in their
own right, he says. Certainly, many
people display richly illustrated coffee
table books. And at Hearst’s October
2013 Designer Visions show house in
New York, Jamie Drake took the
books-as-art notion literally: For his
House Beautiful apartment, he turned
large books spine sides in and stacked
them geometrically in wall recesses to
flank a fireplace as sculptural art.
“Books are precious and beautiful,
both their contents and materials. I
was inspired to provoke thoughts,
placing the bulk of the spines away
from the viewer, thus highlighting the
thousands of paper pages and creating
a sense of desire to discover what lies
within,” he says.
For Elle Decor at the show house,
Alessandra Branca created a warm, inti-
mate library with just two book-
shelves and a chrome easel for a flat-
screen television. A large Candida
Hofer photograph of Dublin’s Trinity
College Library provided a trompe
l’oeil effect, as if the library extended
into the image. Branca imagined the
space, which included walls covered in
chocolatey faux bois (wood-grain
appearance) sateen and a plump sofa
blanketed in tartan, as a room where
you could store favorite vintage books
but also use a digital reader.
“Nothing can replace the wonderful
feel of sitting curled up with a book, or
the happenstance of discovering a
book on the shelf that you haven’t
seen for a while, particularly books on
art, architecture or design,” she say. “I
think we’ll always love the physical
aspect of a book in hand, but I’ve
found I buy more and more of my new
fiction online.”
New York interior designer Elaine
Griffin sees the role of home libraries
changing.
“We’ve come a long way from the
English country home-inspired
libraries of the ’80s — those spaces
that looked like Carson (the butler on
“Downton Abbey”) might come in at
any moment to do a little dusting,”
Griffin says. “Today’s home libraries
are retreats, actually — places to
retreat as an individual from the more
chaotic, group-themed spaces of the
rest of the house.”
Home libraries are reading sanctuar-
ies, she says, but clients often want a
TV included. “The space is an alterna-
tive to the Great Room, used for solo
viewing, for snuggling, for seclu-
sion.”
Many modern bookshelves are
multi-purpose, with space to display
objects as well as reading matter. All
Modern stocks TFG Connections’
black powder-coated steel frame with
java oak shelves; the components can
be configured a number of ways.
Modloft’s Pearl bookcase has open
shelves in a contemporary zigzag
design; finishes include white, wenge
(a dark wood) and walnut with chrome
supports.
Create an enveloped space by run-
ning shelves up to the ceiling; wood
tones keep the ambience warm, but
consider white or even an interesting
color — creamy yellow or rich carmine
(deep red), for example — so books,
accessories and art will pop. Add a
rolling library ladder; Home Depot
offers several in maple, cherry or oak
finishes.
Spanish design house Playoffice
turns a run-of-the-mill home library
into a playhouse with a sturdy mesh
net suspended across the whole space
like an enormous hammock. Kids (and
adults) can take pillows and books up
to the net to read and, literally, hang
out.
The studio has also designed a clever
“Secret Reading” wall — a series of
cupboards made from inexpensive
chipboard that includes bookshelves
and kid-size cushioned cubbies. Doors
can be closed to hide the secret readers
and other stuff. Puck lights are built
into the cubby ceilings.
Right at Home: Personal libraries are retreats
Many modern bookshelves are multi-purpose, with space to
display objects as well as reading matter.
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
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Everything from blueberries to persimmons, citrus to currents can be grown in containers.
By Dean Fosdick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Many fruit growers are going to pots,
and small wonder. Containers are great for
tight spaces, easy to manage, convenient
for harvesting, and provide better soil
than is found in most gardens.
“They also allow growing more experi-
mental fruit, such as warm climate or trop-
ical ones, if pots can be moved inside in
winter,”’ said Leonard Perry, an extension
professor with the University of Vermont.
Everything from blueberries to persim-
mons, citrus to currents can be grown in
containers. And don’t forget that old
standby, the clay strawberry pot.
Some potted fruit, though, may sur-
prise.
“Pineapples are one of the easiest warm-
climates fruit to grow in pots,” Perry said.
“There are even some grapes suited for
containers.”
Potting fruit does pose challenges dif-
ferent from those encountered when grow-
ing fruit in the ground. Some things to
consider:
• Pot size: You can get by with smaller
containers and less re-potting if you
choose wisely. It all depends on the plant.
“You may need to re-pot every three to
five years, trimming off some of the older
roots, to keep plants vigorous,” Perry
said.
“Blueberries are one of the best choices
for containers. Look for one of the newer
cultivars bred for containers — a half-
high or low bush. These can be grown in
pots a foot or so wide. For dwarf fruit
trees, use plastic containers or a whiskey
barrel half, 18 to 24 inches wide,” he
said. “Casters on the bottom make con-
tainers easier to move about a patio, or
inside in winter in colder climates.”
• Watering: Plants in containers dry out
more quickly than those in the ground,
and need more frequent watering.
• Fertilizing: It’s safe to wait a few
weeks before fertilizing since most con-
tainer soils include fertilizers. Water-solu-
ble, slow-release fertilizers generally
work best. Their small capsules gradually
dissolve when watered, adding nutrients to
the plant mix.
• Soil types: “Pots create different
drainage and air properties than soils, so
don’t use straight garden soil for fruit in
pots,” Perry said. “Use half-bagged top-
soil or potting soil, with half organic
matter such as peat moss or compost.
