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June 2010
VOLUME 26, NUMBER 6
Paint Coatings Industry
Globally Serving Liquid and Powder Manufacturers and Formulators
Paint Coatings Industry
Globally Serving Liquid and Powder Manufacturers and Formulators
Architectural Coatings
Additives Handbook
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6 Viewpoint
8 Industry News
12 Calendar of Events
14 Company News
18 Names in the News
20 Products
73 Classifieds
74 Advertiser Index
DEPARTMENTS
PCI - PAINT & COATINGS INDUSTRY (ISSN 0884-3848) is published 12 times annually, monthly, by BNP Media, 2401 W. Big Beaver Rd., Suite
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Audited by
BPA Worldwide Associate Member Printed in the U.S.A.
June 2010
VOLUME 2 6 , NUMBE R 6
C O N T E N T S
FEATURES
24 Liquid Glass Coating Technology, Nanopool GmbH
28 Highly Flexible and Transparent Nanocomposite Coatings
on Compliant Surfaces, Optical Dynamics
38 Advancements in One-Component Moisture-Cured
Urethane Primer Technology, Huntsman Polyurethanes
44 Multipurpose Organosilicone Additive for Waterborne
Coatings and Inks, Dow Corning
ADDITIVES HANDBOOK
46 Additives Handbook Definitions
50 Additives Products
58 Additives Suppliers
66 Additives Distributors
ONLINE FEATURES
w w w. p c i ma g . c o m
Ⅲ High-Performance, VOC-Free Silicone-Polymer
Emulsion Defoamer, Cognis
Ⅲ New Adhesive has Built-in Cure Indicator and Red
Fluorescence for Accurate Bond-Line Inspection, Dymax
Ⅲ MPI Introduces “Extreme Green” Paint Standard, MPI
Ⅲ Boeing 787 Flies with PPG Aerospace Transparencies,
Coatings, Sealants, PPG Industries
Ⅲ Vladimir Water-Dispersion Polymer Plant Opens
BUSINESS TOOLS
22 Supplier Showcase
38
24
44
ON T HE COVE R : Cover design by Clare Johnson.
JUNE 2010
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V I EE WW PP OO II NN TT E W P O I N T
You know each issue of PCI that we finish I think is
the best one – until the next month. I am always so
pleased with the features, the new technology and
all of the technological changes I see in the indus-
try – particularly when you have been around a
while you can look back and see significant change
over time. I have the advantage of reading a great
number of submitted papers and company literature
each day, and it is always exciting. Tremendous
technology is used within a coating that the average
person on the street has no idea about. There are sig-
nificant formulation differences between an interior
house paint and an aircraft coating that must with-
stand extreme temperature and flexibility/expansion changes in a
short time frame. Or the auto paint that must have that showroom
finish and be expected to always appear that way – or the marine
paint that is exposed to salt water and hot sun but better not fade or
peel. And those are but a very, very few examples. Each of the main
components of the coating is important, and sometimes the small-
est amounts – the additives – are the most important of all.
If we could print the entire PCI issue this month it
would be almost 200 pages long. That is because of
the Additives Handbook – which is dear to me, being
one of the co-authors. Back when I first joined the
coatings industry, there were limited resources for
technical and instructional coatings information.
Most of us coming into this industry needed basic
education – we had good backgrounds in chemistry
or other sciences but most were not trained in coat-
ings. So we were hungry to learn – but available
print information was lean. We learned on the job
from experienced formulators and plant personnel
in the companies. We had no internet to search, but
we did have a few journals to read, and we had a basic monograph
series on various aspects of coatings (called the Federation Series
on Coatings Technology), which was printed by people of knowl-
edge who were members of the FSCT. Most of these were published
prior to the 1970s and a few in the early ‘70s.
We would have been happy to have a source like the current
Additives Handbook, which is a compilation of the additives used
in the industry, along with descriptions of each. This was simply
not available back then. Several years ago, when we first put the
Handbook together, it was easier to do than it is today, as addi-
tives fit nicely into defined categories. With the movement toward
waterborne and other low-VOC technologies, however, the world
of additives is rapidly changing. Many additives today are part
of the polymer itself, and so many additives are multifunctional,
making it difficult to categorize. The advent of nanotechnology
has added another dimension to the world of additives.
Because of new technology and the importance of all of our
features we chose to print just a few pages of the Additives Hand-
book definitions so that we would be able to provide you, our
readers, with the latest in new technology via the features. The
Handbook may be found in its entirety on our website, www.pci-
mag.com. Also, it is highly recommended you purchase the CD
of the complete Additives Handbook by contacting Andrea Kropp
directly at kroppa@pcimag.com.
As always we have updated the Handbook with the best available
current information we have regarding the multitude of additives
used in the coatings industry. This is an extensive compilation, and
the CD is of great benefit to all formulators, manufacturers and appli-
cators of coatings, in addition to resource centers such as libraries and
educational facilities. Many ‘seniors’ in the industry have remarked
how beneficial this tool would have been when they first joined the
industry years ago – and I for one wholeheartedly agree.
Also, be sure to read the liquid glass coating technology article
this month (page 24). The liquid glass attributes have resulted in
the coating being regarded as one of the most important surface
coating technologies to have emerged in recent years. And this is
why I always get excited and it never gets old!!
By Darlene Brezinski, Ph.D. / Editor
They Are All Great Issues!
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Brenntag understands
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As the Coatings Industry
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JUNE 2010 | W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 8
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I NN DD UU SS TT RR YY N N EE WW SS N D U S T R Y N E W S
CLEVELAND – World demand for archi-
tectural paint is forecast to rise 3.6 per-
cent per year through 2013 to 22.8 mil-
lion metric tons, valued at $51 billion.
Growth will slow in comparison to the
performance of the 2003 to 2008 period
due to a deceleration in global build-
ing construction growth through 2013.
Gains will nevertheless remain strong
by long-term historical standards. These
and other trends are presented in World
Architectural Paint, a new study from
The Freedonia Group Inc., a Cleveland-
based industry research firm.
As was the case over the past decade,
the most rapid gains will arise in the
world’s emerging markets, most promi-
nently in Asia. Gains in Asia are based
primarily on continued healthy expan-
sion in the large Chinese and Indian mar-
kets. Although Japan is projected to post
gains that will significantly lag behind
the global average through 2013, the
country’s architectural paint market will
see a reversal of the declines experienced
during the 1998-2008 period.
North America will post slightly above-
average gains through 2013. Going for-
ward, the housing and mortgage crisis
that has plagued the United States since
2006 will subside, providing opportuni-
ties for paint sales to the new-homes mar-
ket. Moreover, sales to the much larger
home repainting segment will also ben-
efit as sales of existing homes improve,
because existing homes are often repaint-
ed when they are to be sold.
In 2008, Western Europe accounted
for 21 percent of total architectural paint
demand. Western Europe’s share of the
global market will continue to slip as the
region registers weak gains, due to below-
average economic and building-construc-
tion-expenditure growth, mortgage-
sector weaknesses in some constituent
nations, and stagnant regional popula-
tion gains. Nevertheless, Western Europe
will remain the world’s leading regional
net exporter of architectural paint, due
largely to the presence of Germany.
Architectural Paint Demand to
Reach 22.8 Million Metric Tons
Additives Consumption Study Released
ELMWOOD PARK, NJ – According to Global Coating & Ink Addi-
tives, a new study by the consulting firm Kusumgar, Nerlfi &
Growney, consumption of the five leading additives for coatings
and inks was 1.72 billion pounds, worth $3.47 billion, in 2009.
Volume was down 10 percent compared to 2008, with North
American and European usage down the most. Additive con-
sumption in the Asia-Pacific region was off a more modest three
percent, as growth in China and India partially offset the declines
in Japan and South Korea. A five percent annual rate of growth is
forecast for global additive consumption through 2014.
Rheology modifiers are the leading additive type with 39
percent of the 2009 dollars. Cellulosics, water-based synthetics,
fumed silicas and organoclays are the leading rheology modifiers.
Foam-control additives edged out dispersants for second in value
in 2009 with the bulk used in water-based paints. Dispersants
were 17 percent of the dollars and range from highly specialized
polymeric types to higher-volume polyacrylic acid varieties for
architectural paints.
Slip-and-rub additives were fourth in value and are comprised
of wax products and silicones. Wetting agents were 11 percent of
the volume and 12 percent of the value in 2009.
New Numerical Algorithms Available for Researchers
OXFORD, UK – Paint and coatings researchers can now download
the new NAG Library for SMP and Multi-core from Numerical
Algorithms Group (NAG).
The NAG Library for SMP and Multi-core contains over 1600
routines, including over 100 new routines for this release. A
complete listing of these routines can be found at www.nag.com/
numeric/fl/FSdescription.asp.
Hydraulic Institute Seeks Reviewers
PARSIPPANY, NJ – The Hydraulic Institute (HI), under the approv-
al of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), is seeking
qualified individuals in North America to participate in the review
process for the draft of updated standards ANSI/HI 10.1-10.5 Air-
Operated Pumps for Nomenclature, Definitions, Application and
Operation and ANSI/HI 10.6 Air-Operated Pump Tests.
Individuals and organizations located in North America directly
and materially affected by these standards are asked to contact HI.
To participate, e-mail Karen Anderson at kanderson@Pumps.org.
New EPA Rules Regarding Lead Paint Now in Effect
WASHINGTON – As of April 22, 2010, the U.S. Environmental Pro-
tection Agency requires that renovations and repairs of pre-1978
housing must now be conducted using safe practices to protect chil-
dren and pregnant women from exposure to lead-based paint.
The Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule requires con-
tractors to be trained and certified in lead-safe work practices. The
new rule requires that renovation firms must be certified by the
EPA, individuals must be trained in lead-safe work practices, and
that all those providing training must be EPA accredited.
SME Calls for Award Nominations
DEARBORN, MI – The Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME)
is issuing its annual call for nominations for the 2011 International
Honor Awards, the Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer
JUNE 2010 | W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 10
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I NN DD UU SS TT RR YY N D U S T R Y
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Award and the Award of Merit. The dead-
line to submit nominations for awards is
August 1, 2010. Nomination forms can be
downloaded from sme.org/awards.
North Dakota State University
Offers Short Courses
FARGO, ND – The Department of Coatings
& Polymeric Materials at North Dakota
State University is now accepting reg-
istrations for its annual short courses.
The Fundamentals of Coatings Science
Short Course is designed for all levels of
scientists and technologists working in
the field of coatings. The course will take
place June 6-11, 2010. The Corrosion Pro-
tection by Coatings: Testing and Lifetime
Prediction course will be a practical guide
to the corrosion process, characterization
of corrosion, corrosion protection by coat-
ings and testing of coatings. The course
will take place June 13-15, 2010. For addi-
tional information, visit www.ndsu.edu/
cpm/shortcourse.
Date Change for CHINACOAT 2010
GUANGZHOU, China – CHINACOAT
2010, which was originally scheduled to
take place Dec. 1-3, 2010, will now take
place Sept. 27-29, 2010. The event will be
held in Guangzhou, China, at the Guang-
zhou International Convention and Exhi-
bition Center. For more information about
the show, visit www.chinacoat.net.

Industry Loses
K. Hiroshi Fujimoto
WEST BLOOMFIELD, MI – K. Hiroshi
(Hiro) Fujimoto, 87, of Naples, FL, and
West Bloomfield, MI, died on Thurs-
day, April 8, 2010, at Avow Hospice.
Fujimoto is survived by his wife, Chris-
tine Arnott-Fujimoto, three children,
three stepchildren and nine grand-
children, as well as a brother and sis-
ter. Fujimoto worked with ASTM for
many years, including serving as the
Subcommittee Chair of Committee
D01.21, Analysis of Whole Paints and
Paint Materials. He was recognized
for his work with ASTM, receiving the
John C. Weaver Excellence in Lead-
ership Award in 2002, the Henry A.
Gardner Subcommittee Chairman of
the Year Award in 1982, the Award of
Merit in 1987. and the Award of Appre-
ciation in 2009.
OBITUARY
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bring all your ideas to life and get them to market – fast. Now you can take on
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Formulators choose Sartomer for UV/EB innovation and consistent quality…
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Call 800-SARTOMER, 610-363-4100 or visit www.sartomer.com.
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Mason Color’s high performance pigment technology for coatings provides the ultimate in heat resistance, UV
durability, and chemical resistance. Our mixed metal oxide pigments meet the most exacting color and durability
requirements of the defense, architectural, stove and heating products, and roofing industries. These pigments add
vibrant color to building facades, stove equipment, exhaust parts and outdoor furnishings and equipment. These
advanced technology pigments can be incorporated into any coating platform including powder coatings, electrocoat,
high solids and waterborne paints.
Mason Color Works, Inc. A History of Pigment Technology Excellence
Mason Color Works has been manufacturing high temperature, inorganic pigments since 1842.
For more than 40 years Mason Color has been a global supplier of high performance pigments to all sectors
of the ceramic industry including pottery, artware, bricks, sanitaryware and roofing materials.
In the last 45 years, Mason Color has expanded into the high technology Investment Casting Industry. Our
ISO Compliant Cobalt Aluminate products are integral in the manufacturing jet turbine blades and medical
devices.
In the 1990s heralded the emergence of the fireplace gas log industry and Mason Color's participation as a
supplier of high quality, high temperature pigments for this use.
Soon thereafter, the Swimming Pool and Spa colorant industry
embraced Mason's pigment technology. Our high quality pigment
exceed the demands for resistance to punishing UV energy and the
aggressive chemicals used in swimming pools.
Our fully outfitted Powder Coating Laboratory and skilled
technicians will help you choose the perfect color for your most
demanding requirements.
See you at the American Coatings Show,
April 2010 in Charlotte, NC.
JUNE 2010
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W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 12
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C A L E N D A R
JUNE 13-15
Corrosion Protection by Coatings:
Testing and Lifetime Prediction
www.ndsu.edu/cpm/shortcourse
22
Ci4000/Ci5000 Weather-Ometer
Workshop
www.atlas-mts.com
22-25
A&WMA Annual Conference &
Exhibition
www.awma.org
23
Fundamentals of Weathering
Level I
www.atlas-mts.com
23-24
Asia Pacific Coatings Show
www.coatings-group.com
24
Fundamentals of Weathering
Level II
www.atlas-mts.com
JULY 4-10
International Conference on
Composites/Nano Engineering
http://myweb.polyu.edu.
hk/~mmktlau/ICCE/ICCE_
Main.htm
19-21
Coatings for People in the General
Industry, Sales & Marketing
http://coatings.mst.edu
19-23
Polymers and Coatings
Introductory Short Course
www.polymerscoatings.
calpoly.edu
SEPT. 8-10
Spray Finishing Technology
Workshop
www.owens.edu
9-10
Korean Coatings Show
www.coatings-group.com
26-29
2010 SSCT Annual Meeting
http://ssct.org
27-29
CHINACOAT 2010
www.chinacoat.net
28
Ci4000/Ci5000 Weather-Ometer
Workshop
www.atlas-mts.com
29
Fundamentals of Weathering
Level I
www.atlas-mts.com
30
Fundamentals of Weathering
Level II
www.atlas-mts.com
OCT. 3-5
ASC Fall Convention
www.ascouncil.org
4-6
Radiation Curing Technology
www.pra-world.com
5-6
Coatings Trends and Technologies
www.bnpevents.com/PCI/CTT
11-13
UTECH North America
www.utechnorthamerica.nl
11-13
Polyurethanes 2010 Technical
Conference
www.americanchemistry.com
12-13
Wood Coatings Congress
www.pra-world.com
12-14
COROSAVE
www.corosave.com
C A L E N D A R
Meetings, Shows and Educational Programs
Visit ads.pcimag.com
Find On-Demand
Webinars at
webinars.pcimag.com
Welcome to
a new day of
environmentally
friendly surfactants
for architectural
coatings.
tell me more
www.airproducts.com/newdawn © 2010 Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (32207)
Carbowet
®
13-40 and EnviroGem
®

