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JANUARY 17, 2014
VOL. LXXXIII NO. 19 $1.00
BUILDING A CAMPUS COMMUNITY page 6
REMEMBERING SHARON page 7, 18, 19. 26
SWEET TASTES OF TORAH page 8
INDIAN JEWRY IN TRANSITION page 10
J e w i s h S t a n d a r d
1 0 8 6 T e a n e c k R o a d
T e a n e c k , N J 0 7 6 6 6
C H A N G E S E R V I C E R E Q U E S T E D
More
than a
cure
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NOSHES ...................................................5
OPINION ................................................ 18
COVER STORY .................................... 22
HOW TO CHANGE YOUR LIFE ...... 35
TORAH COMMENTARY .................... 51
CROSSWORD PUZZLE .................... 52
ARTS AND CULTURE........................ 53
CALENDAR .......................................... 54
GALLERY .............................................. 57
OBITUARIES ........................................ 59
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REAL ESTATE ...................................... 62
CONTENTS
Judging the books of our covers
●The 2013 National Jewish Book
Awards were announced this week —
and we’re proud to say we had them
covered.
Winner of the Jewish Book of
the Year is Yossi Klein Halevi’s “Like
Dreamers: The Story of the Israeli
Paratroopers Who Reunited Jerusa-
lem and Divided a Nation.” We put
that book on the cover of our Octo-
ber 11, 2013 issue.
Winner in the biography, autobi-
ography, and memoir category is
Phyllis Chesler for her “An American
Bride In Kabul: A Memoir,” the sub-
ject of our October 4 cover.
Among the finalists in that cat-
egory is “The Worlds of Sholem
Aleichem: The Remarkable Life and
Afterlife of the Man Who Created
Tevye” by Columbia professor and
former Jewish Standard intern Jer-
emy Dauber, whom we interviewed
for our November 8 issue.
In the history category, the winner
is “My Promised Land: The Triumph
and Tragedy of Israel” by Ari Shavit,
which we review on page 53 of this
issue.
Rabbi Menachem Genack of
Englewood was a finalist in the an-
thologies and collections category
for “Letters to President Clinton:
Biblical Lessons on Faith and Lead-
ership,” which we wrote about on
November 22.
Rabbi Ephraim Karnafogel, former-
ly spiritual leader of Teaneck’s Con-
gregation Beth Aaron, was a finalist
in the scholarship category for “ The
Intellectual History and Rabbinic Cul-
ture of Medieval Ashkenaz.” Passaic’s
Ruchama King Feuerman was a final-
ist in fiction for “In the Courtyard of
the Kabbalist,” which we reviewed
on September 21.
All told, awards were given in 17
categories. The full list of winners can
be found at jewishbookcouncil.org.
LARRY YUDELSON
BREAKING NEWS
Chief rabbinate:
We’ll trust Rabbi Avi Weiss after all
●The chief rabbinate of Israel said
it will accept letters from Rabbi
Avi Weiss confirming the Judaism
of couples who wish to wed in the
country.
In a letter sent Wednesday to
Rabbi Weiss’s attorney in Israel, As-
saf Benmelech, the chief rabbinate
affirmed its position on the liberal
Orthodox rabbi from Riverdale, N.Y.
In October, the chief rabbin-
ate rejected a letter from Rabbi
Weiss vouching for immigrants who
wanted to marry in Israel, pend-
ing an investigation into his adher-
ence to traditional Jewish law. The
move sparked widespread outrage
at the realization that Rabbi Weiss,
a longtime synagogue leader who
had vouched for the Jewishness of
many Israeli immigrants in the past,
suddenly was having his credentials
called into question.
Naftali Bennett, Israel’s religious
services minister and Diaspora af-
fairs minister, has been meeting with
officials from the Orthodox Rabbini-
cal Council of America and the chief
rabbinate since November to resolve
the issue. Mr. Bennett reportedly
sees the issue as extremely impor-
tant, given the potential negative im-
pact it could have on Israel-Diaspora
relations.
Rabbi Weiss founded and until
this academic year headed the lib-
eral Orthodox rabbinical seminary
Yeshivat Chovevei Torah, and he has
pioneered a number of controversial
innovations in the Orthodox world,
most recently his decision to ordain
women as clergy through a new
seminary called Yeshivat Maharat.
“I appreciate that this injustice
has been corrected and am deeply
grateful for the overwhelming sup-
port I received from all over the
world,” Rabbi Weiss said in a state-
ment. “I also urge the chief rabbinate
to reflect on how it can help us reach
out, respect and acknowledge all
Jews in the Diaspora.” JTA WIRE SERVICE
Jerusalemites bare
their underwear
on No Pants Day
We all know that it’s impolite
to stare at strangers.
But nearly everyone on the
Jerusalem Light Rail did just that
on January 13, when some 50
people boarded the tramway
and proceeded to take off their
trousers.
It was the second time the “No
Pants Subway Ride” was staged
in Jerusalem, and organizer
Boaz Balachsan said he was very
happy with the outcome.
“It was great; the number of
participants doubled from last
year, and people really got into
it,” Mr. Balachsan said. “People
loved it. We got a lot of posi-
tive feedback. A lot of people
laughed.”
The silly global event started
en masse in New York in 2002.
The idea came about after a city
resident forgot to put on trou-
sers and boarded the subway
in his underwear on January 10,
1986. Although mortified at first,
he found that reactions were
so positive that he and some friends
copied his slipup the following year
until eventually it snowballed into an
international event.
No Pants Day, aka No Pants Subway
Ride, is now celebrated every year on
or around January 10, and again on
the first Friday of May (thanks to a
difference of opinion among organiz-
ers). Only cities with trams or subway
systems can participate.
Mr. Balachsan, a Jerusalem-based
artist, had taken part in the foolery in
European cities and was waiting for
the Jerusalem Light Rail to be finished
in order to launch an Israeli version.
His inaugural baring of legs last year
was so well received that this year
he and some friends set up a group
called Improv Israel to organize “simi-
lar events.”
No Pants Day is just one of the
“pranks and other spontaneous
events to break the routine that we do
in Jerusalem. We do lots of events,”
he says.
“People are always trying to put
Jerusalem in a box of being a city
with a very religious vibe where
nothing happens. But there are tons
of students in the city center and
there are a lot of really awesome
people here. Even members of the
religious communities accept our
pranks. We’re not doing something
provocative; it’s a joke.”
Mr. Balachsan sent an invitation to
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
and other politicians, asking them to
join the fun. “It was mostly students
taking part, and some tourists who
happened to be here,” he says. “Actu-
ally, we had a small group from the
Ukraine who were sad that they were
going to miss No Pants Day at home
and then were really happy to hear we
were organizing an event in Jerusa-
lem.”
As for what to wear, Mr. Balachsan
says, “Last year we wore underwear
with cartoon characters but this year
we just wore what there was. Next
year, we’ll surprise you.”
VIVA SARAH PRESS / ISRAEL21C.ORG
The January cold didn’t stop pantsless
riders from joining the fun. AILON GLITZ
4 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
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6 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
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Resurrecting Koach?
Students try to revive Conservative movement’s college program
JOANNE PALMER
L
ast year, the United Synagogue
of Conservative Judaism, which
represents the Conservative
movement’s affiliated syna-
gogues, discontinued Koach, the move-
ment’s main outreach program to college
students.
That move seemed exactly in tune with
the findings of the recent Pew study, which
showed a diminished, steadily shrink-
ing Conservative movement, although it
did conflict with United Synagogue’s own
strategic plan. That plan, which United
Synagogue’s board adopted in 2011, “rec-
ognized that a continuing presence on
campus for Conservative Judaism is vital
to maintain the bridge between our high
school students and the young adult post-
college generation.”
Many of the students who were part of
Koach, and who were enthusiastic par-
ticipants in its signature event, the annual
Koach Kallah, agreed with United Syna-
gogue’s ideals, if not with its actions. They
are putting together a new organization,
Masorti on Campus, and offering a Shab-
baton, based on the best of the kallah, that
they hope will help grow their organiza-
tion. (Masorti is the name the Conservative
movement uses outside North America.)
“There are a significant number of stu-
dents across North America who consider
themselves to be committed Conservative
Jews, or who identity with the movement
as closest to the way they interact with
Judaism,” said Eric Leiderman of Engle-
wood, a senior at the University of Hart-
ford and Masorti on Campus’s director of
institutional advancement. Those students
“find significance in following halacha and
have egalitarian values,” he said. Those
are the people at whom the Shabbaton is
aimed.
“We are trying to fill the void that was
left when Koach was shut down,” he said.
Many students care about it, “significant
numbers of them, and we can’t just let
them be lost.
“We can’t let campus organizations
flail around by themselves. There has to
be some sort of network, some kind of
umbrella organization.”
Even when students are drawn to the
Conservative movement’s particular com-
bination of tradition and egalitarianism,
Mr. Leiderman continued, they often look
for but fail to find the kind of real commu-
nity that Orthodox groups establish with
apparent ease. “We are trying to work on
community building,” he said.
“That’s the theme of
the Shabbaton — com-
munity building.”
Dougl as Kandl of
Cranford, who has just
graduated from Pace
University and is about
to start a graduate pro-
gram there, is a founder
of Masorti on Campus.
He talked about how
Koach died. (“United
Synagogue says that
Koach is ‘on hiatus,’ but
I think that really it is
defunct,” he said parenthetically.)
“I was really involved with Koach in its
last year,” he said. “We tried to save it. We
were out at the Israel Day Parade in 2012,
getting signatures. We got about 1,000 all
together.
“We presented at the United Syna-
gogue’s board meeting, and they renewed
Koach for a year. They gave us $100,000
and said we had to fund raise about
another $100,000. We did. Koach ran
through last year.
“I was very involved at the Koach Kallah
last year, at the University of Pennsylvania.
We had 138 people; it was very successful.”
But then, despite some last-minute
attempts, Koach was defunded.
“What happened next was that a lot of
students reached out to me, saying that
they wanted to do a Shabbaton on cam-
pus, something like the Koach Kallah, so
we decided that it would be our starting
point,” Mr. Kandl continued. “We also
hope to run an Onward Israel trip through
the Jewish Agency, and we hope that we
will have a program to Israel that will com-
bine an internship and Jewish studies in
the summer of 2015.”
The Shabbaton, which will be held at
the Jewish Theological Seminary in Man-
hattan, is the result of a meeting Mr. Kandl
and other students had with representa-
tives of Conservative movement groups,
including JTS, the Los Ange-
les-based Ziegler School of
Rabbinical Studies, Wom-
en’s League for Conserva-
tive Judaism, the Federation
of Jewish Men’s Clubs, the
National Ramah Commission, the Semi-
nario Rabinico Latinoamericano in Argen-
tina, the Conservative Yeshiva in Jerusa-
lem, Marom, and Masorti Olami. (The last
two organizations are Conservative groups
based outside North America.)
“Some of them” — particularly Women’s
League — “are giving us money, and some
are giving us advertising,” Mr. Kandl said.
The goal is to draw 80 students; after
two weeks, 25 had registered, which puts
it firmly on track, he added.
The Shabbaton will be modeled on the
Koach Kallah, but there will be significant
differences. “The kallah was more about
Jewish learning,” Mr. Kandl said. “We will
have Torah lishmah sessions, but it will
be more about how to bring Conservative
Judaism to your campus. We are bringing
in an organization called Present Tense,
which works with Jewish startups; the
coordinator will be Megan Goldman, a rab-
binical student who led a Shabbaton with
similar ideas last year.” The chancellor
of JTS, Dr. Arnold Eisen, Marom Olami’s
director, Avigail Ben Aryeh, and the direc-
tor of the Conservative Yeshiva, Rabbi Joel
Levy, all will join the group as well.
Mr. Kandl, who grew up in USY, the Con-
servative movement’s youth group, was
active in Jewish life on campus, including
Hillel. “I think that there needs to be more
on campus for progressive Jews in general,
not just for Conservative Jews,” he said.
“The URJ” — that’s the Union for Reform
Judaism — “doesn’t have a college program
right now. The market is only Chabad,
Aish, and the Orthodox Union. We want
to fill that gap.
“Chabad is very good at marketing itself.
It’s good at pitching Judaism to them.
When the others advertise themselves,
they talk about Orthodox Judaism, but
Chabad says just Judaism.
“We are learning from them.”
Mr. Leiderman, who went to the Moriah
School in Englewood through eighth grade
and then to the Abraham Joshua Heschel
School in Manhattan for high school, is
majoring in Jewish studies and consider-
ing rabbinical school. He said that he is
unable to make sense of some of his peers’
assumptions about Conservative Judaism.
There are students who “for political
reasons don’t identify with the move-
ment,” he said. “There is a growing nega-
tive feeling toward Conservative Judaism,
but it is based on a misunderstanding of
what Conservative Judaism represents.
I’m not sure exactly why this is, but when
you ask college students what they’re look-
ing for, they’ll say ‘Jewish tradition and
egalitarianism.’
“Those are the values of Conservative
Judaism, but there is some kind of discon-
nect, where they don’t actually see the
movement as committed to halacha and
egalitarianism.”
Despite the Pew study, “I do think the
movement has a future,” he said. “Right
now, I am in Jerusalem, on a two-week
How to go
to the Shabbaton
Who: Masorti on Campus
What: Presents its first Shabbaton
Where: At the Jewish Theologi-
cal Seminary, 3080 Broadway,
Manhattan
When: February 21-23
Why: To help student leaders
learn to build vibrant Jewish cam-
pus communities
How to learn more or to register:
Go to www.masorticampus.org
Conservative college students read Torah during weekday morning
services.
Eric Leiderman
SEE RESURRECTING PAGE 12
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JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 7
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HONORING
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Sunday Evening
FEBRUARY 9, 2014
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FIRST PERSON
My two experiences with Ariel Sharon
Local rabbi recalls his meeting with the larger-than-life leader
RABBI LAWRENCE S. ZIERLER
I
had the opportunity to be with
the late Prime Minister Ariel (Arik)
Sharon on two occasions.
The first was at an Israel Bonds
Rabbinic Cabinet mission to Israel in Jan-
uary 1992 and the other was as part of a
United Jewish Communities National Mis-
sion a decade later. In the first instance
he was then the Minister of Housing, and
I asked him a question about the settle-
ment blocks. His response, in his inimi-
table way, was to immediately instruct
one of his assistants to provide all of us
with maps to better illustrate the answer
he was about to give.
This was typical Sharon. As a military
strategist he lived his life in large mea-
sure according to his maps. He always
traveled with multiple sets in tow, espe-
cially when speaking to the press or vis-
iting delegations like ours. In the words
of the Talmud, not then explicitly said
by him but clearly intuited, “aino domeh
shemiah l’reiyah,” — “there is no com-
paring the power of something seen to
that which is merely heard.” So we went
home with a sample of Sharon cartogra-
phy in our carry-on luggage.
On the second occasion, he was prime
minister, and addressed a special ses-
sion of the mission participants at Kiryat
Moriah, the educational compound of
the Jewish Agency in south Jerusalem.
Arriving there early, my wife, Berni, and I
managed to secure seats in the front row.
Beyond the fascination of studying the
moves and methods of his security detail,
whose minds seem to operate like mini
machines pivoting at prescribed intervals
and who switch positions every 10 min-
utes to avoid fatigue, was the hominess
and unguarded manner of speech exhib-
ited by the prime minister.
Unlike the earlier experience 10 years
before, where his physiognomy was more
than remarkable — I calculated three to
four steps for the average person to his
Ariel Sharon on his Negev farm in 1993. FLASH90 SEE SHARON PAGE 14
Rabbi Lawrence Zierler
Local
8 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-8*
‘Sweet Tastes of Torah’
Community rabbis gearing up for night of mishkan study
LOIS GOLDRICH
R
abbi David Bockman, coor-
dinator of classes for the
North Jersey Board of Rab-
bis’ annual “Sweet Tastes
of Torah” community-wide evening of
study, thinks that this year’s program will
be special.
While the event — now going into its
fifth year — always has drawn some 200
to 300 people, “there are a couple of
things that are different this year,” Rabbi
Bockman said.
Rabbi Bockman, the religious leader
of Congregation Beth Shalom of Pomp-
ton Lakes, said that his job as organizer
consists largely of “nudging rabbis” to
develop teaching ideas.
Every “Sweet Taste of Torah” evening
has had a theme, but in the past many
rabbis have chosen to go their own way,
he added. But this year, “people have
glommed onto the theme and are excited
by it. It caught their imagination.”
In fact, Rabbi Bockman said, of the 20
classes being offered at the Fair Lawn
Jewish Center on February 1, 17 are
closely connected to the topic chosen
by his committee: “Building a Mishkan —
Making Room for God in our Lives.”
“We’re looking at all different aspects
of it,” he said, explaining that the idea
arose from the Torah portion that will be
read the morning before the program.
“Terumah is about donations for and
instructions on how to build the taberna-
cle, or mishkan,” he said. When the com-
mittee came up with the idea of building
a mishkan, “it gave almost everybody
an idea. It really connected with a lot of
people.”
In line with this theme, rabbis will
tackle subjects ranging from “Old World
Chasidic Melodies” to “The Ancient Ark
as a Model for Personal Integrity,” Rabbi
Bockman said. His own presentation
is called “From Boring Texts to Fiery
Devotion.”
Other presentations will include “The
Collapsed Mishkan — When God Seems
Anything but Present” and “Moving Day
at the Mishkan,” exploring why the Torah
provided so many details about taking
down and building up the tabernacle.
While several of the presentations are
planned as lectures, the majority of them
will involve discussion, Rabbi Bockman
said.
“Most will include reading together,
studying, and discussing,” he said. Others
will include singing, and two will involve
chanting — “using the image of the space
between the cherubim’s wings as the
focal point for meditation.”
He said that participating rabbis —
members of the North Jersey Board of
Rabbis — look forward to the evening.
He noted that after the YJCC in Washing-
ton Township lost funding for its Jewish
Learning Project several years ago, he
suggested at a meeting of the NJBR that
local rabbis might fill the void.
“I said, ‘We’ve got all these rabbis. Why
do we need to bring in expensive lectur-
ers? There’s enough talent here.’ The
rabbis are interested in teaching, and it
gives them a chance to teach something
they’re interested in to people outside
their congregations.”
Rabbi Bockman said the treatment of
this year’s theme — exploring the idea of
the mishkan from many different angles
— really isn’t new.
“For a long time, people who have
studied the structure of the tabernacle
have found that it is not just a physi-
cal space but also represents some-
thing that people can project their ideas
and desires onto,” he said. “Because it
doesn’t exist physically, it may be used
metaphorically.”
The evening is important for two rea-
sons, Rabbi Bockman added.
“It’s not about politics, and it breaks
down any silos between synagogues and
other institutions. This is about Jewish
learning, and studying Torah is some-
thing we can all agree on.”
In addition, “Just being part of a larger
group doing this together is enjoyable.
Even if it’s just for that one night, seeing
all those people go into classes is energiz-
ing and reaffirming.”
For his part, Rabbi Ben Shull — presi-
dent of the NJBR and religious leader of
Temple Emanuel of the Pascack Valley
in Woodcliff Lake — would like to see the
commitment to study extend beyond one
evening.
“We’ve tried and will continue to offer
the opportunity for people to continue
to learn after the event,” he said, noting
that the “ultimate hope” is for learning to
extend throughout the year. He pointed
out that some regional events already
have taken place, especially in the Fair
Lawn area, but for this kind of ongoing
programming to be successful, “it would
require more serious investment on the
part of the larger community.”
“It needs people committed to it,” he
said. “Rabbis have the interest — but
there’s an inability to take it further
Rabbi David Bockman teaches at last year’s “Sweet Tastes of Torah.”
“Sweet Tastes of Torah” draws a diverse group every year.
Local
JS-9
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 9