Leave a couple of inches free on the top
for adding fresh compost each spring.”
• Longevity and yields: You naturally
sacrifice yields by growing in small pots,
said Elmer Kidd, chief production officer
for Stark Bro’s Nurseries & Orchards Co.
in Louisiana, Mo. Nutrition and watering
are far more important with containerized
plants. “For those who want to participate
in the gardening realm by growing in
pots, their efforts can be respectable if
their level of care is good,” Kidd said.
For those who can’t decide which fruit to
grow, grafting can offer more choices.
Consider taking what John Duarte, presi-
dent of Duarte Nursery Inc. in Hughson,
Calif., calls the “Cocktail Tree” route.
Duarte Nursery creates trees with different
varieties of the same fruit or different fruit
species. Acocktail tree can be a peach tree
that has an early-, mid- or late-season
peach variety, or it can be a combination
of peach, plum, apricot or nectarine — all
on the same tree.
“I like the fruit combinations best, but
I’ve had better customer feedback about
trees with a single fruit but producing at
different times,” Duarte said.
Gardening small? Many fruit grow in containers
DATBEOOK 20
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, JAN. 16
Lifetree Cafe Conversations:
Mysteries of Mental Illness. 9:15
a.m. Bethany Lutheran Church, 1095
Cloud Ave., Menlo Park. Free. Includes
complimentary snacks and bever-
ages. For more information email
Angelina Ortiz at angelina@bethany-
mp.org.
Retired Public Employees’
Association Lunch Meeting. 11 a.m.
Elks Lodge, 229 W. 20th Ave., San
Mateo. $18. For more information call
738-2285.
San Mateo Chapter 139 will hold
AARP Meeting. Noon. Beresford
Recreation Center, 2720 Alameda de
las Pulgas, San Mateo.
CSM Painting Class Exhibition.
Noon to 4 p.m. Twin Pines Art Center
Manor House, 10 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont. Through Jan. 31. For more
information call the Twin Pines
Manor House at 654-4068.
Preview to Rx by Kate Fodor. 8 p.m.
Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. Reserve the VIP box
for champagne and chocolates.
Parking is free at the county garage,
with free shuttle Friday and Saturday
nights. For more information and
tickets go to tickets@dragonproduc-
tions.net.
FRIDAY, JAN. 17
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Enjoy a variety
of Lego creations made by members
of the club, featuring train layouts,
Bay Area landmarks, castles, minia-
ture cities, sculptures and more.
Admission is $2. Exhibit runs through
Jan. 19 on Fridays, Saturdays and
Sundays.
Lecture on the Basics of Estate
Planning. Noon. San Mateo County
Law Library, 710 Hamilton St.,
Redwood City. Learn the basics
about living trusts, wills, powers of
attorney and health care directives.
Find out what these documents do
and why you need them for yourself
and your family in this easy to under-
stand presentation by attorney Julie
C. Lanz. Free. For more information
call 363-4913.
CSM Painting Class Exhibition.
Noon to 4 p.m. Twin Pines Art Center
Manor House, 10 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont. Through Jan. 31. For more
information call the Twin Pines
Manor House at 654-4068.
‘Spirit of Uganda.’ 7 p.m. Sequoia
High School, Carrington Hall, 1201
Brewster Ave., Redwood City. A group
of children from Uganda perform riv-
eting dancing, drumming and
singing from East Africa. This per-
formance is organized by, and bene-
fits, Empower African Children.
Tickets are $25. For more information
and to purchase tickets go to
http://www.eventbrite.com/e/spirit-
of-uganda-2014-at-carrington-hall-
s equoi a- hi gh- s chool - t i cket s -
9520559249.
Rose Pruning and Winter Care. 7:30
p.m. Redwood City Veterans
Memorial Senior Center, 1455
Madison Ave., Redwood City. Rose
dormant pruning and winter
careConsulting Rosarian Patti Motta
and expert rosarians will demon-
strate dormant pruning and winter
care of roses. Free. For more informa-
tion call 465-3967.
Foster City Monthly Social Dance.
7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Foster City
Recreation Center, 650 Shell Blvd.,
Foster City. East Coast Swing lessons
from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Ballroom
dance party 8:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.
Snacks included. Couples and singles
welcome. $12 from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m., which includes dance lesson.
$10 after 8:30 p.m. For more informa-
tion contact Cheryl Steeper at 571-
0836.
Al-Anon Meeting. 7:30 p.m. The
Community Church, 1336 Arroyo
Drive at Elm Street, San Carlos. Is
someone’s drinking hurting you?
Find help at an Al-anon family
groups meeting. For more informa-
tion contact
agotasrecovery@gmail.com.
Peninsula Symphony Presents
Eigsti, Brubeck and Gershwin. 8
p.m. to 10 p.m. San Mateo
Performing Arts Center, 600 N.
Delaware St., San Mateo. A nod to
three of history’s great jazz artists
who are at home in the symphonic
scene. $20-$40. For more information
go to www.peninsulasymphony.org.
‘Rx’ by Kate Fodor opens Dragon
Theatre’s 2014 Main Stage Season.
8 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. What if
there were a happy pill that could
take away all the stresses and strains
of life? That’s the premise of ‘Rx,’ the
latest play from Kate Fodor (’100
Saints You Should Know’). The pro-
duction is rated R. Shows though
Feb. 9. Opening night gala after Jan.