2010 newly hatched, APE-Free
surfactants. Whether you’re anticipating
U.S. regulations or complying with
global trends and laws, switching to
Air Products’ newest solvent- and
APE-free surfactants is a smart move.
Carbowet 13-40 and EnviroGem 2010
surfactants contribute no VOCs to zero-
VOC coatings formulations. Additionally,
both products offer excellent wetting
with very low foam for architectural and
industrial coatings, pigment dispersions,
and various other systems. To request
a free sample, call 1-800-345-3148 or
visit us online at www.airproducts.com/
newdawn and look forward to many new
days of simple formulating. Easy on the
environment and easy on you.
JUNE 2010
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W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 14
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C OO MM PP AA NN YY O M P A N Y N N EE WW SS N E W S
VELOX to Distribute for PCC Rokita
HAMBURG, Germany – PCC Rokita’s Polyol business unit (Poland)
has signed an agreement with Hamburg-based raw materials dis-
tribution and sales specialist VELOX for the distribution of Roko-
pol
®
in France, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovakia. Rokopol is
the trade name of a wide range of polyether polyols.
Arkema Emulsion Systems Expands
Customer Service Offerings
CARY, NC – Arkema Emulsion Systems has announced the expan-
sion of dedicated customer service capabilities at its Cary, NC,
headquarters. The expansion includes the addition of four trained
representatives who will work with customers to answer general
product-related questions, assist in delivering specific product tech-
nical support and accept orders for the company’s full line of emul-
sion polymers. For general customer inquiries, call 866/837.5532.
Union Process Expands Presence in China
AKRON, OH – Union Process has moved its China operation into
a larger facility. The company purchased an existing complex in
the downtown area of Qingdao, China. The facility consists of
one structure for manufacturing and an adjoining structure that
houses the testing lab, pilot plant, storage area and office space.
Zeeospheres Ceramics Recognizes Ribelin Sales
LOCKPORT, LA – Zeeospheres Ceramics LLC, Lockport, LA, has
recognized Ribelin Sales Inc., Garland, TX, as its Top Distribu-
tor for Sales in 2009.
Ribelin represents Zeeospheres Ceramics’ portfolio of high-
strength spherical microsphere fillers in Florida, Georgia, Ala-
bama, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Mississippi,
Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, New Mexico, Nevada,
Utah, Colorado and Arizona with stocking locations in Atlanta,
Orlando, Houston, Dallas and Denver.
AkzoNobel Increases Capacity in China
AMSTERDAM, The Netherlands – AkzoNobel has announced
the plant expansion for the manufacture of monochloroacetic
acid (MCA) in China.
The company’s Taixing site, which now boasts production capac-
ity of 60,000 metric tons per year, will help to meet steadily increas-
ing demand for MCA in China, where the market is growing in line
with GDP at more than 10 percent annually.
LyondellBasell Emerges From Chapter 11
ROTTERDAM, The Netherlands – LyondellBasell has emerged
from Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. A new parent company,
LyondellBasell Industries N.V., incorporated in the Netherlands,
is the successor of the former parent company, LyondellBasell
Industries AF S.C.A. LyondellBasell Industries N.V. owns and
operates substantially the same businesses as the previous par-
ent company, including subsidiaries that were not involved in
the bankruptcy cases.
BASF Expands in China
SHANGHAI, CHINA – BASF is establishing a new Polyurethane
Solutions System House in western China. The new system house
will be located in Chongqing, where BASF also plans to build a MDI
plant. It will have local production with sales, technical service and
development personnel and will start its first services by 2012.
BASF has also inaugurated a new section of its Technical Compe-
tence Center for intermediates at its Shanghai Pudong site.
Bayer MaterialScience Listed by MPI
PITTSBURGH – Bayer MaterialScience LLC is one of the first raw
materials suppliers to get on board the Master Painters Institute
®

Inc.’s (MPI) Starting Point Program.
Results of the MPI testing are as follows: the guide formula
based on Bayhydrol
®
UH 2593/1 polyurethane dispersion passed
PITTSBURGH – PPG Industries’ indus-
trial coatings business has opened the
Shmaze Color Design Studio sponsored
by PPG Trendcast. The facility, near
Irvine, CA, is devoted to helping manu-
facturers and industrial designers
accelerate color design and proto-
type development.
“This new facility enables manu-
facturers and industrial designers
from around the world to come into
our workshop and walk out with
production-ready parts and coat-
ings that can run almost anywhere
in the world,” said Richard Zoulek,
PPG General Manager for Strate-
gic Markets. “For design-intensive
organizations like consumer-electronics
companies, that process can take three-
to-six months due to logistical challeng-
es. When you work with PPG, it can be
reduced to days.”
Michael Shamassian, Principal of the
Shmaze Color Design Studio, said the
facility’s core mission is problem solv-
ing. “We have a full-service production
line with robots, tooling, molders and
other equipment that enables us to
work through production and qual-
ity issues in real time, and to prove
the viability of a coating in a matter
of hours or days.”
The Shmaze Color Design Studio
was created to serve manufacturers
and industrial designers in industries
such as consumer electronics, auto-
motive parts and accessories, beauty
products, appliances, sports and rec-
reation equipment, and aerospace.
PPG Opens Color Design Studio
Completed
Dispersion
The ultimate in high speed
powder dispersion.
An intense vacuum draws powders including silica,
thickeners and pigments into the mix chamber of the
SLIM Solids/Liquid Injection Manifold. They are injected
through a ported rotor directly into the high shear zone
and dispersed instantly.
Nothing boosts production faster.
The SLIM powder dispersion system is the world’s
most efficient and reliable device for dispersing
powders into a liquid stream.
With this technology, proven on process lines
around the world, SLIM routinely cuts process
times by 80% or more.
See the new SLIM video online.
See for yourself how SLIM outperforms eductors,
turbines, propellers and other rotor/stator mixers.
Visit www.PowderInjection.com.
Contact Ross to arrange a no-charge
demonstration in the Ross Test &
Development Center or in your plant.
SLIM will boost production and operating efficiency.
Liquid Inlet
Powder Inlet
SLIM eliminates the clogging and poor dispersion quality
associated with eductor-based systems. It also eliminates
the need for an auxiliary pump in most applications.
Operation is simple – and the portable inline SLIM easily
serves multiple process lines.
1-800-243-ROSS • mail@mixers.com
JUNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 16
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
C OO MM PP AA NN YY O M P A N Y N N EE WW SS N E W S
MPI 128, the guide formula based on
Bayhydrol AH XP 2741 acrylic dispersion
passed MPI 129, and the guide formula
based on Bayhydrol UH 2557 polyure-
thane dispersion passed MPI 197.
The Starting Point Program helps
coating raw materials suppliers accel-
erate acceptance of resin or additive
technologies by providing verification
that formulations meet MPI’s highest
performance standards.
DSM and Berliner Glas
Reach Licensing Agreement
HEERLEN, The Netherlands – DSM
Functional Coatings B.V., part of Royal
DSM N.V., and Berliner Glas KGaA, a
European supplier of refined technical
glass, have agreed to the terms of a
licensing deal for DSM’s anti-ref lective
coating system, KhepriCoat™. Berlin-
er Glas intends to use KhepriCoat to
improve the performance of its glass in
lighting-cover applications.
Rio Tinto Minerals Extends
Fitz Chem’s Territory
ITASCA, IL – Rio Tinto Minerals (RTM)
has expanded Fitz Chem Corp.’s territo-
ry, adding Minnesota, North Dakota and
South Dakota. Fitz Chem now represents
RTM’s talc business in these states plus
all or part of Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin,
Indiana and Michigan.
Malvern Acquires Assets of
Reologica Instruments
MALVERN, UK – Malvern Instruments
Limited has acquired certain assets of
Swedish rheology company Reologica
Instruments AB, Lund, Sweden. The pur-
chase gives Malvern access to additional
technologies and intellectual properties.
Evonik Acquires Methacrylate
Specialty Esters Business
ESSSEN, Germany – Evonik Industries
has acquired Arkema’s Methacrylate Spe-
cialty Esters business. With this acquisi-
tion, Evonik enhances its competence in
the Performance Polymers business unit
as a specialist in methacrylate chemis-
try. The acquisition includes the follow-
ing products: 2-ethylhexyl methacrylate
(2-EHMA), dimethylaminoethyl meth-
acrylate (MADAME), and n- and i-butyl
methacrylate (n-BUMA and i-BUMA).
The products will be integrated into the
VISIOMER
®
sales range for methacrylate
monomers, which comprises more than 50
monomers. The product VISIOMER DMAE-
MA will be marketed under the name
VISIOMER MADAME™ in the future.
Cognis Sells UV Acrylates Business
MONHEIM, Germany – Cognis has
signed an agreement to sell its UV Acry-
lates business to IGM Resins B.V., based
in Waalwijk, The Netherlands. The UV
Acrylates business manufactures and
sells monomers and oligomers for UV
applications marketed under the Pho-
tomer brand name.

Visit ads.pcimag.com
Troy Corporation • 8 Vreeland Road • Florham Park, NJ 07932 USA • tel +1.973.443.4200 • fax +1.973.443.0843
Troy Corporation provides paint and coatings manufacturers with the 'Key to Green Coatings' by
offering ecological friendly products that are designed to meet or exceed the toughest performance
standards without compromising sustainability, environmental sensitivity, or regulatory compliance.
Troy is the leader in VOC and formaldehyde-free preservation and provides solutions for complex
technical formulations. Troy develops and promotes sustainable technologies that satisfy wet-state
and dry film material protection needs. Contact your local Troy representative to obtain your
"Key to Green Coatings' and unlock your specific formulation solution.
JUNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 18
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
N AAMMEE SS I I NN T T HHEE N N EE WWSS AME S I N T HE NE WS
Ⅲ Herman Benecke, a scientist for Battelle, has been chosen to
receive the 2010 Industrial Uses of Soybean Oil Award by the Ameri-
can Oil Chemists’ Society. Since 1980, Benecke has been awarded
14 patents, many of which deal with the use of soybean and other
vegetable oils to formulate products varying from flexible and rigid
foams to more environmentally friendly and healthier plasticizers.
Ⅲ Guardian Protective Coatings has appointed Boyd Cooray
Technical Director. Cooray is currently Director of Technology and
New Business Development at Druckfarben Hellas in Greece.
Ⅲ NETZSCH Fine Particle Technology LLC has expanded Chris
Esterly’s sales territory. Esterly will now support NETZSCH cus-
tomers in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia
and western parts of New York. NETZSCH has also designated a new
Manufacturing Representative, Mitch Perlstein from Technika, to
serve customers in the New England states.
Ⅲ Denise Kingstrom Fer-
nandez has been appointed
Strategic Accounts Man-
ager for BASF Automo-
tive Refinish and assumes
responsibility for manag-
ing its ColorSource pro-
gram. Keith Bell has
been appointed Central
Zone Manager. Bell will
focus on growi ng the
BASF Refinish business in
the central United States.
Michael Kaufman has
been appointed Eastern
Zone Manager. Prior to
this, Kaufman managed
the southeast zone for BASF
Automotive Refinish, and
his role has been expanded to include the entire East Coast from
Maine to Florida. John Moreau will rejoin BASF as Western Zone
Manager. Jim Smith has been appointed Strategic Initiatives Man-
ager. In this new role, Smith is responsible for implementing major
initiatives within BASF Automotive Refinish.
Ⅲ John C. Husband has been designated as one of nine TAPPI Fel-
lows for 2010. He currently serves as Lead Scientist for IMERYS
Minerals Ltd., Cornwall, UK.
Ⅲ Thomas Langill, Technical Director at the American Galvaniz-
ers Association in Centennial, CO, has been elected Chairman of
ASTM International Committee A05 on Metallic-Coated Iron and
Steel Products. John Fletcher, Technical Support Manager at
Elcometer Ltd. in Manchester, England, has been named Chair-
man of ASTM International Committee D01 on Paint and Related
Coatings, Materials and Applications.
Ⅲ Evonik Industries has announced that Dietmar Wewers will
succeed Jochen Rosenau as the new head of the Coating & Adhe-
sive Resins business line. Ralf Düssel will take over from Martin
Welp as head of the Adhesive Resins product line.