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because we need a professional to devote time to it
and for laypeople to take it more seriously.”
Rabbi Shull noted that the evening is always
hosted by a shul and that this contributes to its suc-
cess. “It’s a warmer feeling than going to some other
institution, without a host committee to welcome
you” — and after a congregation hosts the event,
its members are more likely to attend the following
year. “There’s something important about the syna-
gogue aspect,” he said.
Rabbi Shull said the night of learning “is really
a shot in the arm for rabbis,” who get to join with
many others in a common venture. Even rabbis who
don’t teach that evening may sit in on colleagues’
classes, he said.
While it is up to rabbis to choose the style of their
presentation, some styles have proved more success-
ful than others, according to Rabbi Shull. “Over the
past few years we’ve tried a panel discussion,” but
“the response wasn’t what we would have liked.”
For that reason, and because the committee could
not select a “hot issue” suitable for this format, it
decided to omit such a discussion this year.
Rabbi Shull said the “Sweet Tastes of Torah” pro-
gram is particularly important to the community
since “there’s no other opportunity for the whole
community to get together to mingle and talk Torah
together.” Participants “get to benefit from hearing a
variety of rabbis and approaches and to get to know
members of other congregations.”
The challenge, he said, is to attract different pop-
ulations, noting that the program tends to attract
older adults. While the committee has tried to devise
ways to attract teens, “we haven’t come up with a
formula to attract them.” Still, he said, the NJBR has
put some thought into working with Limmud, using
the approach and resources of the international Jew-
ish learning program.
“We’d like to expand, and will have that conversa-
tion, but we’ve stuck with a formula that has brought
us some success,” he said.
“It brings the community together in a really great
way,” said Nickie Falk, the program’s longtime coor-
dinator and a consultant to the Synagogue Leader-
ship Initiative of the Jewish Federation of Northern
Jew Jersey.
“Rabbis get to share their love of Torah, and
attendees get excited and want to come again.
“It’s a real event.”
What: “The Sweet Tastes of Torah” —
Building a Mishkan — Making Room for God
in Our Lives.
When: Saturday evening, February 1.
Registration is at 6:15 p.m.; Havdalah at
6:50 p.m.; classes at 7:20 p.m. and 8:30
p.m., followed by dessert.
Where: Fair Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation B’nai Israel, 10-10 Norma
Ave., Fair Lawn.
Cost: $18 per person preregistered by
January 29; $23 at the door.
For more information: Preview the program
and presenters at www.sweettastesoftorah.
weebly.com. Register by mail by sending a
check payable to the North Jersey Board
of Rabbis, 32 Franklin Place, Glen Rock, NJ
07452.
For even more information: call
Nickie Falk at (201) 652-1687 or email
sweettastesoftorah@gmail.com
Local
10 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-10*
FIRST PERSON
An Indian Jewish identity
Local professor reflects on his trip to the Bnei Menashe
MEYLEKH VISWANATH
I
f there are two defining characteris-
tics of my identity, it’s the fact that I
am Indian and that I am Jewish.
For the last several years, in an
effort to better understand my Indianness
and my Jewishness, I have spent a fair part
of each summer traveling in India and
spending time with Indian Jews in Kerala,
in and around Bombay, in Calcutta, in
Israel, and elsewhere.
In the summer of 2012, I decided to
travel to India to explore a part of India
that’s a mystery to most Indians, and at
the same time to visit a people who claim
Jewish antecedents. The Bnei Menashe, a
group of about 7,000 souls in the north-
east Indian state of Mizoram, claim to be
Jews who came to India via China. They
actually are part of a larger group of peo-
ple called Mizo, who number more than
one million.
About 60 years ago, one of the Mizo
leaders received a vision that he inter-
preted as a directive to bring his people
back to their ancient religion. An organiza-
tion called Amishav took up their case and
worked to convert the group to Orthodox
Judaism. More recently, another group,
Shavei Israel, has worked to prepare the
Bnei Menashe for conversion and emigra-
tion to Israel.
About 1,700 Bnei Menashe made aliyah
over the decade, but further emigration
had been held up for various reasons. In
November 2012, the Israeli government
finally gave permission for the rest of the
community to make aliyah.
Since then, small groups of Bnei
Menashe have made their way to Israel;
late last year, Israel’s interior ministry
allowed 889 Mizos from Mizoram and
another Indian state, Manipur, to under-
take the journey back to Zion.
The northeastern part of India is unlike
any of the country’s other regions. The
people belong to tribes that are very dif-
ferent from the rest of India physically,
culturally, and in the languages that they
speak.
I flew out from Calcutta to a place called
Agartala, the capital of the state of Tripura.
After spending some time with a friend in
a small town a four hour’s drive from Tri-
pura, I started off for Aizawl, the capital of
Mizoram, where a group of Bnei Menashe
lives. The first part of my journey was a
10-hour bus ride to Shillong in the state of
Meghalaya. Then I took another bus from
Shillong on a Thursday evening, at about
6. I was headed to Aizawl.
This was the beginning of many exciting
experiences.
At about midnight we arrived
at the border of Mizoram state.
I then discovered that because
of the political instability in that
part of India I needed a special
pass to enter Mizoram. I didn’t
have one. I worried about being
sent back after traveling all
this way, and, moreover, being stuck for
Shabbat.
Fortunately, nobody actually checked
for permits, and after an agonizing 10 min-
utes at the checkpoint we were allowed
to leave. But at about 11 in the morning,
when we were still about three hours from
Aizawl, the bus came to a complete halt.
We found ourselves at the back of a long
line of buses and trucks. Apparently there
had been a landslide, which would have
to be cleared before we could proceed. It
wouldn’t be until Saturday morning that
we would reach Aizawl.
Fortunately, one of my fellow travelers
found a taxi that would take us to Aizawl
by an alternate route. I got there at about
3 p.m., in time for Shabbat.
One of my contacts in Aizawl, a Mizo
Presbyterian woman by the name of Zaii,
welcomed me at my hotel and showed me
how to get to the Bnei Menashe commu-
nity center, a seven-story building perched
on a hillside on a winding street. About 40
or 50 men and an equal number of women
had gathered for Shabbat prayers.
The mishna in Berakhot 4:4 cautions us
that our prayers should not be said as a
matter of rote. Praying together with this
large community of almost-Jews, I could
feel the outpouring of heartfelt supplica-
tion around me. Especially after several
days of a physically gruel-
ing journey through dusty
roads in bone-racking
vehicles, I found it rather
moving. The commu-
nity was very welcoming
toward me, and the chaz-
zan, Meir, who was effec-
tively the rabbi, asked me
to give a d’var Torah. I thought I would be
able to speak in Hindi or English; I have
used both languages in Jewish communi-
ties elsewhere in India. In Mizoram, how-
ever, hardly anybody spoke Hindi. After an
initial attempt in Hebrew and an unsuc-
cessful translation, I switched to English;
the English translator was more comfort-
able with my language.
After the service, Meir invited me to
make kiddush with his family. Since there
was no kosher wine, he offered me some
bread that his wife had made, using only
flour and water and salt, in an oven used
Meylekh Viswanath of Teaneck is an Indian Jew who teaches finance at Pace University. As
part of his research, he investigates economic issues in the Talmud. In addition to believing
that the God of the Jews is God of all the world and has a special relationship with every
human being, he also believes strongly in the importance of the Diaspora and of Diaspora
communities for the continued strength of the Jewish people and the Jewish nation.
After an initial attempt
in Hebrew and an
unsuccessful translation,
I switched to English.
Meylekh Viswanath at the Bara Imambara mosque in Lucknow, India, last year.
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 11
JS-11*
for nothing else. I used this very tasty
bread to make kiddush.
The morning service was as interesting
as the evening service. A high point was
the reading of the Torah. A sefer Torah
was brought out and laid on a table, but
the actual reading was done from a
printed Bible. The quality of the reading
was pretty good, though not following the
traditional system of cantillation.
I was asked to speak once again. On Fri-
day night I had spoken about the Torah
portion, but this time I decided to talk to
the congregation on a more personal level
about the similarities in our backgrounds;
while many Ashkenazi Jews had visited
Aizawl before, this may have been the first
time that they were meeting an Indian Jew.
Of course, I had no idea how much they
understood what I was saying, but I felt
pretty passionate as an Indian Jew speak-
ing to a group of Indians who were about
to become Jews.
After the service, the Torah reader,
Harel, invited me for kiddush. While I was
not able to eat anything at his house, I did
get to meet his family, as well as another
young Mizo man, Elyashiv. Meir and Harel
both were married and had children, but
Elyashiv was not married yet. He had
been brought up Christian, but after read-
ing the Old and New Testaments, he had
decided that Judaism made much more
sense. Elyashiv spoke quite good English
and some Hebrew, as well.
While I was in Aizawl, two women
from Shavei Israel arrived to conduct
some classes on Judaism and Hebrew lan-
guage for the community. Their trip was
in preparation for the voyage a group of
Bnei Menashe was planning to take to
Israel next summer, to undergo formal
conversion.
I wondered what would happen to
this very close-knit community once
they moved to Israel. The younger Bnei
Menashe will speak better Hebrew, they
will be more sophisticated, they will have
better jobs, they will earn more money.
What will this do to the traditional Bnei
Menashe society? In Mizoram, everybody
is religious, Christians as well as Jews;
everybody belongs to a church or syna-
gogue. What will happen in Israel when a
third possibility opens up — of being nei-
ther Christian nor Jewish, of being secular,
of not believing in God?
Should the Bnei Menashe community
work these issues out before they reach
Israel? Should they try to learn from other
communities like the Ethiopian Jews or
the Bnei Israel, or even the other smaller
communities of already emigrated Bnei
Menashe?
These are not easy questions. Mean-
while, as I got ready for my return flight
back to Calcutta, I was happy that I had
come to visit this far-flung part of my coun-
try and this exotic group of Jews-to-be. I
felt that I was a more complete Indian and
a more complete Jew for meeting these
people, who were so different from me
and who nevertheless had so much in
common with me.
Tallitot and tefillin bags in the men’s section of the prayer room on Sunday morning.
The town of Aizawl as seen from a neighboring hill. ALL PHOTOS COURTESY MEYLEKH VISWANATH
Local
12 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-12*
Combining forces
Glen Rock rabbi, pastor share strengths in interfaith class
LOIS GOLDRICH
I
nterfaith study programs work for all
kinds of reasons, according to Rabbi
Neil Tow.
Rabbi Tow has participated in such
an initiative for the last seven years. Moti-
vated by the experience of his own mentor
— Rabbi Leonard Cahan, rabbi emeritus of
Congregation Har Shalom in Potomac, Mary-
land — Rabbi Tow, religious leader of the
Glen Rock Jewish Center, posed the idea for
such a class to Pastor Roger Spencer of the
town’s Good Shepherd Lutheran Church.
“When I was relatively new [to Glen
Rock], I asked Pastor Spencer, one of the
senior ministers in town, if he had ever done
an interfaith study program,” Rabbi Tow
said. “He said no. I mentioned to him that
Rabbi Cahan has been part of a very success-
ful program for a decade or more, also with
a Lutheran pastor. They’ve done classes and
even taken a trip to Israel together.
“I said, ‘Wouldn’t it be great to bring our
communities together to study material we
both consider to be holy and important to
us.’ He was very open. We’re now into our
seventh year of partnership, and it’s become
something we look forward to.”
Rabbi Tow said that over the years,
the class — generally ranging from five to
10 students — has attracted “an interest-
ing mix of folks from a variety of Christian
denominations and from my synagogue and
other Jewish communities in the area. There
has always been a group of people open to
these kinds of discussions and interested in
engaging in this material.”
“Some years it’s bigger, some smaller,” he
added.
The group meets once a month, generally
between January and June, to avoid both the
High Holy Days and Christmas. Attendees
are fairly evenly split between church and
synagogue members.
Course offerings have focused mainly on
biblical writings — including studies on Gen-
esis, the life of Moses, prophets and proph-
ecy, and King David — but this year the group
tackled lifecycle symbols and ceremonies in
both traditions.
“We covered birth through marriage,
death, burial, baptism, and elements of
religious thinking,” Rabbi Tow said. “This
year we’ll be going back to the Bible, doing
Psalms: Poetry of the Soul.” Classes switch
locations from month to month, he said; the
next class, set for January 30, will be held at
Good Shepherd.
The Book of Psalms is particularly appro-
priate, Rabbi Tow said, because “both reli-
gions share it as holy, and it is an often-used
text. And since most psalms happen to be
shorter, it will allow for us to really get into it.
“Because they are so common in both lit-
urgies, people can really connect with it.”
Rabbi Tow said that
“part of the blessing” of
this interfaith venture is
the chance to sit together
with the pastor and pre-
pare material for their
classes. “As satisfying and
uplifting as the actual
teaching of the class is,
having some face time
together to look at the text
and talk about issues” is
equally valuable, he said.
Pastor Spencer clearly agrees, not-
ing that while he and his members have
learned much from the class, “most often
my learning has come when the rabbi and
I sit down to plan out a session.
“He and I get to go deeper in sharing.
It has been a blessing and a joy to learn
and teach with Rabbi Tow. And that goes
across the board in our working together
in many areas in our town.”
Rabbi Tow noted that since the church
vicar, or intern, often sits in on planning
sessions and joins the discussion, the two
religious leaders feel that they’re “paying
it forward,” introducing the idea of inter-
faith study to the next generation.
“If I’m fortunate enough to bring an
intern here to the synagogue, I hope to
involve that person as well,” he said.
Rabbi Tow said that he and Pastor
Spencer each bring some-
thing different to the table.
“Pastor Spencer is well-
seasoned and thought-
ful, a great reader of text
for moral messages and
relevance. I can root the
discussion in the origi-
nal Hebrew l anguage
and bring out things that
English translations can-
not. We hand it off to one
another.”
Response from attendees has been posi-
tive, he said, noting that members of the
class often suggest future topics.
Citing the value of the class, Pastor
Spencer said that while it has introduced
both synagogue and church members to
different perspectives, “it has not been so
much [about] seeing things in a different
way as deepening our appreciation of one
another’s traditions.
“Programs such as this are always a
benefit, valuable to the individual faith
communities and to the town as a whole —
even for those who are not directly partici-
pating. It not only teaches but also makes
a statement to the wider community about
interfaith relationships.
“We share learning and time together
because we accept and respect one
another as people and as faiths.”
Rabbi Neil Tow
winter break program. Not all of the
20 of us on the program identify them-
selves as Conservative Jews, but we all
identify with intellectual Judaism. Hold-
ing to traditional halacha is important
and relevant, but so is not being afraid
to question, to discuss openly. Pluralism
— holding different opinions as valid — is
important.
“Conservative Judaism embodies intel-
lectual Judaism.”
He takes issue with the Pew report. “It
is seen by us — by college students — as
not making sense, as not representative
of what we see as reality.
“We don’t think that the Conservative
movement is dying. It will look different,
but it’s going to continue. It’s not going
away.
“We love this type of Judaism. It’s how
we express ourselves.”
Marc Gary is the Jewish Theological
Seminary’s executive vice chancellor
and chief operating officer; he repre-
sented the seminary at the discussions
that gave birth to the Shabbaton. He said
that the seminary, like most of the rest
of the movement, is working to keep col-
lege students connected. “It is a mistake
to infer from the decision of one organi-
zation to discontinue a particular college
program that there is a lack of commit-
ment among the leaders of Conserva-
tive Judaism to our college students,” he
wrote in an email.
In a later phone conversation, Mr. Gary
cited as examples of new initiatives the
Nishma program, begun last summer,
which provided 15 students with intensive
Torah study at JTS. “We will have maybe
20 students this year, maybe more,”
he said. “It has a stellar facility, and we
already have more than 15 applications.”
He also talked about Reshet Ramah, a
new program aimed at graduates of the
highly successful network of summer
sleepaway and day camps that span the
country. “A significant number of Ramah
staff already are on college campuses,”
he said. “And we have had some alumni
events where we partner with Reshet
Ramah here, and it attracts college and
graduate students. It is a strong recogni-
tion on the part of Ramah and JTS that
we already have thousands of present
and former campers and staff on college
campuses already.”
And, of course, there is the Masorti on
Campus Shabbaton.
“One of the great strengths is that it
is a student-led organization, without a
top-down structure,” Mr. Gary said. The
program’s goal is to train leaders, who
“will go back to their campuses and gal-
vanize students there. It is a different con-
cept, that students will be most effective
in galvanizing their own communities.”
Resurrecting
FROM PAGE 6
Douglas Kandl stands on a Jerusalem rooftop.
JS-13
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 13
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one gulp of a gait — the latter-day Sharon,
while still large in stature, had lost the stat-
uesque form of the celebrated soldier and
general. But when I questioned him then
about what message he would like us to take
back to our children in the United States, his
immediate and seemingly natural response
was to “tell them to study the Bible.”
Born on a collective farm, and reared
as a military man, Ariel Sharon’s life was
very much the confluence of our land
and our lore — on the one hand dispens-
ing maps and on the other encouraging
the study of Tanach. It is then no mere
political staging that often captured Sha-
ron sitting at his desk in the Prime Min-
ister’s office with book-lined shelves
behind him. In this way, the Israeli prime
minister’s office is markedly different
from that of the tome-less Oval Office, so
carefully designed for its measured mes-
sage of power and symbolism.
Some would say that Ariel Sharon was
a man of many, even gross contradictions.
As a family we lived in Israel during the two
years that saw the “Hitnatkut” (Gaza with-
drawal) proposed and realized, with all of
the national convulsions it wrought. That
failed effort, pursued in earnest, intended
to preserve the Jewish nature of the county
and avoid a demographic threat, will haunt
his legacy. But one cannot have met this
man and heard his message without feeling
his unwavering, visceral commitment to the
preservation of the Land and the People,
their safety and security.
Lawrence S. Zierler is rabbi of the Jewish
Center of Teaneck.
Local
14 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-14*
‘More Songs She Loved’
Stephanie Prezant is remembered with the music that defined her
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
“More Songs that She Loved, “ a program
that will be presented at the Kaplen JCC
on the Palisades in Tenafly on the night
of February 8, is billed as a tribute — not
a memorial — to Stephanie Iris Prezant, a
Haworth woman who died in a rock-climb-
ing accident in April 2012, a month before
she would have graduated from the Uni-
versity of Delaware.
Funds raised through ticket sales will
support the Stephanie I. Prezant Maccabi
Fund at the JCC. They will allow Jewish
teen athletes to participate in this Olym-
pic-style national Jewish competition for
sports and dance. Stephanie was on a Mac-
cabi dance team for four years.
Elana Prezant said that her oldest daugh-
ter had extraordinary enthusiasm for life,
and the concert is meant to keep that spirit
alive for her family and many friends and
admirers. Stephanie’s father, Jeffrey Pre-
zant, and her 22-year-old brother, Jona-
than, are participating in the show, playing
guitar and keyboards, respectively. Steph-
anie’s cousin, Sarah Fortinsky, 16, will be
a lead vocalist. The music ranges from
American and British pop to Israeli folk.
“My husband plays guitar for fun, and
music was one way Jeff and Stephanie
connected,” Ms. Prezant said. “He was the
only American invited to perform with an
Israeli band at the JCC a couple of years
ago. Three months after Stephanie’s acci-
dent, two of those band members sug-
gested doing a concert of songs Stephanie
liked.
“It far exceeded our expectations. We
had about 400 people. It was a magical
night — a night of energy that we as a fam-
ily felt from our community. It was uplift-
ing at the worst of times, and it kind of felt
like Stephanie was there.”
After the concert, many audience mem-
bers suggested a reprise the next year. “It’s
a huge time commitment, and all the band
members have careers outside of music. I
wasn’t sure everyone wanted to jump on
board again, but they did,” Ms. Prezant
said. “I just really hope to get that magical
feeling back. It reaffirmed how supportive
our community is, and what a huge loss is
felt by many people beyond our immedi-
ate family.”
The venue is of special significance.
Stephanie went to the JCC’s nursery
school, studied dance in its School of Per-
forming Arts, participated in JCC Holo-
caust memorial commemorations, and
competed in the Maccabi Games held
there in 2003. Even her standing-room-
only funeral was held at the JCC, at the
suggestion of its chief executive officer,
Avi Lewinson.
“She was the type of kid who, when she
walked into the house, you felt her sun-
shine walking in, and so people remem-
ber her,” her mother said. “She was full of
life and excitement and energy. Since the
accident, I have learned that she touched
a lot of people.”
Shlomi Pilo will be on keyboard and
vocals and his daughter Erel on vocals that
Saturday evening, Udy Kashkash will be on
guitar and vocals, Ronen Mikay will be on
saxophone, Arlene Gould will contribute
Hebrew vocals, Gal Gershovsky will be on
drums, and Uri Kleinman will be on bass.
Professional vocalist Susan Collins Caploe,
a family friend who lives in Tenafly, will
put in a special appearance.
The songs were selected by Jeff, Jona-
than, and Jacqueline Prezant. Jacqueline,
17, is Stephanie’s sister. “The three of them
put together the playlist using Stepha-
nie’s iTunes list from her computer, so
the songs are very directly connected to
Stephanie,” their mother said.
One of the selections, “Try” by Pink,
often was heard in the Prezants’ piano
room. “Jonathan would play piano and
her cousin Sarah would sing the song, and
Stephanie would watch them so proudly,”
Ms. Prezant said.
Among the other songs are “Iris” by the
Goo Goo Dolls and “Uf Gozal” (Fly, Little
Bird) by Arik Einstein, a song Stephanie
learned when she was a pupil at Solomon
Schechter Day School of Bergen County
and included in the video montage for her
bat mitzvah party. Jonathan Prezant added
“Let Her Go” by Passenger. This song came
out soon after Stephanie’s death, and the
lyrics resonated with her brother.
Tickets for “More Songs That She
Loved,” at $30 per person, $15 for students
18 and under, are on sale online at www.
jccotp.org. For more information and
underwriting opportunities, call Sharon
Kestenbaum at 201-408-1406 or email her
at skestenbaum@jccotp.org.
Stephanie Prezant and her brother, Jonathan. Her memory will be kept alive at
a second memorial concert.
She was the type
of kid who, when
she walked into
the house, you
felt her sunshine
walking in.
ELANA PREZANT
His immediate
and seemingly
natural response
was to “tell
them to study
the Bible.”
Sharon
FROM PAGE 7
JS-15
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 15
Junior Girl
Scout troop
earns badges
Participants in the Junior Girl
Scout Troop 5826 recently vis-
ited the Teaneck Volunteer
Ambulance Corps to earn their
very first badge – Junior First
Aid. The scouts, who are part
of a new troop that meets at
Keter Torah in Teaneck, were
collecting items for first aid kits
they will donate to Shelter Our
Sisters.
During the visit, Ari Lifschitz,
who is a TVAC volunteer and the
father of a troop member, gave
them a tour of TVAC.
The troop is holding a food
drive to benefit the Teaneck
Food Pantry, and members are selling Girl Scout cookies at $4 per box; the cookies
are kosher and dairy, and some are nut free. You can also buy a box to be donated to
U.S. troops overseas. For information, email dancerbaker@gmail.com.
Local
16 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-16*
NCSY scholarship dinner
Alyse Neumark Rozenberg of Bergen-
field, veteran New York and National
NCSY adviser, will be inducted into
the Ben Zakkai Honor Society at its
national scholarship dinner on Sun-
day, January 26, at the Hudson Theatre
at the Millennium Broadway Hotel in
Manhattan. She is a second generation
leader in the Orthodox Union.
Also among the BZHS inductees is
Anne Samson of Beverly Hills, who
was killed in an automobile accident in
Los Angeles in August. She will be post-
humously inducted into the society and
honored with the Ezra Ben Zion Light-
man Memorial award.
NCSY is the Orthodox Union’s interna-
tional youth movement and the Ben Zak-
kai Honor Society is NCSY’s Alumni Hall
of Fame. Proceeds from the scholarship
dinner will be used to enable teens to
attend NCSY national initiatives, includ-
ing summer travel and study programs
and the National Yarchei Kallah — five
days of intense Torah study for public
school teens during their winter break.
The event will begin with a memo-
rial shiur given by Rabbi Natan Slifkin,
son-in-law of Anne and Lee Samson, at
4 p.m.; the reception is at 5, and dinner
at 6. For information about the dinner,
email Elaine Grossman at grossmane@
ou.org or call her at (212) 613-8350.
Alyse Neumark
Rozenberg
Anne Samson, a”h
PHOTOS COURTESY OU
Sinai Schools selects
honorees for event
Sinai Schools will hold its annual ben-
efit dinner on Sunday, February 9, at the
Teaneck Marriott at Glenpointe Hotel in
Teaneck.
Sinai is the only local Jewish school that
serves children with a broad range of com-
plex learning or developmental disabilities
who cannot learn in a regular education
setting. The school creates an individual-
ized program for each child, based on his
or her social, emotional, and academic
needs. With a 1:2 staff-to-student ratio, in-
house therapies, and specialists on staff at
each school, the Sinai’s own cost per child
is very high. The benefit dinner helps the
school provide scholarships to many who
are in need.
This year’s guests of honor are David
and Marjorie Bernstein, William and Gail
Hochman, Ma’adan Caterers’ Stuart Kahan
and Yossie Markovic, Aryeh and Arielle
Sheinbein, and Cantor Joseph and Beatrice
Malovany. In celebration of Sinai’s 32nd or
“lev” year, the honorees are being recog-
nized for the particular qualities of their
hearts that connect them to Sinai.
The dinner will feature a new inspira-
tional video called “Sisters,” which tells
the story of the transformation of two girls
who have overcome tremendous chal-
lenges with Sinai’s help,.
For information, to make reservations,
or to donate, call (201) 833-1134, ext. 105,
or go to www.sinaidinner.org.
William and Gail
Hochman
Cantor Joseph and
Beatrice Malovany
Aryeh and Arielle
Sheinbein
David and Marjorie
Bernstein
Yossie Markovic and
Stuart Kahan
PHOTOS COURTESY SINAI
Teaneck resident assumes double duty
Cha ni Her r ma nn of
Teaneck, director of New
Jersey Yachad, the Ortho-
dox Union’s agency for
people with disabilities,
has been named program
director for Yachad at Camp
Mesorah in Guilford, N.Y.
Camp Mesorah is one of
the many sleepaway and day
camps where Yachad mem-
bers are mainstreamed into
the camp program, either as
campers or as staff members. Campers
assisted by shadows and the vocational
staff is helped by job coaches.
Ms. Herrmann will oversee all aspects
of the program, from working with the
campers, staff members, shadows and
coaches, to coordinating with the many
parts of the camp.
She will perform her
responsibilities for both posi-
tions simultaneously and will
move to the camp with her
family during the summer.
Campers range from 8 to 16
years old and vocational staff
from 21 to 35. The camp sea-
son begins June 26 with staff
orientation, and camp opens
on June 30; the second ses-
sion starts on July 28. Camp
ends on August 18. This will be Yachad’s
fourth summer at Camp Mesorah, with
enrollment increasing every year.
There are limited openings for this
summer. For information or to register,
go to yachadsummer@ou.org or call
(212) 613-8369.
Chani Herrmann
COURTESY OU
Rosner named director
at Beth El nursery school
Abbe Rosner of Teaneck has been named nursery school
director at Temple Beth El of Northern Valley in Closter.
Before that, she was the director of the Early Learning Cen-
ter at the YM-YWHA of Greater Clifton/Passaic. Information
and registration materials are available at the synagogue’s
website, www.tbenv.org, or by calling the nursery school
office at (201) 768-3726.
Abbe Rosner
COURTESY TBE
C
O
U
R
T
E
S
Y