17 show. $30 and $10 rush tickets on
Thursdays and Fridays. For more
information go to http://dragonpro-
ductions.net.
SATURDAY, JAN. 18
SingFest! 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 178
Clinton St., Redwood City. Join the
Ragazzi Boys Chorus for a free half-
day of musical games and fun. Boy
between ages 7 to 10 who love to
sing are invited to participate. Pre-
registration is required. To pre-regis-
ter or for more information go to
www.ragazzi.org or call 342-8785.
Volunteer Information Session. 10
a.m. Little House Activity Center, Lucy
Uhl Room, 800 Middle Ave., Menlo
Park. Learn how you can help seniors
in our community. For more informa-
tion contact mrached@peninsulavol-
unteers.org.
South San Francisco AARP Chapter
Meeting. 10:30 a.m. Magnolia Senior
Center (Third Floor), 601 Grand Ave.,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call (415) 467-7205 or
991-4111.
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Enjoy a variety
of Lego creations made by members
of the club, featuring train layouts,
Bay Area landmarks, castles, minia-
ture cities, sculptures and more.
Admission is $2. Exhibit runs through
Jan. 19 on Fridays, Saturdays and
Sundays.
Dad and Me at the Library. 11:15
a.m. Woodside Library, 3140
Woodside Road, Woodside. Free. For
more information go to www.father-
hoodcollaborative.org.
Oysters and Chardonnay Open
Day. Noon to 4 p.m. La Honda
Winery, 2645 Fair Oaks Ave.,
Redwood City. Fresh $1 oysters; five
fine wines and cheese for $10. For
more information call 366-4104.
CSM Painting Class Exhibition.
Noon to 4 p.m. Twin Pines Art Center
Manor House, 10 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont. Through Jan. 31,
Wednesdays to Sundays from noon
to 4 p.m. For more information call
the Twin Pines Manor House at 654-
4068.
Dad and Me at the Library. 2 p.m.
Main South San Francisco Library,
840 W. Orange Ave., South San
Francisco. Free. For more information
go to www.fatherhoodcollabora-
tive.org.
Art Liason hosts an artists’ recep-
tion. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Mistral
Restaurant and Bar, 370 Bridge
Parkway, Redwood Shores. For more
information go to artliasons.com or
call 596-0868.
‘Rx’ by Kate Fodor opens Dragon
Theatre’s 2014 Main Stage Season.
8 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. The pro-
duction is rated R. Shows runs
through Feb. 9. $30 tickets. For more
information go to http://dragonpro-
ductions.net.
SUNDAY, JAN. 19
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Enjoy a variety
of Lego creations made by members
of the club, featuring train layouts,
Bay Area landmarks, castles, minia-
ture cities, sculptures and more.
Admission is $2. Exhibit runs through
Jan. 19 on Fridays, Saturdays, and
Sundays.
CSM Painting Class Exhibition.
Noon to 4 p.m. Twin Pines Art Center
Manor House, 10 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont. Runs to Jan. 31,
Wednesdays to Sundays from noon
to 4 p.m. For more information call
the Twin Pines Manor House at 654-
4068.
Third Sunday Ballroom Tea Dance
With Bob Gutierrez Band. 1 p.m. to
3 p.m. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno. $5.
For more information call 616-7150.
Third Sunday Book Sale. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. For more information go
to www.friendsofscl.org.
‘Rx’ by Kate Fodor opens Dragon
Theatre’s 2014 Main Stage Season.
2 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. The pro-
duction is rated R. Through Feb. 9.
$30 tickets. For more information go
to http://dragonproductions.net.
The Dream Marches On With
Clayborne Carson. 3 p.m. to 4:30
p.m. First United Methodist Church,
625 Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto.
Clayborne Carson will be the guest
speaker. Free. For more information
call 856-3780.
Mike Galisatus Big Band. 4:30 p.m.
Douglas Beach House, 307 Miranda
Road, Half Moon Bay. Swinging big
band standards by 17 Bay Area musi-
cians and vocalist Duane Lawrence.
$35. For more information go to
www.bachddsoc.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
these same officials say they are large-
ly taking a wait-and-see approach
because it is unclear whether a poten-
tial buyer will continue operating
Seton Medical Center and Seton
Coastside and, if so, commit to exist-
ing arrangements with San Mateo
County for its low-income patients.
“Until that is resolved, it’s pretty
hard to answer what will happen,” said
County Manager John Maltbie.
The Board of Supervisors earlier this
year committed $11.5 million in
Measure A half-cent sales tax revenue
to Seton Medical Center for mandato-
ry seismic upgrades at the Daly City
hospital. Seton and DCHS donated
more than $1.5 million to the pro-
Measure A committee. The contribu-
tions provided the lion’s share of the
funds used to pass the half-cent sales
tax measure. The allocation agreement
is predicated on Seton continuing its
provision of safety net services at cur-
rent levels and using no less than $2
million on the state-mandated seismic
fixes. Seton is also currently working
on a strategic business plan, half
funded by the county, on which a
longer-term arrangement — if still
valid depending on the potential sale
— will be based.