Bell Kaufman
Kingstrom Fernandez Moreau
All rights reserved. ©2010
Brilliant
Solutions!
Look to Brilliant Additions to achieve a
real competitive advantage. Formulators
use these versatile functional fillers to
add performance and value without
compromising cost targets. Meaningful
cost savings are possible with higher
loading rates, improved production
efficiencies and rationalized raw
materials inventories.
www.BrilliantAdditions.com
For more information and our complete product portfolio visit:
SPECIALTY AND PERFORMANCE MINERALS
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Any surface. Any environment.
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Our performance resins help you meet your customers’
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the latest in high- performance waterborne industrial
coatings or low-VOC architectural paints, look to
Reichhold for the best technologies for any surface.
AROFLINT
®
Non-Isocyanate
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Systems
EPOTUF
®
Epoxies,
Curing Agents &
Epoxy Esters
UROTUF
®
A full line of
Polyurethanes
P RR OO DD UU CC TT SS R O D U C T S
JUNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 20
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
Ⅲ Powder Checker
DEFELSKO CORP.: The PosiTector PC
powder checker measures uncured pow-
der coatings using ultrasonic technology
to automatically
calculate and dis-
play a predicted
cured thickness.
New technology
allows measure-
ment on small
tubes, odd shapes
and moving parts.
Features include
an internal mem-
ory of up to 1,000 readings.
Visit www.defelsko.com
ⅢAutomated Control Package
MORSE MANUFACTURING CO., INC.:
An advanced automated control package
for Morse Tilt-To-Load drum rotators fea-
tures automated drum lifting, rotating for
operator-set time and return of drum to
upright position at floor level. A safety
interlock on heavy-duty enclosure auto-
matically shuts down the rotator if the gate
is opened. Users can set rotation time any-
where from a few seconds to 99 hours.
Visit www.MORSEmfgco.com
Ⅲ Wax Emulsion
MICHELMAN: Michem Emulsion 47950 wax
emulsion is a sacrificial anti-graffiti coating
additive that also provides effective water
repellency and anti-blocking. It is com-
monly used as a surface modifier in concrete
coatings to reduce or eliminate concrete’s
susceptibility to damage caused by weather,
equipment, vehicles or foot traffic.
Visit www.michelman.com
Ⅲ Oven
THE GRIEVE CORP.: This walk-in oven
is used for heat treating and curing paint
and varnish. Features include: a maxi-
mum operating temperature of 1100 °F;
9’ x 9’ x 9’ work space dimensions; 240
KW installed in Incoloy-sheathed tubu-
lar heating elements; 24,500 CFM, 20 HP
recirculating blower providing combina-
tion airflow; safety equipment for han-
dling flammable solvents; and inner and
outer door gaskets.
E-mail sales@grievecorp.com
Ⅲ Mixer
CHARLES ROSS AND SON CO.: The Sani-
tary PowerMix Model PD-100 features a low-
speed planetary stirrer with a conventional
high-speed disperser. Both agitators revolve
on their own axis while at the same time on
a common axis. The high-speed blade pro-
vides an internal shearing action, while the
planetary stirrer continually moves material
into the high-speed blade.
E-mail sales@mixers.com
Ⅲ Emulsions
CELANESE EMULSION POLYMERS: Eco-
VAE
®
405 and EcoVAE 408 are extremely
low-odor, APE-free vinyl acetate/ethylene
resins with low residual-monomer levels
and the ability to formulate low- to near-
zero VOC coatings. With greater durability,
NEW K-KAT
®
XK-622

Catalyst for Solventborne
2K PU Coatings

A Friendly Alternative to Tin Catalysts


x Offering equivalent or improved
performance over DBTDL*

x Good pot life

x Quicker tack-free time

x Faster hardness development

x Excellent hardness and gloss

NEW K-KAT
®
XK-622


Request additional
information today by:

Emailing:
coatings@kingindustries.com

or Calling:
203-866-5551
www.kingindustries.com
* Performance can be system/formulation specific
Circular recorder DBTDL K-KAT XK-622
Set to touch, hours* 3 2.5
Surface dry, hours** 5.7 5.1
*Time when paint stops flowing into the scribed channel.
** Time when the recorder’s teflon stylus no longer leaves a clear channel, but begins to rupture the dry upper layer of the
curing film.
Air Dry Tack-free Times
DBTDL K-KAT XK-622
20° Gloss, % 95.4 99.3
60° Gloss, % 100 100
Pendulum Hardness, cycles
(initial)
44 50
Pendulum Hardness, cycles
(3 days)
78 84
Film Hardness & Gloss
(30 minutes at 80°, Cure Schedule)
K-KAT
®
XK-622 Vs. DBTDL
Comparison: 2K PU SB Acrylic Clearcoat
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ADHESIVES & SEALANTS:
Conserve energy in production
and product use.
COATINGS:
Go ‘green’ with innovative
binder and additive technologies.
ELASTOMERS:
Formulate with alternative
raw materials, and do it
competitively.
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CASE@univarcorp.com
www.univarcorp.com
INNOVATION = VALUE
YOUR CUSTOMERS DEMAND ENVIRONMENTALLY-FRIENDLY
PRODUCTS. LET UNIVAR SHOW YOU HOW YOU CAN GO GREEN.
Univar supplies the CASE Specialties industry with much more than a comprehensive line
of sustainable ingredients — we can provide you with an innovative approach to your
green formulation challenges, offering you technical expertise from concept to production.
Consider Univar your partner in sustainable product development. We connect you to the
latest materials and technologies, and help you bring environmentally-friendly products
to market. Innovation, sustainability, expertise — it all adds up to value.
I NNOVATI ON > TECHNI CAL EXPERTI SE > MARKETI NG > SALES > LOGI STI CS > DI STRI BUTI ON
JUNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 22
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
P RR OO DD UU CC TT SS R O D U C T S
EcoVAE 405 allows formulators to develop
products for use in tough environments
such as kitchens and playrooms where
frequent washing occurs. EcoVAE 408 was
designed to be formulated into freeze-
thaw-stable paints for contractors and DIY
consumers in cold climates.
Visit www.celanese.com
Ⅲ LED Lights
LARSON ELECTRONICS: Combin-
ing bright light output, color tempera-
ture control and five-year bulb life, these
explosion-proof LED lights for paint spray
booths are available in four-foot and two-
foot lengths. With a UL Class 1 Division 1
and Class 2 Division 1 rating, these lights
offer more light output than high-output
fluorescent alternatives but with lower
electricity usage and 5.5-year bulb life.
Visit www.magnalight.com
Ⅲ Silica Aerogel
CABOT: Nanogel
®
aerogel for insulative
coatings formulations is created through
a closed-loop process
with little to no impact
on the environment.
Benefits include: long
shelf life with con-
sistent performance,
formulation flexibility,
rheology control, dispersion stability, density
reduction, carrier for functional actives, non-
toxic and sustainable, low-VOC formulations
enabled, sag resistance, and low loading.
Visit www.cabot-corp.com
Ⅲ Curative
COGNIS: Versamine
®
S 23 meets the need
for benzyl alcohol, nonylphenol and bis-
phenol-A-free curatives with conventional
or plural-component spray capability and
that have excellent coating performance
properties. It is designed to be used as a
stand-alone curing agent due to its rapid
cure response. Epoxy coatings based on
Versamine S 23 have excellent chemical
resistance properties.
Visit www.cognis.com
Ⅲ Biocide
INTERNATIONAL SPECIALTY PROD-
UCTS INC.: Nuosept W Concentrate is a
broad-spectrum preservative that combines
the antimicrobial effects of CIT/MIT and Bro-
nopol at higher concentrations than other
commercial offerings. Typical use levels for
the preservation of adhesives, tackifiers,
coatings and detergents range from 0.025-
0.1 percent by weight. It will not contribute
to the VOC of the product preserved and
does not contain a formaldehyde donor.
E-mail aficon@ispcorp.com
Ⅲ Polyester Resin
REICHHOLD INC.: AROFLINT
®
810 is a
polyester resin designed for high-perfor-
mance 2K polyester-epoxy systems where
excellent appearance, durability and
toughness are required. When combined
with AROFLINT
®
608 epoxy resin, this non-
isocyanate system has improved dry and
hardness development and performance
comparable to a 2K urethane.
Visit www.reichhold.com

S
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P
P
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I
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S
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O
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A
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E
S
MACE Polymers & Additives, Inc.
The Polyurethane Specialists
New Ownership / A World of Possibilities
Ⅲ “Green” PUD’s – Zero nMP & Zero VOC
Ⅲ Nano-Engineered PUD’s - for Improved Performance
Ⅲ Anti-Graffiti Coatings – Zero nMP
Ⅲ Fire Retardant PU Dispersions – Halogen Free
Ⅲ Functional PU Films for Thermoforming Applications
Contact Ernie Gulla at 1-888-205-8126
or via email at: egulla@maceco.com
Dudley, MA • Phone: 508-943-9052 • www.maceco.com
TThhee K K iisshh C C oommppaannyy i i ss a a l l eeaaddiinngg s s uupppplliieerr o o ff i i nndduussttrriiaall m m iinneerraallss,, The Kish Company is a leading supplier of industrial minerals,
eexxtteennddeerrss,, a a ddddiittiivveess a a nndd l l iigghhttwweeiigghhtt s s pphheerreess t t oo t t hhee p p llaassttiiccss,, extenders, additives and lightweight spheres to the plastics,
ppaaiinntt,, r r uubbbbeerr,, i i nnkk,, a a ddhheessiivvee a a nndd s s eeaallaanntt i i nndduussttrriieess.. paint, rubber, ink, adhesive and sealant industries.
TThhee K K iisshh C C oommppaannyy i i ss a a bbllee t t oo o o ffffeerr e e xxtteennssiivvee t t eecchhnniiccaall e e xxppeerriieennccee The Kish Company is able to offer extensive technical experience
ttoo s s uucccceessssffuullllyy i i nntteeggrraattee o o uurr p p rroodduuccttss i i nnttoo y y oouurr s s yysstteemmss.. to successfully integrate our products into your systems.
WWiitthh o o uurr i i nntteerrnnaattiioonnaall n n eettwwoorrkk o o ff r r eessoouurrcceess,, w w ee o o ffffeerr t t hhee h h iigghheesstt With our international network of resources, we offer the highest
qquuaalliittyy m m iinneerraallss i i nn t t hhee w w oorrlldd a a nndd o o uurr 1 1 44 d d iissttrriibbuuttiioonn p p ooiinnttss quality minerals in the world and our 14 distribution points
tthhrroouugghhoouutt t t hhee w w oorrlldd w w iillll m m eeeett y y oouurr s s aammee d d aayy i i nnvveennttoorryy n n eeeeddss.. throughout the world will meet your same day inventory needs.
Family Of Companies
Repco, Inc – Tokyo Japan
Sphere One, Inc – Chattanooga Tennessee, www. sphereone.net
Contact us at (800) 886-5238
or info@kishcompany.com
www.kishcompany.com
Soyanol S S ooyyaannooll

High Performance, Sustainable Additive Solutions
Multiple functions including coalescent,
plasticizer, and dispersant
Zero and Low-VOC Solutions for solvent and
water-born formulations
Compatible with most resin systems
Excellent Freeze / Thaw performance
info@soytek.com • www.soytek.com
Soyanol™ is the perfect blend of high performance,
versatility, and sustainability.
The Innovation Principle.
Innovation is the most important formula for success. At BYK we know that innovation
demands forward thinking about new products and processes, effective services and strong
partnerships. It takes imaginative applications of state-of-the-art technologies. Ultimately,
innovation requires knowledge, experience and the drive to discover new solutions. That’s
BYK’s Innovation Principle –
L

. Put it to work for you. Together, we can help you achieve a
decisive competitive advantage.
Visit us at the Asia Pacific Coatings Show 2010, June, 23 – 24, Balai Sidang Jakarta
Convention Center, Jakarta, Indonesia, Booth # E1.
www.byk.com/innovation
J UNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 24
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
I
recently became aware of this new technology,
and the project manager at Nanopool graciously
extended to me the liberty of taking previously
published material and presenting it in PCI. The
following information is taken from the Nano-
pool website, press releases and an editorial written for
journals in the healthcare industry.
Nanopool GmbH is recognized as a world leader in
SiO
2
-Liquid Glass

Nano Layering technology. Its award-
winning “liquid” glass coatings allow the end user to
apply a nano-scale layer of super-durable, super-phobic,
highly flexible glass to almost any surface. This technol-
ogy is revolutionizing how we manage our environment.
The liquid glass attributes have resulted in the coating
being regarded as one of the most important surface coat-
ing technologies to have emerged in recent years.
Apart from a select group of professionals, few people
know about this stunning technology. If one walks around
the Ataturk’s Mausoleum in Ankara you are walking on
it. If you visit certain hospitals in the United Kingdom you
are touching it. If you see an unusually clean train you are
probably looking at it, and if you wonder how your white
settee looks so clean, you may be sitting on it. All of these
surfaces have been coated with invisible glass.
SiO
2
NLT
The SiO
2
nano layering technology (NLT) evolved from
manipulation of the sol-gel process. This process is a wet
chemical technique (chemical solution deposition). While
the process has been known for years, Nanopool refined it
to create “liquid glass” or “glass in a bottle”. Molecules of
SiO
2
(pure quartz glass) are isolated and held in a solvent
of either water or ethanol. This “solution” can then be
wiped or sprayed onto most any surface. The subsequent
coating forms a layer of pure glass, which is approximately
100 nanometers thick.
The water-based solution is designed for absorbent
surfaces such as stone, wood and fabrics, whereas the
alcohol-based solution is designed for metal, glass, plastic
and painted surfaces. Almost all surfaces can be coated
with SiO
2
NLT, with the exception of Teflon or other
non-stick coatings. Additionally, all surfaces must be
completely clean prior to application, as a finger print
can be 100 times thicker than the coating. There are no
polymeric binding agents used in the solution – only SiO
2

and water or ethanol.
It is believed that Van der Waals forces enable the SiO
2

layer to polymerize rapidly and adhere to the surface.
Keep in mind that nano-scale technologies perform very
differently than their micro- or macro-scale counterparts
– hence the unusual characteristics and benefits.
By Darlene Brezinski, Ph.D., Editor | PCI Magazine
LLiiqquuiidd Liquid
GGllaassss C C ooaattiinngg Glass Coating
TTeecchhnnoollooggyy Technology
MONOLlTL
®
Yellow 113901
f.Y. 139 · |soínoo|íne Ye||ow
Ih|º br||||an| red ºhade ye||ow p|gmen| |º an exce||en| cho|ce |or a|| ||nd o| h|gh
per|ormance app||ca||onº, ºuch aº au|omo||ve & re||n|ºh, decora||ve and co|| coa||ngº.
|| ºhowº very h|gh opac||y and || |º eºpec|a||y recommended |or uºe |n coa||ng
app||ca||onº requ|r|ng ou|º|and|ng wea|her and ||gh| |aº|neºº.
|euco|ech ||d.
Phone +1 · 800 · |EUBAC|
|ax +1 · 21S · 736 · 2249
E·Ma||. ºa|eº©heubachco|or.com
|n|erne|. www.heubachco|or.com
O
r
g
a
n
i
c

