PEOPLE

SECTION D
FRIDAY
OCTOBER 15, 2010
Television. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3D
Puzzles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4D
Comics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5D
★★
Last weekend, our family
traveled to Natchitoches so
our fourth-grade son could
attend a robotics program
at the Louisiana School for
Math, Science, & the Arts.
Our trip included an over-
night stay in Ville Platte to
visit my mother-in-law.
We don’t surf the Inter-
net at my mother-in-law’s
house, and while she enjoys
television, she doesn’t have
the kind of house with a
flat-screen TV in every
room. The relatively low
profile of technology in
my mother-in-law’s home
encourages us to do simpler
things when we visit.
I sat on my mother-in-
law’s patio and watched the
growing dusk of a perfect
autumn Friday, content
to observe the cats who
meander through her lawn
as slowly and carefully as
planets crossing a night
sky.
We had a good, long talk
over homemade bread and
crawfish etouffee.
Later, I cracked open a
book in a quiet corner, read-
ing only three pages before
falling asleep an hour be-
fore my usual bedtime.
I had concluded a busy
week that included wrap-
ping up some extra projects
and recovering from minor
surgery, but I hadn’t real-
ized how tired I was. The
quiet allowed me to listen
more attentively to what
my mind and body were
telling me.
As I drifted off to sleep, I
wondered how many times
I’ve missed these kinds of
cues because of time spent
before one kind of elec-
tronic screen or another.
The intensity of our con-
nectedness these days can
make us all seem like stock-
brokers in a trading pit, our
attention adrenalized by the
tide of incoming news.
I had touched on this
challenge in a column a few
weeks ago that mentioned
“Hamlet’s Blackberry,” a
new book in which author
William Powers argues that
throughout history, people
have faced adjustments
brought about by advancing
communications. The an-
cient Roman writer Seneca
worried that the growing
efficiency of his era’s mail
system might needlessly
distract Romans hooked on
the need for news. Henry
David Thoreau wondered
in the 19th century if the
emergence of the telegraph
would cause similar prob-
lems.
I agree with Powers that
the issue of information
overload isn’t new. But the
ease and efficiency of mod-
ern communication have
taken the challenge to a new
level.
My children, who have
never known a world with-
out cell phones or the Inter-
net, seem more stressed by
the occasional absence of
these things than I do.
I welcome our son’s par-
ticular thrill in the promise
of technology, which is
why we took him to Natchi-
toches to learn more.
But the challenge, in the
midst of all this change, will
be finding a quiet corner to
hear yourself think.
Advocate editorial writer
Danny Heitman contributes
“At Random” to the People
section each Friday. He
welcomes your comments
and suggestions. Contact
him at (225) 388-0295 or
dheitman@theadvocate.
com.
THE ADVOCATE
DANNY
HEITMAN
At random
Quiet brings
different kind
of message
Go to http: / / www. ba-
tonrougegreen.com to help
you decide what trees you
might plant this fall. The
trees you’ll see on Baton
Rouge Green’s website will
be on sale tomorrow from 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. at The Burden
Center, 4560 Essen Lane.
Or walk through the Baton
Rouge Green Tree-for-All
Sale to find THE tree for
your yard. Tree experts will
be there to help you pick
flowering, fruitingandshade
trees, as well as shrubs.
October through March is
tree planting time in Baton
Rouge. Call (225) 381-0037 for
more information.
This year’s sale features a
“Plant Smart Exhibit” with
displays and information.
Members of the BatonRouge
OrchidSociety, LouisianaDe-
partment of Agriculture and
Forestry, LSU AgCenter’s
LA House and Meadowmak-
ers will be on hand to talk
about sustainable yards.
Founded in 1988, Baton
Rouge Green works to edu-
cate residents on conserving
and planting the city’s urban
forest and greenspaces.
Ed Cullen
Advocate staff writer
Editor’s note: This is the fourth
and final story in a series fol-
lowing 28-year-old Kelli Rich-
mond’s fight against ovarian
cancer.
BY PAM BORDELON
Advocate staff writer
One year ago, Kelli Richmond
was handed what amounted to
a death sentence: She was di-
agnosed with Stage III ovarian
cancer.
Today, however, shecanflash
a big smile and talk about her
future.
“Wowza!” the petite 28-year-
old exclaimed, thinking back
on the year she’s endured. “Did
that really just happen to me?
It’s been the longest, fastest
year of my life.”