Maltbie said the agreement between
Seton and Health Plan San Mateo com-
mits the funds through the end of this
fiscal year and, since any Daughters of
Charity sale is unlikely to finalize
before June 30, 2014, he anticipates
honoring that arrangement without
amendment.
“So long as Seton continues to
operate under that provision I see no
change,” he said.
Meanwhile, Maltbie said he has
asked Health Plan San Mateo and the
Health System to look at contingency
planning so that there will be alterna-
tive plans available if the new owner
does not operate the hospital or oper-
ate it under the same terms.
Health System Chief Jean Fraser
called Seton’s commitment to patient
care at all income levels a great asset
and she hopes for a purchaser with the
same resolution.
“Should that not happen, however,
the Health System, along with other
providers, will do our best to ensure
that patients' needs are met elsewhere
in the community,” said Fraser in a
prepared statement.
For its part, the Daughters of
Charity Health System said in its
Monday sale announcement it is seek-
ing potential buyers sharing its
vision to protect the existing care and
jobs. The Board of Directors said it is
soliciting proposals from Catholic,
public, nonprofit and for-profit
groups. The hospital had been
mulling a permanent merger with
Ascension Health but opted instead
for a chain-wide sale after the idea fiz-
zled.
“[T]he realities of modern health
care are harsh, and after prayerful dis-
cernment, it became clear that the
responsible thing to do is to find new
ownership, blessed with the resources
necessary to thrive,” said board Chair
Sr. Marjory Ann Baez in a prepared
statement.
DCHS did not disclose an asking
price.
The system’s financial challenges
were a factor in San Mateo County
officials’ decision to include aiding
private Seton hospital with state-
required infrastructure upgrades using
public money. The county’s public
hospital, San Mateo Medical Center,
is located in San Mateo and clinics are
located throughout the county includ-
ing one in Daly City. However, Seton
Medical Center also accepts a large
number of the county’s indigent and
serves the northern end so officials
were concerned that its possible shut-
tering would further tax the overall
Health System and leave patients
without easy access to care.
Those same worries now shadow the
potential sale of Seton and Seton
Coastside in Moss Beach. Each facili-
ty is also a large employer in their
respective locations which adds eco-
nomic concerns on top of health care
issues.
Like his county counterparts, Daly
City Mayor David Canepa is also
hopeful the potential sale does not
lead to the loss of Seton. Maintaining
a medical facility is priority number
one for the city, he said, but on the off
chance the real estate is sold for
another use he said a corporate campus
akin to Genentech or Amgen would
bolster Daly City’s bottom line.
Both economic and health pieces are
also concern for county Supervisor
Adrienne Tissier whose district
includes Seton Medical Center.
Tissier, who said she personally uses
Seton for its convenience, is taking
an optimistic approach to the future
although she concedes there are sce-
narios that would tax the health sys-
tem and create a large void. Although
Seton’s financial challenges were no
secret, Tissier said she was surprised
to learn the sale was of all the DCHS
hospitals.
“I never thought it went quite this
far,” she said.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
SETON
Councilman David Lim.
“I’ve expressed some buyer’s
remorse in cutting positions during
the recession,” Lim said. “The council
needs to take some responsibility that
we perhaps asked staff to do more with
less.”
The fact that the department is
becoming swamped again is a good
sign, Lim said. But continuing with a
bare-to-the-bone staff while the mar-
ket began to pick up is what led to the
city’s trouble, Lim said.
The Zucker Systems $45,000 audit
involved in-depth interviews with
staff, customer focus groups and sur-
veys of members of the public who are
currently in the permitting applica-
tion process. Having an external
organization solicit staff on condi-
tion of anonymity gave way to frank,
unfiltered and accurate assessments,
Councilman David Lim said.
“You don’t come up with that many
recommendations without digging
deep. … It’s a genuine reflection of the
organization,” Lim said.
The report prioritizes the recom-
mendations and at the top of the list is
hiring appropriate staff to fill vacant
or only temporarily filed positions.
Of immediate importance is the need
to hire a permanent Community
Development director to oversee the
implementation of the Zucker sugges-
tions, Ross said.
Making sure information is not lost
by the wayside and is accurately com-
municated to each staff member
throughout the application process is
critical, said Interim Community
Development Director Rory Walsh.
The city began a $1 million initiative
to implement a software program
known as EnerGov System that will
allow staff to track each application
electronically, Walsh said.
Integrating this risk reduction soft-
ware is a critical piece to ensuring the
department eases its application
processes and upholds the city’s com-
mitment to its customers, Ross said.
Current community development
applications will not be hindered by
the bolstering of the department, said
Interim City Manager Larry Patterson.
“If anything, it could have a posi-
tive impact on current projects,”
Patterson said.
After thoroughly reviewing the
report, the council will determine
which recommendations will be
implemented — and in what order,
Patterson said.
“We’re anxious to move forward
with the implementation of the rec-
ommendations,” Patterson said.
San Mateo can expect to see a per-
manent city manager and Community
Development director some-
time in March or April. The
city wants to move through
the process as quickly as
possible and hopes to have
applied the first round of
prioritized recommenda-
tions in nine months and
the remainder within two to
three years, Patterson said.
“The recommendations
are consistent with our core
principles and allow the
city to look to the future
throughout the implementa-
tion process,” Patterson
said. “We are committed to
serving the San Mateo com-
munity and seeking con-
stant improvement through-
out the organization.”