P
i
g
m
e
n
t
s
One- o| - a- ki nd
Liquid Glass Coating Technology
J UNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 26
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
The glass coating, being approximately 100 nanome-
ters thick, is completely undetectable, is food safe and
environmentally friendly and also a winner of the U.K.
Green Apple Award.
Application Markets
The automotive market is embracing the technology for
coating fabrics, windscreens, painted surfaces and alloy
wheels. Marine coatings, including anti-fouling, will soon
be available. Applications in healthcare and food production
environments are already advanced. There is no doubt that
there is tremendous benefit to the clean room industry.
For fabrics, liquid glass surrounds each individual
filament within the fiber with the invisible coating.
This protective layer of f lexible pure glass ensures that
soiling agents are unable to effectively adhere to the
surface. Liquids such as coffee, red wine, etc., simply
roll off treated textiles.
Many companies all over Austria have discovered the
advantages of nanotechnology and rely on the experience
and the unique sol-gel technology of Nanopool. “In our
recently reopened restaurant in Wals near Salzburg, Nano-
pool has refined all surfaces by means of coating,” says Josef
Klingler, Manager of McDonalds Salzburg. “This coating is
effective, durable and anti-microbial. This means no more
adhesion of soil, long-lasting protection against adhesion of
mould bacteria, and considerably reduced use of chemicals
for cleaning.” By the way, no follow-up treatment will be
necessary after accurate cleaning.
The coatings are now recognized as being suitable for
agricultural and in-vivo application. Vines coated with
SiO
2
do not suffer from mildew, and coated seeds grow
more rapidly without the need for anti-fungal chemicals.
This will result in farmers enjoying massive yields.
For in-vivo application items such as stents can be coated,
which will create anti-sticking features. Catheters and
sutures will also cease to be problematic in the future.
In essence, this is one of the most significant new tech-
nologies to have emerged over recent years. This is a rather
bold claim but it is made with justification as Nanopool
provides a technology that allows the user to create long-
term, easy-to-clean, bacteria-free surfaces using an ultra
environmentally friendly and low-cost technology.

For more information, visit www.nanopool.eu or www.nanopool.co.uk or
e-mail neil.mcclelland@nanopool.co.uk.
Key Point Summary of SiO
2
NLT
Ⅲ SiO
2
(silicon dioxide) is the chemical term for quartz glass.
Ⅲ Liquid glass is invisible to the naked eye, as it is only 100 nm thick –
(approximately 500 times thinner than a human hair). The coating
does not alter the appearance or texture of the treated surface.
Ⅲ SiO
2
“liquid glass” can be applied to all surfaces, (including glass,
metals, fabrics, stone, plastic, food packaging, operating theatres,
skin, computers, food processing areas, cars, shipping, aircraft); in
fact the list is almost endless.
Ⅲ Liquid glass is applied by spraying, dipping or wiping.
Ⅲ It is food safe and mucosa friendly, and has no negative
physiological impact.
Ⅲ It is super-phobic (rejects all soiling elements, including solvents,
acids and alkalis (0.5 pH to 12.5 pH)
Ⅲ It is highly durable; domestic quality variants last approximately
one year per application. Professional variants last 10 years. Certain
treatments last even longer. (The coating will not decay and is only
removed by chemical or mechanical action.)
Ⅲ It is heat tolerant (-150 to +450 °C) and so can be applied to
ovens, freezers, wash basins etc. It removes the need for oven-
cleaning chemicals; simply clean ovens with water and a cloth. It is
UV-stable, chemically inert and cell neutral and so it can be used
for in-vivo application.
Ⅲ It is “particle free” i.e., does not contain any potentially dangerous
nano particles.
Ⅲ It is flexible (200%) and breathable at the molecular level and so it
can be applied to wood, fabrics, stone work and statues, as these
areas need to breathe and expand /contract.
Ⅲ It can be applied with great ease, no special equipment is needed.
Ⅲ All surfaces become easy to clean, and in most instances cleaning
can be carried out with water alone. This is the case within
butchery departments, where NP-coated areas are cleaner after
being washed with water than those areas which have been
cleaned with a chlorinated agent. Savings of 30% on cleaning are
the norm. (Audited figures.)
Ⅲ Treated surfaces become "bio-static " through ionic exchange (this
creates an environment that will not support bacterial growth)
and so the treatments are ideal for sinks, taps, food-prep areas,
nurseries, door handles, toilets, cash registers, conveyor belts,
gyms, schools, hospitals, chiller cabinets etc. Nanopool supplies
an anti-bacterial variant, which satisfies ASTMS E 2180.The anti-
bacterial variant kills bacteria for the life of the coating. Most anti-
bacteria treatments are short lived or exceptionally expensive.
The company offers savings of over 3000% on items such as anti-
bacterial light switches and shower trays.
Ⅲ This technology is new to the UK, but the company already
works with some of the world’s largest organizations. They also
treat trains (London-Midland), both inside and out, Kempinski
hotels, Spar food processing factories, McDonald’s (Austria
and Germany), bakeries, health care environments etc. These
products are now being applied in some of Europe’s leading
supermarkets. The company has recently coated Ataturk’s
Mausoleum in Ankara (750,000m
2
).
Ⅲ A range of specialist products is provided, such as anti-corrosion,
anti-graffiti, anti-fingerprint, skin protection, cork protection and
variants for plants.
J UNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 28
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
O
ptically transparent solids have numer-
ous applications and have experienced
widespread use for centuries. Glass was
the predominant material over most of
that time, with additives often included
to engineer specific properties. A wide range of refractive
indices and absorption characteristics were eventually
produced. Glass and common metal oxides eventually
spanned the refractive index range from 1.44 (SiO
2
) to 2.7
(TiO
2
). In the modern era, polymers have become a com-
mon alternative to glass in many applications.
Visibly transparent polymers have the advantages of
low cost, processing ease and a wide range of physical
properties. Additionally, polymers exhibit strain behav-
ior that far exceeds the limits of glass. Urethanes and
polycarbonate, in particular, also have very high impact
resistance. However, transparent polymers have a more
limited range of refractive index than glasses and gener-
ally scratch more easily. An inorganic-organic nano-
composite ideally maintains the flexibility, low cost and
processability common with organic polymers, while
extending other material properties beyond the limits
of the host polymer. With proper selection, loading and
surface modification, inorganic nanoparticles can be
used to significantly broaden the engineering potential of
transparent polymers.
Over the past few decades, excitement has built around
these hybrid inorganic-organic materials that can offer
improved mechanical, optical, thermal and electrical
properties. Transparent nanocomposite films on the order
of nanometers to microns have successfully been used
to improve abrasion resistance, alter reflectance and
minimize the UV exposure of substrates. The advantages
of these materials include low processing costs, low pro-
cessing temperatures and extended strain ranges over
ceramic films.
The primary optical property of a material is its complex
index of refraction, which is an engineering constant that
explains the propagation and absorption of electromag-
netic waves through materials and at interfaces. The
design and production of optical filters is mainly accom-
plished through the combination of thin films with unique
refractive indices.
1
These are typically dielectric and metal
films that are almost exclusively deposited using vacuum
deposition. Although these materials have been studied
extensively, they have significant disadvantages related
to the required processing steps and limited mechanical
properties of the resultant films.
Nanocomposites composed of inorganic nanoparticles
embedded in an organic polymer matrix directly address
these issues.
2
The primary challenge for nanocomposites
is to alter the optical properties of a material without
affecting the visible transparence of the final article.
When an electromagnetic wave encounters a boundary
between two materials of discrete refractive index, the
direction of the wave is altered both through reflection
and refraction. This holds true with sub-micron particles,
where the optical dimension (refractive index and diam-
eter) must be engineered so as to not scatter light waves
(scattering decreases transparence). Thus, a homogenous
distribution of discrete, mono-disperse nanoparticles with
dimensions less than 1/10 the wavelength of the encoun-
tered light must occur within these nanocomposites to
ensure high visible transparence.
The focus of our research for the past several years has
been spin coating inorganic-organic nanocomposite films
that are used on visibly transparent, flexible substrates.
The engineering limits of polymers have been extended
By Thad Druffel, Matthew Lattis, Omar Buazza and Galen Powers | Optical Dynamics, Louisville, KY
HHiigghhllyy F F lleexxiibbllee Highly Flexible
NNaannooccoommppoossiittee Nanocomposite
on Compliant Surfaces
(D) (C)
(B)
(A)
O
O
NP
O
O
O O
C
C
C
C C C
C
C
C N
F
Si
Si
Si
Si
FIGURE 1 | Schematic of four different functional schemes using organosilanes.
PAI NT & COATI NGS I NDUS TRY Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
29
through incorporation of nanoparticles that make up over
half the volume of the composite. Spin coating is practi-
cally limited to substrates that cover less than a square
meter. It will be required to coat larger areas to move this
technology towards broader applications.
Large-area deposition of nanocomposites could more
effectively and economically reduce unwanted reflections
from consumer products such as cell phones, computers
and e-book readers. Inexpensive deposition of thin-film
filters over large areas is also applicable to solar energy,
where management of the solar spectrum is beneficial
(UV and IR reflectors, improved visible transmittance
and spectrum splitting). Additionally, these large-area
processes can be adapted to three-dimensional deposition,
further extending the reach of this technology.
Nanoparticles
In optical applications, it is crucial to obtain ultrafine
and stable nanodispersions in order to produce thin films
with low surface roughness and haze. Although the
primary size of most commercial nanoparticles is quite
small (5-50 nm), the high nanoparticle surface energies
cause agglomeration in the synthesis and post-synthesis
processes. This leads to dispersions with primary particles
in the nanometer range, but with a significant number of
large particle groups exhibiting complex shapes and mor-
phologies due to agglomerated and aggregated networks.
These conditions negatively impact haze and transpar-
ency.
3
The term agglomerates relates to groups with weak
interparticle bonds that allow them to be re-dispersed in
a solvent. Ball milling and ultrasonication are typically
used to break up agglomerates. The term aggregates
(or hard agglomerates) describes groups with primary
particles held together by strong attractive forces.
4
Aggre-
gates formed during high-temperature synthesis often
persist after ultrasonication or milling and must often be
removed through centrifugation or filtration.
Solution-based synthesis of nanoparticles was first
reported by Stober in 1968
5
using a tetraethoxy silane
(TEOS). Many researchers have improved on the original
methods, with a key enhancement being modification of
particle surfaces with functional organic groups, desig-
nated as an ORMOSIL (Organically Modified Silica).
6
This
method served as a basis for production of other metal
oxide nanoparticles through hydrothermal and solvother-
mal methods. The solvothermal method is carried out in a
closed reactor in which precursors of the metal oxide are
mixed into a solvent. The reactants are heated and reac-
tion kinetics are adjusted to alter the size of the nanopar-
ticles. Solution synthesis of nanoparticles has three very
important advantages:
• The nanoparticles are grown and harvested in a liq-
uid, reducing airborne contaminants.
• High heats are not required, so the presence of aggre-
gates is reduced.
• The solvents are amenable to several surface function-
alization schemes.
Preservation of discrete nanoparticles is of utmost
importance for high visible transparence in the finished
article. Dispersion of nanoparticles in liquids and solids
can be aided by functionalization of the particle surface.
Several functionalization schemes have been demon-
strated in literature, including the use of ions
7
, surfac-
tants, ligands
8
, polymers
9
, coupling agents
10
, and shells of
silica
11
or polymer.
12
The nanoparticles discussed here are metal oxides,
which are subject to simple functionalization using
organosilanes (as typically used with ORMOSILS). The
nanoparticles can be functionalized with different groups
that can include single groups that may or may not be
polymerizable (Figure 1). Functionalization that includes
a polymerizable group will aid in making the nanopar-
ticles an integral part of the matrix.
Engineered Nanocomposite Films
The third element of these nanocomposites is the poly-
mer that envelops the particles in a matrix, which may
also include covalent bonds between the inorganic and
organic phases. Nanoparticles can be dispersed directly
into a swelled polymer, although dispersing monomers
or oligomers directly into a nanoparticle solution has
advantages. Many monomers are soluble in the same
solvents the nanoparticles are already stabilized in and
can polymerize to functional groups on the particles.
Once the solvent has been removed, polymerization of
the nanocomposite can be performed using thermal or
photoinitiated curing.
The optical and mechanical properties of a nanocom-
posite are engineered by varying monomers, initiators,
curing conditions and the concentration of nanoparticles
used in the matrix. With spin coating techniques, up to
65 volume percent nanoparticle loading is possible, which
is near the theoretical limit of close packing with spheres.
Between the properties of the base polymer and the fully
a a nndd T T rraannssppaarreenntt and Transparent
C C ooaattiinnggss Coatings
Highly Flexible and Transparent Nanocomposite Coatings on Compliant Surfaces
J UNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 30
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
loaded nanocomposite, a continuous realm of possible
combinations exists.
Spin coating is a well-understood deposition technique
that produces reproducible, uniform films that are spread
across a substrate with considerable shear forces. When
the optical diameter of the nanoparticles becomes too large,
scattering results as light waves are reflected from the
boundary of the inorganic and organic phases (Figure 2).
A homogeneous dispersion of discrete mono-disperse nano-
particles will yield a highly transparent nanocomposite.
Models predicting light scatter intensity in a nano-
composite show a linear relationship with path length,
packing density and refractive index ratio, but scattering
varies with the cube of particle diameter.
13
I
I
0
= exp
−3V
p

3

4
(m−1)
(1)
where I/I
0
is the ratio of transmitted intensity to the
initial intensity, Vp is the volume packing density of the
nanoparticles, l is the path length, φ is the diameter of
the nanoparticle, λ is the wavelength of light, and m
is the ratio of the refractive indices at the inorganic to
organic boundary.
The refractive index of a nanocomposite is the com-
bination of the volume fraction of the inorganic and
organic components. The composite refractive index
can be modeled as:
n
2
= v
i
n
i
2
i

(2)
where n
i
and v
i
are the refractive index and volume frac-
tions of the components.
14
The inorganic nanoparticles
have a non-uniform refractive index across the visible
spectrum, whereas the organic polymer is nearly constant.
To demonstrate this effect, measurements were made
using nanocomposite films approximately 500 nm thick
with refractive indices between 1.5 and 1.75 (measured at
1.80
1.70
1.60
1.50
400 500 600 700 800
5%
25%
30%
40%
50%
R
e
f
r
a
c
t
i
v
e

I
n
d
e
x
Wavelength (nm)
FIGURE 3 | Refractive index dispersion of nanocomposites featuring varying volume
fractions of ZnO dispersed in a UV-cured polyurethane acrylate.
(A) (B)
FIGURE 2 | Effect of nanoparticle agglomeration on light waves. (A) Schematic
showing an agglomeration of primary particles that do not allow the light wave to
pass through. The large, rough surface encountered by the light waves will result
in reflected beams that travel in many directions. (B) Shows how steric stabilization
techniques maintain discrete separations between the nanoparticles allowing light
to pass unobstructed.