B
E
T
H

K
E
P
E
T
S
JS-17
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 17
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Not just a gym,
A Family Wellness Center
Ofer may not be combined. Valid on new, annual
memberships. No building fund or bond required.
Individual, family, youth & senior membership options
available. Must take tour to receive guest pass. The JCC
is proud to be an inclusive environment, open to all.
STATE-OF-THE-ART fitness center
FULL COURT basketball AND racquetball COURTS
outdoor tennis COURTS
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR aquatics center WITH WATER PLAY PARK
youth/teen fitness CENTER
OVER 90 FREE GROUP EXERCISE classes INCLUDING SPIN, PILATES,
BARRE, ZUMBA, YOUTH ZUMBA, YOUTH SPIN—AND MORE!
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ACCESS TO INFANT, TODDLER, AND SCHOOL-AGE programming IN
SPORTS, KARATE, ATHLETICS, GYMNASTICS, ARTS AND SCIENCE
LUXURIOUS spa CENTER OFFERING MASSAGES, FACIALS, WAXING AND MORE
RENOWNED NURSERY SCHOOL, DAY CAMPS; MUSIC, DRAMA & DANCE SCHOOLS.
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Try us out with
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Editorial
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Editor Emerita
Rebecca Kaplan Boroson
Remembering Ariel Sharon
A
lthough Ariel Sharon had
been in a coma for eight
years until he died last
Shabbat, it is hard to think
of a person who more radiated hard,
complicated life.
Although he was so iconic that it’s
difficult to see past the myth, Sharon
lived a life that was a hugely exagger-
ated version of the lives the rest of us
live, with all its contradictions and
radical revisions and tragedies and
losses and victories.
He personified Israel in a way that
almost no one still alive can do. He
came after the first generations of
founders but he fought in all of the
new state’s wars and all by himself
he embodied the founders’ strength,
will, bullishness, courage, charisma,
sentimentality, rawness, self-sacri-
fice, blinkered vision, and love; their
attachment to the land and the peo-
ple of Israel, often to their own per-
sonal detriment and sometimes to
the detriment of the cause to which
they devoted their lives.
He was often right and he was
often wrong, and as a people we can-
not agree about when he was which.
Think of that iconic photograph
of Arik Sharon holding a sheep
over his shoulders. He was 70 years
old. The photo was taken in golden
light, which bathes both Sharon and
the sheep in its glow. Sharon looks
resigned, although we are not sure
to what; the sheep looks entirely
comfortable, its coat matted, its
ears hanging low. The oddly rueful
charisma surging from that picture is
enough to stop a viewer’s breath.
It is hard to know how to react
when someone so fundamental and
oversized is gone, no matter how
you felt about him when he was alive.
We know that opinion about him is
mixed — that is true even within our
office — and that his theoretical piv-
ots cast off many of his admirers even
as others chose to follow him for the
first time.
It seems as if he were so deter-
mined to leave this world only on
his own terms that he lived for
eight years after a stroke that would
have killed almost anyone else
immediately.
His death leaves a hole.
- JP
18 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-18*
Leaders and bridges
S
ome topics just don’t go
away.
One of them, unsurpris-
ingly, is leadership. The
other, perhaps less obviously, is lane
closures.
A few weeks ago, we wrote about
the George Washington Bridge mess,
predicting that it would not go away.
(Much as we would love to claim pre-
science, that really was a total no-
brainer.) It has not.
For the last few weeks, our weekly
Torah readings have addressed
leadership; this week, in fact, Yitro,
Moshe’s father-in-law, tackles the
subject head on. Moshe, the servant
of God, whose struggles with ego and
power to some extent foreshadow
the struggles we see played out in
history and current affairs, has to
learn how to delegate, to commiser-
ate, and ultimately to lead.
Which brings us to Gov. Chris
Chri sti e, whose monument al
struggles with these issues are now
thrashing out all over the country’s
front pages. Whether you believe
him to be personally responsible for
the lane closures or simply guilty of
having hired and overlooked a staff
he later called “stupid,” certainly it
speaks to his leadership style.
And this really does matter. Com-
ments on the story from across the
country make clear that it is hard for
others to understand exactly how
important, how genuinely arterial,
the bridge is to those of us who live
or work here.
The local lanes Gov. Christie has
dismissed as somehow unfairly par-
celed out to Fort Lee are in fact the
lifeline for all the communities south
of the bridge and east of the highway
entrances, and they often are major
timesavers for people who live north
and east and want to avoid the Pali-
sades Parkway. They are not a special
perk, a road you need a Fort Lee visa
to be allowed to drive.
People from elsewhere may
not be able to understand what
it feels like to be stuck in that traf-
fic, with no way out, watching the
clock move inexorably forward as
your car sits inexorably still. The
road gets quiet as engines are shut
off. Huge trucks loom behind and
around you. As the minutes tick by,
doctors’ appointments, classes, job
interviews, social engagements all
become impossible. Ambulances,
fire trucks, and police cars are stuck.
Babies cry, children fidget, soda
cans empty, snack bags are balled
and tossed on the floor. Bladders fill.
Sounds that had been music turn
into blaring noise. Traffic reports
either ignore the problem or predict
that it will not end. Either way, no
comfort.
All this for revenge?
This is not leadership.
-JP
KEEPING THE FAITH
A shameful
double standard
SHAMMAI ENGELMAYER
R
abbi Avi Weiss is not Orthodox in the eyes
of Israel’s chief rabbinate. So the office
declared last week in a statement released
by its attorney, Harel Goldberg, who said
the allegedly preliminary decision was based in part
on the testimony of members of the Rabbinical Coun-
cil of America.
For the record, over last weekend the RCA distanced
itself from that announcement.
At issue is Weiss’ lenient
views on a variety of mat-
ters, and especially his
espousal of what has
become known as “Open
Orthodoxy,” which he
defined in a 1997 article.
Open Orthodoxy, he wrote
in Judaism: A Journal of
Jewish Life and Thought,
is “open to secular studies
and views other than those
of [Orthodox] rabbis; open
to non-Jews and less obser-
vant Jews; open to the State of lsrael as having religious
meaning; open to increased women’s participation [in
religious life]; open to contact with the Conservative,
Reform, and Reconstructionist movements; and open
to public protest as a means of helping our people.”
This is an undeniable fact: Distinguished, even
revered rabbis, have deviated from traditional norms
from the very start of the rabbinate two millennia ago.
We have Hillel and Shammai, Sephard and Ashkenaz,
chasid and mitnagid, and this only scratches the sur-
face of the myriad shades of halachic diversity. There
is no gold standard for what it means to be halachic or
traditional, but there does seem to be a double stan-
dard when it comes to the Modern Orthodox.
There is one rabbi, revered to the point that his rul-
ings are virtually accepted without question, who did
questionable things in his career, yet no one ever did
to him what is being done to Avi Weiss, who has gone
nowhere near as far as this rabbi in the things he has
done.
Shammai Engelmayer is rabbi of Temple Israel
Community Center | Congregation Heichal Yisrael in
Cliffside Park.
Shammai
Engelmayer
Op-Ed
There is the case, for example, of a Jewish man who
wanted to marry a Jewish woman, but the rabbis in
Israel declared that man a mamzer — a child of a for-
bidden relationship — and declared him ineligible to
marry another Jew. The rabbi heard of the case, found
a loophole, and drove a truck through it. The man was
not a mamzer, he said, and he may marry. The rabbis
in Israel accepted the decision.
Another time, this rabbi completely shoved aside
Torah law in a financial matter. Why? It was because
the Torah law was anachronistic and even harmful.
Again, no one challenged him.
Perhaps the most outrageous example is when he
converted a man whose only reason for wanting to be
Jewish was so that he could dress like one. Seriously;
the man became enamored of a form of Jewish dress,
and this revered rabbi saw no reason to deny him his
conversion — even though the rabbi knew that most
Jews actually did not dress that way.
More to the point, there is no record that this rabbi
ever called in a bet din to oversee the conversion, or
insisted on circumcision and mikvah. Yet the conver-
sion was — is — accepted by everyone as valid.
Avi Weiss would never consider converting anyone
for so flighty a reason; he would not automatically dis-
miss black-letter Torah law as anachronistic and harm-
ful; and he would not so lightly dismiss the ruling of
other rabbis on matters of mamzerut. Yet he is vilified,
while this other rabbi is praised.
By now, some readers probably suspect this col-
umn’s veracity. These cases, after all, appear so egre-
gious that they cannot be true.
They are true. The rabbi’s name was Hillel the Elder
(yes, that Hillel).
To take the last case first, the man in question was
so taken by the specialized clothing of the high priest
that he wanted the job so that he could wear the cloth-
ing. Hillel converted him, apparently on the spot, and
then had the man find out for himself that he could
never be a priest, much less high priest. As explained
by Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz in his commentary, “In prac-
tice, people like the ones that Hillel converted [there
were two other equally strange cases] are not accepted
as converts.... However, Hillel apparently relied on the
fact that these converts could eventually accept Juda-
ism in its entirety at a later time.” (See the Babylonian
Talmud tractate Shabbat 31a for the three cases.) That
reliance would not pass muster with today’s chief rab-
binate or the RCA.
The Babylonian tractate Gittin (34b-37b) reports
on the institution of the prosbul, a document appar-
ently thought up by Hillel that in essence overturns
the Torah’s commandment regarding the release of
debts in a sabbatical year. Through the legal fiction of
the prosbul, the debts remain in force no matter what
year it is.
It is in BT Bava M’tzia 104a that we find Hillel over-
turning a ruling of the sages regarding the status of
Jewish men in Alexandria, Egypt. The somewhat com-
plicated case involved women who were formally
betrothed, but then forced to marry other men, who
may not even have been Jewish. The sages ruled that
their children were mamzerim; Hillel found a some-
what questionable loophole (it was based on word-
ing in marriage contracts that could not possibly have
been written because the marriages never took place),
which the sages accepted.
We revere Hillel precisely because he epitomized
“Open Judaism.” Yet Avi Weiss is reviled. That is a dou-
ble standard — and a sad commentary on Jewish life
in 2014.
JS-19*
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 19
KEEPING THE FAITH
A shameful
double standard
SHAMMAI ENGELMAYER
R
abbi Avi Weiss is not Orthodox in the eyes
of Israel’s chief rabbinate. So the office
declared last week in a statement released
by its attorney, Harel Goldberg, who said
the allegedly preliminary decision was based in part
on the testimony of members of the Rabbinical Coun-
cil of America.
For the record, over last weekend the RCA distanced
itself from that announcement.
At issue is Weiss’ lenient
views on a variety of mat-
ters, and especially his
espousal of what has
become known as “Open
Orthodoxy,” which he
defined in a 1997 article.
Open Orthodoxy, he wrote
in Judaism: A Journal of
Jewish Life and Thought,
is “open to secular studies
and views other than those
of [Orthodox] rabbis; open
to non-Jews and less obser-
vant Jews; open to the State of lsrael as having religious
meaning; open to increased women’s participation [in
religious life]; open to contact with the Conservative,
Reform, and Reconstructionist movements; and open
to public protest as a means of helping our people.”
This is an undeniable fact: Distinguished, even
revered rabbis, have deviated from traditional norms
from the very start of the rabbinate two millennia ago.
We have Hillel and Shammai, Sephard and Ashkenaz,
chasid and mitnagid, and this only scratches the sur-
face of the myriad shades of halachic diversity. There
is no gold standard for what it means to be halachic or
traditional, but there does seem to be a double stan-
dard when it comes to the Modern Orthodox.
There is one rabbi, revered to the point that his rul-
ings are virtually accepted without question, who did
questionable things in his career, yet no one ever did
to him what is being done to Avi Weiss, who has gone
nowhere near as far as this rabbi in the things he has
done.
A true leader in Israel
PHIL JACOBS
H
e led Israel, warts
and all
It has been almost
a week since Ariel
Sharon, an Israeli political and
military leader who truly had a
hand in shaping the history of the
Jewish state, died.
Sharon, born Ariel Scheiner-
man, suffered a stroke in January
2006. He remained in a coma at
the Sheba Medical Center outside
of Tel Aviv.
I believe that his political moves
and military strategies will be dis-
cussed and studied now and for gen-
erations to come.
How could a man be loved and
applauded by so many Israelis and
then so loathed by those same
people?
Arguably, it was because he was a
pragmatist, knowing that different
times meant different actions on the
battlefield, in the Knesset, or on the
world political stage.
He was the hero of the battle for
Jerusalem in 1948; a man who served
in wars that threatened Israel’s very
existence. His command of the IDF’s
southern front defeated Egypt in its
near-successful 1973 surprise attack
on Israel.
He was a soldier who cleared most
of the terrorist operations out from
Gaza in 1971.
But then there was Ariel Sharon
the defense minister, who pushed
the PLO all the way to Beirut in 1982,
against the desires of the Reagan
administration.
During the occupation of south-
ern Lebanon, under his watch, Leba-
nese Christian Phalangists, operating
under Israeli stewardship, massacred
Palestinian refugees at the Sabra and
Shatila refugee camps. The action
violated a ceasefire brokered by the
Reagan administration. But that was
the political part. The massacre cast
Sharon as a man with blood on his
hands. Certainly the Arab world felt
that way — and so did many Jews in
Israel and in the Diaspora.
The 1983 Kahan Commission
under the Israeli government found
that then Secretary of Defense Sha-
ron was personally responsible “for
ignoring the danger of bloodshed
and revenge” in those Palestinian
refugee camps. The Kahan Commis-
sion recommended that Sharon be
removed from his post. It was just
like Sharon to refuse to step down at
first, but eventually he did.
He would return to power in 2001
as prime minister. This was his life’s
turning point.
It was in the early part of the 21st
century that Sharon talked publicly
about Palestinian statehood. The
man who permitted settlements in
the west bank and Gaza changed dra-
matically in 2005, when he ordered
21 Jewish settlements in Gaza and
four on the west bank removed —
the Jews were resettled in Israel and
the land was turned over to the Pal-
estinians. Unfortunately, the terror-
ist group Hamas was empowered in
Gaza.
There is much more to say about
Sharon. He formed the Kadima
party, a centrist alliance looking
toward a secure Israel existing side
by side with a Palestinian state. He
knew that if Israel were not to aid
in the creation of such a Palestin-
ian entity, demographics within the
Jewish state eventually would favor
those groups that longed for its
death. On one hand Sharon feared
that Israel’s Arab minority some
day would become a majority. And
even beyond that, he did not want
Israel’s future to be about govern-
ing, controlling, or occupying Pal-
estinian people, infrastructure, or
government. He wanted a Palestine
that eventually would govern itself
peacefully alongside Israel.
The unilateral withdrawal from
Gaza leaves a question mark over
Sharon’s place in history. Historians
and politicians suggest it might have
been possible that a bilateral agree-
ment with the Palestinian Authority
might have kept Hamas out of the
picture.
But Arik Sharon saw a smaller,
more secure Israel, with settlements
and a wall in place, as a way toward
peace.
Handing over Gaza has led to
tension its the border with Israel,
because Iranian-supplied missiles
are now able to reach way beyond
the Israel towns of Sderot and Ash-
kelon and hit Ashdod and the Tel Aviv
suburbs.
Perhaps the biggest paradox of
all was that Sharon was dead, but
still alive.
His well-researched obituary
was just waiting for his death
before an editor somewhere
would hit the enter key.
Without diminishing the accom-
plishments of many memorable
Israeli leaders, scientists, edu-
cators, soldiers and others, it is
safe to say that there probably
will be no other like Sharon. He
was there for it all, the wars, the
political moves, the relationship with
Diaspora Jews and world leaders.
He worked with David Ben-Gurion,
saved the fragile state with Yitzhak
Rabin and Ehud Barak, and brought
Likud and Labor together with Ben-
jamin Netanyahu and Shimon Peres.
He encouraged aliyah, and believed
that the Jewish state must take care
of itself. The logical outgrowth of that
belief is Israel’s world leadership in
technology and agriculture.
This man, whom many saw as
gruff, loved his country and the Jew-
ish people.
He was not right all the time. He
made his decisions based on what he
felt was in Israel’s best interest at the
time. Sometimes, he believed those
decisions would affect Israel’s very
survival. We wished he never took
some of the actions he did take, like
the 2000 visit to the Temple Mount,
which arguably triggered the second
intifada.
Yet these actions would be fol-
lowed by his conciliatory movement
toward a unity government, and the
beginning of a dialogue with future
Palestinian leader Abbas. Years ear-
lier, in 1993, when the Oslo accords
were signed, he said he refused to
shake Yasser Arafat’s hand on the
White House lawn because he had
spent his life trying to kill Arafat.
There have so many shifts in atti-
tudes and policy changes over the
course of Sharon’s life. Israel may be
a world leader in technology, medi-
cine, and many other disciplines, but
it still is a young state after 66 years.
Ariel Sharon was there for all of it. He
was born in a moshav in 1928. He was
there when the state survived and
then as it thrived.
Much will be written now, after
his official death. People will argue
one way or another on the impact of
his leadership. One thing is for sure,
though.
Ari el Sharon wi l l never be
forgotten.
He helped bring Israel this far.
Warts and all.
FLASH90
Op-Ed
20 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-20*
Letters
More on
Elephant Highway
Yasher koach to Max
and Josh Kauderer.
The Engl ewood
brothers were fea-
tured on last week’s
cover for their work in
bringing attention to
the desperate plight
of African elephants.
The reaction from
you, our readers, has
been overwhelming.
Most importantly,
the boys report that
people want to know
more, to get involved. We are
pleased to report that they also
have received contributions.
Two lines in our story struck
a nerve. About 30,000 ele-
phants are killed each year.
That’s one every 15 minutes.
Do the math. There are an
estimated 450,000 elephants
in Africa today. That puts them
a mere 15 years away from
extinction.
There is hope. Just this week
China destroyed about 6 tons
of illegal ivory from its stock-
pile. Still, that is just a small
portion of the illegal ivory it
holds.
El ephant Hi ghway. or g
reports that 84 percent of
the Chinese middle- and
upper-middle class consum-
ers surveyed plan to buy ivory
goods in the future. If 84 per-
cent of the Chinese middle
and upper-middle classes
plan to buy even the smallest
of trinkets, that’s more than
two million items. This rep-
resents a very grim future for
elephants.
Imagine a world without
these magnificent animals. We
ask that you honor the work
done by Max and Josh and join
them. Make a contribution,
“like” Elephant Highway’s
Facebook page, and tell your
friends.
Make a difference before it’s
too late.
- James Janoff
Was Walt Disney anti-Semitic?
RAFAEL MEDOFF
A
ctress Meryl Streep
has rei gni ted a
debate that has
simmered below
the surface in Hollywood for
decades: Was Walt Disney
anti-Semitic?
The occasi on was the
annual awards event of the
National Board of Review, an
organization of filmmakers, students, and
movie scholars. Ms. Streep presented an
award to Emma Thompson for her role in
the new movie “Saving Mr. Banks,” about
the making of Mary Poppins. Ms. Thomp-
son co-stars as Mary Poppins’ creator,
author P.L. Travers, alongside Tom Hanks
as Walt Disney.
Ms. Streep took the opportunity to blast
Mr. Disney as racist and misogynist who
also “supported an anti-Semitic industry
lobbying group.”
She did not actually call
Mr. Disney an anti-Semite,
but many people took it that
way. The Hollywood Reporter
declared that Streep accused
Disney of being “sexist, rac-
ist and anti-Semitic.” Film
professor David Hajdu said
Disney was “a deeply flawed
human being. A misogynist?
You bet. An anti-Semite? That,
too.” An unnamed “female
Academy member” interviewed by the
Reporter referred to him as “that old anti-
Semite himself, Mr. Disney.”
Hollywood historian Neal Gabler exam-
ined the anti-Semitism charge in his 2006
biography of Disney. “Of the Jews who
worked [with Disney], it was hard to find
any who thought Walt was an anti-Sem-
ite,” Mr. Gabler reported. “Joe Grant, who
had been an artist, the head of the model
department, and the storyman respon-
sible for Dumbo... declared emphatically
that Walt was not an anti-Semite. ‘Some
of the most influential people at the stu-
dio were Jewish,’ Grant recalled, thinking
no doubt of himself, production manager
Harry Tytle, and Kay Kamen [head of
Disney’s merchandising arm], who once
quipped that Disney’s New York office
had more Jews than the Book of Leviticus.
Maurice Rapf concurred that Walt was not
anti-Semitic; he was just a ‘very conserva-
tive guy.’”
On the other hand, one former Disney
animator, David Swift, has claimed he
heard Walt make an anti-Semitic remark,
and another ex-staffer, David Hilberman,
has alleged that one employee was fired
because he was Jewish. (However, accord-
ing to Mr. Gabler, Mr. Disney himself was
rarely involved in firing anyone except
the top brass). In addition, the original
animated version of the “Three Little Pigs”
portrayed the Big Bad Wolf as a stereotypi-
cally Jewish peddler, although after com-
plaints, the segment was altered.
When it comes to explicit proof that Mr.
Disney was anti-Semitic, the critics’ case
weakens. “There is zero hard evidence
Walt Disney’s legacy has provoked
controversy. ALAN FISHER
Rafael Medoff
Agenda-driven decisions
It was interesting to read the discussion with
Rabbis Goldin and Lopatin (“Debating Open
Orthodoxy,” January 3). I would summarize
Rabbi Goldin’s criticism of open Orthodoxy as
too agenda-driven, while Rabbi Lopatin criti-
cized modern Orthodoxy (the RCA) for building
walls. I wonder how Rabbi Goldin responds to
Rabbi Zahavy’s criticism (“Dear Rabbi”), in the
same issue, of an Orthodox rabbi who pointedly
remained outside a Conservative bar mitzvah
service.
I would like to hear Rabbi Goldin’s view of
what seems to me to be many instances of the
halachic community being agenda-driven:
The (laudable) efforts of several admired
Orthodox rabbis to find halachic grounds on
which to annul the marriages of agunot, women
whose husbands withheld a get (divorce decree);
The refusal of many Orthodox scholars to
acknowledge the genius and scholarship of Saul
Lieberman, z”l, because he taught at the Con-
servative Jewish Theological Seminary (related
in “Saul Lieberman and the Orthodox,” by Marc
Shapiro);
Similarly, the RCA’s refusal to accept the
“Lieberman clause” to prevent the creation of
agunot — only to accept, 40 years later (note the
resonance of the “40 years”), a minor modifica-
tion of that clause;
The reply of a respected Orthodox rabbi (years
ago) to the question of permitting women to
dance with a Torah scroll on Simchat Torah: “I
would do it if it didn’t seem so connected to the
women’s lib movement”;
The rabbis of the Talmud modifying the
halacha of execution for a “rebellious son” by
adding preconditions that made it practically
unenforceable.
And surely there are many halachot in the
Talmud whose scriptural basis is sufficiently tenu-
ous to suggest that the conclusions preceded the
derivations.
Dan Mosenkis
Fair Lawn
Time to mourn
I wish to state my disagreement with your op ed,
“The stories of Menachem Stark” ( January 10), for
several reasons.
First, Menachem Stark died a horrible death.
That alone should have been the story. Any
discussion as to allegations of his being a slum-
lord and the Satmar community’s toleration of
that fact should have occurred either during his
lifetime or sometime later after the family and
community complete mourning for him. The
way the story was told by the New York Post, the
Forward, and the New York Times transformed a
victim into a victimizer. Had that been done to an
Afro-American or Hispanic, people would have
properly called it racist.
Secondly, prejudice had everything to do with
the way the story was handled. There is a desire
when the opportunity comes about to show reli-
gious people as hypocritical. Some in the media
did exactly that.
Also, anti-Semitic stereotypes tend to stick to
charedi or chasidic Jews. This is wrong and should
be fought against by all Jews, religious or secular.
My only thoughts are condolences to the
widow, the fatherless children, other relatives,
and the Satmar community as a whole. Any other
thoughts can wait.
Alan Levin
Fair Lawn
Letters
JS-21
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 21
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that Disney ever wrote or said any-
thing anti-Semitic in private or public,”
according to Douglas Brode, author of
“Multiculturalism and the Mouse: Race
and Sex in Disney Entertainment”. Mr.
Brode told the Hollywood Reporter that
Mr. Disney used more Jewish actors
“than any other studio of Hollywood’s
golden age, including those run by Jew-
ish movie moguls.”
Mr. Gabler also revealed that Mr. Dis-
ney “frequently” made unpublicized
donations to a variety of Jewish charities,
including a Jewish orphanage, a Jewish
old age home, Yeshiva College (precur-
sor to Yeshiva University), and the Amer-
ican League for a Free Palestine. The
League, better known as the Bergson
Group, publicly supported the armed
revolt against the British in Palestine by
Menachem Begin’s Irgun Zvai Leumi. Mr.
Disney was embracing not just Zionism,
but its most militant wing.
How, then, did the rumors of Mr. Dis-
ney’s alleged anti-Semitism spread so far
and wide?
That’s where Meryl Streep comes in.
The “anti-Semitic industry lobbying
group” with which Mr. Disney was asso-
ciated was the Motion Picture Alliance
for the Preservation of American Ide-
als. The group’s statement of principles
said nothing about Jews; its declared
purpose was to prevent “Communist,
Fascist, and other totalitarian-minded
groups” from gaining a foothold in Hol-
lywood. Among its members were polit-
ically conservative actors such as John
Wayne, Clark Gable, and Ginger Rogers.
But some of its other members were
accused of being privately anti-Semitic,
and in general it had a reputation as
being reactionary.
Mr. Gabler believes that “the most
plausible explanation” for the rumors
about Mr. Disney were a kind of guilt by
association: “Walt, in joining forces with
the MPA and its band of professional
reactionaries and red-baiters, also got
tarred with their anti-Semitism. Walt
Disney certainly was aware of the MPA’s pur-
ported anti-Semitism, but he chose to ignore
it…. The price he paid was that he would
always be lumped not only with anti-Com-
munists but also with anti-Semites.”
The irony is that while Meryl Streep was
condemning Walt Disney for associating
with extremists, she was doing the very
same thing herself. The actress to whom
she gave that award when she made her
anti-Disney speech, her close friend Emma
Thompson, is active in the anti-Israel boy-
cott movement.
Ms. Streep hailed Ms. Thompson as
“splendid, beautiful, practically a saint … a
living, acting conscience.” Yet this “saint,”
together with other British actors, publicly
urged a boycott of Israel’s Habimah theater
troupe when it participated in a festival in
England. Habimah, of course, has nothing
to do with Israeli government policies or any
political issues. Its only “crime” is that it’s
Israeli.
By contrast, Ms. Thompson had no prob-
lem with the National Theater of China
taking part in that festival, even though it
really does represent the Chinese regime —
a regime guilty of the most heinous human
rights violations, aid to terrorists around the
world, and support for the genocidal govern-
ment of Sudan.
But of course, hypocrisy is the hallmark
of the “saints” of the anti-Israel boycott
crusade.
JNS.ORG
Dr. Rafael Medoff is director of the David
S. Wyman Institute for Holocaust Studies
in Washington, D.C. The Wyman Institute
worked with Disney Educational Productions
on its new DVD, “They Spoke Out: American
Voices Against the Holocaust.”
And surely there are many halachot in the
Talmud whose scriptural basis is sufficiently tenu-
ous to suggest that the conclusions preceded the
derivations.
Dan Mosenkis
Fair Lawn
Time to mourn
I wish to state my disagreement with your op ed,
“The stories of Menachem Stark” ( January 10), for
several reasons.
First, Menachem Stark died a horrible death.
That alone should have been the story. Any
discussion as to allegations of his being a slum-
lord and the Satmar community’s toleration of
that fact should have occurred either during his
lifetime or sometime later after the family and
community complete mourning for him. The
way the story was told by the New York Post, the
Forward, and the New York Times transformed a
victim into a victimizer. Had that been done to an
Afro-American or Hispanic, people would have
properly called it racist.
Secondly, prejudice had everything to do with
the way the story was handled. There is a desire
when the opportunity comes about to show reli-
gious people as hypocritical. Some in the media
did exactly that.
Also, anti-Semitic stereotypes tend to stick to
charedi or chasidic Jews. This is wrong and should
be fought against by all Jews, religious or secular.
My only thoughts are condolences to the
widow, the fatherless children, other relatives,
and the Satmar community as a whole. Any other
thoughts can wait.
Alan Levin
Fair Lawn
Secular rebooting
Re: Dr. Jerrold Terdiman’s December
27 letter, “Rebooting isn’t Jewish.” It
is amazing how many Jews who were
secular — not even agnostic! — have
contributed to the establishment of the
State of Israel. Ben-Gurion, Gold Meir,
Shimon Peres, Ehud Barak, Moshe
Dayan, and virtually the entire Zionist
establishment!
In his writing off of 90 percent of the
Jewish people, Dr. Terdiman displays a
lack of understanding of Jewish history.
What he characterizes as “this simple
concept” is far from a “settled opin-
ion.” The saving grace is that he himself
acknowledges that it is only his opinion.
Paul Einschlag
Fort Lee
Jews helped
Christianity survive
According to the historian Josephus,
during the Roman civil war the Jews
supported Julius Caesar. When he won,
therefore, Caesar got the Roman Senate
to declare Judaism an official and rec-
ognized religion of the Roman empire,
so long as the Jews offered sacrifices on
Caesar’s behalf at the Temple in Jerusa-
lem. Because Judaism was an official and
recognized religion, the Jews were free
to practice and observe their religion
in all parts of the empire, and many
leading Romans became interested in
Judaism. When Christianity first came
along, it was widely seen as a sect of
Judaism and was therefore allowed to be
practiced and observed without any hin-
drances from the Roman government,
except during the reign of the emperor
Julian. (The Christians called him “the
apostate”; the Jews simply called him
“the Hellene” — which means “the
Greek,” — because he wanted to restore
the Greek religion.) Therefore, we can
readily conclude that were it not for the
Jews, Christianity might not have sur-
vived to come down to the present day.
What Julian liked about Judaism is that
the Jews were offering sacrifices on his
behalf, but the Christians never did that.
Harry Eisenberg
Glen Rock
Rudeness in Rockland
Rabbi Goldin may be oblivious to the
reality Rockland County Jews have
experienced when requesting to discuss
relations among Jews in their county
(“Insulting generalizations,” Letters,
January 10). The ultra-Orthodox will not
discuss any topic with non-Orthodox
Jews. They do maintain that Orthodoxy
is the only true form of Judaism, and
that other forms are falsifications of
religious worship. They certainly do
disrespect other forms of Judaism, and
feel that only they are the true Jews
and will survive as such. When you
are not attired to their manner, you
are shunned when shopping in their
retail businesses. As for attending a bat
mitzvah, they would decline, on the
grounds of their religious beliefs, in a
courteous manner, giving thanks for the
thought and wishing the child well and
recognizing the child’s effort.
Shel Haas
Fort Lee
Cover Story
22 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-22
JOANNE PALMER
H
ard-copy dictionaries — the big ones, with
thin paper and tiny print and millions of
words — used to have little line drawings
to illustrate some of the concepts next to
some abstract definitions.
If a dictionary-maker had wanted to illustrate the
concept “energy,” he could have used a line drawing
of Warren Geller.
Mr. Geller is the president and chief operating offi-
cer of Englewood Hospital and Medical Center. That
makes him responsible for more than 2,500 employ-
ees, about 1,000 of them medical staff; 520 beds; and
approximately 2,000 births, 31,500 inpatients, and
605,000 outpatients every year. He also oversees an
operating budget of $400 million.
It is impossible to overstate the responsibility of
running a hospital. To go back to that old-fashioned
dictionary’s definition of “literally,” Mr. Geller literally
oversees issues of life and death.
So how did this taut, hyper-alert, angular, athletic,
warm, personable, quick-talking, and unsurprisingly
very busy man get to this level?
He worked very hard for it.
Warren Geller was born in the Bronx in 1968, the
youngest of five, to parents who trace their ancestry
back to Russia and Austria-Hungary. His father “was a
Navy man, in the years between Korea and Vietnam,”
Mr. Geller said; he served on the USS Kearsarge. “He
came home every year and had a kid.”
His father’s naval background “is why I am always
on time, neat, and organized,” Mr. Geller said. “Good
habits die hard.”
His father was in retail once he returned to civilian
life — “children’s toys, health and beauty aids, knick-
knacks,” his son recalled, and his mother, who has not
yet retired, is an office manager for financial planners.
The family moved first to Port Chester, in Westchester
County, and then farther north, to Putnam County;
Mr. Geller grew up in the town of Brewster, where
housing was more affordable. Even then, Putnam was
prime country house territory, so families looking for
year-round residences could do well.
The trade-off, though, was that there were not
The conductor
and the orchestra
Warren Geller
of Demarest talks
about his role at
Englewood Hospital
many Jews in Brewster. There was one
small Reform synagogue in town, Temple
Beth El. “The rabbi, Solomon Aikrish, was
a Moroccan Jew — and also the French and
Spanish teacher at school,” Mr. Geller said.
But he did not go to Hebrew school, and
he did not become bar mitzvah. (Not then,
at any rate.)
The family was close-knit; Mr. Geller’s
oldest brother, Scott, still is his best
friend. The Gellers also were generous;
they hosted a Fresh Air Fund child every
summer. In those pre-social-media days it
was hard to keep in touch with people, but
Derek was a regular part of their summers
for years. “We learned about the melting
pot,” Mr. Geller said.
The family also adored sports. Mr.
Geller’s favorites were football, lacrosse,
any available pickup game in anything,
and martial arts, which he began when
he was young. “When we weren’t play-
ing on the school teams or the rec teams,
we were playing at home,” Mr. Geller said.
He and his siblings also joined the Catho-
lic Youth Organization at the school at the
local church, St. Lawrence O’Toole. “I was
a leader in CYO,” Mr. Geller said. “That’s
because that way I got a key to the gym,
and if you had that, you could play 24/7.”
He also did some community service
work in a local hospital, perhaps foreshad-
owing his career. “I always was drawn to
fields where I could help people,” he said.
And he learned something about himself
early on: “I never was squeamish.”
Mr. Geller got an undergraduate degree
from the university then called SUNY
Albany in 1990, majoring in psychology
and minoring in business administra-
tion. “I didn’t know what I wanted to do,
and when I was in school, there was a big
downturn in the market” — that was in
1987 — “so many of the job opportunities
had dried up,” he said. He had worked in
construction and finance as an intern; in
1992, while he worked as a financial con-
sultant for an industrial construction com-
pany, “an opportunity opened through a
friend of a friend to work on a financial
project at Mount Sinai Medical Center in
Manhattan. I took the project, and I ended
up presenting some of my work to the
board of trustees there.”
That presentation — about “develop-
ing a cost-sharing formula for flex bene-
fits, which were a new thing at the time”
— went so well that “after the meeting,
someone approached me and asked me
if I’d like to stick around and learn health
care administration.
“I said ‘I don’t know what that is.’”
Obviously, Mr. Geller learned quickly.
“I started at Mount Sinai in 1992,” he said,
and he took a pay cut to do so. He stayed
there for 10 years. “That’s where I grew up
in health care,” he said.
He fell in love with the work immedi-
ately. “I had no idea what to expect, but I
learned right away that it’s a microcosm of
jobs that exist outside in society,” he said.
“Almost every field of study exists right
there, from legal work to business to pub-
lic relations to social work to accounting to
clinical care. It’s all there. All the sciences.
It was fascinating to be surrounded by all
of these world experts, who really were
pioneers in their field.”
At Mount Sinai, “I started at the bot-
tom, as a coordinator on the finance side
of human resources,” Mr. Geller said. “I
worked my way up through the academic
clinical departments. In my final years, I
worked out of the president’s office, as a
director of the hospital. My responsibili-
ties ran the gamut from overseeing clinical
practices to building new business oppor-
tunities to selling assets and buying new
assets to developing construction projects
to helping in philanthropy.
“If I had to sum up my job, it was being a
great ambassador for the medical center.”
From Mount Sinai, Mr. Geller was
recruited to become senior vice president
of administration at Northern Westchester
Hospital in Mount Kisco.
It was when he was at Northern West-
chester that other aspects of Mr. Geller’s
personality — his determination, his con-
nection to the community, and yes, his
Jewishness — became clear.
At 36, far beyond the conventional age
for publicly taking on the obligations of
a bar mitzvah, Mr. Geller celebrated his
coming of age. He studied for five years to
prepare for the bar mitzvah, and “I did the
full service — the Torah — it was Hukkat —
and the haftarah —and I gave a speech,” he
said. He lived in Pleasantville, in Westches-
ter, and the service was at the shul to which
he and his family belonged, the Pleasant-
ville Community Synagogue. “I didn’t have
a party,” he said. “My family was disap-
pointed, but I did not want to take any-
thing away from the meaning of the day.”
He also went back to school, earn-
ing two masters degrees, one in public
administration in health care, the other in
teaching, both from Pace University.
Mr. Geller worked at Northern West-
chester for seven years. “I had the auton-
omy to do a little bit of everything there,”
he said. “I learned the institution from the
ground up, surrounded by an incredibly
talented medical staff.
“That really hammered home the mes-
sage that a hospital or medical center
is only going to be as great as its medi-
cal staff. The more talented your clinical
staff, the more patients will seek their care
there.”
He was very happy, but “my obvious
goal was someday to be the steward of the
ship,” he said.
That goal came closer in April 2008,
when “a national recruiter asked me if I
was interested in an opportunity in Engle-
wood as executive vice president and chief
executive officer,” Mr. Geller said. “I was
familiar with Englewood — it has a clinical
affiliation with Mount Sinai — and I always
was impressed by it. But initially I said no.
I had a young family and a good life.”
But the recruiter was persistent, Mr.
Geller let himself be talked into a first
meeting, over breakfast, with the chair
of the foundation, Jay Nadel — and the
rest, of course, followed logically. In Jan-
uary 2009, he took the job that first was
offered; four years later, exactly one year
Cover Story
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 23
JS-23
Warren Geller
of Demarest talks
about his role at
Englewood Hospital
Mr. Geller is flanked by Dr. Herbert Dardik, chief of vascular surgery, and Dr.
Izabela Nowosielski, section chief of hospital medicine, as the two doctors make
their rounds. JERRY SZUBIN
Twins Sarah and Hannah Geller stand at the bimah at Temple Emanu-El of
Closter with their parents, Warren and Kristin, just before becoming b’not
mitzvah in April.
I started at
Mount Sinai in
1992…That’s
where I grew up
in health care.
Cover Story
24 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-24
‘Gross Science’
Kristin Geller talks about writing for Scholastic
JOANNE PALMER
Have you ever wondered how
Scholastic, the children’s book
publisher, finds its writers?
It recruits successful teachers.
They stay in the classroom,
which becomes a kind of labo-
ratory, a place where they can
develop and test their ideas, and
then share them with other teachers.
Kristin Geller of Demarest, the wife of Englewood
Hospital and Medical Center’s president and CEO, War-
ren Geller, is one of those teachers.
For 20 years, Ms. Geller was a classroom teacher,
working in kindergarten, first, fourth, and fifth grades in
a school district in New York’s Westchester County and
then in a private school in Connecticut. Once she moved
to Bergen County with her husband and their then-9-
year-old twins, Ms. Geller decided that she wanted a
more flexible schedule as the family adjusted to their
new life. She became an adjunct at Bergen Community
College and an assistant in the lower school
at Dwight-Englewood School in Englewood.
For the last 15 years, she also has worked
for Scholastic and has published six teach-
ers’ manuals there. The most recent one,
“Gross Science” — a simply wonderful
name, because when she says gross, she
means gross! — is part of a program for
second-graders.
Despite its focus on science, the book