After undergoing surgery
last October, Richmond began
chemotherapy only to discover
after three rounds that it wasn’t
working.
That led to a trip to M.D. An-
derson Cancer Center in Hous-
ton, where doctors developed a
special protocol that her doctor,
Jacob Estes, could administer
here at Woman’s Hospital. A
July PET scan showed that
taking Cytoxan every day com-
bined with rounds of Avastin
every two weeks was working:
There was an almost complete
response just a little residual
disease by the bladder but “all
the stuff near my spleen, liver
and kidneys was gone.”
In August after completing
the sixth round of Avastin,
Richmond underwent another
PETscanandonAug. 12shegot
the results — no change from
the earlier scan. “It’s either a
really low-grade stubborn dis-
ease or scar tissue,” Richmond
said. “I’mgoing with my gut in-
stinct that it’s scar tissue, and
I’ve decided to take a break
from treatment.”
She’s fully aware it’s a risky
decision, but Estes, who has
moved to Birmingham, Ala., to
practice at the Universityof Al-
abama Medical Center, toldher
that it was a 50/50 chance either
way, and it was a decision she’d
have to make.
“He asked me how I felt, and
I told him my body needed a
break, that it needed to heal,”
said Richmond, adding that
the doctor who read her scan
advised her to continue treat-
ment. “I haven’t healed from
surgery and my body lets me
know that. I’ll have another
scanthree months fromthe last
one, and we’ll see what’s going
on and take it from there … it’s
a leap of faith.”
Faith is something on which
Richmond has relied through-
out this journey. Right before
her last scan, she went to see
Sister Dulce, a nun said to have
healing powers.
Dulce didn’t detect any can-
cer and advised Richmond to
trust Estes. “She said to come
back every other month, and
she’ll pray and see if she de-
tects any more cancer in be-
tween scans.”
One of Richmond’s dreams
was an eastern Mediterranean
cruise. OnJuly22 she andmom
Patsy Richmond, sister Kristin
Stewart and cousin Brad John-
son flew into Rome where they
spent a few days before cruis-
ing to Sicily, Athens, Crete and
Kusadasi, Turkey.
The spiritual highlight of the
Newyear, newlife
Woman enjoys newoutlook
after fight with ovarian cancer
Advocate file photo by RICHARD ALAN HANNON
Kelli Richmond undergoes her third round of chemotherapy treatment
at Woman’s Hospital last January.
Advocate staff report
Is it New Orleans blues?
Spanish architecture? Seafood
gumbo? Trolley cars? Politics?
Brown pelicans? Jambalaya or
etouffée?
The reasons to love Louisiana
are myriad and the Foundation
for Historical Louisiana will be
celebrating themall at the 12th
annual Old Governor’s Man-
sion Gala, “I Love Louisiana
Because….,” Thursday at the
Old Governor’s Mansion.
All proceeds are dedicated
to preservation advocacy and
the education work of FHL, a
nonprofit organization funded
entirelythroughmemberships,
donations, earned income and
grants.
This year’s gala co-chairs are
Cynthia and John Graves.
Attendees are invited to wear
“Louisiana-inspired” or black-
tie attire. There will be a cos-
tume contest, and winners will
be announced from the band
stage at 10 p.m.
Mayor-President Kip Holden,
left, and Mark Upton, Founda-
tion for Historical Louisiana
chair, dress in ‘Louisiana-in-
spired’ attire for FHL’s gala.
Nonprofit’s gala
to celebrate Louisiana
➤See GALA, page 2D
IN THE YARD: Tree sale
Attendees get a look at of-
ferings at last year’s Tree-
for-All Sale.
➤See LIFE, page 2D
Photo provided by
KYLE LEMAIRE,
Spaceless Photography
A post-chemo Kelli
Richmond has a lot
of reasons to smile.
‘I Love Louisiana
Because…’
WHAT: The Foundation for
Historical Louisiana’s gala for
preservation.
WHEN: 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Thurs-
day.
WHERE: Old Governor’s Man-
sion, 502 North Blvd.
INFORMATION: (225) 387-2464
or http://www.fhl.org.
DETAILS: The event will feature
food, beverages, music by The
Bench Bar Boogie Band and
members of the Lost Bayou
Ramblers and The Malfacteurs,
a silent auction and more.
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.
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If youhave anyquestions, call
John Ballance, Advocate photo
manager, at (225) 388-0680.
trip was praying in the silent
chapel at St. Peter’s Basilica. “I
got to personally thank God in
the closest place to himI could
be,” Richmond said. “I prayed
for people I’ve met going
through the same thing as me;
it was really cool.”