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480 nm). The range of refractive indices
was achieved with 5-50% loading of ZnO
nanoparticles in the UV-curable monomer
TMPTA. Results are shown in Figure 3. The
films were applied to a substrate using an
Optical Dynamics spin coater. The source
of the ZnO is a nanoparticle dispersion in
methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) produced by
Umicore (Zano MEK 067). It is reported as
containing 30 nm ZnO nanoparticles at
45 weight percent and uses a surfactant to
maintain nanoparticle separation. Reflec-
tance was measured with a contact spec-
trophotometer (F20 by Filmetrics), with
thickness and roughness determined using
a contact profilometer (XP-1 by Ambios
corporation). This data was then used to
determine refractive index using a Cauchy
model. It should be noted that the refrac-
tive index of the fully loaded ZnO film has
been determined to be approximately 1.75,
which is slightly lower than the expected
1.82. This is most likely due to the added
surfactant reducing the effective refractive
index of the ZnO nanoparticles. A similar
study of TiO
2
nanocomposite films was
undertaken and resulted in a maximum
refractive index of 1.88 with volume pack-
ing of 65 percent. In this case surface modi-
fication was responsible for the reduced
refractive index. These films were used to
produce thin-film reflective filters with up
to 38 layers, with the resultant stack sur-
viving strains up to 25 percent.
15
There is potential for the use of nano-
composite films in absorptive filters that
maintain high visible transparence. A
possible use is protecting eyes from harm-
PAI NT & COATI NGS I NDUS TRY Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
31
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2
0
0 20 40 60
A
b
s
o
r
b
a
n
c
e

(
A
.
U
.
)
Volume Density of ZnO (%)
FIGURE 4 | UV absorption of ZnO nanocomposites as the volume density of nanoparticles is increased.
A linear relationship between absorption and nanoparticle volume is observed.
Air In Chuck
Coating
Bowl
Filter
Chemistry In
Coating Dispense
Nozzle
HEPA Filter
coat
Substrates
cure clean
Air Out
Substrate
C
o
a
t
i
n
g

C
h
e
m
i
s
t
r
y

R
e
s
e
r
v
o
i
r
s
FIGURE 5 | Spin coating equipment to deposit thin films. (A) Schematic of coater showing the staging,
coating and curing stations of the machine. (B) Cross-section of the coating bowl showing move-
ment of air through the bowl and application of chemistry from below the substrate.
Highly Flexible and Transparent Nanocomposite Coatings on Compliant Surfaces
ful ultraviolet or infrared
wavelengths. Metal oxides
have high absorption in the
UV region with low absorp-
tion in the visible range,
which makes them ideal for
optical applications requir-
ing UV blocking. It is well
known that titanium diox-
ide and ZnO have very high
absorption in the ultravio-
let region. The visible and
UV response of 500-nm-
thick f ilms containing
varying volume ratios of
ZnO nanoparticles was
measured using a UV-Vis
spectrophotometer (8453
by Hewlett Packard). The ZnO disper-
sions demonstrated sharp changes in
response at about 380 nm, as expected
when the UV absorbance of ZnO is con-
sidered. The UV absorbance (λ = 340
nm) was linearly related to the volume
fraction of ZnO in the films (Figure 4), as
predicted by equation 1.
A similar study of the impact of volu-
metric loading of nanoparticles on the
modulus of a thin film resulted in a maxi-
mum modulus near 60 percent loading.
16

In this study, silica nanoparticles were
used at volumes ranging from 30 to 75
percent and the modulus was measured
using nanoindentation.
Deposition
The films discussed above
were spin coated with equip-
ment that was specifically
designed to deposit thin-film
nanocomposites. The coater
moves up to four 80-mm-
diameter substrates through
three process steps: clean-
ing, coating and curing
(Figure 5a). The unit main-
tains a consistent internal
temperature of up to 100
o
F
for evaporation consistency
and includes a HEPA filter to
reduce film defects. The sys-
tem is completely program-
mable and can deposit up to
six distinct coating chemistries.
Surfaces to be coated are first cleaned
with a high-pressure wash (1000 psi) to
remove fine particulates. The substrate
is then moved to the coating bowl where
one of six chemistries can be applied to
the spinning substrate. The liquid coat-
ings are filtered at the nozzle (5-micron
filters) and applied to the spinning sub-
strate (~1000 rpm) using computer con-
trolled solenoid valves (Figure 5b). The
dispersions are applied from beneath the
substrate and readily coat flat, cylindri-
cal, toric or spherical shapes. All of the
coating parameters (spin speed, substrate
sweep over the dispense nozzle, dispense
pressure, dispense time, air flow and air
temperature) are computer controlled,
and solvent vapors are removed from the
coating chamber using a fan. After the
coating is applied, the films are cured
using a pulsed xenon strobe lamp. The
substrate can then go back to the coating
bowl for subsequent layers or be returned
to the staging area, after which the next
substrate can be processed. The system
does not require high temperatures or
pressures and deposits films ranging from
roughly 30-3,000 nm with an accuracy
of +/- 5% for each layer.
Spin coating involves the thinning of
a liquid chemistry that is spread across a
spinning substrate as solvent evaporation
leaves behind the solute. This well-under-
stood technique controls film thickness
primarily through the viscosity of the
solution and the spin speed used during
film formation. The repeatability of the
process is very high as long as the coating
environment is well controlled, since this
leads to solvent evaporation rates that are
nearly constant. Initial film thickness is
set by a balance between the centrifugal
Functionalized Un-functionalized
500 nm 100 nm 100 nm
FIGURE 6 | Bulk nanocomposites utilizing functionalized and un-functionalized
nanoparticles.
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Highly Flexible and Transparent Nanocomposite Coatings on Compliant Surfaces
J UNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 34
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
forces applied to the film as the substrate spins and vis-
cous forces that increase as evaporation takes place. Once
these forces balance, evaporation becomes the primary
driver of film thinning. The forces encountered during
spin coating are significantly larger than gravitational
forces, so coating complex geometries with negligible
variation in coating thickness is practical. Additionally,
these forces allow extremely high nanoparticle packing
densities to be achieved.
Spin coating is not an ideal candidate for large sub-
strates, and thus the engineer is faced with depositing
high-volume-density films without a simply applied body
force to overcome the thermodynamic surface forces of the
nanoparticles. A large-area deposition will still need to
overcome the tendency of nanoparticles to agglomerate.
The functionalization of the nanoparticle surface should
reduce the surface energy and may aid in the self assem-
bly of the nanocomposite. The stabilization techniques
used to keep nanoparticles dispersed in a solvent may not
translate into a discrete dispersion in the nanocomposite.
Systems that rely on ions to maintain nanoparticle separa-
tion in an aqueous dispersion will begin to agglomerate as
the water is removed. Steric stabilization techniques using
surfactants can also create films that are poorly suited for
multilayer applications, since these methods can interfere
with interlayer adhesion. Ideally, functionalization would
reduce the surface energy of the nanoparticles to a level
comparable to that of the monomers used in the system,
thus creating a bulk nanocomposite monomer.
A demonstration of a bulk nanocomposite using
organosilane functionalization techniques reducing the
surface energy of the nanoparticles to achieve a homo-
geneous dispersion is shown in Figure 6. Two mixtures
were created that use alcohol-dispersed silica nanopar-
ticles (Nissan Chemistries IPA-ST) at 10 volume percent
in TMPTA. In the first mixture the silica dispersion was
used as supplied. The second mixture was functional-
ized using a methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane. The
mixtures were then placed into a rotary evaporator and
the alcohol was removed and the bulk monomer nano-
composite was cured using UV radiation. The nanopar-
ticles that were not functionalized tended to agglomer-
ate in the polymer matrix, which created haze. The
nanoparticles that were functionalized remained sepa-
rated in the dispersion as shown.
An ideal application method for coatings involving
large areas is dip coating. A simple setup was built to pull
a glass slide out of a nanoparticle-based coating solution
at speeds between 1 and 25 mm/s. The nanocompos-
ite dispersion was cerium dioxide, which is available
as a colloidal suspension from Sigma-Aldrich (Product
No 289744), and a trimethylolpropane triacrylate. The
ceria dispersion was functionalized such that acrylate
groups surrounded the nanoparticles. The total volume
of nanoparticles in the resultant film was 40 percent.
The thickness of the coating was determined to be 270
nm, with a refractive index of 1.8 (measured at 480 nm).
The original formulation was then diluted to produce a
film on the order of a quarter wavelength (approximately
70 nm), which is shown in Figure 7b. This quarter wave
producing high-index chemistry was used along with an
SiO
2
-bearing nanocomposite to produce a 9-layer reflec-
tive stack based on an alternating low/high pattern (with
curing between dip coating steps). The resultant film is
shown in Figure 7a.
Another technique suitable for roll-to-roll coating is
spray deposition using the setup shown schematically
in Figure 8. A trial was run depositing a nanocomposite
with approximately 40 percent nanoparticles by volume.
A spray nozzle and micro dispense valve from Lee Electro-
Fluidic Systems were used to spray the chemistry. The
valve was driven at a frequency of 20 Hz, and a substrate
was slowly passed under the nozzle to produce a continu-
ous film across. The resulting coating was highly trans-
parent at a thickness of 2.5 microns. The refractive index
of the coating was determined to be approximately 1.75.
Conclusion
In this paper we reviewed the engineering of nanocom-
posite thin films by adjusting inorganic nanoparticle load-
ings in a polymer matrix. The nanocomposite films were
engineered for refractive index, absorbance and modulus.
The preliminary work focused on spin coating techniques
in which optical and mechanical properties were engi-
neered with nanoparticles composing nearly 65 percent of
the volume. In order to move the technology to large-area
deposition and increase applicability to additional indus-
tries, nanoparticle surface modification is essential to
A B
FIGURE 7 | Dip-coated thin films of CeO
2
(right) and alternating
CeO
2
/SiO
2
layers (left).
Adhesion
layer
Deposition
Air
Knife
UV
Cure
Uncoated
Roll
Pick-Up
Roll
FIGURE 8 | Schematic of roll-to-roll coating of nanocomposites using spray.
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CoIorIng
CrossIInkers
NattIng
ResIn Components
ResIns
5mart FormuIating.
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Highly Flexible and Transparent Nanocomposite Coatings on Compliant Surfaces
J UNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 36
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
equalize the surface energies of the nano-
particles and surrounding monomers.
Thus, large body forces are not required
to overcome the tendency of the nanopar-
ticles to agglomerate. Three systems were
shown demonstrating that highly packed
nanocomposites can be formed using scal-
able deposition techniques.