For a full copy of the
Community Development
Department Management
Audit visit the city’s website
at www.cityofsanmateo.org/
index.aspx?NID=2706.
Continued from page 1
AUDIT
COMICS/GAMES
1-16-14
WEDNESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Cul-de- —
4 Rough it
8 Brass component
12 Unexplained sighting
13 Mixed bag
14 Jeannie portrayer
15 Trigger, e.g.
17 Cut, as wood
18 Road company
19 Supple
21 Juniors
23 Fat fiddle
24 Hay holders
27 Dueler’s weapon
29 Search engine find
30 Eye drop
32 Gather in
36 Chuck wagon dinner
38 Molecule part
40 Type of whiskey
41 Chills
43 Early stages
45 Disappear gradually
47 Feathered has-been
49 Strictness
51 Fragrant trees
55 Roller coaster
56 Fit
58 Livy’s route
59 Manitoba tribe
60 Environmental prefix
61 Velvety plant
62 Northern Iraqi
63 At present
DOWN
1 Bldg. manager
2 In the distance
3 Ariz. neighbor
4 Soil builder
5 ET, e.g.
6 Opposite of max
7 Combine
8 Livelier
9 Wyoming neighbor
10 Stair post
11 MSNBC rival
16 Supplant
20 — got it!
22 Not standing
24 Drag along
25 Hockey great
26 Winter complaint
28 Old hand
31 — de cologne
33 Speaker’s pauses
34 Pro vote
35 Furry companion
37 Pesters
39 Was on a runway
42 Thermal lead-in
44 Knotlike mass
45 Corn chip name
46 Helpers
48 Yellow pigment
50 Pool hall triangle
52 Pharaoh’s god
53 Puerto —
54 Trash hauler
55 Edge
57 Play about Capote
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Listen carefully, but
don’t allow your emotions to sway you in one direction
or another. It would be better to mediate, rather than
participate, in an unwinnable debate.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Show everyone how
capable you are. A proposal will bring in extra cash
and change the way you live. Don’t let a secret affair
cause emotional grief. Honesty is the best policy.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — You can make your
dreams come true with a little time and effort. Join
organizations that share your interests and expertise. A
special person should be treated to a romantic evening.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Your changing or
inconsistent attitude will cause disruptions with the
people you deal with personally and professionally.
Think twice before you make a sudden move.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Relax, and enjoy
friends and family. Make personal changes that
will keep you up to date mentally and physically. A
pleasurable trip will entice you, but caution while
traveling will be essential.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Set your goals high,
and get ready for action. Consultation with experts
will enable you to cut corners and reach your
destination quickly. Mix business with pleasure.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — If you feel uncertain,
step back and observe. The more information you
gather, the easier it will be to make a tough choice.
Refuse to get upset about matters you cannot change.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — An emotional mat ter
will skyrocket if you don’t control the situation.
Prepare to make last-minute changes if it will
help you avoid an unsavory entanglement. Focus
on personal relationships.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Take steps to ensure
that things go the way you plan. Don’t leave
anything to chance, and take steps to correct any
situation that you feel has the potential to head in
the wrong direction.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Too much, too fast
leads to disaster. Watch what everyone else is doing
and protect your interests. Empty promises can be
expected. Get what you want in writing, or take a pass.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Let your mind
wander and your imagination take over. Take a
look at your friendships, lifestyle and home base.
An unconventional arrangement will inspire you to
be more adventuresome.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — An investment
opportunity may look like a sure thing, but look before
you leap. You aren’t likely to have all the facts required
to make an educated choice. Don’t take a risk.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TAXI & Limo Driver, Wanted, full time,
paid weekly, between $500 and $700
cash, (650)921-2071
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
CUSTOMER CONTACT -
OUTSIDE POSITION
FULL TIME/PART TIME
$15.62 per hour start
to $35 per hour
with bonuses
Full training and expenses
Mr. Connors (650)372-2810
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff (easy job)
$9.00 per hr. Apply in Person at or email
resume to info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
OFFICE HELP NEEDED -
Part time, college student welcome. 3
days a week for tax office. Bookeeping
and tax experience preferred. Call
(650)624-9583
110 Employment 110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SENIOR INTEGRATION Engineer (Red-
wood Shores, CA) Implement custom de-
ployments of NICE prod. suite for clients.
Domestic Travel 50% MS or foreign
equiv. in Comp. Apps and 2 yrs. exp. in
integration with enterprise sw. 2 yrs. exp
working on customer-facing sw imple-
mentation projects. 2 yrs. of exp. on im-
plementations and testing methodology.
2 yrs. exp. of data handling and SWL, w
exp. in performance tuning. 2 yrs. experi-
ence leveraging the following tools/tech-
nologies: Relational Databases, SQL,
DBC/JDBC, web servers, app server,
source control, SSO, IP networks, script-
ing languages, SQL Server, Red-hat Li-
nux etc. 2 yrs. exp. writing req. and de-
sign docs, and presenting deliverables
directly to internal and external stake-
holders In lieu of MS. + 2 yrs exp. will ac-
cept Bach + 5 yrs. exp. Exp. may be
gained concurrently. Any suitable combi-
nation of exp, educ or training is accepta-
ble. Mail resume & letter of application
detailing experience to Katie Oaks, HR,
NICE Systems, Inc., 7604 Technology
Way, Denver, Colorado 80237
Katie.Oaks@nice.com.