As far as her favorite stop,
that was Sicily; “it’s what you
ideally think of as Italian vil-
lages.” She also liked Kusadasi
andEphesus, where she visited
Mary’s House, where Jesus’
mother and St. John the Evan-
gelist are said to have lived in
the early years of Christianity.
And, for the captain’s dinner,
Richmond wore what was sup-
posed to be her wedding dress.
“It was the perfect celebra-
tionthat mytreatment is work-
ing,” Richmond said. “I’m def-
initely one of those people who
could bop around Europe for a
few months and be OK with it.
I loved the food, the people are
verynice, the Mediterraneanis
beautiful and the shopping —
to die for. The whole trip was
liberating in a sense. I had de-
cided to go whether it was a
celebration of my healing or
not.”
Back home in Baton Rouge,
Richmond is resuming her
“normal life.” She’s back at
work as the development di-
rector for the ALS Association
Louisiana Chapter. It’s a busy
time at ALS with fundraising
walks taking place across the
state and Richmond pushed
herself a little too much in the
beginning, but she’s nowfound
a good rhythm. “I couldn’t ask
for a better boss and co-work-
ers.”
She has a newman in her life
— Mitch Dickson, a first-year
LSUlawstudent whomshe met
almost three months ago. “We
complement each other very
well,” said Richmond, glowing
as she talked of this newdevel-
opment. “We challenge each
other to be a better person. We
value each others’ opinions.”
She gives him extra credit
for putting up with a 28-year-
old menopausal woman. “I’m
not the easiest person to deal
with,” said Richmond, laugh-
ing. “It’s pretty funny, I have
more incommonwithmymom
and her friends than my
friends. I’ma handful to put up
with. … he handles it like a
trooper.”
As she’s done throughout her
treatment and with her doc-
tor’s support, Richmond has
workedwitha wellness consul-
tant to help with the
menopause symptoms, too.
She’s alreadyseena difference
after beginning the supple-
mental regimen a couple of
weeks ago.
After visiting with old friend
chef Nick Brune, who owns
Eco Caterers in Los Angeles,
Richmondis doingresearchon
the best ways to nourish your
body. She wants to produce a
cookbook geared toward can-
cer patients. “Everything I’ve
come across so far as cook-
books go has been about
recipes for nausea, etc., but not
the essentials of how to eat,”
she said. “I believe you are
what you eat. Alot of skeptical
people think it’s a bunch of
hooey, but I really believe in
it.”
Richmond’s also resumed an
oldpassion—dancing. She’s in
a class at Jeffie Jean Dance
Studio of what she describes as
“20-something-year-old has
beens” — former high school
dancers giving it another try.
“We have a lot of fun,” said
Richmond, who was on crutch-
es after taking a fall in class
the night before. “My first
thought was, ‘Ouch,’ but thenit
was, ‘I just jumped in the air
and hurt myself, but I was able
to do it, and I’m going to be
OK.’”
And Richmond is continuing
to share her inspirational story.
One way is through her new
blog, What Comes After C?
(http://wcac.tumblr.com) “It’s
about my life after cancer. It
has some specifics, but some of
it is life in general … things
anybody going through trials
andtribulations intheir life can
relate to,” she said. “I’ve hadso
many people tell me they read
my story in the paper or read
postings on Facebook. I even
had a guy injured in the war
who said I inspired him in his
recovery.
“I get humbled, chills,” Rich-
mond said. “It’s amazing for
someone to tell me they got
shot and that in their healing
process they were inspired by
me. Fighting cancer is a big
deal, but divorce, pregnancy
troubles, losing a child, a
breakup, any heartache you
canthinkof —theytell me I in-
spired them. There are a lot of
stories out there, but I’m will-
ing to share mine and people
need that. Not everybody is
willing to share their stories,
and they’re not easy for me to
read. I bawled my eyes out in
CC’s whenI readthe first one.”
Richmond also served on the
Girl Cancer Awareness Com-
mittee that organizedthe city’s
first Gynecological Awareness
Month in September.