Acknowledgements
This work was supported in part by the National Sci-
ence Foundation SBIR Phase II award No. 0848825
and in part by an award by the Kentucky Cabinet for
Economic Development, Department of Commercial-
ization and Innovation, under the grant agreement
KSTC-184-512-09-069 with the Kentucky Science and
Technology Corporation.
References
1
Heavens, O. S. Optical Properties of Thin Solid
Films; Butterworths, London, 1955.
2
Druffel, T.; Geng, K.; Grulke, E. Mechanical
comparison of a polymer nanocomposite
to a ceramic thin-film anti-reflective filter.
Nanotechnology 2006, 17(14): 3584.
3
Mandzy, N.; Grulke, E.; Druffel, T. Break-
age of TiO2 agglomerates in electrostati-
cally stabalized aqueous dispersions. Pow-
der Technology 2005, 160: 121- 126.
4
Park, B.; Smith, D.; Thoma, S. Determination
of agglomerate strength distributions: Part 4
Analysis of multimodal particle size distribu-
tions. Powder Technology 1993, 76: 125-133.
5
Stober, W.; Fink, A.; Bohn, E. Controlled
growth of monodisperse silica spheres in
the micron size range. J. Colloid Interface Sci.
1967, 26: 62-69.
6
Chisholm, B.; Resue J. UV-Curable, Hybrid
Organic-Inorganic Coatings. International
Waterborne, High-Solids, and Powder Coat-
ings Symposium. New Orleans, 2003, Paint
and Coatings Industry 2003, 6.
7
Khrenov, V.;Klapper, M.; Koch, M.; Mul-
len, K. Surface functionalized ZnO particles
designed for the use in transparent nano-
composites. Macromol. Chem. Phys. 2005,
206: 95-101.
8
Grubbs, R. B. Roles of polymer ligands in
nanoparticle stabilization. Polymer Reviews
2007, 47: 197-215.
9
Kislenko, V. N.; Verlinskaya, R. M. Adsorp-
tion of polyacrylic acid and its copolymers
with acrylonitrile on zinc oxide particles. J.
Colloid Interface Sci. 2002, 250: 478-483.
10
Allen, C. G.; Baker, D.J.; Albin, J.M.; Oertli,
H.E.; Gillaspie, D.T.; Olson, D.C.; Furtak,
T.E.; Collins, R.T. Surface modification
of ZnO using triethoxysilane-based mol-
ecules. Langmuir 2008, 24: 13393-13398.
11
Tago, T.; Tashiro, S.; Hashimoto, Y.; Waka-
bayashi, K.; Kishada, M. Synthesis and Opti-
cal Properties of SiO2-coated CeO2 Nano-
particle. J. Nanoparticle Res. 2003, 1-6.
12
Vedula, R. R.; Spencer, H.G. Adsorption of
poly(acrylic acid) on titania (anatase) and
zirconia colloids. Colloids Surfaces 1991, 58:
99-110.
13
Novak, B. M. Hybrid nanocomposite materi-
als - between inorganic glasses and organic
polymers. Advanced Materials 1993, 5(6):
422-433.
14
Seferis, J. C. Refractive Indeices of Poly-
mers. Polymer Handbook. J. Brandrup, E.
H. Immergut and E. A. Grulke. Hoboken,
John Wiley and Sons. 1999, 2: 571-582.
15
Druffel, T.; Lattis, M.; Spencer, M.; Buazza,
O. Elastic behaviour of a nanocomposite
thin film undergoing significant strains.
Nanotechnology 2010, accepted
16
Druffel, T.; Mandzy, N.; Sunkara, M.;
Grulke, E. Polymer nanocomposite thin
film mirror for the infrared region. Small
2008, 4(4): 459-461.
For more information, visit www.opticaldynamics.
com. This paper was presented at the American Coat-
ings Conference, Charlotte, NC, April, 2010.
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J UNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 38
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
A
n important class of specialty isocya-
nates includes one-component systems
that cure with moisture. One-component
PU systems are prone to surface foaming
and require special surface preparations.
Since it is more convenient to apply a single one-compo-
nent primer system compared to a two-component sys-
tem, Huntsman has developed a new moisture-cure MDI,
SUPRASEC
®
9611, which has low viscosity, low foaming
characteristics and is VOC free. This paper addresses
physical properties, reactivities and primer processing
conditions of this new moisture-cure MDI and compares
the properties to existing primer systems.
Introduction
Two-component spray coatings based on polyurea, hybrid
and polyurethane elastomer technology continue to find
commercial success in protective applications for civil
infrastructure, process plants and many more applica-
tions.
1,2
It is critical to the success of these coatings to
follow proper procedure in preparing the surface of the
substrate.
3
For concrete surfaces this may include chemi-
cal etching or sand blasting. However, surface preparation
may not always guarantee proper adhesion or a coating
without defects. There are potentials for an improperly
prepared surface, an undesirable surface tension, or per-
haps a damp substrate, which can cause an excessive
outgas. All of these issues could lead to blisters or pinholes
in the coating surface or could even potentially cause
delamination of the coating from the substrate. Cor-
recting these problems after the fact is both
expensive and timely.
When encountering difficult
substrates or surfaces, the spray
applicator can reduce the
likelihood of serious
problems with
the application of an appropriate primer. Primer systems
can increase the adhesion of the overall coating system.
This occurs when a primer is able to penetrate into a porous
surface and create a mechanical bond. The application of
the primer in this case increases the overall strength of
the substrate. In addition, the topcoat has the opportunity
to form a chemical bond with the primer. These covalent
bonds also increase the strength of the overall adhesion.
Finally, the primer acts as a barrier and will prevent the
contamination of moisture into the surface of a substrate
and therefore inhibit some of the surface defects that may
have been encountered otherwise.
A number of two-component polyurethane systems
have been evaluated as primers over the years and
recently were discussed by Camargo and Skok.
4
They
described the performance benefits of using a two-com-
ponent coating as a robust primer over damp concrete
prior to a top coat. The main advantages to the formu-
lator include the ability to adjust coating properties
via polyol selection and mixing ratio, and the ability to
adjust cure speed through catalyst selections.
Despite the benefits mentioned above, in the field it is
much more convenient to use a one-component system.
Using a one-component system eliminates problems with
incorrect mix ratios, improper or poorly mixed compo-
nents, or limited pot life after mixing. A one-component
moisture-cured polyurethane is typically made by react-
ing excess isocyanate with a high-molecular-weight poly-
ester or polyether polyol. The amount of free NCO groups
remaining in these “prepolymers” is generally 16% or
lower. Once the moisture-cure prepolymer is applied
to the substrate in a thin film, the amount of
relative humidity controls the curing speed.
The NCO groups in the prepolymer react
with the active hydrogen of the water
molecule and form an amine and
carbon dioxide. Additional
NCO groups begin to react
with the amine and form
ureas until all NCO
JJ UN J UN JJ UN J UN J UN JJJ UN JJJ UN J UN JJJJJJJ UN J UN J UN JJ UU JJ UN J UN J UN J UN JJJ UN J UN N JJJ U UU E 2 E 2 E 2 E 2 222 E 2 EE 2 E 2 E 2 2222 E 2 2 E 2 E 2 EE 2 E 2 E 2 E 2 E 201 01 01 1110 10 01110 11111 000001 111110 1 01 0110 010 010 0110 0 0001 10 10 110 1
||||||| W W W W W W W W WWWWW W WWWWWWWW W W W W WW W W W W W W W W W W W W W W WWWWWW W W W W W W W W W WWWWWWW W W WW W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W WWW W W W W W W W W W W W W W W WW W WW P C P C P C P C PP C PPP C CC P C C P C P C P C P C P C P CCCC P C P C CC P C P C C P C P C P C P C CCC . P C PP C . P C CCC . P C CC P C C P C CC . P C C I M A IIII M I M A MM A M A MM A M A MM A M A M A MM A MM AAAAAA M A II AAAA I M A I M A I M A I M A I M A I M A I M A I M A I M A M A I M A M A M A M A M A M A M A MMM A M A M A M A M A A M A A M A M A I M M A I M MMM A M A M A M A A I M A MM I M M A I M A M A M A MM A M A M A M A M A A I M M I M A I M A I M M A M A M A M A MMMM A AA M G C G C G . C O M O M O M
ⅢⅢ
By Roeland J. Tuinman, Katie L. Skok and Kevin A. Buck | Huntsman Polyurethanes, Auburn Hills, MI
Advancements in One-Component
Urethane Primer
TABLE 1 | Product descriptions of primers.
Product Description
SUPRASEC 9611 Moisture-cure MDI; no VOC
SUPRASEC 9584 and castor oil
2-component urethane 1:1 by
volume
RUBINATE 9511 and xylenes Moisture-cure MDI; 10% VOC
Acrylic emulsion #1 Water-based acrylic with filler
Acrylic emulsion #2 Water-based acrylic; no filler
SUPRASEC 9259 and water
Emulsifiable MDI and water
75:25 by weight
PAI NT & COATI NGS I NDUS TRY Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
39
groups have been consumed. The generated carbon diox-
ide dissipates from the film and evaporates into the air. If
the film thickness is too large or if the amount of moisture
is too high, there is an opportunity for the CO
2
to become
trapped in the film and to cause an undesirable effect of
foaming and blisters. This effect can become exaggerated
if the viscosity of the prepolymer is too high. The high
viscosity of the prepolymer causes the CO
2
gas to diffuse
more slowly from the film and increases the likelihood of
trapped gas. For this reason, it has been a common prac-
tice in the industry to add solvents to the prepolymers in
order to reduce viscosity. In addition to reducing foaming
effects, the overall lower viscosity helps improve the pen-
etration into porous substrates and, therefore, increases
the bond strength. Unfortunately, the addition of solvent
into a coating system greatly increases the overall VOC
content. The industry has shown a trend away from this
practice when at all possible. For this reason, Huntsman
has developed SUPRASEC 9611, a non-VOC, low-viscosity,
MDI moisture-cure prepolymer, designed for use as a
primer on porous substrates.
Experimental
Materials
Six primer coating chemistries were evaluated in this
study. The primers, most of which are commercially avail-
able, include a waterborne acrylic with fillers; a water-
borne acrylic without fillers; a two-component isocya-
nate/castor oil system; a one-component, solvent-based
isocyanate; a non-VOC, one-component-based isocya-
nate; and an emulsifiable-based isocyanate/water system.
The products and descriptions for the six comparative
primers are listed in Table 1.
Characterization
Curing comparisons between systems were conducted
at 23 °C and 50% humidity using a thin-film B-K drying
recorder from Gardco. Films of 20-mil thickness of each
system were applied onto clean glass plates and allowed
to cure for 1 week. The films were removed from the glass
and tested for tensile strength, elongation and Die C tear
according to standard ASTM methods, ASTM D 882 and
ASTM D 624 respectively.
Adhesion specimens were prepared on either wet or dry
concrete blocks by coating the substrate with the primer
at a 5-mil thickness using a brush. Dry blocks were condi-
tioned for 1 week at 23 °C and 50% humidity. Wet blocks
were submerged in water for 3 hours. Once removed from
the water, the blocks were primed immediately, while still
saturated. A standard polyurea formulation based on a
commercial MDI prepolymer was sprayed at different time
intervals following the primer application using a Gus-
mer H20/35 proportioning unit and a Graco Fusion Air
Purge Gun, model AR2020. The details of the polyurea
system can be found in Table 2. After one week, adhesion
specimens were prepared with 1-inch diameter test dollies
and pulled off with an Elcometer 106 Adhesion Tester to
measure strength and failure mode.
Results and Discussion
Physical Properties
Drawdowns of films (20 mil) on glass provided bubble-free
and defect-free coatings from which we were able to evalu-
ate physical properties of each primer chemistry, with the
exception of the emulsifiable system, SUPRASEC 9259
and water mixed at a 75 to 25 weight ratio. This system
formed a brittle film that could not be tested. Physical
properties of the remaining systems are listed in Table 3.
Urethane chemistries displayed the highest overall physical
strength. The one-component system of RUBINATE 9511
and xylenes had the highest tensile values, followed by
SUPRASEC 9611. This was expected since the RUBINATE
9511 and xylenes combination had the highest percentage
of free NCO groups available to react with water and form
urea hard segments, which provide strength to the coating.
The acrylic emulsions were softer materials with lower ten-
sile strength. The non-filled system, Acrylic Emulsion #2,
provided an advantage in physical properties such as ten-
sile and tear strength when compared to the filled system.
Reactivity
The reactivity profile of each primer chemistry is pre-
sented in Figure 1. The open time refers to the amount of
time in which the primer remains a liquid. The viscosity
of the liquid increases until the material has gelled into a
Moisture-Cured
Technology
TABLE 2 | Description of spray polyurea system.
Isocyanate Component SUPRASEC 9608 100 parts
Resin Component
Jeffamine D-2000 64.31
Jeffamine D-5000 3.57
DETDA 28.54
Rebus 6021 3.57
Reaction Profile
Gel time 4 sec
Tack free time 6 sec
Physical Properties
Tensile strength 3200 psi
Tear strength 600 pli
Elongation 330%
Shore D 50
Taber abrasion 0.007 g/cycle
TABLE 3 | Physical properties of primers.
Primers Tensile, psi Elongation, % Die C Tear, pli
S 9611 3383 85 440
S 9584 and CO 2450 43 260
R 9511 and xylenes 5115 101 523
Acrylic emulsion #1 529 264 155
Acrylic emulsion #2 1300 83 242
Advancements in One-Component Moisture-Cured Urethane Primer Technology
J UNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 40
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
solid, as indicated in Figure 1 as “gel time.” The material
loses its stickiness or tackiness, as indicated by “tack free
time”, which also indicates that the material has reached
full cure. At 50% relative humidity, both acrylic emulsions
demonstrated the quickest cure. Final cure was reached
within 2 hours time. The one-component moisture-cure
isocyanates, SUPRASEC 9611 and RUBINATE 9511 with
xylenes, reached final cure within 3 hours. While these
cure profiles demonstrate the typical curing behaviors,
increased humidity and temperatures will decrease the
amount of time needed to reach final cure. Previous work
has demonstrated the ability to spray a polyurea topcoat
over the primer before it has reached its final cure.
3

Increased adhesion values are noted in the urethane-
based systems even when the polyurea is applied over wet
or tacky primers. In these instances it is presumed that
the unreacted NCO groups remaining in the primer have
the opportunity to be covalently bonded into the polyurea
matrix and thus the adhesion is increased.
Adhesion
The six primers were brush applied at 5-mil thickness
to both dry and wet concrete. A polyurea topcoat was
sprayed over the primers at 1, 3, 6 and 24 hours after the
primers were applied. The adhesion values of the complete
primer and polyurea system to dry and wet concrete were
measured (Figure 2). For the dry concrete, increased adhe-
sion was noted with the SUPRASEC 9611, the RUBINATE
9511 and xylenes, and the SUPRASEC 9584 and castor
oil system. Both acrylic systems had average values below
300 psi, which was a slight decrease from the non-primed
adhesion value. The polyurea system without primer had
an average of 400 psi adhesion to concrete.
The wet concrete contributed to lower adhesion values
overall, when compared to the dry concrete data (Figure
3). The concrete was extremely saturated with water before
priming, and the conditions tested represent the absolute
worse case scenario for a moisture-contaminated substrate
in the field. The adhesion value of polyurea to concrete
without any primer was on average 100 psi. There was an
overall improvement in adhesion when a primer was used
prior to the polyurea topcoat. The greatest adhesion was
obtained when using SUPRASEC 9611 or SUPRASEC 9259
and water system. For both one-component systems, there
was a trend towards improved adhesion after 24 hours.
Data beyond 24 hours was not evaluated in this study,
although it has been shown previously to yield good adhe-
sion.
5
It is our belief that beyond 24 hours, the opportunity
for contamination over the cured primer in a commercial or
an industrial setting is potentially large.
Visual Inspection
The visual inspection of test dollies after the adhesion
testing is complete can provide extremely important
information regarding the adhesion performance of the
primer and topcoat. The adhesion tester and a dolly that
has been “pulled off” from the concrete block are displayed
in the photo in Figure 4. In addition, photos were taken of
the dollies after they were removed from both dry and wet
concrete that had been primed 1 and 24 hours before the
application of a polyurea topcoat (Figures 5, 6). The dark
A
d
h
e
s
i
v
e

S
t
r
e
n
g
t
h
,

P
S
I
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
450
S 9611 S 9584
and CO
Acrylic
Emulsion
#1
Acrylic
Emulsion
#2
R9511 and
Xylenes
S 9259
and Water
Unprimed Adhesion = 100 psi
1 h Cure 3 h Cure 6 h Cure 24 h Cure
FIGURE 3 | Adhesion to wet concrete.
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
S 9611 S 9584
and CO
Acrylic
Emulsion
#1
Acrylic
Emulsion
#2
R9511 and
Xylenes
S 9259
and Water
A
d
h
e
s
i
v
e

S
t
r
e
n
g
t
h
,

P
S
I
1 h Cure 3 h Cure 6 h Cure 24 h Cure
Unprimed Adhesion = 400 psi
FIGURE 2 | Adhesion to dry concrete.
0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16
S 9259 & Water
Acrylic Emulsion #2
Acrylic Emulsion #1
R9511 and Xylenes
S 9584 and CO
S 9611
Hours
Open time Gel time Tack free time
Primer Reactivities
75
º
C, 50% Relative Humidity
FIGURE 1 | Reactivity profiles of primers.
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Advancements in One-Component Moisture-Cured Urethane Primer Technology
J UNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 42
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
particles shown on the dollies are actually pieces of the
concrete that have been pulled from the concrete block.
Concrete failure of this type is highly desired because it
indicates that the primer has successfully penetrated into
the substrate. The dollies in the photos that appear white
have not removed any of the concrete. One can visually
see the white color of the polyurea coating, which indi-
cates that the primer was not as effective.
In Figure 5, the dollies on the left side of the picture have
more concrete failure than those on the right side. This is
expected, as the measured adhesion values from the wet
bricks were typically lower than the dry bricks. In Figure 5,
SUPRASEC 9611 and SUPRASEC 9584 and castor oil have
provided the greatest concrete failure. The Acrylic #1 and
Acrylic #2 display the least amount of concrete failure.
Figure 6 presents the dolly test specimens that were
obtained from the 24-hour polyurea topcoat over both
wet and dry primed bricks. Once again, the dry specimens
on the left of the picture display more concrete failure
than the wet specimens on the right. Comparison of both
pictures reveals that the 24-hour specimens appear to
have a higher concentration of concrete failure than the
1-hour specimens. High levels of concrete failure were
also observed on the dollies of the urethane systems
coated with polyurea after 3 and 6 hours. This indicates
that a large window for topcoat application exists.
Conclusions
The use of a primer under a polyurethane, polyurea or
hybrid coating is a critical step that can enhance the perfor-
mance of the coating system, especially when encountering
a difficult substrate. Not only can the primer improve adhe-
sion to the substrate, it can also eliminate the possibility of
moisture contamination during the topcoat application.
Since it is more convenient to use a one-component prod-
uct in the field, Huntsman has developed a one-component
moisture-cure MDI, SUPRASEC 9611, which has low vis-
cosity, low foaming characteristics and is VOC free.