180 Businesses For Sale
ESTABLISHED BUSINESS FOR SALE
in Downtown San Mateo (510)962-1569
or (650) 347-9490.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259144
The following person is doing business
as: GPB Repair Services, 851 Woodside
Way, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Grigori
Birger, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN.
/s/ Grigori Birger /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/14, 01/16/14, 01/23/14, 01/30/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259119
The following person is doing business
as:Box Lunch Company/Panini Time,
360 Shaw Rd #C, SOUTH SAN FRAN-
CISCO, CA 94080 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Espostos Fine
Foods Inc, same address. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 12/15/2013
/s/ Desiree Esposto /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/14, 01/16/14, 01/23/14, 01/30/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259047
The following person is doing business
as: Hot Wok Bistro, 1012A Howard Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jin Rong
Liang and Tim Lwi, 1761 Doane Ave.,
Mountain View, CA 94043. The business
is conducted by a Married Couple. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN
/s/ Jin Rong Liang/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/14, 01/16/14, 01/23/14, 01/30/14).
23 Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
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LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259132
The following person is doing business
as: Ready Realty, 1700 S. El Camino
Real #345, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Kurt Byer, 1232 Kenilworth Rd, Hillsbor-
ough CA 94010. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN
/s/ Kurt Byer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 1/6/2014. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/14, 01/16/14, 01/23/14, 01/30/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259200
The following person is doing business
as: North Coast Seaweed, 135 Mesa
Verde Way, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Cassandra Bergero and Randy Tan,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Randy Tan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/14/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/14, 01/23/14, 01/30/14, 02/06/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259179
The following person is doing business
as: Esprit de Vie, 336 El Camino Real,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Valerie
Spier, Po Box 547, El Granada, CA
94018. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Valerie Spier /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/10/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/14, 01/23/14, 01/30/14, 02/06/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259199
The following person is doing business
as: Ninja Sushi & Tofu, 681 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: S & J
Total Enterprise, Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ He Jin Park /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/14, 01/23/14, 01/30/14, 02/06/14).
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
IMPORTANT NOTICE
APN: 033-145-140
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST DATED MARCH 2,
2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO
PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY
BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU
NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NA-
TURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON-
TACT A LAWYER.
Notice is hereby given that PHILIP
KEITH, as duly appointed trustee pur-
suant to the Deed of Trust executed by
Juan C. Salgado and Maria R. Salgado,
husband and wife as joint tenants, as
Trustor, dated March 2, 2006 and record-
ed on March 13, 2006, as Instrument No.
2006-035267, of Official Records in the
office of the Recorder of San Mateo
County, CA, will sell on February 18,
2014, at 1:00 P.M., AT THE MARSHALL
STREET ENTRANCE TO THE HALL OF
JUSTICE AND RECORDS, 400 COUN-
TY CENTER, REDWOOD CITY, CALI-
FORNIA 94063, AT PUBLIC AUCTION
TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in cash or
check as described below, payable in full
at the time of sale, all right, title and inter-
est conveyed to and now held by him un-
der said Deed of Trust, in property situat-
ed in said County and State, and as
more fully described in the above refer-
ence Deed of Trust. The street address
and other common designation, if any of
the real property described above is pur-
ported to be: 16 FREMONT STREET,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401, APN 033-145-
140-1. The undersigned Trustee dis-
claims any liability for any incorrectness
203 Public Notices
of the street address and other common
designation, if any, shown herein. Said
sale will be made, but without covenant
or warranty, expressed or implied, re-
garding title, possession, or encumbran-
ces, to pay the remaining unpaid balance
of the obligations secured by the proper-
ty to be sold and reasonable estimated
costs, expenses and advances at the
time of the initial publication of this No-
tice of Trustee's Sale is estimated to be
$269,500.00 (Estimated); provided, how-
ever, prepayment premiums, accrued in-
terest and advances will increase this fig-
ure prior to the sale. Beneficiary's bid at
said sale may include all or part of said
amount. It is possible that at the time of
sale the opening bid may be less than to-
tal indebtedness due. In addition to
cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier's
check drawn on a state or national bank,
a savings and loan association, savings
association or savings bank specified in
Section 5102 of the California Financial
Code and authorized to do business in
California, or other such funds as may be
acceptable to the trustee. In the event
tender other than cash is accepted, the
Trustee may withhold the issuance of the
Trustee's Deed Upon Sale until funds be-
come available to the payee or endorsee
as a matter of right. The property offered
for sale excludes all funds held on ac-
count by the property receiver if applica-
ble. Said sale will be made in an “AS IS”
condition and without covenant or war-
ranty, express or implied regarding title,
possession or encumbrances, to satisfy
the indebtedness secured by Said Deed
of Trust, advances thereunder, with inter-
est as provided, and the unpaid principal
of the note secured by said Deed of
Trust, with interest thereon as provided
in said Note, plus fees, charges and ex-
penses of the Trustee and of the trusts
created by said deed of trust.
NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If
you are considering bidding on this prop-
erty lien, you should understand that
there are risks involved in bidding at a
trustee auction. You will be bidding on a
lien, not on the property itself. Placing
the highest bid at a trustee auction does
not automatically entitle you to free and
clear ownership of the property. You
should also be aware that the lien being
auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you
are the highest bidder at the auction, you
are or may be responsible for paying off
all liens senior to the lien being auctioned
off, before you can receive clear title to
the property. You are encouraged to in-
vestigate the existence, priority, and size
of outstanding liens that may exist on this
property by contacting the county record-
er's office or a title insurance company,
either of which may charge you a fee for
this information. If you consult either of
these resources, you should be aware
that the same lender may hold more than
one mortgage or deed of trust on the
property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The
sale date shown on this notice of sale
may be postponed one or more times by
the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a
court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the
California Civil Code. The law requires
that information about trustee sale post-
ponements be made available to you and
to the public, as a courtesy to those not
present at the sale. If you wish to learn
whether your sale date has been post-
poned, and, if applicable, the resched-
uled time and date for the sale of this
property, you may call at (888) 745-1888
or visit this Internet Web site www.pkeith-
salesinfo.com using the file number as-
signed to this case: 12-2808. Informa-
tion about postponements that are very
short in duration or that occur close in
time to the scheduled sale may not im-
mediately be reflected in the telephone
information. The best way to verify post-
ponement information is to attend the
scheduled sale.
203 Public Notices
DATE: January 8, 2014
__________________________
PHILIP KEITH, Trustee
354 Pine Street, Third Floor
San Francisco, California 94104
Telephone: (415) 433-1790
(Published in the San Mateo Daily Jour-
nal, 01/16/14, 01/23/14, 01/30/14).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ART: 5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”,
signed Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all.
650-345-3277
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! SOLD!
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! (650)430-6556
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! SOLD!
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
(650)430-6556
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL REFRIGERATOR great for of-
fice or studio apartment . Good condition
$40.00 SOLD
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 (650)591-3313
SCHWINN 20” Boy’s Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, SOLD
120 Foreign (70), U.S. (50) USED Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$5.00 all, SOLD
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
298 Collectibles
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRAMED 19X15 BARBIE USPS Post-
mark picture Gallery First Day of issue
1960. Limited edition $85.
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TONKA EXCAVATOR, two arms move,
articulated,only $22 SOLD!
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL floor lamp, marble
table top. Good condition. $90. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL table lamps, (2),
shades need to be redone. Free. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BOX FULL TOYS Original Pkg., 40’s -
50’s, $90 for all (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
30" SHARP T.V. w/ remote - $65.
(650)333-5353
32 “ FLAT SCREEN TV - Slightly Used.
HDMI 1080, $100 SOLD
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPAD 4, brand new! 16 GB, Wi-Fi, black,
still unopened in box. Tired of the same
old re-gifts? Get yourself something you
really want... an iPad! $500. Call
(954)479-8716 (San Carlos)
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PHOTO ENLARGER, new in box $25.
650-726-6429
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO SOLD
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO SOLD
AMOIRE ENTERTAINMENT cabinet $50
(650)622-6695
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
SOLD
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
24
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
304 Furniture
DINETTE SET, round 42" glass table,
with 4 chairs, pick up Foster City. Free.
(650)578-9045
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINNING ROOM table with chairs excel-
lent condition like new. $99.00 SOLD
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50 SOLD
DRESSER - Five Drawer - $30.
(650)333-5353
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $200 OBO
SOLD!
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, SOLD
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $80
RETAIL $130 OBO (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable
coast $600.00 sacrifice $80.00 SOLD
RECLINING CHAIR (Dark Green) - $55.
(650)333-5353
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
304 Furniture
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SMALL VANITY chair with stool and mir-
ror $99. (650)622-6695
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 SOLD!
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
SOFA- FABRIC, beige w/ green stripes
(excellent cond.) - $95. (650)333-5353
SOLID OAK bed frame, dresser, mirror
and night table, $75, 650-726-6429
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
T.V. STAND- Excellent Condition - $35.
(650)333-5353
TABLE 4X4X4. Painted top $40
(650)622-6695
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72” tall x 13”
wide, $20 (650)591-3313
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. SOLD.
TWIN BED including frame good condi-
tion $45.00 SOLD
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE METAL daybed $40. 650-726-
6429
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. SOLD!
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS(3) stainless steel
21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5 gal. - $10 all
(650)574-3229
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GAS STOVE - Roper, Oven w 4 Burners,
good condition $95 (650)515-2605
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
306 Housewares
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 (650)368-0748
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench 20-150 lbs,
warranty & case $25 650-595-3933
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW 18VOLT Drill/Driver w/ light,
warranty, only $29.99 SOLD!
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
WINCHESTER POCKETKNIFE scis-
sors, bade, sdriver file $10 650-595-3933
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
PANASONIC FAX machine, works
great, $20. (650-578-9045)
SLIDE PROJECTOR, Vivitar + slide
trays/carousels $25. 650-726-6429
SUPER 8 projector $25. 650-726-6429
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
16 BOOKS on Histoy if WWII Excllent
condition $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BALANCING SANTA, Mint condition,
Santa rocks back/forth, 20 in high, sturdy
metal, snowman, chimney, $12.00
(650)578-9208
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used
( 26"x49") aqua - $15 each
(650)574-3229
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used(
26"x49") aqua - $15 each (650)574-3229
BLACK LEATHER Organizer, Unop-
ened, Any Year, Cell Holder, Wallet, Cal-
ender., In Box $12 (650)578-9208
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CEILING FAN 44", three lights, Excel-
lent condition, white or wood grain rever-
sible blades. $25. 650-339-1816
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRIC OMELET Maker quesadillas
& sandwich too $9 650-595-3933
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.SOLD!