“This has been the most sur-
real experience ever, but it’s
also the most real experience
I’ve ever been through,” said
Richmond of the past year. “I
look back at the person I was a
year ago — that girl sitting
here a year ago is almost un-
recognizable. I have anoutlook
on life I wouldn’t wish on any-
one else but, wow, what this
worldwouldbe like if everyone
had the perspective of a dying
person. I feel like I’ve aged 70
years in a year. I wouldn’t give
back the experience for any-
thing. It sucked —it really, re-
ally sucked, but so much good
came out of it and, too, every-
body wonders ‘who’s going to
showup at my funeral?’ Well, I
know the answer to that ques-
tion, and I didn’t have to die,
and those people are surpris-
ing.”
In particular, Richmond ad-
mits she couldnot have made it
without her mom, dad Ron, her
sister, her therapist, Lyell
Turner at Nature’s Wellness,
the nurses at Woman’s Hospi-
tal, Estes and the prayers of
family, friends and complete
strangers.
And dealing with the uncer-
tain but potentially bright fu-
ture? “The majority of time I
try not to think about it, but I
have moments when I re-
process what has happened
and what could happen,” she
said, reflectively, admitting
she will probably have to re-
sume some type of mainte-
nance chemo.
“The chances of this staying
away are pretty slimto none. I
have a very strong faith that if
God wants me to be OK, I will
be. I try not having a pity par-
tyfor too long; I just put mybig
girl panties onandkeepmarch-
ing.”
Also in the lineup for the
evening are live music, a major
silent auction, gourmet fare and
“adult beverages” throughout
the landmark Louisiana White
House, which was an historic
home to nine governors and
their families — from Huey P.
Long to Jimmie Davis.
Providing the music will be
The Bench Bar Boogie Band in
the Mansion Rose Garden from
7 p.m. to 11 p.m., and inside will
be members of the Grammy-
nominated Lost Bayou Ram-
blers and The Malfacteurs
acoustic ensemble.
This year’s silent auction in
the East Room has more than
150 entries with items ranging
fromspa services andpackages
to fine jewelry and collectibles
Among them is a hand-carved
exotic woodcuttingboardbylo-
cal artist Erskin Mitchell, a gift
certificate to the fine antique
gems at Classic Jewelers, and a
weekend package at the Hilton
Capitol Center.
Bidding at the gala will start
at 7:30 p.m. and continue until
10 p.m.
Helping to coordinate the
event are Heirloom Cuisine,
owners JasonandCarynRoland
and Rhonda Altazan of Court-
land’s Catering.
Also donatingunique fare and
signature items will be Acme
Oyster House, Addicted to
Chocolate, Bayou Bistro, Best
Catered Events, Margo E.
Bouanchaud, Bonanno’s Fine
Catering, Bayou Bistro, Cabot
Cheese, chef Don Bergeron,
Chelsea’s, Confections by
Michelle, Courtland’s Catering,
Drakes Catering, Edible
Events, HeirloomCuisine, Hon-
ey Baked Ham, Jimmie and
Maude Catering, Legers Cater-
ing, Maggio’s Catering & Deli-
catessen, Noble’s Catering, Oak
Lodge, The Perfect Platter,
Sammy’s Grill, Unique Cuisine,
White OakPlantationandZoe’s.
Beverages are being donated
by Coca-Cola, Mockler Bever-
age and Power House Coffee.
There will be three “designer
drinks” made with vodka and
bourbon compliments of Glaz-
er’s Distributors.
In keeping with the theme,
each roomwill provide “a walk
through Louisiana” with dis-
plays of what makes the state
lovable frompelicans to politics
to trolley cars and tailgating.
Also helping to provide the
backdrop will be flower
arrangements by Designs by
Milissa and MalcolmAnderson
of Andes Floral Design. Other
suppliers are AVExpress, B&B
Staffing and Narcissus Affair.
Members of the gala commit-
tee are Allie Wester, Claire
Murphy Trahan, Jennifer
Berniard, Erin Michelle Brush,
Clif Murphy, Danielle Honey-
cutt, Emily Wilbert, Johnny
Palazotto, Phil Cangelosi, Susan
Gavrelis, Selena Grant, Sylvia
Duke, Carolyn Bennett, Brad
Way, Anna Ramirez, Elizabeth
Eaton, Mark Upton and Angela
deGravelles.