teaches writing. Its goal is to model nonfic-
tion writing for young students. “It’s called the launch
text,” Ms. Geller said. “A teacher would share it with her
students, looking at how the experiments were written
up and how the author presents factual information.
Then the kids go off and try it themselves, or they might
come up with their own experiments and try to write
about them.
“The ultimate goal is to have them write and present
their own science experiments.
“Right now I’m working on a unit on Native
Americans,” Ms. Geller continued. “One source is about
Chief Joseph” — who died in 1904 — “and Susan Shown
Harjo, who is still alive and kicking. I am going to pres-
ent information on both of them. That writing unit is on
comparing and contrasting.”
Ms. Geller also has won election — uncontested, the
best kind — to the school board in Demarest, which has
its own elementary and middle school; she sits on the
board of Temple Emanu-El of Closter as well. Both pres-
ent learning opportunities for this lifelong teacher.
ago, he took on the title and responsibili-
ties he has today.
Five years ago, the Geller family —
Warren, his wife, Kristin, and their twin
daughters, Hannah and Sarah, moved to
Demarest. They joined Temple Emanu-El
of Closter, and this year Kristin Geller was
elected to the shul’s board of trustees. Ms.
Geller also sits on the town’s school board.
His daughters became bnot mitzvah at the
synagogue last spring.
Mr. Geller is deadly serious about his
work at Englewood. “We are a wonderful
melting pot here,” he said. “We take care
of everything, from nicks and cuts and
bumps and bruises to the sickest of the
sick. We have an award-winning, nation-
ally recognized staff, and it is so talented,
and supports our mission so thoroughly
every day, that it makes my job easy.”
He and his staff believe that the hos-
pital’s job is more than helping cure the
symptoms of illness. “We look at the whole
patient,” he said. “We look at patients’
experiences, their family, their lives — it’s
all part of their path to wellness.
“It’s about having the expertise, the
technology, the humanity.
“For the last seven years in a row, we’ve
had a surplus, so we have been able to
invest in the community. We can buy the
latest and greatest technology; the key is
to deliver it in a humanistic environment.
“We are here for you not only when you
are sick; we are here for your psychosocial
needs, for your family’s needs, and for the
community. We are not-for-profit — a 501c3
— and that makes us a charity.
“We have a foundation that supports us,
and we are extremely fortunate in the cul-
ture of philanthropy here,” he continued.
That local culture of philanthropy “is
unusual, and so touching,” Mr. Geller said.
“It’s an outpouring of support, of people
giving their time and energy as well as
their money, and is particularly strong in
the Jewish community.
“Russ and Angelica Berrie, the Taubs,
Maggie and Bill Kaplen — it started with
the Berrie Center, and then Maggie and
Bill as leaders in the building of the Kaplen
Pavilion. That was completed in Septem-
ber 2009, for a little over $30 million. That
was paid for 100 percent by the generosity
of our community, and it allowed us to free
up the rest of our resources for programs
we wanted to start or to grow.
“We are thankful to our donors every
day,” he said.
Where does that philanthropic impulse
come from? “I think that it starts at home,
in the way people are raised, as being part
of a culture that takes a lot of pride in what
it does and wants to be part of the greater
good.”
As the politics of health care change, it
will be important “to stay ahead of that
curve and be proactive,” Mr. Geller said.
The hospital’s board and administration
is committed to “meeting the needs of a
diverse population.
“We take all comers,” he said. “We have
a charity care policy, based on your abil-
ity to pay, that steps the level of payment
down to zero. Last year, we provided in
excess of $20 million in charity care.
“We are proud to do that. The healthier
we can keep the community, the better off
Kristin Geller
Ms. Geller, a teacher, writes manuals for other teachers.
The new cancer treatment and wellness center atop the Russell and Angelica Berrie Center for Humanistic Care is under
construction now at the hospital.
Cover Story
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 25
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we all are.”
When asked to tell a story about him-
self, Mr. Geller demurred. “I do not want
to put myself on a pedestal,” he said. “It is
not about me. It is about the experts, and
the people who give their time and money.
“I am the conductor. They are the
orchestra.”
He told one final story about the orches-
tra, and his place in it.
In October, Master Sergeant Nicolas
Oresko underwent surgery at Englewood.
He was 96 years old, the oldest living
recipient of the Medal of Honor — he was
given his by President Harry S Truman.
“Representatives of all the branches of
the military were lined up to keep watch
on him,” Mr. Geller said. Mr. Oresko was a
widower, and his only son also had died,
so he had no close relatives left. “They
asked me to come over there and meet
with Mr. Oresko,” Mr. Geller said. “I went
to his room, after saluting everyone out-
side” — remember, his father had been in
the Navy — “and it was very emotional.
“He was lying in bed, and his aide said,
‘Nick, you need to wake up. Mr. Geller is
here to see you, and he’s the president.’
“Mr. Oresko opened his eyes, looked at
me, and yelled out, in his loudest voice,
‘President of what?’
“That immediately brought me back
down to earth.”
The Marines who were standing guard
outside Mr. Oresko’s room asked Mr. Geller
if there was anything else they could do to
help, so “we asked them to transport our
patients who were being discharged,” Mr.
Geller said.
“So they were wheeled out by Marines.
It was very touching.”
The president of Englewood Hospital
was visibly moved by the story, and that
in itself is a story about how health care
should work.
Philanthropists and volunteers at Engle-
wood sing Mr. Geller’s praises in virtual
harmony.
Maggie Kaplen of Tenafly, who with her
late husband, Bill, was the lead donor of
the state-of-the-art emergency room that
takes up the first floor of the pavilion bear-
ing their name, is struck by Mr. Geller’s
listening skills. “He appreciates all com-
ments, negative as well as positive, with-
out being offended,” she said. “He is a pos-
itive person, rather than a negative one.
With him, the glass is always half full.
“His enthusiasm is infectious,” she
added.
Jay Nadel of Demarest, a business con-
sultant, is immediate past chair of the
board of Englewood Hospital and Medical
Center and chair of the board of the Engle-
wood Hospital and Medical Center Foun-
dation. It was Mr. Nadel who had breakfast
with Mr. Geller at the very beginning of the
process that ended with Mr. Geller work-
ing in Englewood.
“Within five minutes, at breakfast, I
knew that he would be the right person,”
Mr. Nadel said. “He is a very special, high-
energy, passionate type of an individual.
“My goal, and the board’s goal, was to
change the culture of the hospital. We
were able to do that by bringing in a leader
named Warren Geller.”
Thomas Senter of Tenafly, a lawyer,
chairs the hospital’s board, succeeding Mr.
Nadel. “We felt that Warren really under-
stands health care, and also recognizes
that the business of health care is different
from other businesses,” he said.
“We’re dealing with human lives.
“He’s a really special guy,” Mr. Senter
continued. “It’s important to him to be
part of the fabric of the community. We’re
here to provide for the health care needs
of the community. It’s important to have
senior people who really care.”
A nurses’ station at the new mother/baby unit in the main building.
Jewish World
26 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
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NEWS ANALYSIS
Sharon’s unfinished business
URIEL HEILMAN
W
hen I first heard about Ariel
Sharon’s stroke — the first
one, a minor brain attack
about four weeks before
he suffered the massive hemorrhage that
would leave him comatose for the final
eight years of his life — I was having din-
ner at a Jerusalem restaurant with a col-
league from the Jerusalem Post. We both
sat transfixed as we watched the TV over
the bar.
It was December 2005, just five months
after Sharon had completed Israel’s with-
drawal from the Gaza Strip. There was
a sense that Sharon was in the midst of
engineering a historic realignment of the
Israeli-Palestinian conflict, a realignment
that might even end the messy marriage
Israel had endured with the Palestinians
since its conquests in the 1967 Six-Day War.
But then came news of the stroke,
and suddenly it looked like folly to
pin a nation’s hopes on an obese
septuagenarian.
For years, Israel had suffered from the
fickleness of Palestinian negotiating part-
ners who had shown themselves either
unwilling or unable to deliver on prom-
ises of security for Israelis. First came the
bombings of the mid-1990s, following the
signing of the Oslo Accords in 1993. Then
there were the devastating attacks of the
second intifada on the heels of the failure
of the Camp David summit between Ehud
Barak and Yasser Arafat in 2000.
When Sharon was elected prime minis-
ter in a landslide in 2001, Israel’s responses
to Palestinian attacks quickly grew harsher.
One after another, militant Palestinian
leaders were eliminated in targeted assas-
sinations carried out by the Israeli military.
In the west bank, a barrier separating Jews
from Palestinians took shape, keeping
Palestinian suicide bombers at bay while
inviting accusations against Israel of a land
grab.
Though he had managed to silence Pal-
estinian attacks with an iron fist, Sharon
did not stop once the attacks had subsided.
He believed that more bloody confronta-
tions and international isolation lay ahead
if Israel were to remain inextricably tied
to the Palestinians, and he shocked many
longtime supporters when he told Likud
party lawmakers in 2003 that Israel could
not “keep 3.5 million Palestinians under
occupation” indefinitely.
Thus began his effort to unilaterally
“disengage” Israel from the Palestinians,
starting with the 9,000 Jewish settlers
and soldiers in the Gaza Strip. Despite
the heart-wrenching scenes of Jews being
dragged from their homes and Palestin-
ians celebrating atop the ruins of aban-
doned Israeli settlements, Sharon man-
aged to complete the withdrawal as
planned in the summer of 2005, and the
country held its breath to see what would
come next.
Compared to the west bank, Gaza was
easy. There were relatively few Jewish set-
tlers in Gaza amid the more than 1.5 mil-
lion Palestinians, the strip offered Israel
no tactical military advantages, and the
Jewish people did not have deep histori-
cal ties to Gaza.
By contrast, the west bank held more
than 250,000 settlers, represented a stra-
tegically valuable buffer between Israel
and its Arab adversaries to the east, and
was a repository of Jewish history dating
back to the Bible.
Everyone knew disentangling Israel
from west bank Palestinians would be
hard, but if anybody could do it, it was Sha-
ron, an architect of the settlement move-
ment and the man who once declared that
the fate of Netzarim, a Jewish settlement in
Gaza, was the fate of Tel Aviv.
When Gaza’s Jewish settlements were
leveled amid the 2005 pullout, the nick-
name Sharon had acquired during his mili-
tary days, Bulldozer, took on a new conno-
tation, and many of his settler supporters
turned against him. As a sign of his new
direction, Sharon broke from the rightist
Likud faction and founded a new centrist
political party, Kadima, which peeled off
Jewish World
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JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 27
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moderates from the left and right and
instantly became Israel’s largest political
grouping.
Then came the second stroke on Janu-
ary 4, 2006, and Sharon was gone.
It was obvious from the get-go that Isra-
el’s accidental new leader, Ehud Olmert,
could not fill Sharon’s shoes.
Sharon was a warrior-statesman whose
legendary battlefield feats, dating back to
Israel’s 1948 War of Independence, had
earned him the respect of adversaries and
supporters alike, but who seemed more at
home with the sheep on his Negev ranch
than with politicians in Jerusalem. Olmert
was a wheeler-dealer ex-mayor with scant
military experience, an affinity for expen-
sive cigars, and a habit of never turning
down an opportunity to travel to New
York.
He quickly got into trouble. The Pales-
tinians in Gaza tested Olmert with inces-
sant and growing rocket fire. In 2006,
when the Lebanese militant group Hezbol-
lah attacked an Israeli military patrol and
abducted two soldiers, Olmert launched a
34-day war that went on long enough to
demonstrate that Israel could not quite
vanquish Hezbollah.
Any notion of extending Sharon’s disen-
gagement plan to the west bank quickly
faded, Olmert resigned under a
cloud of corruption, Benjamin
Netanyahu was elected prime min-
ister, and the Israeli-Palestinian con-
flict fell into deadlock. Today, the
conflict seems as intractable as ever.
In the years since he was felled,
Sharon’s critics have pointed to
the rocket attacks from Gaza and
the missile threat from Lebanon as
evidence that any unilateral with-
drawal from the west bank would
have been a disaster for Israel,
bringing its heavily populated cen-
ter, including Jerusalem and Tel Aviv,
within range of enemy rockets.
Would Sharon have come to believe that
his withdrawal from Gaza was a mistake?
I doubt it. He believed that diverting copi-
ous military resources to keep a few thou-
sand Jews amid a sea of Palestinians in a
strip of land Israel never wanted in the
first place was not sustainable militarily or
diplomatically.
Would Sharon have replicated his
model of withdrawal in the west bank?
He believed that time was not on Israel’s
side, that the occupation was bad for Isra-
el’s diplomatic standing, cost too much
in terms of money and lives, and was a
demoralizing drain on the Israel Defense
Forces and the Jewish people.
By all indications, Sharon’s plan for the
west bank was to redraw Israel’s borders
unilaterally to keep as many Jewish set-
tlers as possible, as few Palestinians as
possible, and as much open territory as
possible — including the strategically valu-
able Jordan Valley. If he could have pulled
it off, it would have angered Israeli nation-
alists and Palestinians, and Sharon would
have faced a deeply skeptical international
community.
But it also probably would have resulted
in a state for the Palestinians — something
Sharon endorsed in 2001 — and given
Israel a shot at ending the messy
entanglement of the Israeli and Pal-
estinian populations.
This vision may not be so far off
from what Netanyahu says he wants,
but we haven’t seen much progress
toward the goal.
The first time I got to talk to Sha-
ron was during a visit he made to
New York as foreign minister in 1999.
I was among the scrum of report-
ers squeezed into Mayor Rudy
Giuliani’s office in City Hall during
a news conference, and I asked Sha-
ron if he had any intentions of being
prime minister.
Sharon responded dismissively, as if the
notion of having political ambitions were
beneath him. Months later he’d become
Likud’s leader, and a year and a half after
that prime minister.
Sharon quickly made clear that he was
in office to take action. The wisdom of his
moves could be debated — and they were
— but not their boldness.
Eight years after his premature exit, and
in the wake of his death on January 11 at the
age of 85, Israel remains stuck in a holding
pattern, waiting for some bold move that
will lift the nation out of its morass with the
Palestinians. JTA WIRE SERVICE
Israeli soldiers trying to evacuate Jewish settlers
from the Gaza Strip in 2005. YOSSI ZAMIR/FLASH90
Jewish World
28 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
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URIEL HEILMAN
Mark Bittman is not a religious man by any stretch of the imag-
ination, least of all his own.
A longtime food writer for The New York Times who shifted
from cooking to food policy columnist three years ago, Bit-
tman has made a living eating the kinds of things frowned
upon by Jewish tradition.
As he told me recently, “Pork cooked in milk is an amazing
dish.”
Though he was born and raised a Jew — going to synagogue,
religious school, and Reform youth groups at Manhattan’s East
End Temple — Bittman says he pretty much has had nothing to
do with Judaism since he graduated from high school in 1967.
But read his columns on food sustainability and the book
he published last April, “VB6: Eat Vegan Before 6:00 to Lose
Weight and Restore Your Health... for Good,” and you might
Is food writer Mark Bittman going kosher?
see some religious echoes in Bitt-
man’s food philosophy.
Bittman enjoins consumers to
steer clear of food produced by
companies that mistreat animals,
exploit their workers or degrade
the earth — values also reflected
in Jewish law. He rails against
food waste large and small, from
the inefficiency of using corn
for ethanol fuel to the failure to
repurpose dinner leftovers as
the next day’s lunch, tendencies
that arguably also run afoul of the
Jewish prohibition of “bal tash-
chis” — Do not waste.
Then there’s Bittman’s VB6 diet
— basically, eating more plants
and fewer animals, with the goal
of improving personal health and
making food consumption more
environmentally sustainable. Like
Lent and the nine-day Jewish mourning period preced-
ing Tisha B’Av, it eschews eating meat at certain times.
“VB6 is like being kosher till 6, basically,” Bittman said
last month in a panel discussion at the biennial confer-
ence of the Union for Reform Judaism.
But talk to Bittman one on one and you’ll find it’s clear
he thinks a diet governed by religion is as outlandish as
a chasidic butcher might find Bittman’s predilection for
bacon.
“How can Jews observe these kashrut laws, which,
with all due respect, I don’t think make any sense from
a health perspective or any other perspective?” Bittman
said. “They’re just some cool — or not cool, whatever —
tradition. I get that, but why would you do that when
there’s evidence that says there’s a smarter way to eat?”
Bittman, 63, has carved out a unique niche for him-
self. Though he has no formal culinary training, he hit
the big time in 1998 with the publication of his cookbook
“How to Cook Everything” and the launch of his Mini-
malist dining column in the Times.
Now, with a cooking column in the Times Magazine,
an op-ed column, and his blog, MarkBittman.com, he
has turned himself into the only brand-name food writer
in America taking on both cooking and food policy
simultaneously.
“For decades, Americans believed that we had the
world’s healthiest and safest diet,” he wrote in his inau-
gural food policy column in February 2011. “We worried
little about this diet’s effect on the environment or on
the lives of the animals (or even the workers) it relies
upon. Nor did we worry about its ability to endure — that
is, its sustainability.
“That didn’t mean all was well. And we’ve come to
recognize that our diet is unhealthful and unsafe. Many
food production workers labor in difficult, even deplor-
able conditions, and animals are produced as if they
were widgets. It would be hard to devise a more waste-
ful, damaging, unsustainable system.”
In subsequent columns and in his new book, Bittman
has not minced words. He predicted that Pepsi may
ultimately come to be regarded as a killer as lethal as
cigarettes, and faulted singer Beyoncé for endorsing the
soda. He has written about the hazards of chemicals in
cosmetics and how humans are treated as guinea pigs by
the industry. He has called for an entire rethinking of the
U.S. model of food production.
The central tenet of “VB6” is eating fewer animal
products, because as Bittman writes, “the industrial
production of animal products and hyper-processed
foods creates devastating byproducts, from greenhouse
gas emissions to land degradation to polluted water
supplies.”
But Bittman doesn’t advocate strict vegetarianism,
a goal he knows is unrealistic for most Americans,
including himself. (He’s not Orthodox, after all.) Rather,
he advocates veganism — foregoing meat, poultry,
fish, dairy, or eggs — until evening, though he readily
acknowledges often breaking his own rule. Bittman calls
himself a “flexitarian.”
In the months since his book came out, Bittman said,
he has done some rethinking; if he were rewriting “VB6”
today, he’d make clear that the divide between pro-
cessed food and unprocessed food is just as important
as minimizing carnivorous eating.
“I don’t want to be just vilifying animal products left
and right,” he said. “I want to make it clear that what
we’re talking about is not just eating more fruits and veg-
etables; we’re talking about eating more real food.”
It’s been a mostly lonely crusade. While elements of
what Bittman advocates are shared by the environmen-
tal, labor rights, and animal rights movements, a real
food movement hasn’t quite coalesced.
“Here’s three questions about the food movement we
should be asking ourselves: What are we asking for? How
are we united? Who’s representing our movement?” Bit-
tman said. “The answers to those three questions right
now are: a) we don’t know; b) we’re not; and c) no one.”
Bittman rejects any notion that Jewish values motivate
him, though he credits his “Peter, Paul and Mary-ish”
Jewish upbringing with inspiring his progressive values.
“I grew up right after the Holocaust, and no one
through the ‘50s stopped talking about that — with
good reason,” Bittman said. “My reaction to that was to
develop a sense of justice and fairness, but it went way
beyond what was right for Jews.”
As we wrapped up our chat at the Times office in New
York, I asked Bittman if he had any favorite culinary
guilty pleasures. Hot dogs, good corned beef, and pizza
topped the list.
Then I asked if there were anything he pointedly did
not eat. Bittman thought for a moment.
“Not really,” he said, then motioned toward the Times
cafeteria. “I try not to eat there.”
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Food writer Mark Bittman wants you to eat more plants.
Jewish World
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 29
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Tougher Iran sanctions gain
majority backing in Senate
But still not enough to override veto
RON KAMPEAS
WASHINGTON — More than half the United States Sen-
ate has signed on to a bill that would intensify sanctions
against Iran.
But in a sign of the so-far successful effort by the White
House to keep the bill from reaching a veto-busting 67
supporters, only 16 Democrats are on board.
The number of senators co-sponsoring the bill, intro-
duced by senators Mark Kirk (R-Ill.) and Robert Menen-
dez (D-N.J.), reached 59 this week, up from just 33 before
the Christmas holiday break.
Notably only one of the 25 who signed up in recent
days — Senator Michael Bennet (D-Colo.) — is a Democrat,
a sign of intense White House lobbying among Democrats
to oppose the bill.
Backers of the bill say it would strengthen the U.S.
hand at the negotiations. But President Obama has said
he would veto the bill because it could upend talks now
under way between the major powers and Iran aimed
at keeping the Islamic Republic from obtaining a nuclear
bomb. A similar bill passed this summer by the U.S.
House of Representatives had a veto-proof majority.
On Thursday, the White House said backers of the bill
should be upfront about the fact that it puts the United
States on the path to war.
“If certain members of Congress want the United States
to take military action, they should be upfront with the
American public and say so,” Bernadette Meehan, the
National Security Council spokeswoman, said in a state-
ment posted by the Huffington Post. “Otherwise, it’s not
clear why any member of Congress would support a bill
that possibly closes the door on diplomacy and makes
it more likely that the United States will have to choose
between military options or allowing Iran’s nuclear pro-
gram to proceed.”
A number of pro-Israel groups, led by the American
Israel Public Affairs Committee, are leading a full-court
press for the bill’s passage, with prominent Jewish lead-
ers in a number of states making calls and writing letters
to holdouts. Dovish Jewish groups such as J Street and
Americans for Peace Now oppose the bill.
The bill would expand sanctions in part by broadening
existing definitions targeting energy and banking sectors
to all “strategic sectors,” including engineering, mining
and construction. It also would tighten the definition
of entities eligible for exceptions and broaden the defi-
nition of targeted individuals who assist Iran in evading
sanctions.
The National Jewish Democratic Council, in an effort to
back a Democratic president while not expressly oppos-
ing intensified sanctions, issued a mixed verdict on the
bill, saying it does not support its passage at present
though the option of intensified sanctions should remain
open down the road if the president seeks it.
“We encourage Congress to support the President’s
foreign policy initiative by making stronger measures
available should they be required,” the statement said.
“Final action on the legislation should be dependent upon
Iran’s full compliance with its obligations.”
Rabbi Jack Moline, the NJDC’s executive director,
accused AIPAC and the American Jewish Committee of
“strong-arm tactics, essentially threatening people that
if they don’t vote a particular way, that somehow that
makes them anti-Israel or means the abandonment of the
Jewish community.”
David Harris, the AJC’s executive director, said he was
“shocked” by Moline’s allegations.
“We support the Iran sanctions bill, as do a bipartisan
majority of U.S. senators,” he said. “Can a group differ
with him on a critically important issue like Iran, where
potentially existential issues are at stake, without being
maligned or misrepresented, or is that the price we’re
supposed to pay for honest disagreement?”
A spokesman for AIPAC declined to comment. Moline
subsequently apologized to the AJC, telling JTA that his
understanding now is that the pressure had been exerted
in the organization’s name, but not by its employees.
Despite its majority, the law faces significant Senate
opposition. Ten committee chairmen in the Democratic-
led Senate have pushed back against new legislation in
a letter to Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.), the Senate majority
leader. One of the committee chairman, Senator Tim
Johnson (D-S.D.) of the banking committee, has the par-
liamentary power to hold the bill.
Among the other committee chairs opposed to advanc-
ing the bill now are four Jewish senators: Dianne Fein-
stein (D-Calif.), the chairwoman of the Intelligence Com-
mittee; Carl Levin (D-Mich.), the chairman of the Armed
Services Committee; Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), the chair-
woman of the Environment Committee, and Ron Wyden
(D-Ore.), the chairman of the Energy Committee.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Senator Robert Menendez, addressing the AIPAC
conference in 2013, has led the charge for an
intensified Iran sanctions bill that now has the sup-
port of 59 senators. MARK WILSON/GETTY IMAGES
Jewish World
30 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
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JULIE WIENER
When Stosh Cotler takes over as CEO of Bend
the Arc, a Jewish group that fights for immi-
gration reform, workers’ rights, and other
domestic liberal causes, she will be one of the
few women leading a national Jewish group
of its size.
But Cotler’s gender is not the only thing that
sets her apart.
It’s not just that she only connected with
Judaism as an adult, or that her appearance
during an interview in her Manhattan office
— all-black clothes, dark red lipstick, pale blue
fingernail polish, and a visible tattoo on her
arm — is less corporate than Goth. How many
Jewish communal CEOs have a black belt
in kung fu, trained women in self-defense,
danced at a sex club, or protested Israel’s
treatment of Palestinians during the second
intifada?
The 45-year-old Olympia, Wash., native
declined to discuss her past or present views
on Israel, which she said are not relevant to
Cotler new Bend the Arc head
First woman leader has black belt, radical streak
her work at Bend the Arc. But
she describes her unconven-
tional background as an advan-
tage in reaching out to Jews on
the margins of the community.
“If we are successful in
reaching more Jews who have
little or no or an ambivalent
connection to being Jewish,
if they come to us, we will be
transformed because of that
infusion of very different per-
spectives,” Cotler said.
Bend the Arc was formed from
the 2011 merger of the New York-
based Jewish Funds for Justice
and the West Coast-based Pro-
gressive Jewish Alliance. It has
billed itself as “the nation’s leading pro-
gressive Jewish voice solely dedicated to
mobilizing Jewish Americans to advocate
for the nation’s most vulnerable.” In addi-
tion to its policy advocacy, Bend the Arc
collects funds for community investing
in disadvantaged areas, makes grants to
grassroots activist groups, and conducts
leadership training. The organization had
a budget of $5.7 million last year.
Cotler has been with the organization
since 2005, for the last three years as its
executive vice president. She is replacing
Alan van Capelle, who spent two years
at Bend the Arc’s helm and is leaving to
become CEO of the Educational Alliance,
a venerable Jewish institution on New
York’s Lower East Side.
Cotler’s colleagues at Bend the Arc and
liberal Jewish groups give her high marks
for her strategic planning skills and col-
laborative approach. She has led Bend the
Arc’s Selah Leadership Program, which
has trained more than 300 Jewish activ-
ists working for a mix of Jewish and secu-
lar organizations.
Cotler said that she was drawn to Jewish
communal work by her growing aware-
ness of American Jewish power.
“We have responsibility to leverage our
financial resources, intellectual heft, cul-
tural capital, to leverage our deep organi-
zation, to leverage the positions of influ-
ence and power that Jews have attained in
politics, business, finance and education”
to assist “other communities that are still
facing discrimination, that are still disen-
franchised, who are not experiencing the
kinds of opportunities Jews experience on
a daily basis,” she said.
Before she began her Jewish communal
career in New York, Cotler — who used
to go by the name Staci; Stosh was her
family’s nickname for her — was an activ-
ist in Portland, Ore. She founded Open
Hand, a local organization that trained
women in self-defense and provided vio-
lence prevention and girls’ empowerment
programming in local schools.
In her mid-20s, Cotler had what she
describes as a spiritual crisis, but since
none of her friends or family were active
in Jewish life, it did not occur to her that
Judaism could be a resource. A few years
later, however, she had a transformative
experience that she wrote about in the
“Love & Justice in Times of War Hagga-
dah.” In her essay for the 2003 ‘zine-style
activist Haggadah, Cotler, who identifies
as queer, recounted how a lesbian couple
invited her to their Passover seder after
she did a table dance for them at what she
refers to as a “sex club.”
Cotler declined to comment on her
work at the club beyond saying that she
was a dancer for a period in her 20s “to
make ends meet.” But she said going to
that seder, her first in many years, set her
on a Jewish path.
“I realized I have a place in this tra-
dition, that I am not alone, that other
people like me found ways to connect,
that this tradition has wisdom to teach,”
Cotler said.
Soon after, Cotler said, she met a rabbi
who “literally took me under her wing
and said, ‘Please come to synagogue, you
can sit next to me.’” At age 30, after a few
years as a weekday minyan regular, Cotler
celebrated a bat mitzvah.
In Portland, Cotler was involved in
activist groups like the Jewish Radical
Action Project and Jews for Global Jus-
tice, and she demonstrated against Israeli
policies. In 2001, she protested a Portland
appearance by former Israeli Prime Minis-
ter Ehud Barak. The next year, Portland’s
Willamette Week described her staging a
mock Israeli checkpoint in a downtown
intersection.
“You are now at an Israeli check-
point. If you protest, you will be killed.
Expect to be blindfolded and beaten,”
she shouted through a megaphone,
according to the paper.
Stosh Cotler is taking over as CEO of Bend
the Arc from Alan van Capelle. Here, the two
stand outside the White House.
COURTESY OF BEND THE ARC
SEE COTLER PAGE 32
Jewish World
JS-31*
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 31
RON KAMPEAS
WASHINGTON — Bernie Sanders, the indepen-
dent senator from Vermont and the only self-
described socialist in Congress, long has been
an outspoken voice in Washington on issues of
economic inequality.
But with the vanishing middle class figuring
prominently in the campaign for mayor of the
country’s largest city, and President Obama last
month calling the gap between rich and poor
“the defining issue of our time,” Sanders’ pet
political cause has moved to the forefront of the
national discussion.
“There has been an understanding in the Dem-
ocratic Party that now is the time to focus on
protecting the collapsing middle class and the
needs of moderate- to low-income Americans,”
Sanders said. “When the middle class is shrink-
ing and the wealthiest people are doing phe-
nomenally well, we do need revenue to come
from the wealthiest people in the country.”
Sanders, 72, who long has caucused with the Demo-
crats, is one of 10 Jewish members in the U.S. Senate.
A Brooklyn native, he is the son of Polish immigrants;
his father’s family was wiped out in the Holocaust,
according to a 2007 New York Times profile.
After graduating from the University of Chicago,
Sanders spent time on an Israeli kibbutz around 1963
— notably, it was before the 1967 Six-Day War, when it
was not common for American youngsters to spend
time in Israel.
But Sanders is hesitant to draw a connection
between his Jewish background and his priorities as
a senator. With a series of observations about the Jew-
ish history of rootlessness and oppression, Sanders
begins to describe the role of his lower-middle-class
upbringing in forging him into the Congress’ only self-
described socialist. Then he catches himself.
“This isn’t a profile,” he declared, interrupting him-
self. “There are very important issues that need to be
discussed — the collapse of the middle class, very high
unemployment rates, the crisis of climate change, the
widening income gap.”
With a bespectacled face framed by a wild mop of
white hair and a lingering tendency to bark in Brook-
lyn intonations even after 45 years in Vermont, Sand-
ers is one of the more identifiably Jewish senators.
“As everyone in this room knows, I am a Jew, an old
Jew,” the actor Fred Armisen, portraying Sanders,
announced in an unaired “Saturday Night Live” sketch
last year to knowing guffaws from the other members
of the Senate Armed Services Committee.
Now with income inequality becoming a defining
issue in the 2014 midterm elections, Sanders is gain-
ing a different kind of attention. He has become a go-to
talking head on the subject on cable news networks,
Economic issue in spotlight for Senate’s lone socialist
including the conservative Fox News.
“You have the Walton family of Walmart owning more
wealth than the bottom 40 percent,” Sanders said. “While
at the same time we’ve had a huge growth in the number of
millionaires and billionaires.”
Sanders’ focus on issues of income inequality are true to
his socialist reputation — one he continues to embrace as
fiercely as he did in 1980, when he was the surprise win-
ner of a mayoral election in Burlington, Vt. In 1990, he was
elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, and in 2006
he won his first Senate election.
Sanders acknowledges a certain stigma attached to the
label socialist, but believes Americans would be likelier to
embrace the term if they were better informed about the
benefits of socialism.
“The ideas do resonate, but there is a
stigma regarding the word,” he said. “We
went through a McCarthyite period, a
Cold War with the Soviet Union. There is a
misperception of what democratic social-
ism is.”
That might be changing. Where Sanders
once was prone to excoriate fellow Demo-
crats for their solicitousness of corporate
interests or their failure to oppose cuts to
entitlement programs, he now is likelier to
praise them for embracing the battles he
has waged for years.
Sanders notes Bill de Blasio’s success-
ful run for New York mayor on a platform
focused in large part on income inequal-
ity. Congress, too, has come along, he
says. Entitlement reform formerly was a
watchword among Republicans, and even
among the president and some Democrats.
Now, Sanders says, “Most Democrats understand that
Americans don’t want cuts in Social Security and Medicaid
and Medicare. The Democratic Party is becoming more vig-
orous in trying to extend unemployment benefits, in raising
the minimum wage. I see that as a step forward in under-
standing that the American people do not want to see more
attacks on the children, the elderly and the poor.”
There has been speculation that Sanders may run for
president as a means of keeping Democrats on the true path.
He won’t count it out, but insists, again, that his personal
ambitions are not the point. Income inequality is.
“I don’t wake up every morning thinking about whether I
should be president of the United States,” Sanders said. “But
those issues have to be discussed. And if nobody else is, I
will discuss them.” JTA WIRE SERVICE
Senator Bernie Sanders addressing a rally on Capitol Hill in 2013.
There is a
misperception of
what democratic
socialism is.
SENATOR BERNIE SANDERS
Jewish World
32 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
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Cotler refused to discuss her participation
in Israel-related activism, saying that Israel
does not factor into Bend the Arc’s work.
“It’s fully outside of our mission,” she
said. “We have a principled approach that
we just do not make any commentary on
that issue at all.
“We feel like by being so clear in this
way what we create is a big tent, what we
create is an organization where Jews who
have a range of opinions feel like they
can find a home at Bend the Arc to focus
their activist energy on a very progressive
domestic agenda.”
Howard Welinsky, a member of Bend
the Arc’s executive board who is also active
in the American Israel Public Affairs Com-
mittee and chairs Democrats for Israel, Los
Angeles, said that Cotler’s views on Israel
are not relevant to her work at Bend the Arc.
“I’m personally passionately pro-Israel
and have been very aggressive in those
activities, but when I’m on a [Bend the Arc]
call it’s about the domestic programs of our
country and the progressive Jewish agenda
we focus on,” Welinsky said. “All the other
things we leave at the door. I have never had
a conversation with [Cotler] about Israel.”
Ruth Messinger, president of the Ameri-
can Jewish World Service, which partici-
pates with Bend the Arc in the Jewish Social
Justice Roundtable, praised Cotler for being
a “responsive, out-of-the box thinker” and a
“real team player.” Like several other high-
ranking Jewish women professionals inter-
viewed for the article, Messinger praised
Bend the Arc not only for hiring a female
CEO but for recognizing talent within an
organization rather than looking outside.
Rabbi Jill Jacobs, executive director of
T’ruah, formerly the American branch
of Rabbis for Human Rights, said that as
recently as five or 10 years ago, “the Jewish
social justice world was surprisingly male,
and now it’s really shifting.”
Jacobs, who worked with Cotler at Jew-
ish Funds for Justice, said that Bend the
Arc’s newly tapped leader is known for
being a “strong presence” who is “attuned
to human dynamics and interpersonal
issues.” Cotler, Jacobs said, is “not some-
one out there tooting her own horn, but
everyone who’s ever worked with her is
impressed by her.” JTA WIRE SERVICE
Cotler
FROM PAGE 30
BRIEFS
Silt tablet offers glimpse of biblical times
Ever wonder how the people in bibli-
cal times arranged their schedules? The
answer may lie with a 4,000-year-old silt
tablet recently discovered in the ruins of
Larsa, an ancient Sumer city located in
modern-day southern Iraq.
Larsa’s neighboring city was Ur Kas-
dim, mentioned in the book of Genesis
as the birthplace of Abraham.
The tablet, currently on display at the
Bible Lands Museum in Jerusalem, lists a
schedule for one of the temples in Larsa
that corresponds with eight days in the
Hebrew month of Shevat and includes a
to-do list for a festival on the eighth day.
The schedule is written in Akkadian.
“This silt tablet, which dates back
to the time of biblical Abraham, is the
only Mesopotamian text we know of to
describe temple rituals stretching eight
days. It also illustrates the similarities
between our calendar and its Babylo-
nian origins,” museum director Amanda
Weiss said. JNS.ORG
Scarlett’s spritz for Israel’s SodaStream
SodaStream, the popular Israeli carbon-
ated drinks company, has announced
that Jewish-American actress Scarlett
Johansson will be its “global brand
ambassador” in a new multiyear
contract.
Johansson, 28, who was named
Esquire magazine’s “Sexiest Woman
Alive” in 2013, will kick off the new part-
nership by appearing in SodaStream’s
upcoming $4 million Super Bowl ad.
“We are thrilled to welcome the
remarkably talented Scarlett Johansson
into the SodaStream family,” CEO Daniel
Birnbaum said in a statement.
Headquartered near Tel Aviv, SodaS-
tream offers devices that allow consum-
ers to use regular tap water to create
homemade carbonated beverages. Last
year, the company generated more than
$436 million in revenue.
JNS.ORG
Golden Globes features Jewish winners
and spurs Woody Allen controversy
Among this year’s Jewish winners at the
2014 Golden Globes, which took place
Sunday, actor Michael Douglas won
the award for Best Actor in a Miniseries
or TV Movie for his role as Liberace in
“Behind the Candelabra,” and Andy
Samberg won the award for Best Actor
in a TV Series Comedy for his role on
“Brooklyn Nine-Nine.”
While Jewish filmmaker Woody Allen
was honored with the Cecil B. DeMille
Award for lifetime achievement, Allen’s
estranged partner and her son, Mia
Farrow and Ronan Farrow, criticized
the tribute. Allen and Mia Farrow were
together for 12 years until Farrow dis-
covered the director was having an
affair with her adopted daughter, Soon-
Yi Previn. Previn is now Allen’s wife.
Farrow sued Allen for allegedly molest-
ing her then 7-year-old daughter, but
the charge was eventually dropped.
“A woman has publicly detailed
Woody Allen’s molestation of her at age
7. Golden Globe tribute showed con-
tempt for her & all abuse survivors,”
Mia Farrow tweeted.
JNS.ORG
Go ahead and try to look it up
in first Hebrew/Judeo-Yemeni dictionary
The first Hebrew/Judeo-Yemeni Arabic
dictionary was recently introduced by its
editor, Rabbi Dr. Aharon Ben-David. The
lexicon aims to offer the Hebrew equiva-
lent for a popular North Yemeni dialect,
once common in the Jewish communi-
ties of Hidan, Najran, and Higra.
The “Yar Yair Dictionary,” compiled
by the late Assaf Yair Madar-Halevy
over more than 50 years, comprises
more than 500 pages. Madar-Halevy
died in 1991 and did not live to see his
life’s work published.
“I will never forget coming to Israel