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO SOLD!
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
310 Misc. For Sale
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 SOLD!
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER CURTAIN set: royal blue
vinyl curtain with white nylon over-curtain
$15 (650)574-3229
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra $35
(650)873-8167
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR no brand $65
(650)348-6428
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, SOLD!
VIOLIN $50 (650)622-6695
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $10
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK JACKET faux, hip length, satin lin-
ing. Looks feels real. Perfect condition
$99 OBO 650-349-6969
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
25 Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 In the know
6 Simplicity
10 Dundee damsel
14 Ledger entry
15 Cannonball, e.g.
16 In the know about
17 “The Caine
Mutiny” novelist
19 Walk or run
20 Some NASA
data-retrieval
missions
21 Invitation “S”
22 Take the wrong
way?
23 Empty (of)
24 “Reward Your
Curiosity” soda
27 Fragrant resin
29 Dusk, to Donne
30 Aus. language
31 Crescent piece
33 Underworld piece
34 Medical
breakthrough
35 17th-century
artistic style
38 Booted, say
40 Org. with
complex
schedules
41 Lump
42 Mr. Potato Head
part
43 Tankard filler
44 Ferry stops
48 Early
Schwarzenegger
nickname, with
“The”
53 Asia’s __ Darya
river
54 Glisten
55 “__ Wiedersehen”
56 Oscar-winning
Whitaker role
57 Stadium access
58 People of good
breeding
61 Tommie of the
Miracle Mets
62 Unpopular spots
63 __ Claire:
women’s
magazine
64 Sew up
65 Woody __,
“Cheers”
bartender
66 Strictly controlled
refrigerant
DOWN
1 Stay attached
2 Cotton pest
3 Wear away
4 Glass edges
5 Two after epsilon
6 Dickens’ Drood
7 Pungent mayo
8 “Law and
Order: __”
9 It’s a scream
10 Columbo asset
11 Veggie burger, to
a hamburger
12 Price place
13 “In your face!”
18 Decoding org.
22 Twitter follower
24 D.C. neighbor
25 Edward known
for limericks
26 Reveal
28 Certain domestic
32 Some like it hot
33 Word with log or
burner
34 Wrigley team
35 Revelation
foursome
36 City ESE of Los
Angeles
37 Nestlé product
introduced in 1948
38 Big name in
liquor
39 Railroad charge
43 Ulna locale
45 Rossellini film
renamed “Ways
of Love” in its
American version
46 Actor Estevez
47 Like the Titanic
49 Wrapped, as an
ankle
50 Nursery
employee
51 Exposed publicly
52 Old gridiron gp.
56 Where some
worship from
58 Shoot the
breeze
59 “Foucault’s
Pendulum” writer
60 “Unbelievable”
rock group
By Robin Stears
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
01/16/14
01/16/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB LOUNGE exercise machine cost
$100. sell for $25. Call 650-570-6023
BASEBALLS & softballs 6 in all for only
$5 650-595-3933
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 SOLD!
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
318 Sports Equipment
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
SOLD!
TAYLOR MADE 200, driver & Fairway
metals. 9 PC iron set $99 OBO.
650-349-6969
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $45., (650)873-8167
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
WOMAN'S BOWLING ball, 12 lbs, "Lin-
da", with size 7 shoes and bag, $15.
(650)578-9045
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
REDWOOD CITY WEST OF EL CAMI-
NO - WALK TO STORES - 1 BR, 1 BA
W/NEW RUGS AND PAINT - WALK IN
SHOWER - ELECTRIC OVEN AND
HEAT - 2 CLOSETS WITH CABINETS -
CARPORT - NO SMOKING.
MANAGER AVAILABLE 9-4.
NON REFUNDABLE APPLICATION
FEE $30. $1500/ MONTH (650)361-1200
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
620 Automobiles
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
ON 01/23/2014 at 365 87TH ST DALY
CITY,CA, a lien sale will be held on a
1981 PORSCH,
VIN:WP0AA0912BS120340
LIC:5GHG426 at 10:00A
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2,400 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
ISUZU ‘96 RODEO, V-6, 153K miles,
clean body, red, no dents, immaculate in-
terior. Kenwood stereeo with boom box
included. Great car! Asking $3,750.
SOLD!
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
MA'S AUTO
REPAIR SERVICE
Tires • Service • Smog checks
***** - yelp!
980 S Clarem’ont St San Mateo
650.513.1019
704 N San Mateo Dr San Mateo
650.558.8530
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
MyErrandServicesCA.com
Concrete
Construction
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTERS AND ROOF
REPAIR
• New Installation seamless,
• Cleaning and Screening,
• Commercial and Residential
Power Washing
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1976
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED
DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters, Faucets,
Toilets, Sinks, & Re-pipes
(650)461-0326
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
Champagne Sunday Brunch
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Furniture
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
28
Thursday • Jan. 16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
º 0eaI With £xperts º 0uick 8ervice
º 0nequaI 0ustomer 0are
www.8est8ated6oId8uyers.com
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 1/31/14
WEBUY
$â0
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR

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