Sponsors are Preservation
Champion — CFA Community
Fundfor the Arts, Louisiana Di-
vision of Administration and
the National Trust for Historic
Preservation; Preservation In-
vestor —Entergy, ExxonMobil
and Louisiana Lottery; Preser-
vation Benefactor — Evans-
Graves Engineering, Perkins-
McKenzie Insurance, Stone Pig-
man LLC and Cox Communica-
tions; Preservation Patron —
Wampold Companies, LUBA
Workers’ Comp, Taylor Porter
Attorneys at Law, Country
Roads Magazine, WRKF,
Franklin Press, Clear Channel
Radio and Lamar Advertising;
and individual donors — Emily
and John Wilbert.
Tickets are $100 per person
for FHL members and $125 for
nonmembers. The foundationis
also offeringa special ticket for
$65 for those age 35 and under
to encourage the younger
crowd to get involved in his-
toric preservation.
For corporate sponsorship in-
formation, contact Carolyn
Bennett, executive director, at
(225) 387-2464. Levels range
from$1,500 to $7,500.
For tickets and more infor-
mation, call (225) 387-2464 or go
to http://www.fhl.org.
GALA
Continued from page 1D
LIFE
Continued from page 1D
2D ■ Friday, October 15, 2010 ■ The Advocate
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Mother, 16-year-old daughter constantly at odds
Dear Annie: I have been fighting
a lot withmy16-year-olddaugh-
ter, “Rebecca.” It has escalated
to the point where she moved
into an apartment with her 19-
year-oldboyfriend, “Rick.” I am
not comfortable with the age
difference and have tried to
talkto her, but she just won’t lis-
ten. I don’t knowRickverywell,
and I am worried about my
daughter.
Rebecca comes home only to
ask for money, do laundry or
get a fewpersonal items. When
I try talking to her during those
times, she throws a tantrumand
storms out. I saw a therapist
about it, but that led nowhere.
Taking away her car keys,
phone and credit card has done
nothing. What can I do? — Des-
perately Confused Mom
Dear Mom: Is Rebecca consid-
ered a legal adult in your state?
If not, you can report the situa-
tion to the police. It is a drastic
step that may get her away
from Rick, but it will likely es-
trange you completely. Your
second option is to get to know
her boyfriend. Part of the prob-
lem is that Rebecca is in full-
blown rebellion, and your dis-
approval of Rickis a compelling
reason for her to stay with him.
Stop railing against the situa-
tion. Instead, invite Rick and
Rebecca over for dinner. You
need to find out whether he’s a
good guy, and if not, help Re-
becca see that for herself.
Dear Annie: I have known“Geor-
giana” since grade school. She’s
a good-hearted, loyal, trustwor-
thy person but is quite difficult
to be around, andI canonlytake
her in small doses.
My mother reviewed an
autism website and discovered
that Georgiana displays many
of the traits andcharacteristics
of someone with autism. How-
ever, she grew up at a time
when learning disabilities were
not commonly diagnosed, and
she never got the helpshe need-
ed. Both of her parents died
when she was in her early 20s,
and although she’s in contact
with her extended family, they
provide minimal support.
Now things seem to be piling
up. Infour years, Georgiana has
had five different jobs. She’s
currently unemployed and
owes thousands of dollars in
credit card debt. She is barely
making it. We want to help by
directing her to the support she
needs, but she is very stubborn
and defensive, so we are reluc-
tant to approachher. If she does
have autism, how do we con-
vince Georgiana to be evaluat-
edbyaspecialist? —Bedford, Mass.
Dear Bedford: It is possible that
Georgiana suffers from As-
perger’s, which is a high-func-
tioningformof autism. She may
also have an underlying mental
illness or simply lack social
skills. In order to influence her,
you will have to spend more
time in her company and per-
haps enlist the help of her ex-
tendedfamily. Askif she’s seen
her doctor lately, and whether
she would allow you (or one of
her relatives) to accompanyher
to her next visit. Whoever goes
withher canmentionthese con-
cerns to the doctor.
“Annie’s Mailbox” is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. E-mail
your questions to anniesmail-
box@comcast.net, or write to
“Annie’s Mailbox,” P.O. Box
118190, Chicago, IL 60711.
© 2010, Creators Syndicate
SUGAR AND MITCHELL
Annie’s Mailbox
Photos provided by KELLI RICHMOND
From left, Kelli Richmond, Woman‘s Hospital oncology nurse Jennifer Arceneaux and Woman’s social worker Robyn Maggio
do yoga on the steps of the State Capitol on Sept. 4 as part of Gynecological Awareness Month activities.
Kelli Richmond, right, with, from left, sister Kristin Stewart,
cousin Dr. Brad Johnson and mom Patsy Richmond stand in
front of the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens.
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