in 1951, at the age of nine,” Ben-David
told Israel Hayom. “A few years later,
I watched ‘Roots’ [a miniseries based
on Alex Haley’s 1976 novel of the same
name] and I decided that I wanted to
find my own roots. Since that day, I
have always sought ways to preserve
the traditions and heritage of the North
Yemeni Jewish community.”
JNS.ORG
JS-33
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 33
JS-33
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 33
KAPLEN JCC on the Palisades 411 EAST CLINTON AVENUE, TENAFLY, NJ 07670 | 201.569.7900 | jccotp.org
TO REGISTER OR FOR MORE INFO, VISIT
jccotp.org OR CALL 201. 569.7900.
UPCOMING AT
JUDAICS
KAPLEN JCC on the Palisades
NURSERY
SPECIAL FILM SCREENING EVENT
Defiance
WITH SPECIAL GUEST BRENDA WEISMAN, DAUGHTER
OF ARON BIELSKI, THE FILM’S REAL-LIFE HERO
Join us for this 2007 blockbuster film about Aron Bielski, a
key leader in Eastern Poland’s resistance movement, who
helped save 1,000 lives during the Holocaust. In partnership
with Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey. All proceeds
will be donated to Holocaust awareness and education.
Program appropriate for children 6th grade and up.
Sponsorship packages available for $180. For tickets visit
www.jfnnj.org/defiance.
Sun, Jan 26, 4:45 pm,
$18 per person in advance/$25 at the door
4:45 pm: Casual dinner
5:30 pm: Film screening
PROFESSIONAL CHILDREN’S THEATER SERIES
Henry and Mudge: A Musical
PRESENTED BY THEATREWORKS USA
This award-winning, sold-out musical from NYC is
based on stories by Cynthia Rylant, who writes about
a young boy, Henry, his big lovable dog, and his feisty
cousin Annie, who finally gets Mudge to do some very
funny tricks. Filled with love and humor. For more info
call Inbal at 201.408.1493.
Sun, Feb 2, 2 pm, $12 advance sale per person/
$17 day of performance, if available
THE LEONARD & SYRIL RUBIN
Nursery School Open House
Come see what we’re all about! Our school
curriculum includes cognitive learning and
enrichment; fine and gross motor skills;
reading readiness skills; sensory experiences;
Judaic programming; art, music, dramatic
play, cooking, gym and swimming. Options
for toddlers, 2s, 3s, 4s, and Kindergarteners,
including extended day programs. RSVP to
201.408.1436.
Jan 22, 9:30-10:30 am
Etia Segall Judaic Programs
Understanding the Language of the Torah
Review and explore the Book of Exodus.
Mondays, Feb 3 – May 19, 9:30-11 am, $75/$90
Hebrew Reading
An introduction to some of the minor prophets, using
their books as text.
Mon, Feb 3–May 19 (except 4/21), 11:30 am-1 pm, Free
MUSIC
WINTER REGISTRATION
Don’t miss out on the great winter we have lined up for
kids of all ages. Classes begin the week of January 26.
Sign up early to make sure you get the classes you
want! Visit jccotp.org or consult the program brochure
for a full list of early childhood, school age and teen
programs.
Register ONLINE visit www.jccotp.org
or BY PHONE call 201.408.1448
Flute Workshop
FEATURING IAN CLARKE, FLUTE
“One of the leading player/composers
in the flute world.” Join us for our 19th
season of presenting world-class musicians
sharing their artistry with the stars of
tomorrow. Gain insight into music and the
artistic process in these intimate, public
coachings. This workshop is sponsored by
Karen and Michael Neus. For more info call
201.408.1465.
Wed, Jan 29, 5-8 pm,
Suggested donation $10
IS OPEN
Jewish World
34 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-34*
Women
of the
IDF
Defense force
highlights eight
stirring stories
MAAYAN JAFFE
F
rom the inception of the Jewish
state to the present, Israel’s mili-
tary has been anything but a male-
dominated institution.
On May 26, 1948, Prime Minister David
Ben-Gurion established the Israel Defense
Forces. Less than three months later, the
Knesset instituted mandatory conscription
for all women without children. Today 57
percent of all officers in the Israeli army are
women, according to the IDF.
The IDF recently highlighted the stories
of a group of those women on its blog, in a
list titled “8 Female Soldiers Who Shattered
Barriers in 2013.” The article, which featured
women in a variety of military roles and from
diverse backgrounds, said that in recent
years women have “taken increasingly high-
level positions in the IDF.”
The female soldiers included in the
list “challenge stereotypes,” wrote the IDF.
Among those listed are two soldiers originally
from the United States: Cpl. Dylan Ostrin,
who is from Houston and made aliyah when
she was 7 years old, and Sgt. Sarit Petersen,
who is from Maryland and is now in the pro-
cess of making aliyah.
Petersen, who recently completed her IDF
term, served as a shooting instructor in the
Nahal Infantry Brigade. Her job was to teach
reconnaissance brigade soldiers — Special
Forces — to use their weapons. Speaking
from her parents’ home in Baltimore, Peter-
son was modest about being chosen for the
IDF blog entry.
“There are awesome people doing awe-
some things in the army all the time,” she
said.
A 2010 graduate of the Yeshiva of Greater
Washington, Petersen said that she was “sur-
prised” at her selection, though she was one
of the first to hold her position in the IDF.
Petersen trained soldiers slated for elite army
units, who already had completed at least
eight months of basic training and often had
several additional months of more intense
training. She said that she and her colleagues
would “sit for hours and hours” planning and
analyzing how they were going to take these
men from “regular soldiers to Special Forces
— to even better.”
“We would spend hours and hours on an
exercise list. We would look at their old ones,
see what they had done and figure out how
to make it harder and faster, how they could
run more. Then we would go to the shooting
range and make them do all of these [exer-
cises] we had set up for them and they would
do it,” she said. “We would do it first, to test it
out, and then they would do it.”
Is Petersen good with a gun?
“Yeah,” she said. “I am a pretty good shot.”
Petersen said she shot her first gun as a
14-year-old, on a vacation with a friend in
Nevada; they shot cans in the desert.
“I thought, ‘Wow! I am really good at this
and it is really fun,’” she said, noting that she
could never have dreamed then of her time
in the IDF.
Other female soldiers on the list have vastly
different roles. Take Pvt. Or Meidan, who
moved to a southern Israeli kibbutz from
Uganda. In November 2012, her town was a
regular target of Hamas rockets. Today, she is
an Iron Dome missile defense system opera-
tor. Also listed is First Sgt. Monaliza Abdo, an
Arab-Israeli combat soldier. While most Arab-
Israelis don’t even take part in army service,
Abdo rose through the ranks to become a
commander, teaching soldiers how to com-
bat terrorism and other threats. In December,
she completed three years of service — one
more than the required number for Israeli
women.
Lt. Amit Danon, a former Israeli national
champion in rhythmic gymnastics, became
a combat officer in the mixed-gender Caracal
Battalion. She also is on the IDF’s list.
“She was one of the first women to become
an officer in a combat unit,” Risa Kelemer, a
commander who also serves in Carcal, said.
Kelemer, who is from Baltimore, said Cara-
cal is the only coed combat unit in the world.
“Boys and girls play the same roles,” she
said, noting that despite this she has felt lit-
tle tension from the men she works with. “I
encounter more difficulty when I am in civil-
ian life. I meet someone who says, ‘You are a
combat soldier? Girls aren’t combat soldiers!’”
Kelemer does not pretend to be as strong
as her male counterparts, though she said
she is able to hold her own. When it comes to
an operation, however, she said each person
has a role. Kelemer, for example, is a trained
grenade launcher. Another female comrade
is a sharpshooter. Another is a medic.
“Combat is not just running with 50 pounds
on your back, though we also do that,” Kele-
mer said.
Katja Edelman, originally from Kansas
and now a student at Columbia Univer-
sity, recently completed her service as a
combat infantry soldier in the IDF’s canine
unit. In that role, she worked with dogs
in the field and trained them back at the
base. She said that the IDF “has a lot to be
proud of regarding integration of women.
I felt like I had amazing opportunities in
my service and was able to do many of the
same things men do. It was always impor-
tant to me to demonstrate professionalism
and capability to set the right precedent
for a continued and hopefully expanded
role for women in the IDF.”
Edelman said she did feel pressure to
prove herself in the IDF, and she went to
extra lengths not to show signs of fatigue
“even if the boys were openly exhausted.”
“I feel that most women in male-dominated
workplaces can relate,” she said.
Kelemer’s mother, Amian Frost-Kelemer,
said she is “incredibly impressed” with
and proud of her daughter. But she is also
“petrified.”
“She believes she can do whatever the guys
can do,” Frost-Kelemer said. “She is really
fast. But the weight they have to carry is not
great for a woman’s body.
“Mentally, there is no issue. Physically, the
reality is that as strong as she is, it is about
heart — she is there for the heart.”
JNS.ORG
Sgt. Sarit Petersen is on the IDF’s
recent list of “8 Female Soldiers Who
Shattered Barriers in 2013.”
Cpl. Dylan Ostrin also is on the IDF’s list. PHOTOS COURTESY ISRAEL DEFENSE FORCES
JS-35
Whether your goal is to enhance your health, promote your
sense of well-being, or enliven your self-image, local resources exist
to guide you in your journey. In this special section, you’ll fnd
some useful tips to help you transform your life.
Do You Need to Change Your Life?
36 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-36
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Dr. Carole Miller: Helping clients navigate through stress
JUNE GLAZER
Starting out as a special education teacher, after earning
three master’s degrees she went to work as a counseling
psychologist at B’nai B’rith Career and Counseling Cen-
ter in Union. There, she was given the job of counseling a
growing number of mature women who wanted to enter
the workforce, the result of the then-new phenomenon
known as the Women’s Movement.
She was living in Morris County then and after a couple
of years at B’nai B’rith people in her community asked
her to open a practice nearby. She did, founding The
Humanex Group, an innovative human resource and
career development counseling and consulting company
that she ran for 27 years. The practice grew rapidly, soon
attracting clients from other areas, particularly Bergen
County and New York City. In 1985, she opened a second
office in Teaneck, where she remained until she closed
her practice in 2005.
A turning point in Dr. Miller’s career came when she
began working with a large number of men who came
to her complaining of cardiac, hypertensive, and other
major health issues as a result of work pressures. “They
were all in competitive jobs and, after their bypass surger-
ies and other treatments, they wanted to find jobs that
would not damage their health,” she said.
Most of these men were in their late 40s to mid-50s and
Dr. Miller saw a growing number of these clients in her
practice. Wanting more information to help them, she
began consulting with cardiologists and internists to fig-
ure out what was making them ill. Not getting answers, in
1980 she enrolled in doctoral studies at Rutgers University.
These clients were the focus of articles she wrote that
caught the attention of a team from the School of Allied
Health at SUNY Buffalo conducting a major study that
dovetailed with the work she was doing, and she was
invited to join it. The study, today recognized as land-
mark, followed a group of some 2,000 subjects, monitor-
ing the effects of work pressures—the word “stress” had
not yet become a buzzword—on their health.
“The study had several facets. One was to determine
individual stress triggers that caused a physiological
change in an individual that, over time, contributed to
health impairment, as well as to determine the types of
triggers that were most frequent and common. Another
facet was to identify measures that could moderate or
reduce the health damage to these individuals,” she
explained.
The only clinician on the six member team, Dr. Miller
developed a “paper-pencil” test to determine whether the
study subjects could identify the factors that were stress-
ful in the lives. Test results were then correlated with the
results of the ambulatory blood pressure monitors they
wore, and showed that some 90 percent were unable to
correctly identify the factors that led to the physiological
“Change is part of life—a lot of it predictable and normal, a lot
of it beyond our control,” says Dr. Carole Miller, who has helped
thousands of people overcome issues related to transition and
change during her 40-year career as a counseling psychologist
and most recently as a transition coach.
“All normal, healthy human beings have issues that come up
at different times in their lives that are difficult to deal with. Relo-
cating for a job, kids who move and go to new schools, situations
related to divorce, or the death of a spouse—these are some of
the things people go through during the course of a lifetime,”
says Dr. Miller, a Bergen County resident whose own career has
been filled with change.
All normal, healthy
human beings have
issues that come up at
different times in their
lives that are difficult to
deal with.
Do You Need to Change Your Life?
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 37
JS-37
Providing individualized, short-term help
Increased knowledge and confdence
Strategies and action plans
40+ years of professional experience counseling,
teaching, consulting and assisting individuals and
organizations including Fortune 500 companies
ONE CERTAINTY IN LIFE
IS CHANGE!
Help dealing
with the challenges
of change and
transition Dr. Carole Miller
Transition Coach
Call for additional information
Englewood Clifs, NJ · 551-655-3637
We’re Changing
the Face of Healthcare
Because you live in northern New Jersey, your access
to world-class healthcare has never been better.
Hackensack University Medical Group | Primary Care
has come to town.
This new alliance of primary care physicians, specialists
and other healthcare professionals works together
to keep you well, and helps you when you aren’t.
Because you’re busy, each office has extended hours
and a patient portal for easy and secure access to
your doctor and your health records. We offer well-
and sick-visits, screenings, and treatment of acute
or chronic ailments, with same-day appointments
available.
Don’t travel far for the best medical care.
Learn more at: www.HackensackUMG.org
Or call: 855.486.4722
Our locations for
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Bergen Women’s Health Care
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HackensackUMG 150 Overlook
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internal changes that would eventually
damage their health.
“In light of this finding, helping the sub-
jects and my clients to be aware of triggers
was one of the things I built into my work.
This was important in order to help them
develop strategies to reduce the effect of
triggers and thus reduce or moderate the
damage,” she said.
Another of her contributions to the study
was devising measures to lower blood
pressure. She employed deep breath-
ing techniques, problem solving, attitude
change, and exercise, innovative methods
then that are today common knowledge.
After the study concluded, Dr. Miller con-
tinued to employ the measures she came
up with, refining them as she used them
in her practice. She sometimes used those
same techniques when working with major
corporations and government entities that
had begun hiring her to consult on stress
control.
With her reputation growing, Dr. Miller
started speaking around the country and
teaching at colleges and universities in the
New York area, and began working as an
expert witness in court cases related to
employability in New York, New Jersey,
and Pennsylvania, appeared on cable and
educational TV and radio talk shows, took
up leadership roles in state and national
organizations, and spoke at private organi-
zation events.
All of these activities, combined with the
demands of a busy practice, took a toll on
her. Dr. Miller found herself working up to
60 hours a week, and as a solo practitioner
with a support staff and large overhead, she
could not limit her hours or take extended
vacations. After long deliberation, in 2005
she closed her practice.
Embarking on a new phase of her life,
Dr. Miller became involved with volunteer
work and consulting. But in 2013, with her
lifelong passion of helping people lead bet-
ter lives still burning, she decided to open a
new practice, this time as a transition coach
— someone who functions as a teacher,
trainer, and coach with focus on the issue
of change. She set up shop in Englewood
Cliffs.
“Change and transition can be difficult
for people. It is an issue I have helped cli-
ents with throughout my entire work life.
In my new practice, I help individuals
improve their lives by overcoming diffi-
culties in dealing with problems that stem
from such things as divorce, unemploy-
ment, career discontentment, retirement
planning, leisure-time activities, adjust-
ment to different stages in life, and adjust-
ment to life as a widow or widower, to
name a few,” she says.
One of the ways in which she helps cli-
ents is to advise them to set a goal and make
a concrete plan. “I tell them to be specific
and to plan their actions. For example,
wanting to lose 20 pounds is a wish. But,
wanting to lose 20 pounds by Memorial
Day, joining a gym, marking gym visits
on the calendar, and starting a diet is a
commitment.
“I advise clients to set goals that are real-
istic and achievable. Finding a new job
within six months with the proper tools
and a plan is realistic. Becoming the senior
vice president of a Fortune 500 company
within five years of graduating from college
is not.”
She then assists them to clarify their plan
— “to clearly define the change they wish
to make” — and to think it through in con-
cise terms. She helps them establish ways
to measure their progress and refine their
plan as they proceed.
Dr. Miller acknowledges being unconven-
tional in her approach in that she doesn’t
follow the medical model traditionally used
by most of her colleagues. That model dic-
tates that the therapist diagnose a pathol-
ogy and provide treatment.
“My approach has always been based
on a belief that normal people experience
particular issues and problems that don’t
require therapy but do need some assis-
tance such as counseling, support, clarifi-
cation, skills, feedback, guidance, and help
in adjusting their attitude toward different
realities. My job is to give them the tools
they need to feel increased self-confidence
and self-esteem so they can go on and be
comfortable in dealing with the issues in
their lives,” she says.
A new smile for a new year
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Porcelain veneers are an increas-
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Do You Need to Change Your Life?
38 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
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An action plan for healthier living
Hackensack Medical Group suggests comprehensive approach
You can make a difference in your own health in 2014
by taking a few simple steps. We asked local physicians
from Hackensack University Medical Group | Primary
Care to give us their most effective actions for staying
healthy this year.
Start your day with more than coffee. Your body needs
real nutrition to get going. Beware of fatty or sugary fast
foods at any time of day. If you are 50+, you should have
a colonoscopy. Colo-rectal cancer is very treatable when
discovered early.
— David Goldstein, M.D., Board-certified
in Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology
Learn your personal risk factors for heart disease,
stroke, and diabetes so you can make a serious effort
to avoid them. As you get older, it’s important to stay
active and control any chronic conditions. If you’ve
been prescribed any medicines, take them consistently
as directed.
— Evan Kushner, M.D., Board-certified in Geriatrics
Arthritis and other joint diseases can slow you down. Inac-
tivity leads to serious health problems including obesity,
osteoporosis, and circulatory issues. It’s important to get
some effective exercise every day. When pain interferes,
speak with your health care provider. There are many
treatment options to help get you moving again.
— Steven Rosner, M.D., Board-certified
in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology
At all stages of life, women can benefit from an annual
well-woman exam that includes a general health
checkup, a breast exam, a pelvic exam, and testing
such as a mammogram or PAP test as appropriate.
Breast cancer and cervical cancer are best treated
when found in their early stages.
— Amy M. Siegel, M.D. Board-certified
OB/GYN, Specializing in Gynecology
One of the most important things people can do to
change their lives and ensure a healthy future is to
stop smoking. Even if tobacco has been a part of your
life for decades, stopping the habit will start to reverse
the effects throughout the body. We know that quitting
isn’t easy. Get advice and treatment from your primary
care provider.
— Edward Gold, M.D., Board-certified
in Internal Medicine and Hematology/Oncology
The new year is always a good time to take action to
improve your health. But don’t try and “go it alone”.
Get help and advice from your health care provider,
learn all you can about your medical condition, and
keep any chronic conditions under control. Make 2014
the year you change your life for the better.
Hackensack University Medical Group | Pri-
mary Care is a growing network of primary care
providers and specialists committed to excel-
lence in patient care. For more information visit
www.HackensackUMG.org.
How massage makes you feel better
The result of massage is a profound state of relax-
ation. Many clients who get regular massage report a
decreased need for pain and sleep medications, making
massage the most natural approach to conquering stress
and daily pain.
One of the most consistent benefits of massage is that
the pain caused by tight muscles, injury, or surgery, is
relieved. Over time your body becomes accustomed to
being in a tense state and your muscles may actually for-
get how to relax. Experienced therapists help ease the
stress and tension that you often carry in your body, so
you can experience relief.
Massage can also relieve headaches and migraines.
Stress causes your muscles to contract, which creates
tension that can cause headaches and even migraines.
By focusing on your scalp, neck, and shoulders, a
massage therapist can help relax these contracted
muscled to offer drug-free relief from headaches.
It can also provide relief from injury, since mas-
sage therapy increases your body’s circulation to the
injured area, bringing it the nutrients and oxygen it
needs. This also helps decrease inflammation and
speed up the healing process.
Massage is excellent for seniors, who often experi-
ence pain due to arthritis. Therapeutic massage calms
the nervous system, increases circulation within the
joints that are causing pain, and supports improved
mobility.
Pre- and post-natal massage can help the mother’s
body adjust to the demands of childbearing. Pre-natal
massage focuses on relieving pains and fatigue of preg-
nancy. Post-natal massage helps the mother’s body to
revive and relax after giving birth.
Although there is no single identifiable cause of
fibromyalgia, most people experience pain at mul-
tiple body sites which cause fatigue, headaches, and
trouble sleeping. Deeply relaxing and comforting mas-
sage shifts your attention to the pleasant sensation of a
caring touch. The relief massage can provide may help
you to experience deeper and more restorative sleep.
Since opening in 2001, Back In Touch Massage Ther-
apy in Teaneck has been dedicated to making the heal-
ing power of massage therapy available and affordable
for everyone as an integral part of a healthy lifestyle. For
more information, visit or call (201) 836-0006.
Experienced
therapists help ease
the stress and tension
that you often carry
in your body.
JS-39
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 39
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Do You Need to Change Your Life?
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Orthodox Union presents webinar
on genetics and cancer prevention
An educational webinar on “Breast and
Ovarian Cancer in our Community:
Genetics, Knowledge and Prevention”
was recently presented by the Ortho-
dox Union, and is available for watching
online.
The webinar was presented by Dr.
Susan Gross, professor of clinical obstet-
rics and gynecology and women’s
health, pediatrics and genetics at Albert
Einstein College of Medicine; and found-
ing director of the Program for Jewish
Genetic Health, and chief medical offi-
cer of Natera, a California-based medical
diagnostics company.
The program was designed for reb-
betzins, yoatzot halacha (women certi-
fied by Orthodox rabbis to be a resource
for women with questions regarding
areas of Jewish Law that relate to mar-
riage, intimacy and women’s health) and
kallah (bride) teachers and held in part-
nership with the Yeshiva University Pro-
gram for Jewish Genetic Health and the
Albert Einstein College of Medicine of
Yeshiva University. Co-sponsors are the
Rabbinical Council of America (RCA),
Yeshiva University Center for the Jew-
ish Future, and the National Council of
Young Israel.
At the center of the discussion was
the role of the BRCA genes (BRCA1 and
BRCA2), found within the DNA of each
person which protect the body against
cancer. Yet one in 40 Ashkenazi Jews car-
ries a mutation in a BRCA gene, which
are passed down in families, accord-
ing to The Program for Jewish Genetic
Health, a initiative of Yeshiva University
and its Albert Einstein College of Medi-
cine. When these genes have changes, or
mutations, they cause an increased risk
for breast and ovarian cancers.
“Ashkenazi Jewish ethnicity confers its
own risk for BRCA mutations,” empha-
sized Dr. Gross.
Geneticists say that one in ten Ash-
kenazi Jewish women with breast can-
cer and one in three Ashkenazi Jewish
women with ovarian cancer are likely
to have a BRCA mutation, according to
the Program for Jewish Genetic Health.
Males can also carry BRCA mutations.
“The more we begin speaking about
getting tested for BRCA gene mutations
and educating our community, the
more lives we can save,” emphasized Dr.
Gross.
“The Jewish community has champi-
oned educational awareness and testing
for the prevention of diseases linked to
those of Jewish heritage (compared to
the general population), such as Tay-
Sachs and Cystic Fibrosis, but knowledge
and testing for BRCA mutations are not
as well-known as they should be,” said
Rebbetzin Judi Steinig, associate direc-
tor of OU Community Engagement, and
webinar coordinator. “Testing is about
prevention. Testing is about saving lives.”
Dr. Gross emphasized that BRCA muta-
tions cause a significantly increased risk
for breast and ovarian cancer (among
others), yet women who have BRCA
mutations have options to reduce their
cancer risks.
“The more we begin speaking about
this and educating our community,
the more lives we can save,” Dr. Gross
stressed.
The full webinar may be watched at
www.ou.org/BRCA.
Run (or walk) for Big Game 5K
and help a variety of nonprofits
Join Adler Aphasia Center and other area
nonprofits at The Big Game 5K next Sun-
day, January 26, at the Westfield Garden
State Plaza Mall food court in Paramus.
The 5K race starts at 9 a.m. on a timed
course around the perimeter of the mall.
At 9:30, a leisurely one-mile walk inside
the mall begins.
Registration is $30 until January 20 and
$35 on race day.
Event proceeds will benefit several
area nonprofit organizations including
Adler Aphasia Center, National Multiple
Sclerosis Society, Maria Fareri Children’s
Hospital, Children’s Aid and Family Ser-
vices, Girl Scouts of Northern New Jersey,
Boys and Girls Clubs of Bergen County-
Hawthorne and Northwest N. J., and
Heroes and Cool Kids.
Interested participants can register at
www.raceforum.com/biggame5k. Get more
information about the Big Game 5K on their
event web site at www.thebiggame5k.com,
on Facebook at www.facebook.com/big-
game5k and on Twitter at @biggame5k.
Expected to draw hundreds of partici-
pants, The Big Game 5K is open to run-
ners and walkers of all ages and abilities
(wheelchairs welcomed). The entry fee
includes a T-shirt, a medal and a swag
bag.
Immediately following the 5K run,
there will be an award ceremony, fol-
lowed by music and a tailgate party in the
food court featuring food tasting from
area restaurants.
Former NFL greats Joe Morris of the
Giants and Bruce Harper of the Jets are
serving as race ambassadors. The Big
Game 5K was organized by a partnership
of individuals, small businesses and non-
profit organizations working together to
make a greater impact on our commu-
nity, while enjoying the Super Bowl fes-
tivities going on in the area.
Valley Hospital is the Platinum event
sponsor. To become a sponsor of the
Big Game 5K, contact Elissa Goldstein
(201) 368-8585 or email at egoldstein@
adleraphasiacenter.org.
Englewood Hospital and Medical Center
brings art and music to healing process
Englewood Hospital and Medical Center
is launching The Art of Healing Program
in partnership with The Art School at
Old Church in Demarest. The new pro-
gram is designed to showcase the power
of healing through art and music
“Our mission is to form meaningful
partnerships with our community
in an effort to provide high-quality,
compassionate, humanistic care and
enhance the hospital experience,” said
Warren Geller, president and CEO of
Englewood Hospitral. “Our collaboration
with The Art School will contribute to the
comfort and wellbeing of all patients and
visitors, who will be exposed to various art
works in designated areas of The Medical
Center throughout the year.”
Arti sts i n Bergen Count y and
surrounding counties who are interested
in having their works displayed at The
Medical Center for its second exhibition
set to debut on June 12 have until March
12 to submit. For more information and
submittal requirements, visit www.
englewoodhospital.com and download
an entry form or contact TASOC
Exhibitions Director Mary Gagler at
exhibitions@tasoc.org or (201) 767-7160.
Best in Show will receive a $500 award
and two notable mentions will each
receive $100.
The premiere of the first show will take
place at the hospital’s Ferolie Gallery on
February 6, and will include a tour of
the first 19-piece exhibition and an artist
reception from 5:30–7:30 p.m.
Noted jazz musicians will provide
entertainment, made possible through
the hospital’s Dizzy Gillespie Memorial
Fund and the New York City-based Jazz
Foundation of America.
JS-41
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 41
CareOne at Teaneck Programs
For Our Jewish Residents and Families
CareOne is committed to satisfying
the cultural and religious needs
of the residents and families
that we serve. For our Jewish
customers, we are pleased
to offer an array of
programs to enhance
each resident’s
stay with us.
These programs
include:
• Celebration of all Jewish holidays with traditional foods. We are Glatt Kosher
• Accommodation for resident’s preferences in Jewish programs and activities
• Under Kosher supervision of RCBC
• Full calendar of Jewish services and programs
CareOne provides a greater sensitivity to the needs of the Jewish customers we
serve. We strive to meet the needs of all our residents and guarantee your stay
with us.
Visit our Web site at www.care-one.com and take a virtual tour of our center.
5
6
5
1
8
1
544 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666 • 201-862-3300
To inquire about
other CareOne locations
near you, visit our website
www.care-one.com
Do You Need to Change Your Life?
42 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-42*
Diagnosis: the female heart
Do you think heart disease is a man’s
disease? “Heart disease is devastating
to women too,” says interventional car-
diologist Janet Strain, M.D., director of
the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory
at The Valley Hospital and a member
of Heart Care for Women, a practice
of five female cardiologists. “Unfortu-
nately, most women are not aware of
the dangers of heart disease, or of the
steps they can take to reduce their risk
for a heart attack or stroke.”
Heart Care for Women offers a free
a Heart Risk Assessment conducted by
a specially trained nurse practitioner.
Some fast facts about women and
heart disease:
• Heart disease is the number one
killer of American women over the age
of 25.
• A woman suffers a heart attack
every 90 seconds in the United States.
• One in three women will die of
heart disease.
Further complicating the issue is the
fact that the symptoms of a heart attack
in women can be subtle. “Both men
and women can experience the typical
chest pain, pressure or discomfort, but
women are somewhat more likely than
men to experience more subtle symp-
toms, such as shortness of breath, diz-
ziness or lightheadedness, pressure
or pain in the lower chest or upper
abdomen, or extreme fatigue,” says
cardiologist Benita Burke, M.D., medi-
cal director of Heart Care for Women.
The good news is that if you seek
help quickly, treatment can save your
life and prevent permanent damage
to your heart muscle. “Women tend
to respond better to certain cardiac
interventions then men, but they are
underrepresented, likely due to atypi-
cal symptoms and under referring,”
says cardiac electrophysiologist Tina
Sichrovsky, M.D., of Heart Care for
Women.
“Women tend to show up in emer-
gency rooms after much heart dam-
age has already occurred because their
symptoms are not those typically asso-
ciated with a heart attack,” says cardiac
electrophysiologist Aysha Arshad, M.D.,
of Heart Care for Women. “If you think
you’re having a heart attack, call for
emergency medical help immediately.”
The physicians of the Valley Medical
Group’s Heart Care for Women provide
specialized services for prevention, diag-
nosis, and treatment of cardiovascular
disease in women. Because there are
differences in the signs and symptoms
of heart disease in women compared
to men, it is important to have special-
ists experienced in the treatment female
patients. For information or to make an
appointment, call (201) 447-8535.
The doctors of Heart Care for Women. Left to right: Janet Strain, M.D., in-
terventional cardiologist; Tina Sichrovsky, M.D., cardiac electrophysiologist;
Benita Burke, M.D., cardiologist and medical director; Aysha Arshad, M.D.,
cardiac electrophysiologist; and Sarah DeLeon Mansson, D.O., cardiologist.
Like us on Facebook
facebook.com/jewishstandard
Fitness Senior Style Yoga Schedule
Wednesdays: 2:15 pm - Yoga for Seniors
RR
Change Your Life?
JS-43
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 43
SERVING BOCA RATON,
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When is a person old?
RICHARD PORTUGAL
The government considers you a senior at 55 years old.
Social Security considers retirement at 65 years. Corpora-
tions consider you less valuable at 45 years old. In profes-
sional sports, a 35 year old is rapidly approaching the end
of career productivity. AARP euphemistically welcomes
new members at 50 years young. In our society, when is
a person old?
Webster’s Dictionary defines old as “showing the effects
of time or use; advanced in years.” Roget’s Thesaurus con-
siders old as “ancient, mature, elderly, disused, experi-
enced, or getting on.”
So what adequately defines or captures the concept of
aging in our society? Is mere number of years definitive?
Are synonyms accurate in portraying age?
We tend to celebrate birthdays as an accomplishment
of merely living. Those in their eighties and nineties, sim-
ply by their age, have garnered our respect. Those over
one hundred are considered heroic. The mere fact of liv-
ing and challenging death is a victory that can be cheered
and admired. And the science of nutrition, of medical
advances, of technological innovations, and of cellular
research has pushed the potential number of birthdays
significantly higher.
But it still begs the question as to what constitutes being
old in our society. Douglas MacArthur believed “you are
as young as your faith, as old as your doubt; as young as
your self-confidence, as old as your fear; as young as your
hope, as old as your despair.” Maurice Chevalier summed
it up quite succinctly when he said, “Old age isn’t so bad
when you consider the alternative.”
But I would suggest “old age” is not the breath of one’s
years, but rather their quality. A century of living cer-
tainly deserves our appreciation, but if it is accomplished
with an independent and productive mettle, it certainly
deserves our applause, esteem, and admiration. No one
knows when the “alternative” comes beckoning, but we
certainly can maintain our faith, self-confidence, and
hope. The latter years only strip us of our dignity when
we lose our independence, yield our ability to fend for
ourselves, and forfeit a quality of life. Once we surrender
our lives to the care and the decision-making of others,
we have become old! Once we cannot climb stairs, sit and
rise from a chair, get into and out of a car, walk in a mall,
be physically proficient, or accomplish activities of daily
living — we are old!
Satchel Paige once asked, “How old would you be if you
didn’t know how old you were?” How would you answer
that question?
Richard Portugal is the founder and owner of Fitness
Senior Style, which exercises seniors for balance, strength,
and cognitive fitness in their own homes. He has been
certified as a senior trainer by the American Senior Fitness
Association. For further information, call (201) 937-4722.
So what adequately
defines or captures the
concept of aging in our
society? Is mere
number of years
definitive?
Do You Need to Change Your Life?
44 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-44*
Wellness in the New Year
Jacqueline Kates, Community Relations Coordinator - Holy Name Medical Center
According to Linda Lohsen, RN, BSN,
Director of the Center for Healthy Living at
Holy Name Medical Center, wellness is more
than the absence of disease. Ms. Lohsen
defines wellness as functioning at one’s
maximum capacity — physically, emotionally,
even spiritually. Although wellness has
always been a concern of the public health
community, it has more recently become a
topic of much greater general interest, due
in part, Ms. Lohsen believes, to insurance
companies recognizing that the costs
associated with illness are much higher than
the costs of prevention.
In a presentation to the public at Holy
Name Medical Center on January 14, Ms.
Lohsen noted that, despite efforts of the
medical community, the obesity epidemic
continues to grow, and studies indicate
that the current younger generation is not
expected to enjoy as long a lifespan as their
parents. Despite widespread knowledge that
proper nutrition and exercise are essential to
physical wellness, obesity is on the increase.
What is getting in the way of wellness?
Admittedly, it is not easy to find
time to make the lifestyle changes that
are necessary to ensure wellness. The
demands of everyday life have never been
greater. The bewildering array of wellness
guidelines, products, and services make
creating a personal plan difficult. Confusion,
resistance, ambivalence and a history of
repeated failures can also present obstacles.
But the obstacles can be overcome. Every
individual needs to connect wellness, health
and fitness to something of value to him or
her. Lifestyle change needs to be something
a person wants to do, not something he
knows he should do.
How can you make lifestyle change
a priority? Ms. Lohsen recommends
determining where you want to be in six
months and why, since an internal goal is
a much more effective motivator that an
outside directive. The next step is to break
your ultimate goal into short, achievable,
measurable goals. Your ultimate goal may be
to weigh 10 pounds less in six months. But
one of your short-term, easily achievable
goals could be to eat only three cookies
a day instead of eight cookies. If it’s too
difficult to carve out 30 minutes to exercise
every day, your goal can be exercising in
three ten-minute segments. It will be easier
to find the time, and shorter segments of
exercise can be just as effective. The success
of your short-term goals will motivate you
to continue toward your ultimate goal.
Center for Healthy Living Director Linda
Lohsen will offer additional suggestions
for achieving wellness at the Senior Source
at Riverside Square on January 29 at 1:30
PM and is available to speak about health-
related topics at synagogues, senior centers
or other venues. She can be reached at the
Holy Name’s Center for Healthy Living at
201- 833-7332.
For information about other programs and services or for a physician referral, please call
1-877-HOLY-NAME (1-877-465-9626) or visit holyname.org.
Touro names director of student mental health
Erica Weissman comes from Bellevue Hospital
The Touro College and University Sys-
tem has announced the appointment of
Erica Weissman, J.D., Psy.D., as director
of student mental health services.
In this newly created position, Dr.
Weissman will be coordinating stu-
dent mental health services at all Touro
schools and sites in the New York City
area. She will work with academic and
administrative leadership, as well as staff
and students, to assess existing services,
identify student mental health concerns,
provide options for intervention, miti-
gate risk, and ensure compliance with federal and state
laws and regulations. Under her guidance, Touro will
develop additional policies and procedures for crisis
intervention and mental health counseling, implement
new mental health services, and provide training and
resources for faculty, staff, and students. She also has
an academic appointment as associate professor in the
Graduate School of Psychology.
Dr. Weissman is a New York State licensed psycholo-
gist who brings to Touro a wealth of experience working
in a variety of settings. As a clinician and clinical admin-
istrator in the New York City public health system, she
has provided inpatient and outpatient treatment to
clients with a range of mental illnesses,
performed numerous forensic evalu-
ations, supervised staff clinicians and
advanced trainees, conducted semi-
nars for psychology interns and medical
residents, and made presentations on
multiple topics in psychology and per-
formance improvement. She has also
taught in academic graduate programs
and maintains a private practice in clini-
cal and forensic psychology. Before
earning her doctorate in psychology, Dr.
Weissman was a practicing attorney spe-
cializing in intellectual property matters.
Prior to joining Touro, Dr. Weissman was the director
of quality improvement for the Department of Psychia-
try at Bellevue Hospital Center and a clinical assistant
professor in the Psychiatry Department of the New York
University School of Medicine.
Dr. Weissman attended the University of Pennsylvania
(B.A.), New York University School of Law ( J.D.), Yeshiva
University (Psy.D.), and the New York Psychoanalytic
Society and Institute. She has published and presented
research on such topics as adolescents, incarcerated
women, treatment of sex offenders and trauma victims,
and competency to stand trial.
Erica Weissman
A & T
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Wishing you a
Happy Passover