Acknowledgements
The authors would like to acknowledge Anita Conway and David Balkevitch
for their valuable assistance in preparation of the test materials. The
authors would also like to thank the Auburn Hills Physical Testing Labora-
tory and Analytical Testing Laboratory for their services.
References
1
Perez, A.P.; Redinger, J.L.; Johnston, J.A. “Performance and Pro-
cessing Enhancements of Aromatic Polyurea Elastomer Systems
Prepared from High 2,4’-MDI” API 2000, Boston, MA.
2

Broekaert, M. “Polyurea Spray Coatings: Technology and Latest
Developments”, European Coatings Show 2000, Berlin, Germany
3

Perez, A.P.; Chen, C.C. “Performance Enhancements of Aro-
matic Polyurea Spray Coatings by the Use of Conventional
Primer Systems”, PDA 2000.
4

Camargo, R.; Skok, K. “New Developments for Two Component
Urethane Primers”, PACE 2006, Tampa, FL.
5

Johnston, J.A. “An Evaluation of Moisture-cure resins as Prim-
ers Under Aromatic Polyurea Elastomer Systems”, PDA 2004.
This paper was presented at Polyurethanes 2009 Technical Conference
in Fort Washington, MD, on behalf of the Center for the Polyurethanes
Industry (CPI).
FIGURE 4 | Elcometer adhesion testing on concrete brick with
primer and polyurea topcoat.
FIGURE 5 | Adhesion dollies displaying failure mode for concrete
coated 1 h after primer coat.
FIGURE 6 | Adhesion dollies displaying failure mode for concrete
coated 24 h after primer coat.
Wacker Chemical Corporation, 6870 Tilghman Street, Allentown, PA 18106-9346, USA
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CREATING TOMORROW’S SOLUTIONS
J UNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 44
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
A
dvances in waterborne coatings tech-
nology in developed countries around
the world have been driven by a com-
bination of regulatory restrictions and
consumer expectations. Within the past
few years, consumers in emerging markets have begun to
demand more environmentally friendly products.
Some regulations in the Western world, such as the
European Union’s REACH (Registration, Evaluation,
Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) initiative,
have affected producers exporting paints and inks. The
coatings industry, according to Frost & Sullivan
1
, also will
have a large impact on technology development around
the world. Many manufacturers in India, where there is
not yet regulation of VOCs in paint, have been proactive in
introducing more sustainable technologies in response to
growing domestic demand for greener products.
Along with this growing expectation for more environ-
mentally friendly products, consumers expect increasing
levels of performance from paint. Waterborne coatings,
however, have posed significant challenges to formulators.
Traditional Trade-Offs
The polarity and cohesive hydrogen bonding between
water molecules lead to very high surface tension in
water-based systems. High surface tension makes it very
difficult for paint to properly wet the surface of substrates
with uneven and/or porous surfaces. But, proper wetting
is necessary for even coating. Poor wetting causes crater-
ing and an increased defect rate. This problem is magni-
fied if dirt particles and other contaminants are present.
When paint is applied to very low-surface-energy, materi-
als such as plastics, air entrapment, crawling, framing
and poor adhesion often result.
To address these issues, formulators have turned to
additives designed to increase substrate wettability and
lower surface tension of the coating. In order to achieve
complete wetting, coatings must have lower surface ten-
sion than the substrate.
Silicone Polyether for Superior Wettability
Dow Corning’s commitment to sustainability and improv-
ing the performance of greener coating formulations led
to the development of Dow Corning
®
67 Additive, a multi-
purpose silicone polyether additive designed specifically
for all types of water-based coatings, including wood coat-
ings, UV-cured systems and more.
Dow Corning 67 Additive is offered as a water-dispers-
ible, 100%-silicone polyether with recommended use lev-
els of 0.1% to 1%. It has a flash point above 100 ºC (212 ºF)
and is stable up to 200 ºC (392 ºF).
This new silicone additive lowers the surface tension
of waterborne coating formulations as measured by con-
By Mustafa Mohamed, Ph.D., Dow Corning Global Application Engineer; and Juan Carlos Corcuera, Dow Corning European Area
Application Engineer | Dow Corning, Midland, MI
Multipurpose Organosilicone
Additive for Waterborne
Coatings and Inks
Eliminates Regulatory/Performance Trade-Offs
No Additive With Dow Corning
67 Additive
C
o
n
t
a
c
t

A
n
g
l
e
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
32 34 36 38 40 42 44
Surface Energy of Substrate, mN/m
Control
Fluoro
surfactant
Acetylenic
diol
Dow Corning
67 Additive
FIGURE 1 | Water-reducible stoving paint with and without Dow Corning 67 Additive;
the new additive significantly reduced the contact angle in 0.1% water compared
to other additives.
PAI NT & COATI NGS I NDUS TRY Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
45 PAI NT & C & C
tact angle. The difference is notable when
compared to other commercially avail-
able additives (Figure 1). While the new
additive significantly enhances wetting
properties, it does not have a negative
effect on other important properties, such
as recoatability.
A distinct advantage of this unique sili-
cone polyether is its ability to wet problem
surfaces such as PVC and other plastics
without the need to add other solvents.
At a 0.2% addition level, with no addi-
tional solvent required, Dow Corning 67
Additive clearly outperforms many other
types of additives on the market (Figure
2). This feature increases the ability of
the formulator to meet strict VOC regula-
tions while providing expected appear-
ance and adhesion properties.
Because it creates a very low dynamic
surface tension, the new additive spreads
quickly and evenly. The ability to develop
water-based systems that perform as
well as traditional solventborne inks and
coatings under these conditions could
provide a significant competitive advan-
tage for formulators.
Ease of use also has been considered
when designing this new silicone addi-
tive for water-based coatings. Addition is
possible at the grind or let down stages of
production, or even after all other steps are
completed (post-added).
Other Developments
The new silicone additive was developed as
part of a comprehensive program aimed at
helping customers address such coating
property issues as gloss enhancement, slip
and mar resistance, impact deadening,
UV resistance, touch and feel, heat and
temperature resistance, water resistance,
and marine foul release capabilities.
Dow Corning’s R&D efforts are focused
on the development of novel silicon chem-
istries, including additives, resins, resin
intermediates and other materials, that
will enable formulators to produce sustain-
able coatings solutions for their customers.
The company has a strong commitment
to the coatings industry around the world
and anticipates launching several innova-
tive solutions in the near future.