The Chateau
At Rochelle Park

96 Parkway
Rochelle Park, NJ 07662
201 226-9600


Sub Acute Rehabilitative Care Center for Hospital After Care


After care is so important to a patient’s recovery … once a patient is released from the
hospital the real challenges often begin – the challenges they now have to face as they
try and regain their strength and independence.

Here at The Chateau we combine the very same sophisticated technologies and
techniques used by leading hospitals with “hands on” skilled rehabilitative/nursing care.
Sub Acute care ensures that patients return home with the highest degree of function
possible.

Our Care Service …
 Ventilator Care/Vent-Dialysis
 IV Therapy
 Tracheotomy Care
 Physical, Speech and Occupational Therapy
 Physician Supervised Wound Care
 On-Site Internal Medicine Physicians
 24 Hour Nursing Care

For more information, or to schedule a tour of The Chateau at Rochelle Park,
please call our Admissions Department at 201 336-9317



Wishing you a
Happy Passover


The Chateau
At Rochelle Park

96 Parkway
Rochelle Park, NJ 07662
201 226-9600


Sub Acute Rehabilitative Care Center for Hospital After Care


After care is so important to a patient’s recovery … once a patient is released from the
hospital the real challenges often begin – the challenges they now have to face as they
try and regain their strength and independence.

Here at The Chateau we combine the very same sophisticated technologies and
techniques used by leading hospitals with “hands on” skilled rehabilitative/nursing care.
Sub Acute care ensures that patients return home with the highest degree of function
possible.

Our Care Service …
 Ventilator Care/Vent-Dialysis
 IV Therapy
 Tracheotomy Care
 Physical, Speech and Occupational Therapy
 Physician Supervised Wound Care
 On-Site Internal Medicine Physicians
 24 Hour Nursing Care

For more information, or to schedule a tour of The Chateau at Rochelle Park,
please call our Admissions Department at 201 336-9317



Sub Acute Rehabilitative Care Center for Hospital After Care
Alaris Health at The Chateau
At Rochelle Park
96 Parkway · Rochelle Park, NJ · 201-226-9600
For more information, or to schedule a tour of Alaris Health at Te Chateau at
Rochelle Park, please call our Admissions Department at 201 336-9317
Wellness in the New Year
Jacqueline Kates, Community Relations Coordinator - Holy Name Medical Center
According to Linda Lohsen, RN, BSN,
Director of the Center for Healthy Living at
Holy Name Medical Center, wellness is more
than the absence of disease. Ms. Lohsen
defines wellness as functioning at one’s
maximum capacity — physically, emotionally,
even spiritually. Although wellness has
always been a concern of the public health
community, it has more recently become a
topic of much greater general interest, due
in part, Ms. Lohsen believes, to insurance
companies recognizing that the costs
associated with illness are much higher than
the costs of prevention.
In a presentation to the public at Holy
Name Medical Center on January 14, Ms.
Lohsen noted that, despite efforts of the
medical community, the obesity epidemic
continues to grow, and studies indicate
that the current younger generation is not
expected to enjoy as long a lifespan as their
parents. Despite widespread knowledge that
proper nutrition and exercise are essential to
physical wellness, obesity is on the increase.
What is getting in the way of wellness?
Admittedly, it is not easy to find
time to make the lifestyle changes that
are necessary to ensure wellness. The
demands of everyday life have never been
greater. The bewildering array of wellness
guidelines, products, and services make
creating a personal plan difficult. Confusion,
resistance, ambivalence and a history of
repeated failures can also present obstacles.
But the obstacles can be overcome. Every
individual needs to connect wellness, health
and fitness to something of value to him or
her. Lifestyle change needs to be something
a person wants to do, not something he
knows he should do.
How can you make lifestyle change
a priority? Ms. Lohsen recommends
determining where you want to be in six
months and why, since an internal goal is
a much more effective motivator that an
outside directive. The next step is to break
your ultimate goal into short, achievable,
measurable goals. Your ultimate goal may be
to weigh 10 pounds less in six months. But
one of your short-term, easily achievable
goals could be to eat only three cookies
a day instead of eight cookies. If it’s too
difficult to carve out 30 minutes to exercise
every day, your goal can be exercising in
three ten-minute segments. It will be easier
to find the time, and shorter segments of
exercise can be just as effective. The success
of your short-term goals will motivate you
to continue toward your ultimate goal.
Center for Healthy Living Director Linda
Lohsen will offer additional suggestions
for achieving wellness at the Senior Source
at Riverside Square on January 29 at 1:30
PM and is available to speak about health-
related topics at synagogues, senior centers
or other venues. She can be reached at the
Holy Name’s Center for Healthy Living at
201- 833-7332.
For information about other programs and services or for a physician referral, please call
1-877-HOLY-NAME (1-877-465-9626) or visit holyname.org.
June Matican, ryt
Certifed Yoga / Chair Yoga Instructor
phone: 201.988.4847 e-mail: jsm1262@gmail.com
CHair yoga by June
Get Fit Where You Sit!
day & evening > group classes > individual sessions
JS-45
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 45
Change Your Life?
46 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-46

Sha’ar Communities
Choose Your Gate. Open Your Soul. Find your Community.


Elisha’s Gate of Wholeness and Healing

Mother/Daughter Spa Shabbat
Friday, January 31 – Sunday, February 2, 2014
The Lodge at Woodloch, Hawley, PA
Relax your body and refresh your soul in the height of luxury and the depths of
feeling.

The Mourning Walk
Alternating Thursday mornings, 8am-9am, beginning February 6, 2014
Meet at the trailhead of Tallman Mountain State Park on the east side of US 9W,
0.3 miles north of Oak Tree Road in Palisades, NY.
For individuals at any stage of the grieving process. Come spend an hour walking
the beautiful Palisades in fellowship with others mourning the loss of a loved one.
Enjoy a coffee at the Market afterwards. Email JoAnne@shaarcommunities.org to
sign up for weather alerts and schedule updates.

Hot Flash Panache: A Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Menopause,
Changing Bodies and Transforming Roles in Family, Community and
Society.
A Spring 2014 series is planned.
A rabbi, gynecologist, nutritionist, fitness expert, social worker and others explore
this transformational time in women’s (and men’s!) lives.
Email JoAnne@shaarcommunities.org for details.

For more information on these programs and other
Sha’ar Gates contact our Director of Communities at
joanne@shaarcommunities.org or visit
www.shaarcommunities.org.
• Family owned community
• Spacious, fully furnished apartments
• Daily Lifestyle Activities to enrich mind, body & spirit
• RN Director of Wellness Program
• Respite Program available
• Licensed by NYSDOH
• Conveniently located on the Rockland/Bergen border
The Esplanade at Chestnut Ridge
168 Red Schoolhouse Rd.
Chestnut Ridge, NY 10977
845-620-0606
www.EsplanadeChestnutRidge.com
…where our residents maintain the level of independence
they desire while receiving the care they need.
(Resident, Lillian Grunfeld with her daughter,
Dir. of Community Relations, Debbie Corwin)

C
o
m
e F
eel O
ur W
armth
ES P L ANADE
T H E
C H E S T N U T R I D G E
L U X U R Y A S S I S T E D L I V I N G
Visit our other locations at
www.PromenadeSenior.com
Be a part
of our Family…
Holy Name fills February
with varied health classes
Holy Name Medical Center will be offer-
ing a variety of community health classes,
support programs and events in Febru-
ary. To view the full calendar, visit holy-
name.org/events. Most events are free,
unless otherwise noted. To register,
please call (877) 465-9626.
Macular Degeneration:
The Latest Treatments
The good news is we’re living longer; the
bad news is our eyes are not keeping up.
Increasing numbers of people are being
affected by macular degeneration, the
leading cause of vision loss for individuals
over 65. This talk will address early signs
and symptoms, the difference between
“wet” and “dry” macular degeneration,
and advances in treatment that are sav-
ing vision and slowing the progression of
this disease.
Speaker: Dr. Kurt Jackson, Holy Name
Ophthalmologist
Monday, February 24, 1-2 p.m.
What Have You
Got to Lose?
Managing Your Weight
This six-week series includes lively ses-
sions on topics such as portion distortion,
move to lose, emotional eating and more,
followed by engaging discussions, goal-
setting and optional weekly weigh-in.
Facilitator: Linda Lohsen, BSN, RN,
Director, Center for Healthy Living
New sessions begin February 25. Tues-
days 10:30–11:30 a.m.
Fee: $60 for each six-week session.
Bariatric Surgery Seminar
Obesity is not a failure of willpower; it’s
a disease that can place you at risk for a
number of serious illnesses and medical
conditions. The best place to start when
contemplating bariatric surgery is one of
our free patient seminars, held several
times a month at Holy Name Medical Cen-
ter. For dates and information, please call
(877) 465-9626 Prompt #5.
Rutgers Safety Program
for Volunteer Coaches
The Rutgers Safety Program is a three
hour safety orientation program for vol-
unteer coaches. It is designed to satisfy
the requirements of the N.J. “Little League
Law” and is utilized by many municipal
and recreational athletic programs to
meet this requirement. Topics covered
include general coaching concepts, legal
aspects, psychological aspects, training
and conditioning aspects and medical
aspects of coaching. Wednesdays Febru-
ary 12, March 12, 6:30–9:30 p.m.
Speaker: James Mendler, M.D., Holy
Name family practice physician and
sports medicine specialist
Fee: $35 per class. Register by email to
mendler@holyname.org
Lose Weight
with Hypnosis
This two-hour weight reduction program
teaches behavior modification and uses
hypnosis to help you make permanent
lifestyle changes that will reduce your
weight gradually and naturally. The pro-
gram is conducted by a certified hypno-
tist and includes a 30-day reinforcement
CD, a series of behavior modification
cards for daily positive reinforcement,
and free reinforcement sessions for one
year.
Tuesdays February 4, March 4, 7–9
p.m.
Fee: $70. Class size is limited. You must
call (877) 465-9626 Prompt #5 to register.
Using Hypnosis
to Stop Smoking
This two-hour program teaches behavior
modification and uses hypnosis to help
you stop smoking. We don’t use scare tac-
tics or gloomy statistics; instead, we focus
on the pleasure and increased self-esteem
you can attain as a non-smoker....without
withdrawal symptoms or gaining weight.
The program is conducted by a certified
hypnotist and includes a 30-day rein-
forcement CD, a series of behavior modi-
fication cards for daily positive reinforce-
ment, and free reinforcement sessions for
one year.
Tuesdays—February 11, March 11, 7–9
p.m.
Fee: $70. Class size is limited. You must
call (877) 465-9626 Prompt #5 to register.
For the Love of Baby
Breastfeeding Preparation Class
Designed to assist women and their
families in understanding the process and
techniques necessary to make the breast-
feeding experience successful. Fee: $30
Breastfeeding Consult
A consultation is available with a breast-
feeding specialist by appointment. Fee:
$75 (Free for couples who have had their
baby at Holy Name.)
Lamaze Childbirth Classes
Four-week or two-session intensive
classes assist women and their coaches
with the birthing process. Fee: $150
Cesarean Birth Prep
Prepares expectant couples for cesarean
childbirth. Fee: $25
Baby Care Basics
Prepares parents for their first weeks at
home with baby. Fee: $20 (Free for cou-
ples who have their baby at Holy Name.)
Do You Need to Change Your Life?
JS-47
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 47
Coupon
$50 OFF
initial office visit
in either Englewood
or Monsey locations
Holy Name fills February
with varied health classes
Fee: $35 per class. Register by email to
mendler@holyname.org
Lose Weight
with Hypnosis
This two-hour weight reduction program
teaches behavior modification and uses
hypnosis to help you make permanent
lifestyle changes that will reduce your
weight gradually and naturally. The pro-
gram is conducted by a certified hypno-
tist and includes a 30-day reinforcement
CD, a series of behavior modification
cards for daily positive reinforcement,
and free reinforcement sessions for one
year.
Tuesdays February 4, March 4, 7–9
p.m.
Fee: $70. Class size is limited. You must
call (877) 465-9626 Prompt #5 to register.
Using Hypnosis
to Stop Smoking
This two-hour program teaches behavior
modification and uses hypnosis to help
you stop smoking. We don’t use scare tac-
tics or gloomy statistics; instead, we focus
on the pleasure and increased self-esteem
you can attain as a non-smoker....without
withdrawal symptoms or gaining weight.
The program is conducted by a certified
hypnotist and includes a 30-day rein-
forcement CD, a series of behavior modi-
fication cards for daily positive reinforce-
ment, and free reinforcement sessions for
one year.
Tuesdays—February 11, March 11, 7–9
p.m.
Fee: $70. Class size is limited. You must
call (877) 465-9626 Prompt #5 to register.
For the Love of Baby
Breastfeeding Preparation Class
Designed to assist women and their
families in understanding the process and
techniques necessary to make the breast-
feeding experience successful. Fee: $30
Breastfeeding Consult
A consultation is available with a breast-
feeding specialist by appointment. Fee:
$75 (Free for couples who have had their
baby at Holy Name.)
Lamaze Childbirth Classes
Four-week or two-session intensive
classes assist women and their coaches
with the birthing process. Fee: $150
Cesarean Birth Prep
Prepares expectant couples for cesarean
childbirth. Fee: $25
Baby Care Basics
Prepares parents for their first weeks at
home with baby. Fee: $20 (Free for cou-
ples who have their baby at Holy Name.)
Diabetes & Pregnancy
Our specialists are experienced in managing diabetes
related to pregnancy.
Call 201-833-3371 for more information.
Infant Massage
A certified infant massage therapist teaches the benefits
and techniques of infant massage. Fee: $30
Sibling Preparation
This course is designed to help children ages 3 to 8 years
prepare for the new baby. Fee: $25 per family
Free Support Groups
Support groups at Holy Name meet monthly. Registration
is encouraged, but walk-ins are welcome. Groups include:
Bariatric Support Group, Bereavement Support Group,
Breast Cancer Support Group, Cancer Support Group,
Caregiver Support Group, Diabetes Support Group, New
Moms Group, Perinatal Loss Support Group, and Prostate
Cancer Support Group
For further information, please call (877) 465-9626, or
visit holyname.org/supportgroups.
Shelter Our Sister responds
to cases of domestic violence
LARRY YUDELSON
Recent news stories in Bergen County have shed impor-
tant light on the tragedies that can result from domestic
violence in our communities.
Shelter Our Sisters is Bergen County’s only non-profit
agency providing comprehensive services for both adult
and child victims of domestic violence. It has been help-
ing families in crisis for more than 37 years. It offers
emergency shelter as well as a diverse array of services
ranging from one-on-one counseling and mentoring to
legal advocacy, educational assistance, job readiness
training, and creative arts therapy for children. You can
find more details at www.shelteroursisters.org.
If you or someone you know is being abused, call the
SOS 24-hour-hotline: (201) 944-9600.
CareOne employees
deliver toys to Valerie
Fund cancer patients
More than 3,000 go to New Jersey
and New York children with
cancer and blood disorder
CareOne employees collected, donated, and deliv-
ered more than 3,000 toys to the children of the Val-
erie Fund Children’s Centers for Cancer and Blood
Disorders. CareOne CEO Daniel E. Straus said that
“this is a real testament to the caring nature of the
CareOne community. Our employees, residents,
family members of residents and vendors all joined
together to make these very special deliveries pos-
sible. The looks of joy on the faces of the children
were absolutely priceless.”
The toys were donated and collected by members
of the CareOne community in the 60 CareOne facili-
ties in New Jersey, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and
Virginia. They were delivered to five Valerie Fund
health care centers. The centers are New Jersey’s
largest network of health care facilities for children
with cancer and blood disorders.
Valerie Fund co-founders Ed and Sue Goldstein
said, “The outreach by everyone from CareOne was
wonderful to witness. It was heartwarming to see the
children so happy and excited. We couldn’t be more
pleased, and we thank the CareOne community for
its strong volunteer and giving spirit.”
The Valerie Fund is a not-for-profit organization
established in 1976 in memory of nine-year-old Val-
erie Goldstein by her parents, Ed and Sue. The Val-
erie Fund’s mission is to provide support for the
comprehensive health care of children with cancer
and blood disorders. Families turn to The Valerie
Fund because of the unique combination of medical
care, counseling, and other services it provides. See
more at: http://www.thevaleriefund.org/.
Change Your Life?
48 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-48
Like us on
Facebook
facebook.com/jewishstandard

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Lepselter sees Florida
real estate market
making a comeback
The cold snowy winter has many flocking south to
the warmth of southern Florida, where one can sip
a piña colada under a beach umbrella on a beautiful
stretch of white sand in the middle of February to
the envy of those remaing up north.
No surprise then that many northerners have
taken advantage of the real estate market in south
Florida in the last year. As many in New Jersey have
noticed an uptick in the market, the same can be
said in Florida.
The market has been making a comeback and
properties are reportedly selling at an extremely
strong pace. It is not unusual to have multiple offers
and be “under contract” in just a few days, according
to Boca Raton-based real estate agent Edward Lep-
selter, a former New Jersey resident, as is his wife
Elly, also a Realtor.
“When I first moved to Florida in 2002 and
decided to become a Realtor, shortly thereafter the
market exploded here and then came the bubble.
This is a different market now; instead of an overflow
of investors and ‘flippers’ we are now dealing with
many people who truly want to get out of the North-
east, whether it’s a permanent move or a vacation
home. Many baby boomers are making the move as
they are tired of the harsh winters etc,” says Lep-
selter, who is the son of former well-known caterer
Irwin Lepselter.
“My father spent 55 years in the catering business
in and around New Jersey and I get calls all the time
from past clients of his who ask about him and then
the real estate market. I tell them right now the mar-
ket is sizzling. The inventory has dropped dramati-
cally and prices are starting to come back up.
“There are two new active adult communities
under construction and sales have been brisk so far.
Valencia Cove is now for sale in Boynton Beach and
Villaggio Reserve is located in Delray Beach,” Lep-
selter said.
“Give us a call so we can go over your criteria and
help you find the best home and community to meet
your lifestyle. Whether you are looking for a little
getaway or a waterfront estate on the intracoastal
with a boat dock we will find the perfect property.
Although our office is in Boca Raton we cover any-
where from Ft. Lauderdale to Jupiter on a daily
basis. We work with all price ranges and specialize in
Active Adult 55+, Beachside and Country Club com-
munities. Feel free to contact us whether purchas-
ing, selling, or renting,”
Lepselter can be reached at (561) 302-9374 or (561)
826-8394.
Many baby
boomers are making
the move as they
are tired of the
harsh winters
Do You Need to Change Your Life?
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 49
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PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSOCIATES
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Michael Scherl, M.D. Donna Szabo, AuD James Lee, M.D. Lori Roses, AuD
“Wearing Siemens hearing aids
has opened up a whole new
world for me. I should have done
this years ago.”
- Carolyn
“Audiologist services are first
rate. The Lyrics make me feel
30 years younger.”
- Elizabeth
“I’m on the phone all day and I was having a
hard time hearing. With the patience of a saint
my doctor straightened out my hearing.”
- Joel
“On my birthday I wished I never had to wear
my hearing aids again. With the Lyric my wish
came true.”
- Jenny
Tu Bish
What?
Supervising license NJ #489
Many baby
boomers are making
the move as they
are tired of the
harsh winters
Sadkhin weight loss method
comes to Bergen County
The Sadkhin Complex offers the many
people who have unsuccessfully tried
to lose weight a unique and effective
approach for losing those extra pounds.
Its diet center uses ancient methods
of acupressure to control your hunger.
Unlike many diet programs, the Sadkhin
Method is all natural, completely drug
free, and does not require the purchase of
any products. The Sadkhin Method works
by targeting the sixteen hunger control
points behind your ears. This allows you
to change and control your eating habits.
The Sadkhin Method attacks the problem
of obesity and excess weight at its source:
hunger. Combining years of research and
modern therapeutic techniques, this pro-
gram targets the hunger-causing elements
in your life and quickly adjusts your body
to a healthier state. The Sadkhin Method
is not only a quick way to lose weight but
it is also designed to readjust your organs
to work optimally. By starting this pro-
gram, you are investing in a longer and
healthier life.
Clients can expect to lose five to ten
percent of their body weight and about
10 to 20 pounds within the first ten days.
In other diets, losing that much can take
months. The secret behind this program
is the small metal balls that are placed by
the practitioner at the precise pressure
points behind the ears. This causes you to
feel full and to eat less while still feeling
energized. Carrying all that extra body
weight simply pulls you down. Once you
start this program, you will immediately
begin to feel great about yourself with
this all natural, non-invasive cleanse.
The Sadkhin Method is much more than
a way to lose weight, it is a way into a
healthier, slimmer and happier you!
Steven Y. Szklarz, CSP, practices in both
Englewood and Monsey. He says his great
success here in the community comes
from his devotion to each and every cli-
ent. He proudly displays all the “Thank
You” notes he has received for changing
people’s lives. People once shy to go out
in public now walk with self-confidence
and pride. Many “Before and After” pic-
tures fill up tack boards and are proudly
displayed on the walls in his offices.
Mr. Szklarz is not only a licensed prac-
titioner, but once was a client himself.
He was 280 pounds. when he started
the Sadkhin program thirteen years ago
and lost over 100 pounds in less than
six months. Nowadays, he continues to
maintain all the weight he lost and uti-
lizes a healthy lifestyle. He therefore has
a better understanding to his patient’s
predicament. The personal attention he
gives each patient is unsurpassed.
Please call (201) 871-0777 to schedule
a consultation in the Englewood office
or (845) 213-1036 to meet in the Monsey
office. You have nothing to lose but the
weight.
Israeli scientists reveal how persistent
bacteria are able to avoid antibiotics
Breakthrough findings could lead to
more effective treatment for bacterial
infections.
Viva Sarah Press
For the first time, Israeli researchers have
revealed the mechanism by which some
bacteria are able to survive antibacterial
treatment. Their work could pave the way
for improved therapies in the future.
In a groundbreaking study, Hebrew
University of Jerusalem scientists focused
their microscopes on “persistent bacte-
ria” which are not resistant to antibiotics
and continue to exist in a dormant or inac-
tive state while exposed to antibacterial
treatment. These bacteria later “awaken”
when that treatment is over, resum-
ing their detrimental tasks, presenting a
dilemma as to how to deal with them.
Until now, it had been known that there
is a connection between these kinds of
bacteria and the naturally occurring toxin
HipA in the bacteria, but scientists did not
know the cellular target of this toxin and
how its activity triggers dormancy of the
bacteria.
Now, the Hebrew University research-
ers, led by Professor Gadi Glaser of
the Faculty of Medicine and Professor
Nathalie Balaban of the Racah Institute of
Physics, have been able to demonstrate
how this comes about. Their research
showed that when antibiotics attack
these bacteria, the HipA toxin disrupts
the chemical “messaging” process neces-
sary for nutrients to build proteins. This
is interpreted by the bacteria as a “hunger
signal” and sends them into an inactive
state (dormancy) in which they are able
to survive until the antibacterial treatment
is over and they can resume their harmful
activity.
The researchers hope the new informa-
tion will lead to more effective treatment
for bacterial infections.
ISRAEL21C.ORG
Until 120
Harry Krieger celebrates his 101st birth-
day at FountainView at College Road,
a retirement community in Monsey
with friends and family by his side. Mr.
Krieger cracked jokes and blew out all
his candles.
Change Your Life?
50 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-50
Want to know about
Heritage Pointe of Teaneck?
Who better to hear it from than
the people who live here.
Listen to what our residents have to say at
www.heritagepointeofteaneck.com
(Heritage Pointe resident testimonials).
For a tour call Joel Goldin at
201-836-9260
www.heritagepointeofteaneck.com
600 Frank W. Burr Boulevard, Teaneck, New Jersey
‘When I Leave My
Son’s House,
I Tell Him I’m Going
Back to Utopia’
Heritage Pointe
of Teaneck
Can chewing gum cause
migraines in teens?
Israeli study finds that 87 percent
who quit the habit experience
major relief from chronic headaches.
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
Maybe it’s not only teachers who get a
headache from their students’ lip smack-
ing, bubble popping and gum cracking.
Dr. Nathan Watemberg of Meir Medi-
cal Center in Kfar Saba, Israel, has evi-
dence that gum-chewing teenagers, and
younger children as well, may be giving
themselves a pain in the head. His small
study focused on child and adolescent
gum-chewers suffering from migraines
and other chronic headaches.
“Out of our 30 patients, 26 reported
significant improvement, and 19 had
complete headache resolution,” said Dr.
Watemberg. “Twenty of the improved
patients later agreed to go back to chew-
ing gum, and all of them reported an
immediate relapse of symptoms.”
He is hoping that his findings, to be
published in Pediatric Neurology, could
offer a simple way to treat migraine and
tension headaches in gum-chewers with-
out the need for additional testing or
medication.
The estimated prevalence of headache
and migraine over periods between one
month and a lifetime in children and
adolescents is 58.4 percent, according
to a 2010 study done in the United King-
dom. Girls are more prone to migraines,
a severe, painful headache that may be
accompanied by flashes of light, blind
spots, tingling in the arms and legs, nau-
sea, vomiting and increased sensitivity
to light and sound.
Typical triggers are stress, fatigue,
heat, video games, noise, sunlight,
smoking, missed meals, and menstrua-
tion. Until now, there has been little
medical research on the relationship
between gum chewing, and headaches.
One previous study suggested that
gum chewing causes stress to the tem-
poro-mandibular joint, or TMJ, the place
where the jaw meets the skull. Another
study blamed gum-related headaches on
aspartame, the artificial sweetener used
in most sugar-free chewing gums.
Dr. Watemberg favors the TMJ expla-
nation. Gum is only flavorful for a short
period of time, suggesting it does not
contain much aspartame, he reasons.
And if aspartame caused headaches,
there would be a lot more headaches
from diet drinks and artificially sweet-
ened products. On the other hand, peo-
ple chew gum well after the taste is gone,
putting a significant burden on the TMJ,
which is already the most used joint in
the body, he says.
“Every doctor knows that overuse of
the TMJ will cause headaches,” said Dr.
Watemberg, formerly the director of
the pediatric epilepsy unit at Wolfson
Medical Center in Holon. “I believe this
is what’s happening when children and
teenagers chew gum excessively.”
At Meir Medical Center’s Child Neurol-
ogy Unit and Child Development Cen-
ter and community clinics, Dr. Watem-
berg noticed that many patients who
reported headaches also chewed gum
every day — especially the teenage girls.
Dr. Watemberg discovered that in many
cases, when patients stopped chewing
gum at his suggestion, they got substan-
tial relief.
So he asked 30 patients between
six and 19 years old — all of whom had
chronic migraine or tension headaches
and chewed gum daily for at least an
hour — to quit chewing gum for one
month. After the month was over, 19 of
the 30 patients reported that their head-
aches went away entirely and seven
reported a decrease in the frequency
and intensity of headaches. To test the
results, 26 of them agreed to resume
gum chewing for two weeks. All of them
reported a return of their symptoms
within days.
This finding was significant to Dr.
Watemberg, a senior lecturer at Tel Aviv
University’s Sackler School of Medicine
who has published scores of articles in
the medical literature and is a member
of the steering committee of Israel’s
Child Neurology and Child Development
Association.
He urged his peers in pediatric neu-
rology to immediately advise teenage
patients with chronic headaches to sim-
ply stop chewing gum, before steering
them toward expensive diagnostic tests
or medications. ISRAEL21C.ORG
Typical triggers
are stress,
fatigue, heat,
video games,
noise, sunlight,
smoking, missed
meals, and
menstruation
D’var Torah
JS-51*
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 51
Yitro: Moses’ non-Jewish father-in-law
H
ow are we to
understand the
legacy of Jethro,
the father-i n-
law of Moses and the person
after whom our Torah por-
tion is named? (For the sake
of us Baby-Boomers, we will
call him Yitro. The name
Jethro, for anyone who grew
up watching television dur-
ing the 1960s, brings to mind
Jethro Bodine from “The Bev-
erly Hillbillies” and that takes
us in a completely different
direction.) Yitro was a man
of many names (the Torah also calls him
Reuel and Hobab) and many talents. He was
a priest of Midian, according to the Torah,
and a man of great wisdom, advising Moses
on how to handle the many disputes of the
people of Israel. Still, first and foremost, to
us, Yitro was the father-in-law of Moses and
thus Yitro was and is part of our family.
For the ancient rabbis, this special
relationship between Yitro and Moses
prompted a great deal of speculation. As
a member of the mishpocha by marriage
and by merit (in addition to helping ease
Moses’ burden, Yitro blesses God on hear-
ing of the rescue of the Israelites from Pha-
raoh’s troops at the Red Sea), the rabbis of
the Midrash hold that Yitro actually became
a proselyte, that he cast his
fate with the Jewish people.
Rashi, the great 11th century
French expositor of the Torah,
teaches in his commentary on
our portion that Yitro’s very
name bespeaks his conversion
to Judaism. His original name
Yeter, meaning “added to,”
was given an additional letter
“vav” when he converted and
fulfilled the mitzvot.
Yitro became a Jew. This
is an understandable rab-
binic leap of imagination.
For a pagan to have so fully
embraced the God of Israel and the peo-
ple of Israel, he must surely have become
one of us. Still, this “conversion” is not
found anywhere in the plain meaning
of the Torah text. Yitro was and forever
remained a pagan, Moses’ non-Jewish
father-in-law, our wise and loving non-
Jewish family member.
Perhaps calling Yitro a “non-Jew” is
insufficient. For his identity was more
meaningful and consequential to us
than just being our opposite. Yitro never
became a Jew but he came close. Yitro was
truly a kerov Yisrael (one who drew near
and close to the people of Israel).
Now, at the risk of running roughshod
over 3,000 years of Jewish history, let’s
move from the time of Moses to our own
day. We live among non-Jews as Moses
lived among non-Jews. And we marry non-
Jews, as Moses married a non-Jew. And,
yes, we have misgivings about marrying
non-Jews, just as Moses’ family had misgiv-
ings about his marrying a non-Jew (Num-
bers 12:1, Miriam and Aaron speak against
Moses for marrying a Cushite woman; the
motivation is unclear). And, thankfully,
some of us have non-Jewish relatives who
are kind and good and share a closeness
with Judaism and the Jewish people, just
as Moses had Yitro, the first kerov Yisrael.
I believe that we should read our Torah
portion as instructing us to acknowledge
the Yitros among us, members of our
larger mishpocha who through their ded-
ication and love are worthy of the title
kerovay Yisrael (those who have drawn
near to our people). Fathers who support
their Jewish children by shlepping them
to religious school and helping them
with their bar/bat mitzvah preparations.
Grandmothers who purchase Chanukah
menorahs for their Jewish grandchildren
and make sure that they participate fully
in Jewish holiday celebrations. Mothers
who stand by their precious babies’ sides
as the mohel performs the brit milah,
l’shem gayrut, for the sake of conversion.
These modern day Yitros are not, and
may never become, fully Jews (as much
as we may desire, just as the ancient
rabbis desired, for that to happen). Still,
they are worthy of our appreciation and
our praise. They are worthy of a positive
identity and not a just negative identity.
They are kerovay Yisrael.
Intermarriage is great challenge for the
Jewish people. I share the anxiety of those
who argue that intermarriage will deplete
our ranks and open the door even wider
to assimilation. No doubt, there are many
children of intermarriage who are lost to
our people.
Still, I believe that a marriage between
a Jew and a non-Jew may also result in
blessings to the Jewish people. When we
reach out to the non-Jewish members of
our family, when we share with them the
joys and triumphs of the heritage of our
people ( just as Moses brought Yitro news
of the triumph of Israel at the sea), we
may find out that they, in turn, are ready
to draw closer to us. Some may chose
to convert and become Jewish (and we
should welcome that possibility with
great joy). Still others may never convert
but will choose instead to be kerovay Yis-
rael, modern day Yitros, shlepping their
children to religious school, encourag-
ing them in their Jewish studies, learning
and teaching by their children’s side. We
all will benefit from their dedication and
grow stronger from their love.
Rabbi
Benjamin
Shull
Temple Emanuel of
the Pascack Valley,
Conservative,
Franklin Lakes
BRIEFS
Cabinet approves further
agricultural development
in the Golan Heights
The Israeli cabinet has approved a plan by the agri-
cultural ministry to establish 750 new farming estates
on 30,000 dunams (7,400 acres) of land in the Golan
Heights region.
The proposal includes a NIS 375 million ($108 million)
investment in agricultural training, upgrading the water
systems and clearing mines from the region.
“The Golan residents rely heavily on agriculture
as a source of income. The decision came in an effort
to expand the employment opportunities and create
anchors that reinforce the Golan Heights community,”
Israeli Agriculture Minister Yair Shamir said on his Face-
book page.
JNS.ORG
Rockets fired from Gaza
on day of Sharon funeral
Two rockets from Gaza were fired at Israel on Monday
despite Israel’s warning to Hamas not to fire rockets on
the day of former prime minister Ariel Sharon’s funeral.
“It was made clear to [Gaza] that [Monday] would be a
very bad day for anyone there to test Israel’s patience,” said
an anonymous Israeli security source, according to Reuters.
Some Palestinians reacted to Sharon’s death Saturday by
cheering and distributing sweets, while others prayed for
divine punishment for the former Israeli leader. In Ramal-
lah, Wasel Abu Yousef, a senior member of the Palestine
Liberation Organization, said Palestinians would remem-
ber Sharon for “his crimes against the Palestinian people.”
“The death of Sharon after eight years of being in a coma
is something from God and an example to all tyrants,” said
Hamas spokesperson Sami Abu Zuhri.
JNS.ORG
Bill banning Nazi symbols
gains committee approval
Israel’s Ministerial Committee on Legislation on Sunday
approved a bill that seeks to ban the use of Nazi symbols,
attributes, and language in Israel except for historical, edu-
cational, or documentary purposes.
Explicit legislation barring the use of Nazi terminology
currently exists in Germany, Poland, and Hungary. Many
other Western nations, especially in Europe, ban such use
under anti-incitement laws.
The bill, promoted by MK Dr. Shimon Ohayon (Yisrael
Beiteinu), head of the Knesset lobby against anti-Semitism,
seeks to make the use of Nazi symbols a criminal offense
punishable by a 100,000-shekel ($28,700) fine and up to six
months of incarceration. JNS.ORG
New IDF training complex
will be named for Sharon
The Israel Defense Forces’ new training complex in the
Negev will be named after the late former Prime Minister
Ariel Sharon, according to Lt. Gen. Benny Gantz, chief of
staff of the IDF, Israel Hayom reported Sunday.
The Ariel Sharon Training Complex (or the City of
Training Bases, as it is commonly known) is an ambi-
tious IDF undertaking that will see numerous military
training schools relocating to the new complex. Policy-
makers hope the pooling of resources will cut costs, as
well as free up lucrative real estate in central Israel, and
create jobs in southern Israel. JNS.ORG
www.jstandard.com
52 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-52
Crossword BY DAVID BENKOF
Across
1. Pulitzer Prizewinner Seymour
6. Where the Western Wall is, compared
to the Dome of the Rock
11. When Rachel named Joseph, she said
“The Lord ___ to me another son.”
14. “America” singer in “West Side Story”
15. C’est ___ (that is to say)
16. Bernard Baruch’s astrological sign
17. “War and ___” (Herman Wouk novel)
19. 586 ___ (Destruction of the First
Temple year)
20. Ending for chariot
21. Kippah, streimel, etc.
23. YU Rosh Yeshiva Mordechai
26. Sounds from Americans in “Maus”
27. Israel’s unilateral move of August 2005
32. Artist-photographer Lassry
33. Characters in James Burrows’ “Cheers”
34. Grauman of Grauman’s Chinese
Theater
37. St. where Bernard Madoff attended
college for one year
38. Many of the 1972 Munich murderers,
initially
40. Home Front Defense Minister Dichter
41. Home to the JTS
42. ___-Semite (Jew-lover)
43. Diplomat whose first name was origi-
nally Aubrey
44. “Charlie’s Angels” producer
48. Most German-speakers get at least the
___ of Yiddish
50. Essayist Finkielkraut and producer
Goldman
51. Like “An American Tail: Fievel Goes
West”
56. “___ Got a Little Grogger” (Hyman
Resnick Purim song)
57. First plague in Hebrew
58. Eastern European promoters of immi-
gration to Palestine
63. Lennon: ___ : McCartney: Eastman
64. “Jewish Millionaire: ___ for Kids” from
Mazon
65. Gid Hanasheh (sciatic ___ forbidden
by the Torah)
66. Nobel Prizewinning Soviet physicist
Landau
67. Shalach ___ (Purim gifts)
68. Rebecca, Abraham’s ___ niece
Down
1. ___ HaMenuchot (largest cemetary in
Jerusalem)
2. Suffix with Ess
3. Pacific ___ (Middle East rival)
4. Salo Baron’s “___ by Adversity” about
American Jews
5. Gluekel, 17th century memoirist
from ____
6. ___-Ilan University
7. ___ HaChareidis (known popularly as
the Bedatz)
8. A bit of “Death of a Salesman”
9. Boat in Spielberg’s “Jaws”
10. Plant that starred in one of Jenji
Kohan’s shows
11. He developed an oral vaccine against
polio
12. Drink produced by Israel’s Elite
13. Machers
18. ___ Gen. Daniel Gold (Iron Dome
creator)
22. ___ Sacher (Jerusalem park)
23. Gene played him in a 1971 movie
musical
24. Sci-fi author who wrote over
500 books
25. Jeff who plays Murray Goldberg
on “The Goldbergs” on ABC
27. He and Frank were part of the Rat
Pack along with Sammy
28. They may be set for the year
at Rosh Hashanah
29. Cafe ___ (Holocaust survivor’s center
in Los Angeles)
30. “Family Guy” daughter voiced by
Mila Kunis
31. Brooklyn add-on
35. Boesky and Reitman
36. Suky & ___ (Presenters of “Uncle
Moishy and the Mitzvah Men”)
38. Mo. in which Tel Aviv was founded
39. He and Kissinger won the 1973 Nobel
Peace Prize
43. Hebrew pioneer Ben Yehuda
45. In Israel, it’s called a “Caspomat”
46. The ___ Wiesel Foundation
for Humanity
47. Performing Netilat Yadaim
48. Leading sage of a generation
49. Meshuggah
52. “I still had ___ sandwich for lunch!”
(Sen. George Allen’s comment after
he found out his mother is Jewish)
53. Item of clothing for Flavius Josephus
54. “___ Almighty” (modern-day retelling
of Noah’s ark)
55. Palestinian Solidarity Wk.
(anti-Israel ___)
59. Ehud Barak was one from the Yom
Kippur War (abbr.)
60. Ctry. where Israeli President Chaim
Herzog was born
61. Herod the Great’s eggs
62. Sergei Brin’s medium
The solution for last week’s puzzle
is on page 61.
Arts & Culture
JS-53*
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 53
Context and consciousness
Ari Shavit’s “Promised Land”
AVRAHAM BRONSTEIN
“For the irst time in your life, you’re not
thinking only as an engineer, in terms of
problems and solutions. You, too, are now
consciousness. You see context. And the
context ills you with pride, but it also ills
you with dread. You realize what you’ve
done, and it is too big for you.”
Thus Ari Shavit concludes the irst and
last interview ever conducted with Yosef
Tulipman, director general of Israel’s
Dimona nuclear reactor in the critical
period of 1965 to 1973. It is a turning point
in his “My Promised Land: The Tragedy
and Triumph of Israel,” and encapsulates
many of his feelings about Israel itself.
Shavit’s story begins in 1897, but
focuses less on Herzl than on his own
great-grandfather, an upper-middle-
class Londoner, who leads an explor-
atory mission to Palestine. Shavit notes
how these early Zionists were enrap-
tured by the romance of the Biblical his-
tory around them. They were excited as
they considered the salvation that the
land could offer their brethren facing
the twin threats of anti-Semitism and
assimilation. However, he also describes
how they almost uniformly failed to
comprehend the meaning of the Arabs
around them, who lived in the cities
and towns, who worked the farms and
tended the flocks. They did not realize
that building a homeland for Europe’s
victims necessarily would mean displac-
ing an indigenous population. As Shavit
writes, “My great-grandfather does not
see because he is motivated not to see.
He does not see because if he does see,
he will have to turn back. But my great-
grandfather cannot turn back. So that
he can carry on, my great-grandfather
chooses not to see.”
Shavit was born 60 years later, in 1957.
He describes growing up in the newly
formed Israel as living with a series of deni-
als, of the vague awareness of things that
were just behind the surfaces. The Holo-
caust was never spoken of, especially by
survivors. The Palestinians were never dis-
cussed, even by those living in what were
once their houses. “Erased from memory
are the land that was and the Diaspora
that was, the injustice done to them and
the genocide done to us.” For a desperate
nation struggling for its very survival, hav-
ing had so recently experienced and com-
mitted terrible things, denial was neces-
sary to function, to live and move forward.
All this to offer a future to the next genera-
tion, to project the secure, “normal” life at
the heart of the Zionist dream.
Another half century later, though,
and Shavit sees all too clearly. “What this
nation has to offer,” he concludes, “is not
security or well-being or peace of mind.
What it has to offer is the intensity of life
on the edge.” Once a devotee of the peace
movement led irst by Yossi Sarid and then
by Yossi Beilin, he has come to see the
Israeli-Arab conflict as ultimately unsolv-
able. He concludes that the flaw with both
the peace and settler movements was
the (perhaps necessary) belief that Israel
could continue proactively solving its own
problems and ensuring its own viability
by taking unilateral action, whether by
controlling the West Bank or by returning
it. For Shavit, this belief was just another
form of denial, because it ignores the
essential Palestinian narrative, just as his
great-grandfather could not see the villag-
ers so many years before.
What neither Israel’s right nor left
truly understood was that “the situation”
is not a morality play, with misfortune
the result of poor choices. Instead, it is
an epic tragedy, pitting two peoples in a
zero-sum struggle for a single homeland.
Shavit now believes that “what is needed
to make peace between the two peo-
ples of this land is probably more than
humans can summon. They will not
give up their demand for what they see
as justice. We shall not give up our life.”
Faced with the choice of accepting “Zion-
ism with Lydda,” a Palestinian city wiped
off the map in 1948, its population forced
into exile, and no Zionism at all, he comes
down unequivocally on the side of Zion-
ism. By dint of that choice, he also under-
stands how a people for whom Lydda rep-
resents its own national aspirations can
never accept Zionism.
Shavit chooses Zionism because an
independant State of Israel is necessary to
ensure the survival of the Jewish people,
to give Jews agency in determining their
own fate. That being the case, there was
no option other than to settle the land, to
create a state, to displace one people to
save themselves. It is also why Shavit does
not seriously consider a Palestinian right
of return, or Israel becoming a “state of its
citizens” by forgoing its distinctly Jewish
character in the name of democracy and
equality, opting instead for perpetual exis-
tential conflict.
Shavit’s prose beautifully conveys his
own deep understanding and love of
Israel, which is both comprehensive and
personal. His long career as one of Isra-
el’s most influential journalists and politi-
cal writers gives him a remarkable sense
of perspective, one that dovetails with his
own life experience and family history,
and is his entree to a series of remarkable
conversations with key personalities span-
ning the spectrum from Tulipman to the
owner of Tel Aviv’s most celebrated night-
clubs, from peace leader Yossi Sarid to reli-
gious-zionist revolutionary Yehuda Etzion,
to Aryeh Deri, controversial head of Isra-
el’s Sephardic Shas party. These interviews
are the vertebrae that form the book’s
backbone, and tellingly, all take the form
of biography. Thus framed, their stories,
richly developed, seem to carry a heavy
sense of inevitability, of childhoods fore-
shadowing careers at the center of Israel’s
triumphs and tragedy.
Indeed, Shavit is truly chronicling the
loss of illusion, the waking from the dream
of normalcy to realize the enormity of
just what has happened over the last 100
years. Even as he exults in the relentless
intensity needed to maintain Israel’s exis-
tence, an intensity that spills over into the
frenetically creative and vivacious enery
driving Israeli entrepreneurship, technol-
oy, life, and culture, he wonders if succes-
sive generations of Israelis, not hardened
in the crucible of the irst half of the 20th
century, might not be up to the challenge.
Towards the end, he reflects. “Our play was
the most extravagant of modern plays. The
drama was breathtaking. But only when we
know what has become of the protagonists
will we know whether they were right or
wrong, whether they overcame the tragic
decree or were overcome by it.”
Rabbi Avraham Bronstein is program
director of the Great Neck Synagogue. He
tweets at @AvBronstein.
Ari Shavit takes a hard look at Israel’s reality.
Calendar
54 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-54*
Friday
JANUARY 17
Shabbat in Washington
Township: Temple Beth
Or holds Mishpachah
Shabbat for very young
children and their
families, with songs
and Schmuley the Bear,
6 p.m. Regular services at
8. 56 Ridgewood Road.
(201) 664-7422 or www.
templebethornj.org.
Shabbat in Fort Lee:
The JCC of Fort Lee/
Congregation Gesher
Shalom offers a Tu
b’Shvat seder and
supper, 6 p.m., and
Shabbat Together
musical service at 7:30.
1449 Anderson Ave. (201)
947-1735.
Shabbat in Closter:
Temple Beth El offers
services led by Rabbi
David S. Widzer and
Cantor Rica Timman, with
the Shabbat Unplugged
Band, 7:30 p.m. 221
Schraalenburgh Road.
(201) 768-5112 or www.
tbenv.org.
Shabbat in Emerson:
Congregation B’nai
Israel offers its annual
“Freedom Shabbat”
service honoring the lives
and messages of Rev.
Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr. and Rabbi Abraham
Joshua Heschel,
7:30 p.m. Rabbi Debra
Orenstein and Cantor
Lenny Mandel will lead
the service, which will
include Westwood
area clergy, choirs, and
congregants from their
churches. 53 Palisade
Ave. (201) 265-2272 or
www.bisrael.com.
Shabbat in Jersey
City: Temple Beth-El
hosts its 29th annual
service in tribute to
Martin Luther King Jr.,
7:45 p.m. Veteran Jersey
City Journal reporter
Earl Morgan is the guest
speaker. 2419 Kennedy
Boulevard. (201) 333-
4229 or www.betheljc.
org.
Shabbat in Bayonne:
Temple Emanu-El holds
a service in tribute to
Martin Luther King Jr,
7:45 p.m. 735 Kennedy
Boulevard. (201) 436-
4499.
Shabbat in Glen Rock:
The Glen Rock Jewish
Center honors Martin
Luther King Jr. during
services, 8 p.m. 682
Harristown Road. Rabbi
Neil Tow, (201) 652-6624
or rabbi@grjc.org.
Saturday
JANUARY 18
Shabbat in Fort Lee:
Congregation Gesher
Shalom/JCC of Fort Lee
offers tot Shabbat led
by Roberta Seltzer, with
songs, props, stories,
and a giant siddur; its
education director, Cory
Chargo, leads a family
service; 11 a.m. 1449
Anderson Ave. (201) 947-
1735.
Café night in Fair Lawn:
The Men’s Club of Temple
Beth Sholom holds
its annual Café Night,
featuring the music of a
Touch of Gray and Plaza
North, 8 p.m. Snacks
and desserts. BYOB
(kosher only, mixers will
be provided). 40-25 Fair
Lawn Ave. (201) 797-9321
or mensclub@tbsfl.org.
Trivia in Teaneck:
Temple Emeth presents
“The Big Quiz Thing,” a
night of trivia with a live
five-round multimedia
game, hosted by a
professional quizmaster,
DJ, and assistant, 8 p.m.
1666 Windsor Road.
(201) 833-1322 or www.
bigquizthing.com.
Sunday
JANUARY 19
Torah yoga in Franklin
Lakes: Barnert Temple
offers yoga, prayer,
and an opportunity to
renew body and spirit
using themes inspired
by the Jewish calendar
and teachings, 9 a.m.
Bring a yoga mat and
wear comfortable,
nonrestrictive clothing.
747 Route 208 South.
(201) 848-1800 or www.
barnerttemple.org.
Film/discussion in
Leonia: Dr. Lance Strate
of Fordham University
introduces “Hannah
Arendt,” a new film
directed by Margarethe
von Trotta, and then
leads a discussion at
Congregation Adas
Emuno, 10 a.m. Dr. Strate,
the shul’s president, is
a regular guest blogger
for the Hannah Arendt
Center at Bard College.
Refreshments. 254
Broad Ave. (201) 592-
1712 or www.adasemuno.
org.
Summer camp: A
representative from
Camp Harlam in
Kunkletown, Pa., a
Reform Jewish sleep-
away camp, will talk
about summer camp
life at Temple Beth
Or, 10:30 a.m. 56
Ridgewood Road,
Washington Township.
(201) 664-7422, www.
templebethornj.org, or
www.harlam.urjcamps.
org.
COURTESY YMCA
Concert in Wayne:
The YMCA of
Wayne continues its
Backstage Series with
a performance by
Emmy Award-winning
composer Richard Reiter
on saxophone and flute,
accompanied by pianist
Mitch Schechter and
bassist Takashi Otsuka
11:45 a.m. The Metro
YMCAs of the Oranges
is a partner of the YM-
YWHA of North Jersey.
1 Pike Drive. (973) 595-
0100, ext. 257.
Movie in Hackensack:
Temple Beth El screens
Aviva Kempner’s award
winning documentary,
“Yoo-Hoo, Mrs.
Goldberg,” 2 p.m.
Popcorn. 280 Summit
Ave. (201) 342-2045.
Football/Chinese food
in Emerson: The Men’s
Club of Congregation
B’nai Israel shows
the NFL Conference
Championship game
and serves Chinese
food, 2:30 p.m. Board
games available for
nonfans. 53 Palisade Ave.
Reservations, (201) 265-
2272 or www.bisrael.com.
Film in Bayonne:
Temple Emanu-El
screens “Brighton Beach
Memoirs,” film adaptation
of Neil Simon’s hit
play, as part of its 2014
Broadway Film Festival,
4 p.m. 735 Kennedy
Boulevard. (201) 436-
4499.
Monday
JANUARY 20
School open house in
Oakland: The Gerrard
Berman Day School,
Solomon Schechter of
North Jersey offers open
houses for its Academies
at GBDS, featuring
biology, leadership, and
ecology for all ages,
9-11 a.m. and 5-7 p.m.
Parents and children
welcome. Limited
openings for September
in nursery through eighth
grade. 45 Spruce St.
(201) 337-1111, gbds@ssnj.
org, or www.ssnj.org.
Cooking for special
needs children: The
Friendship Circle of
Passaic County offers
its cooking circle in two
places at 11:30 a.m. —
the Chabad Center of
Wayne, 194 Ratzer Road;
and at Temple Beth
Shalom, 733 Passaic
Ave., Clifton. Volunteers
will be on hand to assist
the children. (973)
694-6274 or www.
FCPassaicCounty.com.
Tuesday
JANUARY 21
BEN NELSON
Roaring Twenties:
Benjamin Nelson,
Fairleigh Dickinson
University professor
emeritus of English
begins a four-part series,
“The Crucible of Justice
— Three Notorious
Trials of the Roaring
Twenties” — Sacco-
Vanzetti, Leopold-Loeb,
and Scopes — at the New
Synagogue of Fort Lee,
1 p.m. Refreshments. 1585
Center Ave. (201) 947-
1555.
Singer David Grover will perform at the
Bergen County YJCC in Washington
Township on Monday, January 20, at 1 p.m.
Mr. Grover, a children’s performer, has been
compared to Mr. Rogers, Paul Simon, James Taylor,
and Raffi, and has earned many awards and a Grammy
nomination. The performance has been made possible
by the YJCC’s Josh Herman Endowment for Early
Childhood Enrichment. $5 per family. 605 Pascack
Road. (201) 666-6610 or www.yjcc.org. COURTESY YJCC
JAN.
20
Calendar
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 55
JS-55*
Jewish mind and
wellness: Temple
Beth Or in Washington
Township begins an
eight-week learning
course, “Mindfulness in
a Jewish Context,” led
by Rabbi Rex Perlmeter
and Beth Sandweiss
of the Jewish Wellness
Center of Montclair,
7 p.m. 56 Ridgewood
Road. Lynne, (201)
664-7422 or Lgraizel@
templebethornj.org.
Wednesday
JANUARY 22
Networking in Fair
Lawn: The Jewish
Business Network meets
for breakfast at the
Ives Architectural Firm
offices, 8:30 a.m. 14-25
Plaza Road, Suite S-3-5.
www.jbusinessnetwork.
net.
Networking in Wayne:
The Passaic County
Jewish Business &
Professional Network
hosted by the Chabad
Center of Passaic County
meets there, 7 p.m. 194
Ratzer Road. Gift raffle.
Rabbi Gurkov, (973)
694-6274 or www.
Jewishwayne.com.
What to wear:
Sisterhood of the Fair
Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation B’nai Israel
supports the Professional
Women’s Network with
a program on “What to
Wear,” led by Pamela
Etzin from An Eye for
Detail, at the shul, 8 p.m.
PWN welcomes women
who want to meet others
in a variety of fields and
stages of their lives and
careers for conversation
and skills development.
10-10 Norma Ave. (201)
796-5040.
Thursday
JANUARY 23
Healthy living: Liz
Hecker, a registered
dietitian from Englewood
Hospital and Medical
Center, and Cynthia
Mulder, who is in charge
of the hospital’s Center
for Integrative Care,
present “Live Well, Laugh
Often,” at Temple Beth El
in Closter, 7:30 p.m. 221
Schraalenburgh Road.
(201) 768-5112 or www.
tbenv.org.
Judaism series: The
United Synagogue of
Hoboken’s Rabbi Robert
Scheinberg begins
a seven-week series,
“Explore Judaism,” for
Jews and non-Jews
who seek a deeper
understanding of Jewish
tradition, values, and
spirituality, 7:30 p.m.
115 Park Ave. (201)
659-4000 or www.
hobokensynagogue.org.
Friday
JANUARY 24
Shabbat in Teaneck: The
Jewish Center of Teaneck
offers Carlebach-style
davening, 4:45 p.m. 70
Sterling Place. (201) 833-
0515 or www.jcot.org.
Shabbat in Wyckoff:
Temple Beth Rishon
offers Shabbat La Vida
Loca, Sephardic heritage,
and the Latin American
Jewish community.
Following a Sephardic
Shabbat dinner at
6:30 p.m., there will be
Latin American musical
services at 8 led by
Cantors Mark Biddleman,
Ilan Mamber, and Jenna
Daniels, accompanied
by a salsa band. Dessert
follows. 585 Russell Ave.
(201) 891-4466 or www.
bethrishon.org.
Shabbat celebration:
Sha’ar Communities
hosts Friday Night Live!
—services and dinner
— commemorating
Debbie Friedman’s
yahrzeit, 6:30 p.m.
Location information,
JoAnne, (201) 213-
9569 or joanne@
shaarcommunities.org.
Shabbat in Closter:
Temple Beth El offers
services with music by a
guest from the New York
Philharmonic, 7:30 p.m.
221 Schraalenburgh
Road. (201) 768-5112.
Shabbat in Jersey City:
Temple Beth-El offers
a “Jewish Arts” service,
8 p.m. Choreographer
Ariel Grossman of Ariel
Rivka Dance and her
husband, composer
David Horman, will
discuss their new work,
“The Book of Esther:
A Modern Dance and
Music Collaboration.”
2419 Kennedy Boulevard.
(201) 333-4229.
Saturday
JANUARY 25
Shabbat in Teaneck: The
Jewish Center of Teaneck
offers services at 9 a.m.;
then Rabbi Lawrence
Zierler discusses “What’s
New about the Jews
from the Pews?” as
part of the Three Cs —
“Cholent, Cugel, and
Conversation.” Kinder
Shul for 3- to 8-year-olds,
while parents attend
services, 10:30-11:45. 70
Sterling Place. (201) 833-
0515 or www.jcot.org.
Shabbat in Jersey
City: Congregation
B’nai Jacob offers Torah
lessons and blessings
for new month of Adar
during services led by
Cantor Marsha Dubrow,
9:15 a.m. Tu b’Shvat seder
during kiddush lunch.
176 West Side Ave. (201)
435-5725 or bnaijacobjc.
org.
Comedy/auction: The
Glen Rock Jewish Center
offers entertainment by
comedians Chris Coccia,
Sandy Marks, and Barry
Weintraub, and a silent
auction, 8 p.m. 682
Harristown Road. (201)
652-6624.
Sunday
JANUARY 26
Mitzvah mall in Franklin
Lakes: At Barnert
Temple’s annual Mitzvah
Mall, a 9 a.m. pancake
breakfast is followed
by interaction with
representatives of 10
charities dedicated to
helping hurricane victims.
747 Route 208 South.
(201) 848-1800 or www.
barnerttemple.org.
Combating human
trafficking: The
Jewish Federations of
Northern New Jersey
and MetroWest pitch in
for a project to combat
human trafficking.
Hundreds of volunteers
from New Jersey will
gather at the JFNNJ’s
Paramus headquarters
for training at 10 a.m.;
then they will divide up
to go to area hotels and
distribute soaps marked
with information on
human trafficking and
hotline phone numbers
to call. The project is in
time for an expected
rise in this activity in
conjunction with the
Super Bowl. Project also
sponsored by SOAP
(Save Our Adolescents
from Prostitution) and
the NJ Coalition Against
Human Trafficking. 50
Eisenhower Drive. (201)
820-3900 or www.jfnnj.
org.
Summer camp fair
in East Hanover:
Sensational Summers
holds the New Jersey
Summer Camp Fair at the
East Hanover Ramada
Inn & Conference Center,
featuring representatives
from many camps; noon-
3. The first 100 families
to mention the Jewish
Standard and bring this
listing get a free gift. 130
Route 10 West. www.
njcampfairs.com.
Ice skating and
program: Chabad of
Passaic County offers
Kids in Action, for 6- to
12-year-olds, focusing
on the five senses, at
the Chabad Center, 194
Ratzer Road in Wayne,
1 p.m. Afterward, they
have lunch and go to the
Ice Vault for skating. Pick
up at the skating rink,
10 Nevins Road, Wayne.
(973) 694-6274 or
Chanig@optonline.net.
Film in Woodcliff Lake:
Temple Emanuel of the
Pascack Valley screens
“The Heritage,” winner of
three Israeli film awards,
7 p.m. 87 Overlook Drive.
(201) 391-0801.
Film in Franklin Lakes:
As part of its Israel
Film Series, Barnert
Temple presents “The
Syrian Bride,” 7 p.m.
747 Route 208 South.
(201) 848-1800 or www.
barnerttemple.org.
ZOA president in
Teaneck: Morton Klein,
Zionist Organization
of America’s national
president, discusses “Iran
Nuclear Deal: Progress or
Peril?” at Congregation
B’nai Yeshurun, 7:30 p.m.
641 West Englewood
Ave. Laura Fein, (201)
424-1825 or lfein@zoa.
org.
In New York
Monday
JANUARY 20
Joshua Nelson
Martin Luther King Jr.:
The JCC in Manhattan
presents “The Living
Legacy of Dr. King:
Leading a Socially
Responsible Life,” a day
of study and action on
Martin Luther King Jr.,
2:30 p.m. Interactive
workshops and family
activities follow. At
6, there will be an
artists’ celebration with
performance artist Judith
Sloan, keynote speakers
Susannah Heschel and Eli
Black, and a performance
by Joshua Nelson, the
Prince of Kosher Gospel.
334 Amsterdam Ave.
at 76th Street. (646)
505-5708 or www.
jccmanhattan.org.
Singles
Sunday
JANUARY 19
Line dancing/brunch:
North Jersey Jewish
Singles (40s-60s) at the
Clifton Jewish Center
offers line dancing with
instructor Terri Defelice,
11 a.m. $5. Karen, (973)
772-3131 or join North
Jersey Jewish Singles at
www.meetup.com.
Calendar
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 55
Calendar
56 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-56*
Dr. Edward Julie, seated at the head of the table, was the guest speaker at a
recent SOS event. COURTESY CHABAD
Program for seniors in Wayne
Last month’s Smile on Seniors meeting at
the Chabad Center of Passaic County fea-
tured a discussion on a cardio-healthy life-
style with Dr. Edward Julie of St. Joseph’s
Regional Hospital of Wayne. The next pro-
gram is Monday, January 27, at 11:30 a.m.
For information, call (973) 694-6274 or
email Chanig@optonline.net.
Hadassah goes
to the ballet
TriBoro Hadassah plans a trip to
a matinee of “Don Quixote” by
the American Ballet Theatre on
Wednesday, May 14. The perfor-
mance will be at the Metropolitan
Opera House at Lincoln Center. A
bus will leave from Temple Emeth
in Teaneck. Reserve tickets by Jan-
uary 24. For information, call (201)
384-3766.
Chabad joining
NYC Shabbaton
The Chabad Center of Passaic
County is participating in the Cteen
Shabbaton in Manhattan from Feb-
ruary 28 to March 2. Teens will
gather for a fun-filled weekend
with volunteer opportunities, a
tour of Manhattan, an Alex Clare
concert, and unity Shabbat meals.
The shabbaton is for ninth- to
12th-graders, or students from
14- to 18-years-old. Transporta-
tion will be provided both ways. If
you sign up by January 31 you pay
$75, instead of $200. For each Jew-
ish friend a teenager signs up and
brings, he or she will get an addi-
tional $25 off. Call Chani at (973)
694-6274 or go to JewishWayne.
com/cteenshabbaton.
Athletes invited
to aid cancer fight
Team Sharsheret is seeking participants
for the NYC Half-Marathon on Sunday,
March 16, and the NYC Triathlon on Sun-
day, August 3. Proceeds help support Jew-
ish women and families facing breast can-
cer and ovarian cancer.
Sharsheret will fly participants to New
York if they live outside the New York met-
ropolitan area but within the continental
United States. Team Sharsheret members
receive race gear, coaching, group runs
(if they are in the New York metropolitan
area), virtual training, and a personalized
fundraising page.
For information, email athletes@
sharsheret.org.
Photographs
at Kaplen JCC
Artist and photographer Randi Lauren Klein,
a.k.a. doodlehedz, will exhibit her photo-
graphs in “Details by Randi” at the Waltuch
Gallery of the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in
Tenafly through the end of the month.
A New York native, Ms. Klein, who now lives
in Harlem, was inspired by her grandparents,
who are both Holocaust survivors and artists.
Her photos are at @doodlehedz on Instagram.
For information, call Jessica Wolf Spiegel at
(201) 408-1426 or go to www.jccotp.org.
COURTESY JCCOTP
David Sanborn Trio
to play bergenPAC
The Bergen Performaning Arts Center in Englewood pres-
ents the David Sanborn Trio on Sunday, January 26, at 7
p.m. The group blends blend instrumental pop, R&B, and
traditional jazz. Sanborn has released 24 albums, won six
Grammy Awards, and amassed eight gold and one plati-
num album. For tickets, call the box office at (201) 227-
1030 or go to www.ticketmaster.com or www.bergenpac.
org.
116 MainStreet, Fort Lee
201.947.2500
www.inapoli.com
S
am
m
y’s
North Jersey’s Premier Italian
Steak, Seafood & Pasta Eatery
JoinUseverytuesday
andthursdayforthe
lobsterspecial, anystyle
Anddon’tforgetevery
MondayandWednesday
areDelmonicoSteakNights
ComebyMon. throughSat.,
4:00-6:00pmforourawesome
earlybird, completemeal
withdrink
You asked for it for the last 20 years and
nowit’s here! Chef Sam’s Basil Vinaigrette
House Dressing is nowbottled to go.
Bring this Ad in
to receive a
Free Bottle
min. $40 purchase
Expires 6/30/13
only
$19.95
only
$19.95
also
$19.95
3493212-01
napoli
5/17/13
subite
canali/singer
carrol/BB
This ad is copyrighted by North
Jersey Media Group and may not
be reproduced in any form, or
replicated in a similar version,
without approval from North
Jersey Media Group.
3
4
9
3
2
1
2
-
0
1
©
N
J
M
G
116 MainStreet, Fort Lee
201.947.2500
www.inapoli.com
S
am
m
y’s
North Jersey’s Premier Italian
Steak, Seafood & Pasta Eatery
JoinUseverytuesday
andthursdayforthe
lobsterspecial, anystyle
Anddon’tforgetevery
MondayandWednesday
areDelmonicoSteakNights
ComebyMon. throughSat.,
4:00-6:00pmforourawesome
earlybird, completemeal
withdrink
You asked for it for the last 20 years and
nowit’s here! Chef Sam’s Basil Vinaigrette
House Dressing is nowbottled to go.
Bring this Ad in
to receive a
Free Bottle
min. $40 purchase
Expires 6/30/13
only
$19.95
only
$19.95
also
$19.95
3493212-01
napoli
5/17/13
subite
canali/singer
carrol/BB
This ad is copyrighted by North
Jersey Media Group and may not
be reproduced in any form, or
replicated in a similar version,
without approval from North
Jersey Media Group.
3
4
9
3
2
1
2
-
0
1
©
N
J
M
G
Tuesday and Thursday
Our famous seafood special
Call for details
ONLY
$19.95
ONLY
$19.95
ONLY
$19.95
Monday and Wednesday
are Delmonico Steak Nights
Come by Mon. through Sat.,
4:00-6:00pm for our awesome
early bird, complete meal
with drink
Bring this Ad
in to receive a
Free Bottle
min. $40
purchase
Expires 2/7/14
Meet for lunch: Circle of
Single Jewish Friends,
49+, meets for lunch at a
restaurant in Metuchen,
noon. Roberta, (908)
668-8450.
Sunday
JANUARY 26
Brunch/discussion:
North Jersey Jewish
Singles (40s-60s) at the
Clifton Jewish Center
offers a “bagels and
conversation” brunch
with “musical tables,”
11:30 a.m. $15. Film at shul
at 2 p.m. Karen, (973)
772-3131 or join North
Jersey Jewish Singles
45-60s, at www.meetup.
com.
Keep us informed
We welcome announcements of events. An-
nouncements are free. Accompanying photos
must be high resolution jpg files, and allow at
least two weeks of lead time. Not every release
will be published. Please include a daytime
telephone and send to:
NJ Jewish Media Group
1086 Teaneck Rd., Teaneck, NJ 07666
pr@jewishmediagroup.com
(201) 837-8818
Gallery
JS-57*
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 57
n 1 From left, Judah Cohen of Engle-
wood, Isaac Mirwis of Teaneck, and Hami
Alexander, gap-year students at Yeshivat
Torat Shraga, are pictured at a January 2
bar mitzvah celebration at the Sanhedria
Children’s Home in Jerusalem. Sanhedria is
a rehabilitative residence for religious boys
taken from their homes by social services
because of severe neglect or abuse. Stu-
dents in gap-year programs often volunteer
there once a week. COURTESY SANHEDRIA
n 2 The Jewish Community Center of Para-
mus/Congregation Beth Tikvah offers a Parent
Involvement Program for parents with children
who will become bnai mitzvah this year. A
recent Sunday morning PIP class had parents
on the bimah learning about the sequence
of events in a Shabbat service. Congregants
Eileen Schneider, front, and Robert Chananie
to her right, run the classes. The next session
will be in a classroom on a February Shab-
bat morning. Call the JCCP/CBT at (201)
262-7691 for information. COURTESY JCCP/CBT
n 3 The gimel class at Temple Emanuel
of the Pascack Valley participated in a
challah baking workshop led by congre-
gant Susan Liebeskind. COURTESY TEPV
n 4 Rachal Sammit of Woodcliff Lake and Eva
Fischbein of Hillsdale rode the bumper cars at
the Funplex in East Hanover during a Valley
Chabad winter Camp Gan Israel program. The
camp, with karate, crafts, cooking, trips, and
classes, had 25 participants. COURTESY CHABAD
n 5 Evan and Daniel Haber from West Or-
ange are pictured at Areyvut’s New Year’s
Day Carnival Extravaganza. Areyvut, a non-
profit based in Bergenfield, held the January
1 event at the Garden State Exhibit Center
in Somerset. Nearly 1,500 people attended
the carnival, which featured mechanical and
inflatable rides, carnival booths and games,
kosher food, and live shows including a BMX
stunt show, the Gizmo Guys comedy jugglers,
and the Chicago Boyz from “America’s Got
Talent.” The Gift of Life Bone Marrow Founda-
tion also registered 26 potential donors at the
carnival. Event proceeds support Areyvut,
whose mission is to infuse the lives of Jewish
youth and teens with the core Jewish values
of chesed (kindness), tzedakah (charity), and
tikkun olam (social action). COURTESY AREYVUT
n 6 Megan Simon, Charlotte Barbach, and
Nathan Shimelfarb enjoyed making gak
(a form of slime) in their pre-K class at the
Academies at GBDS Solomon Schechter of
North Jersey in Oakland. COURTESY GBDS
n 7 Ben Porat Yosef eighth graders experi-
mented with hands-on learning in conjunction
with their study of the human body and the
circulatory system. Elianna Benhamu, left,
and Odelia Fried collaborated on dissect-
ing a sheep’s heart. COURTESY MICHAEL LAVES
1 2
3 4 5
66 7
58 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-58
58 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-58
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
Start Your New Married Life Right...
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• Free! 70 free group exercise classes per week
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• Full range of personal training options for
all ages & levels of fitness
• New! Spa Center offering revitalizing services
• Plus Free babysitting services & children’s indoor
tumble room
• Indoor running track & two air-conditioned gyms
We’re There When You Need Us!
• Day Care, Nursery School & Kindergarten
with remodeled classrooms, child friendly
kitchen, indoor playrooms & tumble room
• Parenting Center offering classes for newborn
to 2+ years
• Full range of afterschool enrichment, youth
& teen programs including new teen lounge
• Neil Klatskin Day Camp ACA accredited
• Adult programs Learning, Lifestyle & Leisure
• JCC Thurnauer School of Music NJSCA designated
• JCC School of Performing Arts
201.408.1448
join@jccotp.org
www.jccotp.org
Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
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catering for every occasion and event
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Owner On the Forks Catering
info@ontheforks.com
646-389-1099
Quilted Giraffe · Sign of the Dove
Bolivar · Tapas Lounge · Eros
Casa La Femme · Camino Sur
Kenney’s Commune and Commissary
Executive Chef
LARRY KOLAR
has worked at them all...
Now he’s available
for your next affair.
“The cooking here is very assured with a fine
sense of balance and admirable restraint….”
— William Grimes, New York Times
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
Start Your New Married Life Right...
Make Wellness a Priority!
Join Today,We’ll Design the Best Program Just for You.
• Year-round indoor, outdoor pools, CPR-trained
swim instructors & lessons for all ages
• Free! Wellness assessment & orientation
• Free! 70 free group exercise classes per week
including spin & mat pilates
• Full range of personal training options for
all ages & levels of fitness
• New! Spa Center offering revitalizing services
• Plus Free babysitting services & children’s indoor
tumble room
• Indoor running track & two air-conditioned gyms
We’re There When You Need Us!
• Day Care, Nursery School & Kindergarten
with remodeled classrooms, child friendly
kitchen, indoor playrooms & tumble room
• Parenting Center offering classes for newborn
to 2+ years
• Full range of afterschool enrichment, youth
& teen programs including new teen lounge
• Neil Klatskin Day Camp ACA accredited
• Adult programs Learning, Lifestyle & Leisure
• JCC Thurnauer School of Music NJSCA designated
• JCC School of Performing Arts
201.408.1448
join@jccotp.org
www.jccotp.org
Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
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Best Of The Best 2011
Brunch - The Backyard at Sole East
Continental Cuisine - The Backyard at Sole East
ON THE FORKS CATERING
owned and operated by
Larry Kolar Executive Chef / The Backyard at Sole East.
catering for every occasion and event
small•large•intimate•corporate•wedding•birthday
simple barbeque…

Larry Kolar
Executive Chef Sole East
Owner On the Forks Catering
info@ontheforks.com
646-389-1099
Quilted Giraffe · Sign of the Dove
Bolivar · Tapas Lounge · Eros
Casa La Femme · Camino Sur
Kenney’s Commune and Commissary
Executive Chef
LARRY KOLAR
has worked at them all...
Now he’s available
for your next affair.
“The cooking here is very assured with a fine
sense of balance and admirable restraint….”
— William Grimes, New York Times
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
Start Your New Married Life Right...
Make Wellness a Priority!
Join Today,We’ll Design the Best Program Just for You.
• Year-round indoor, outdoor pools, CPR-trained
swim instructors & lessons for all ages
• Free! Wellness assessment & orientation
• Free! 70 free group exercise classes per week
including spin & mat pilates
• Full range of personal training options for
all ages & levels of fitness
• New! Spa Center offering revitalizing services
• Plus Free babysitting services & children’s indoor
tumble room
• Indoor running track & two air-conditioned gyms
We’re There When You Need Us!
• Day Care, Nursery School & Kindergarten
with remodeled classrooms, child friendly
kitchen, indoor playrooms & tumble room
• Parenting Center offering classes for newborn
to 2+ years
• Full range of afterschool enrichment, youth
& teen programs including new teen lounge
• Neil Klatskin Day Camp ACA accredited
• Adult programs Learning, Lifestyle & Leisure
• JCC Thurnauer School of Music NJSCA designated
• JCC School of Performing Arts
201.408.1448
join@jccotp.org
www.jccotp.org
Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
i
n
f
o
@
o
n
t
h
e
f
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(J215&(2&-<1&M35B/&H8-15I2O &
I2;3U32-<1;35B/+@3L &
Best Of The Best 2011
Brunch - The Backyard at Sole East
Continental Cuisine - The Backyard at Sole East
ON THE FORKS CATERING
owned and operated by
Larry Kolar Executive Chef / The Backyard at Sole East.
catering for every occasion and event
small•large•intimate•corporate•wedding•birthday
simple barbeque…

Larry Kolar
Executive Chef Sole East
Owner On the Forks Catering
info@ontheforks.com
646-389-1099
Quilted Giraffe · Sign of the Dove
Bolivar · Tapas Lounge · Eros
Casa La Femme · Camino Sur
Kenney’s Commune and Commissary
Executive Chef
LARRY KOLAR
has worked at them all...
Now he’s available
for your next affair.
“The cooking here is very assured with a fine
sense of balance and admirable restraint….”
— William Grimes, New York Times
A party to remember.
INFO@ONTHEFORKS.COM
Obituaries
JS-59
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 59
Planning in advance is a part of our lives.
We spend a lifetime planning for milestones such as
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• Graveside Services
Gary Schoem – Manager - NJ Lic. 3811
Beatrice Barbieri
Beatrice Verp Barbieri, 96, of Wayne, formerly of
Totowa, died on January 13.
She worked at her family’s business, Verp’s Bakery,
for over 50 years.
Predeceased by her husband, Pacifico, and a sister,
Sylvia Verp Davis, she is survived by a brother, Frank
Verp, and nieces and nephews and their families.
Shiva will be observed at the home of Harriet Davis in
Hackensack. Arrangements were by Robert Schoem’s
Menorah Chapel, Paramus.
Harriet Collins
Harriet Collins of Englewood, 78, died on January 8
at home.
She is survived by her husband of 62 years, Her-
bert, children, Lance, Rhonda Sarner (Dr. David),
and Ellen Richmond (Mark); a brother, Arnold Green-
field; five grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.
Arrangements were by Robert Schoem’s Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.
Tillie Falkenstein
Tillie Falkenstein, neé Blumenthal, 92, of Washington
Heights, New York City, died on January 9.
Born in Mühlhausen, Germany, she was prede-
ceased by her husband, Felix, and is survived by her
children, Barbara Green (Steven) of Woodcliff Lake,
and Stanley of Marina del Rey, Calif.; a sister, Elsie
Zeilberger (the late Fred) of Fort Lee; four grandchil-
dren, and four great-grandchildren.
Contributions can be sent to the Center for Adults
Living Well, YM-YMHA of Washington Heights, New
York. Arrangements were by Gutterman and Musi-
cant Jewish Funeral Directors, Hackensack.
Lenore Krigsman
Lenore Krigsman, neé Leibowitz, of Hackensack, for-
merly of Bergenfield and Brooklyn, died on January 3.
Before retiring, she worked in accounts receivable
for the Borough of Tenafly.
She is survived by her husband, Harry, children,
Craig of Boston, and Tammy Chesney (William) of
Ramsey; a brother, Stan Leibowitz (Roberta) of Coral
Springs, Fla.; two grandchildren, and a niece.
Donations can be sent to Memorial Sloan-Kettering
Cancer Center, Gastric Cancer Research, New York,
or Temple Emeth, Teaneck. Arrangements were by
Gutterman and Musicant Jewish Funeral Directors,
Hackensack.
Shirley Porte
Shirley Newman Porte of Jersey City, 95, died on
January 8.
Born in Cleveland, she and her husband owned
Creative Printing and Advertising in Jersey City. She
was a longtime member of Temple Beth-El in Jersey
City, a former Jersey Journal Woman of Achievement,
and was a supporter of many charities during her
life. She was a past president of the Jersey City Par-
ents’ Council, Women’s American ORT, and Jewish
Family & Counseling Services.
Predeceased by her husband Elliott in 2011, she is
survived by daughters Leslie Porte (Stan Hutkin) of
West Orange and Bonita Porte Heyman ( Jay) of New
York City; a sister, Phyllis Newman Green of Manhat-
tan, and two grandchildren, Rachel and Sage Heyman.
Arrangements were by Eden Memorial Chapels,
Inc., Fort Lee.
Adele Posnansky
Adele Doris Posnansky, neé Mendelsohn, 77, of
Tamarac, Fla., formerly of Paramus, died on January
11 after a five-year battle with ALS.
She attended Indiana University, and graduated
from Seton Hall University. She was an elementary
school teacher and later worked in jewelry sales.
Predeceased by her husband, William, she is
survived by her children, Laurie H. Martin of West
Milford, Jay Martin (Kathy) of Lawrenceville, Ga., and
Sharee Martin of Buford, Ga.; a sister, Marlene Silver-
man of Lansdowne, Va.; three grandchildren, and
two nieces.
Donations can be made to the Bloomingdale Ani-
mal Shelter or Friends of Wayne Animals. Arrange-
ments were by Robert Schoem’s Menorah Chapel,
Paramus.
Ernie Pressburger
Ernie Pressburger, 79, of Wayne died on January 14
after a battle with multiple myeloma.
He worked until recently as an electrical engineer
and college professor. He was an active member of
the Wayne Adult Community Center and Temple
Beth Tikvah.
Predeceased by his first wife, Minnie, he is sur-
vived by his wife, Joan, daughters, Sherri Federico
(Lou) and Patti Edelstein (Adam); stepdaughters,
Susan Fox (Carter), and Lisa Brandwein (Michael);
and eight grandchildren.
Donations can be sent to the Multiple Myeloma
Research Foundation. Arrangements were by Robert
Schoem’s Menorah Chapel, Paramus.
Leo Raven
Leo Raven, 96, of Cedar Crest Village in Pompton
Plains, formerly of Pompton Lakes, died on January 9.
Born in Leipzig, Germany, he was a Holocaust sur-
vivor and a member of Congregation Beth Sholom in
Pompton Lakes.
Predeceased by his wife, Rita, he is survived by a
sister, Margot Reich, nieces, nephews, grandnieces,
and grandnephews.
Donations can be made to the Jewish National
Fund. Arrangements were by Louis Suburban Cha-
pel, Fair Lawn.
Marion Saltzman
Marion Saltzman, 93, of Tenafly died on January 9.
Arrangements were by Louis Suburban Chapel,
Fair Lawn.
Libby Wahl
Libby Rose Wahl, neé Stiskin, 92, of Fair Lawn, died on
January 14 at the Valley Hospital.
Born in Jersey City, she and her husband were among
the founders of Congregation Shomrei Torah — The
Orthodox Congregation of Fair Lawn.
She is survived by her husband, Harold, children, Dr.
Steven of Roseland and Barbara Halenar of Ridgewood;
a sister, Naomi Piekarski; three grandchildren, and one
great-grandchild.
Arrangements were by Eden Memorial Chapels, Inc.,
Fort Lee.
Obituaries are prepared with information provided by
funeral homes. Correcting errors is the responsibility
of the funeral home.
www.jstandard.com
Classified
60 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-60
Get results!
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Classified
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 61
JS-61
Solution to last week’s puzzle. This week’s puzzle is
on page 52.
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Call Bert at
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FURNITURE FOR SALE
PARSON TABLE
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mazon.org
Every day, hungry people have to make
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no matter which option they choose, they will
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It shouldn’t be this way.
MAZON is working to end hunger for
Rhonda and the millions of Americans and
Israelis who struggle with food insecurity.
Please donate to MAZON today.
“We can’t put off paying my mom’s
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©2012 MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger/Barbara Grover
Real Estate & Business
62 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-62
62 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-62
Real Estate Associates
Ann Murad, ABR, GRI
Sales Associate
NJAR Circle of Excellence Gold Level, 2001, 2003-2006
Silver Level, 1997-2000, 2002,2009,2011,2012
Direct: (201) 664 6181, Cell: (201) 981 7994
E-mai l : anni eget si t sol d@msn. com
123 Broadway, Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07677
(201) 573 8811 ext. 316
Each Office Independenty Owned and Operated
“ANNIE GETS IT SOLD”
EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY
HOUSING EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
Orna Jackson, Sales Associate 201-376-1389
TENAFLY
894-1234
TM
CLOSTER SECLUDED $589,900
Fabulous 4 bedroom, 2 bath contemporary bi-level nestled amid mature trees and
flowering shrubs in very private setting, living room with vaulted ceiling, updated
eat-in kitchen, master with walk-in closet, hardwood floors,
skylights, oversized deck, blue ribbon schools.
ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS
568-1818
TENAFLY
894-1234
CRESSKILL
871-0800
ALPINE/CLOSTER
768-6868
RIVER VALE
666-0777
Jeff@MironProperties.com · www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com · www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!
ENGLEWOOD
240 VAN NOSTRAND AVE $699,000
ENGLEWOOD
Quaint Colonial. Expansion possibilities. $758 K
ENGLEWOOD
401 DOUGLAS ST $1,345,000
ENGLEWOOD
State-of-the-art estate. $2,400,000
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TENAFLY
Picture perfect 3 BR/2 BTH home.
TENAFLY
Spacious 4/5 BR Col. Great curb appeal.
TENAFLY
Sprawling Ranch on .97 acre w/babbling brook.
TENAFLY
One-of-a-kind manor. $3,748,000
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L
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!
LEONIA
5 BR/4 BTH Col. $3,900/MO
PARAMUS
Lovely Ranch. Wonderful property.
TEANECK
Expanded & upgraded 5 BR/3.5 BTH Col.
TEANECK
Picturesque setting. Private oasis.
G
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CHELSEA
Spacious flex 1 BR. Chelsea gem.
GREENWICH VILLAGE
Quintessential pre-war full-service co-op.
GREENPOINT
3,200 sq. ft. Greek revival details.
UPPER EAST SIDE
Continental Towers. 2 BR/2 BTH City views.
U
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WILLIAMSBURG
Stylish building. Heart of B’klyn.
UNION SQUARE
1 BR/1.5 BTH duplex w/loft. $699,000
SUNNYSIDE
Large L-shaped studio. Great location.
CHELSEA
Grand 3 BR/2.5 BTH. $3,750,000
S
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Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
Remarkable Service. Exceptional Results.
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 • M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 • M: 917.576.0776
For Our Full Inventory & Directions
Visit our Website
www.RussoRealEstate.com
(201) 837-8800
READERS’
CHOICE
2013
FIRST PLACE
REAL ESTATE AGENCY
All Close to NY Bus/Houses of Worship/Highways
259 Elm Ave. $335,000
Well Maintained 3 BR (incl Mstr on 1st flr), 2 Bth Cape on
50’ X 150' Prop. Updated Kit & Baths. H/W Flrs. Fin Bsmt.
C/A/C. Gar.
1402 Milford Ter. $413,500
Prime W Englewd Colonial. 3 Brms, 2 Updated Baths. LR/
fplc, FDR, Den, Skylit MEIK, Fam Rm. Unfin High Ceil Bsmt.
Polished, Inlaid H/W Flrs. Att Gar.
TEANECK VIC/N MILFORD
OPEN HOUSE • 1-3 PM
1109 Korfitsen Rd. $414,900
Updated 4 BR, 3 Bth Cape on 75' X 109' Prop. Mod Kit open
to Fam Rm/Sliders to Deck. Sunken Den/Off/Priv Ent. Fin
Bsmt. Gar. Room to Expand Up & Out.
BERGENFIELD
OPEN HOUSE • 1-3 PM
114 Blauvelt Ave. $359,900
Beaut Updated S/L on Quiet St. 113' X 90' Priv Prop. Ent
Foyer, LR, DR/Doors to Huge Party Deck. Granite Count MEIK,
Mster BR/.5 Bth, 2 Add’l BRs & 1 Full Bath.
HAWORTH
OPEN HOUSE • 1-4 PM
84 Summit Pl. $875,000
Priv Cul De Sac. Yng, Stucco CH Col. High Ceil, Oak Flrs.
LR, Island Kit/Bkfst Rm/Deck. Fam Rm/Fplc. Mstr Ste/Jacuz
+ BR/Bth + 2 More BRs & Bth. 2nd Fl Laund. Gigantic Grnd
Lev W/O Bsmt. C/A/C. Gar. Wooded Prop.
TEANECK
OPEN HOUSES • 1-3 PM
SELLING YOUR HOME?
Call Susan Laskin Today
To Make Your Next Move A Successful One!
©2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
Cell: 201-615-5353 BergenCountyRealEstateSource.com
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This summer, Camp Veritans will serve the pre-K set
Camp Veritans is launching a new program for children
who will be 4 by June 30 this summer, called Yeladim.
The Yeladim program aims to foster independence, pos-
itive attitudes, social growth, enhanced coordination,
and new skills in its campers, but most of all it hopes to
provide a positive summer camping experience.
Yeladim campers will have the same quality summer
day camp fun that older Veritans campers experience.
The program day includes instructional and free swim,
sports, arts and crafts, science, cooking and so much
more. A hot lunch and snack are also provided. The
option of a shorter day is available.
For more information please call the camp at (973)-
956-1220, or email Carla@CampVeritans.com
Opening its doors for the first time in 1950, Camp Veri-
tans is an ACA accredited camp located on 60 acres of
lush, wooded play-space complete with hiking trails, a
ropes and challenge course and a noted aquatics pro-
gram. Committed to providing children with a safe and
nurturing environment, campers are encouraged to
explore, discover, create, and succeed. The top-notch
programming is designed by professionals who believe
that campers thrive when they are guided by confident
and engaged staff in a structured environment.
The Crown of Jerusalem comes to New York
The King David’s Crown, a luxury development in the
heart of Jerusalem, has announced the grand opening
of its New York office. Located within The Five Towns
Design Center in Cedarhurst, the new sales office will offer
potential buyers a chance to learn about the magnificent
property.
In conjunction with Jeffrey Mark of J. Mark Interiors,
the King David’s Crown office is the most recent addition
to the newly completed Five Towns Design Center. The
Design Center also houses Brookville Cabinet & Design,
Cedar Carpets, Leiberts Royal Green Appliance, and
NY Custom Closets. Visitors to the new King David’s
Crown office are met with a breathtaking mural of the
regal property and the surrounding Jerusalem hills.
King David’s Crown offers an exclusive combination
of innovation and history and is located at the very
heart of Jerusalem. The King David’s Crown is situated
in the shadow of the King David Hotel and is adjacent
to the sophisticated sports complex of the YMCA. The
property also lies a short distance from the Old City
and the Western Wall, the Great Synagogue, David Cita-
del Hotel, and the Jerusalem Theater. The King David’s
Crown is a short walk from the entertainment, busi-
ness and commerce sites of one of the most outstand-
ing cities in the world.
J. Mark Interiors at The Five Towns Design Center is
located at 461 Central Ave. in Cedarhurst. Stop by to
learn more about these unique residences and take a
virtual tour, or visit www.king-david-crown.com.
JS-63
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014 63
Jeff@MironProperties.com · www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com · www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!
ENGLEWOOD
240 VAN NOSTRAND AVE $699,000
ENGLEWOOD
Quaint Colonial. Expansion possibilities. $758 K
ENGLEWOOD
401 DOUGLAS ST $1,345,000
ENGLEWOOD
State-of-the-art estate. $2,400,000
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TENAFLY
Picture perfect 3 BR/2 BTH home.
TENAFLY
Spacious 4/5 BR Col. Great curb appeal.
TENAFLY
Sprawling Ranch on .97 acre w/babbling brook.
TENAFLY
One-of-a-kind manor. $3,748,000
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LEONIA
5 BR/4 BTH Col. $3,900/MO
PARAMUS
Lovely Ranch. Wonderful property.
TEANECK
Expanded & upgraded 5 BR/3.5 BTH Col.
TEANECK
Picturesque setting. Private oasis.
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CHELSEA
Spacious flex 1 BR. Chelsea gem.
GREENWICH VILLAGE
Quintessential pre-war full-service co-op.
GREENPOINT
3,200 sq. ft. Greek revival details.
UPPER EAST SIDE
Continental Towers. 2 BR/2 BTH City views.
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WILLIAMSBURG
Stylish building. Heart of B’klyn.
UNION SQUARE
1 BR/1.5 BTH duplex w/loft. $699,000
SUNNYSIDE
Large L-shaped studio. Great location.
CHELSEA
Grand 3 BR/2.5 BTH. $3,750,000
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Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
Remarkable Service. Exceptional Results.
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 • M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 • M: 917.576.0776
to the newly completed Five Towns Design Center. The
Design Center also houses Brookville Cabinet & Design,
Cedar Carpets, Leiberts Royal Green Appliance, and
NY Custom Closets. Visitors to the new King David’s
Crown office are met with a breathtaking mural of the
regal property and the surrounding Jerusalem hills.
King David’s Crown offers an exclusive combination
of innovation and history and is located at the very
heart of Jerusalem. The King David’s Crown is situated
in the shadow of the King David Hotel and is adjacent
to the sophisticated sports complex of the YMCA. The
property also lies a short distance from the Old City
and the Western Wall, the Great Synagogue, David Cita-
del Hotel, and the Jerusalem Theater. The King David’s
Crown is a short walk from the entertainment, busi-
ness and commerce sites of one of the most outstand-
ing cities in the world.
J. Mark Interiors at The Five Towns Design Center is
located at 461 Central Ave. in Cedarhurst. Stop by to
learn more about these unique residences and take a
virtual tour, or visit www.king-david-crown.com.
64 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 17, 2014
JS-64
RCBC
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