Reference
1
Press Release: “Frost & Sullivan Predicts
Gradual Revival of China’s Paint & Coat-
ings Market,” June 28, 2009.
Additional information on Dow Corning’s additives for
inks and coatings is available at www.dowcorning.
com/coatings.
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80
70
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Droplet
diameter
on PE foil
Surface
tension
mN/m
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0.2% addition level with the
droplet applied to PE foil.
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FIGURE 2 | Dow Corning 67 Additive improves wetting by lowering surface tension. These conditions
could provide a significant competitive advantage for formulators.
I’m finding
it difficult
to control
microfoam and pinholes
in my airless spray
applied topcoats. What
would you suggest?
Ask the Expert
Jim
Reader
Lead
Research
Chemist
Q
tell me more
www.airproducts.com/
surfactants
© Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., 2009 (31892) B40
Microfoam is caused by
small air bubbles that
are caught in the paint
film by the spray process
and rise too slowly in the drying film,
so they remain trapped at or beneath
the surface. Pinholes are often
caused when these small bubbles
break free at the surface, and the film
is too viscous to flow back and fill the
hole left behind. Pinholes can also
appear when coatings are baked;
bubbles, initially trapped below the
surface, rise as the coating flows
under the heat and before it gains
viscosity through cross-linking.
Deaerators are needed to bring
these bubbles to the surface quickly
so that the air can be released before
the film sets. Molecular defoamers,
such as Surfy¯ nol
®
DF110C defoamer
or EnviroGem
®
AD01 defoamer are
effective deaerators for many spray
applied coatings. These products
can also be used in combination with
other defoamers, such as Surfy¯ nol
DF58 defoamer or Surfy¯ nol DF70
defoamer, if stronger defoaming is
required.
A
Visit ads.pcimag.com
Additives belong to a broad and diffuse category of key
components in a coating formulation. They comprise a
small percentage in that formulation, usually less than
5%, but their impact is significant. Additive function is
almost always very specific in nature. Some additives
are multi-purpose; for example, they may be important
to the manufacturing process as well as to the coating’s
performance. In recent years more multi-purpose addi-
tives have been developed, thus allowing the use of
fewer additives in many formulations. Occasionally the
use of one additive will require the use of another to
counter some undesirable effect of the first.
Some additives are proprietary products with highly
specific functions that work well in some systems but can-
not be used in others. In addition, because of the proprie-
tary nature of many additives, their chemical composition
is not disclosed. This can make general recommendations
difficult. In addition, this lack of structural knowledge
means that additive substitutions cannot be made on the
basis of fundamental structural chemistry.
In recent years the focus on green technology, lower cost
and safer products has led to the introduction of newer addi-
tives and chemistries. With a large number of additives avail-
able for a particular problem, formulators can find them-
selves in trouble if the wrong additive is initially selected
or added to alleviate or correct a problem. Correct additive
selection is important to success, and such selection is made
through vendor assistance or years of experience.
Please note that there are a number of new nano-sized
additives on the market today that are difficult to categorize.
Their functions are varied and tend to overlap our traditional
categories. For this reason we have included a number of
these types under the Nanotechnology section.
The following is a brief description of various coating
additives along with some generic examples. The major-
ity of additive types are represented.
Additives Handbook
T W O T H O U S A N D T E N
By Dr. Joseph V. Koleske, Robert Springate and Dr. Darlene Brezinski
JUNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 46
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
ABRASION-RESISTANCE IMPROVERS
See Slip Aid, Nanotechnology
Abrasion is a phenomenon caused by the mechanical action of rubbing,
scraping or erosion. It has two forms, marring or wearing. Mar abrasion is
the permanent deformation of a surface, but the deformation does not
break the surface. Wear abrasion is removal of a portion of the surface by
some kind of mechanical action: wind erosion, sliding back and forth of
an object, wear of tires on traffic paint, and so on. The surface removal
is gradual and progressive in nature. Abrasion resistance is a combina-
tion of basic factors such as elasticity, hardness, strength (both cohesive,
tensile and shear strength), toughness, and, especially in the case of
wear resistance, thickness. In addition, abrasion resistance is intimately
related to scratching and slip. Thus, compounds that enhance these
properties will improve abrasion resistance.
The nature of the polymeric resin and the pigments affect abra-
sion resistance. In the case of the pigments, it should be noted that
extender pigments are noted for their ability to contribute to a variety of
mechanical properties. Examples of compounds that have been used to
enhance abrasion resistance include: silica glass spheres, specialty glass
spheres such as UVT™ Sunspheres, and similar compounds that improve
hardness. Certain silicones and other oils will decrease surface friction,
making it easier for objects to slide over the surface and thus reduce
wear abrasion. Increasing crosslink density by use of higher functionality
oligomers and/or larger amounts of crosslinking agents has been used
to improve abrasion resistance.
Waxes have also been used to improve slip and thereby abrasion.
Hard waxes resist abrasion better than soft materials. Both PE and PTFE
waxes function by the ball bearing mechanism, while the softer micro-
crystalline waxes work via the layer (bloom) mechanism.
The use of nano-sized materials in coating formulations can signifi-
cantly improve scratch resistance. These improvements can be used in
clear topcoats, ink over-print varnishes and pigmented finishes. The
commercial availability of nanoparticles allows formulators to obtain
new properties that were unachievable in the past, not only in scratch
resistance but many other physical performance attributes.
For nanoparticles to be of use in transparent coatings, it is critical
that aggregates present in the powder be dispersible to their primary
particle size in the coating formulation to avoid rapid settling and exces-
sive light scattering. In addition, it is critical that the dispersed primary
particles avoid re-aggregation during the coating curing process.
Thousands of scratch-resistant coating applications are present in
our everyday lives. Examples of these applications include coatings for
wood floors, safety glasses, electronic displays, automotive finishes
and polycarbonate panels. Improving the mar, scratch and/or abrasion
resistance in these transparent coating applications is a major chal-
lenge, particularly with regard to not affecting the other performance
attributes of the coating.
Inorganic Fillers
Incorporation of inorganic fillers into coatings to improve mechanical
properties is well known. Drawbacks associated with this approach can
include loss of transparency, reduced coating flexibility, loss of impact
resistance, increase in coating viscosity and appearance of defects.
To overcome these defects, a filler material should impart improved
scratch resistance without causing the aforementioned drawbacks.
Nanomaterials have the potential to overcome many of these drawbacks
because of their inherent small size and particle morphology.
Maintaining transparency in a coating containing inorganic filler par-
ticles is a challenge. Four properties dictate the degree of transparency
in a composite material: film thickness, filler concentration, filler particle
size, and the difference in refractive index between the bulk coating and
the filler particle.
2010 Additives Handbook
2010 Additives Handbook
JUNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 48
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
Silica particles, colloidal or fumed, and clays are among the most
widely studied inorganic fillers for improving the scratch/abrasion resis-
tance of transparent coatings. These fillers are attractive from the stand-
point that they do not adversely impact the transparency of coatings
due to the fact that the refractive indices of these particles (fumed silica
= 1.46; bentonite clay = 1.54) closely match those of most resin-based
coatings. The drawback to silica-based fillers is that high concentrations
of the particles are generally required to show a significant improve-
ment in the scratch/abrasion resistance of a coating, and these high
loadings can lead to various other formulation problems associated with
viscosity, thixotropy and film formation.
Alumina
The use of alumina particles in transparent coatings is much more lim-
ited even though alumina is significantly harder than silica-based mate-
rials and, as a scratch- and abrasion-resistant filler, higher performance
at lower loadings is often observed. For alumina particle sizes greater
than 100 nm, the high refractive index (1.72) results in significant light
scattering and a hazy appearance in most clear coatings. Currently, only
high-refractive-index coatings, such as the melamine-formaldehyde
resins used in laminate production, can use submicron alumina for
scratch resistance and maintain transparency.
To use alumina as a scratch-resistant filler in transparent coatings, the
particle size must be sufficiently small to overcome its refractive index
mismatch. A Physical Vapor Synthesis (PVS) process has been developed
that allows production of nonporous crystalline metal oxides having
primary particle sizes less than 100 nm at economically viable rates with
essentially no byproducts or waste streams.
Two grades of aluminum oxide can be produced using the PVS process:
NanoTek™ and NanoDur™ alumina. Both grades feature a mixture of γ- and
δ-crystal phases and are spherical in shape, but the grades differ in terms
of primary particle size. NanoTek alumina has a surface area of 35 m
2
/g cor-
responding to a mean particle size of 48 nm, whereas NanoDur alumina
has a surface area of 45 m
2
/g with a mean particle size of 37 nm.
There is a proprietary particle dispersion stabilization process that
involves specific surface treatments designed to yield nanoparticles
that are compatible with a variety of different coating formulations.
For example, stable dispersions of metal oxide nanoparticles can be
prepared in solvents such as water, alcohols, polar and nonpolar hydro-
carbons, plasticizers, and even directly in acrylate monomers with the
appropriate surface-treatment process. These surface treatments allow
solids levels of up to 60 wt% to be dispersed, and yet maintain a suf-
ficiently low viscosity for ease of blending.
The use of highly concentrated, non-aggregated nanoparticle disper-
sions allows incorporation of the nanoparticles into a coating formulation
without substantial dilution of the formulation with the dispersion liquid.
This feature is particularly important in 100%-solids coating formulations
wherein the nanoparticle is dispersed in one of the reactive monomers.
Within a given coating class, formulations that result in harder/
stiffer coatings tend to show greater improvement with alumina
incorporation than formulations that lead to softer/more elasto-
meric coatings. In addition, transparent coating formulations that
exhibit crosslinking upon curing, such as UV-curable, 2K polyure-
thane, and melamine-based coatings, show greater improvement
in their scratch resistance upon alumina nanoparticle incorporation
compared to transparent coatings that do not crosslink but rather
coalesce, such as emulsion-based coatings.
SNC
SNC is an abbreviation for silica nanocomposites that are composed
of colloidal silica particles with an organic surface modification. These
particles, which improve the scratch and abrasion resistance of a variety
of coatings including radiation-curable formulations, are produced by
a unique process that results in monodispersed, non-agglomerating
spheres with a diameter of about 20 nm. The flexible manufacturing
process is also capable of producing a broad range of cationic (epox-
ide) and free-radical (acrylate) radiation-curable oligomeric composite
materials. These products are stable, transparent and have low viscosity,
even at a silica loading of 60%.
Nanoscale materials for coatings also include complex silicon oxides
and aluminum silicates. Nanoparticles of these materials have been
incorporated into automotive coating formulations that have good sag
resistance. The cured coatings have excellent chip and scratch resis-
tance, outstanding appearance, superior sandability, and resistance
to water spotting and acid etching. Some properties, such as scratch
resistance, are maintained after accelerated weathering.
Sol-gel
It is also possible to improve the scratch- and wear-resistance properties
of a coating as well as its photostability/weatherability by the addition
of nanoparticles prepared by sol-gel processing. This method has the
advantage in that it starts from existing, well-developed formulations
to which a sol containing nanoparticles is added. After curing, the
modified systems give transparent coatings with high wear and scratch
resistance.
Very often, hybrid (organic-inorganic) materials are produced by
sol-gel. The most common way to produce nanocomposites is to form,
in-situ, an inorganic phase by hydrolysis and condensation of alkoxides
or alkoxysilanes. A further curing results in covalent bonding between
the organic and inorganic phase.
ABSORBENTS
Absorption is a process wherein a material is taken up and held, or
retained, by another material. The material taken up is called the “absor-
bate” and the material that retains the material from the absorption
process is called the “absorbent.” Thus, absorbents are materials that are
able to take up another material with the formation of a homogeneous
mixture. For example, cotton fibers will take up moisture, charcoal will
take up a gas, baking soda will take up odors, silica gels will take up mois-
ture; certain pigments, clays or extenders will take up oils and others will
take up moisture; and so on. This should be contrasted with adsorption,
which is a surface phenomenon and wherein adsorbed molecules can
have markedly different properties than those of absorbed molecules.
Compounds such as zeolites or molecular sieves are adsorbents that take
up compounds by the adsorption process (See Moisture Scavenger).
ACCELERATORS
See Hardeners
These products increase the epoxy-amine reaction rate and subse-
quently reduce the possibility of undesired blushing or blooming
reactions. Controlled use of the amount and type of accelerator
ensures minimal impact on the cured binder performance. Although
there are numerous products capable of accelerating epoxy-amine
reactions, the most commonly used are: tertiary amines (e.g., DMP-30
= 2,4,6-tris-[dimethylaminomethyl]-phenol), phenol derivatives (e.g.,
nonylphenol), alcohols (e.g., benzyl alcohol) or acids (e.g., salicylic
acid). Be aware that adding accelerator will significantly reduce the
pot-life of the binder system.
ACID CATALYSTS
See Catalysts
Acid catalysts are used to accelerate chemical reactions. Strong acids
such as p-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA) are frequently used. Also used are
catalysts based on dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (DDBSA) and hexafluo-
rophosphoric acid. In using strong acids as catalysts, acid strength does
not necessarily influence the cure rate but it does affect some film prop-
erties. The most widely used of the strong acids is PTSA. Weaker acids,
such as butylphosphoric, those based on aromatic phosphates and vari-
ous carboxylic acids, are also used in some coatings systems. Blocked
acid catalysts are also used for many crosslinking reactions.
ACID SCAVENGERS
Acid scavengers remove the small amounts of acid that are formed
during the lifetime of a coating or ink. For example, when vinyl
PAI NT & COATI NGS I NDUS TRY Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
49
copolymers are aged small amounts of hydrochloric acid are formed
as they age. An acid scavenger reacts with the acid, which removes
it from the system so it cannot cause harm to the coating, substrate
or abutting objects. Compounds such as cycloaliphatic epoxides
and soybean oil epoxide, which readily react with strong acids, are
examples of acid scavengers.
ADHESION PROMOTERS
See Coupling Agents
Adhesion promoters improve a coating’s ability to withstand mechani-
cal separation from a substrate. That is, they improve adhesive strength.
Quite often these compounds contain two different functional ends, one
of which will interact with the substrate and the other that will interact
with the coating binder. Examples of the various coupling agents are the
silanes, which are trihydrolyzable; the titanates, which can be mono-, di-,
and tetrahydrolyzable; and the chromiums, which are complex in nature.
For metal surfaces that are to be coated, this is particularly important
because metals, as a class, are unstable. The pure metal is always oxidiz-
ing to the metal oxide on the surface of the metal substrate. Exposure to
moisture, oxygen and salts accelerates the process. Almost all coatings
contain microvoids through which oxygen, small molecules like water,
and ionic materials can diffuse. If the coating can remain bonded to the
metal, then the damage done by these diffuse agents will be nonexis-
tent. In other words, corrosion can be prevented. It is, therefore, very
important to do all that is possible to maximize adhesion.
For some materials this involves a mechanical roughening of the
substrate surface to increase the surface area for physical absorption.
Chemical pretreatments such as zinc/iron phosphate and various other
materials have also been used because tightly bound phosphated sur-
faces will retard access to the metal and, therefore, impede corrosion.
Typically, organofunctional silanes have been used in coatings as
adhesion promoters because they provide a polar functional group to
contribute to increased bonding to a mineral substrate. They also are
hydrolyzable and provide wetting ability and surface activity. The silanes
are moisture sensitive and will hydrolyze over time to silanols. This is not
a problem in solventborne coatings systems but can cause problems for
waterborne systems. The silanes react with both the polymer and the
substrate to form covalent bonds across the interface. Silane adhesion
promoters are used in urethane, epoxy, acrylic and latex systems.
Receptive inorganic surfaces are those that have hydroxyl groups
attached to elements such as Si, Al, Ti and Fe. Nonreceptive surfaces, such
as boron, and alkaline earth oxides, do not form stable covalent bonds with
silanols. A number of different commercial silane coupling agents are used
in coatings. Levels that range from 0.05-1.0% are generally effective.
Methacrylic phosphate monomers that improve adhesion to metal,
concrete, glass and other inorganic substrates and that can be used
in both water- and solventborne formulations are available. Some
methacrylic phosphate monomers improve metal adhesion and also
significantly improve corrosion resistance. There are also acrylic phos-
phate functional monomers that improve adhesion to various metal
substrates. The acrylic reactive group provides a higher reaction rate in
UV- and EB-curable applications.
Other adhesion promoters that are in the marketplace are titanates
(such as isopropyl tris-[N-ethylaminoethylamino] titanate), zircoaluminates,
zirconates, aryl/alkyl phosphate esters and proprietary metal organic com-
pounds. The titanates and zirconates suffer from moisture sensitivity as
well, so caution is necessary when using them with waterborne systems.
Neo-alkoxy products are claimed to not have this problem. Alkyl/aryl phos-
phate esters, zircoaluminates and the metal organic promoters are stable
in waterborne coatings. They are quite different in chemical nature and
therefore the formulator needs to evaluate them separately.
Epoxy/methoxy functional additives are effective in promoting
adhesion of a variety of coating systems to glass, aluminum and steel.
Methacrylate/methoxy functional additives improve adhesion of free
radical cured resins, such as polyacrylates, to inorganic substrates.
Epoxy functional silanes improve adhesion and water resistance of
a variety of coating systems to inorganic substrates. Amine/methoxy
functional additives improve adhesion and water resistance of coat-
ings and adhesives when bonded to glass or metal substrates.
Powder Coatings
The same precautions regarding clean substrates and pretreat-
ments that apply to liquid coatings are advised for powder coatings.
Adhesion promoters such as the silanes and titanates may also be used
to enhance adhesion. Silanes designed for use in powder coatings
have an organo functionality that has an affinity for the powder resin
system. The organo-silane must orient itself at the coating-substrate
interface. The choice of organo-silane is usually governed by the resin
system, and experimental screening is advised to determine which
promoter provides the most improvement. Adhesion promoter types
commonly used in powder include mercapto-silanes, amino-silanes,
carboxyl/hydroxyl-silanes, and carboxyl-silanes.
Plastic Substrates
Due to high chemical stability, low price, excellent balance of physical
properties, possible recycling, etc., the amount of polypropylene (PP)
and thermoplastic olefin (TPO) consumed by automotive parts, house-
hold electrical appliances and molded general goods businesses is
increasing. However, PP and TPO are materials with low surface energy
that make painting and adhesion problematic, hence chlorinated poly-
olefin (CPO) has found wide use as an adhesion promoter. Solventborne
CPOs have traditionally been used. Excellent adhesion between TPO
substrates and CPO can be obtained as the result of good wetting and
higher dispersion interaction, which are affected by the properties of
the CPO’s chlorine content, crystallinity, melting temperature, molecular
weight and its polydispersity.
There are several factors that can affect the performance of a CPO-
based adhesion promoter. Application parameters play a significant role
in designing a system that will provide optimum adhesion performance.
Of particular importance is the temperature at which a coating applied
to a PP or TPO part is cured or baked. In addition, substrate and CPO
composition can influence overall adhesion performance.
Coating bake temperature is the temperature at which the coating
applied to the TPO part is cured. Coating bake temperature can have
an effect on the interaction between a CPO-based adhesion promoter
and the surface of TPO, which can affect performance. For best results,
coating adhesion is enhanced when the coated TPO parts are baked at
temperatures over 100 ˚C, given the same coating type. However, CPO-
based adhesion promoters are successfully used in applications, such as
automotive refinish applications, where the coating is air-dried or baked
at temperatures lower than 100 ˚C.
The chemical and physical properties of the CPO can also have a sig-
nificant effect on adhesion performance. Addition of co-resins to CPOs
can enhance adhesion, reduce blistering, and improve the appearance
of coatings applied over the adhesion promoter layer. CPOs have limited
compatibility with most resin types, but unlike conventional coatings this
may not be detrimental to performance. CPOs promote adhesion best
when they are at the interface of the substrate and the coating applied
over the substrate. This means that a formulated adhesion promoter sys-
tem with a CPO and borderline compatible co-resin may actually allow the
CPO to reach the interface more readily. A number of co-resin types can
be used with CPO, including acrylic, acrylic-modified alkyds, polyesters
and others. The level of CPO used in the formulation will be dependant
upon the substrate, coating type and required performance properties.
Research efforts are focused on waterborne coatings applicable to TPO
substrates that coalesce well at baking temperatures as low as, or lower
than, 80 ˚C (176 ˚F) in order to save energy costs and to avoid thermal defor-
mation of TPO substrates at the higher temperatures. Chlorine-free adhe-
sion promoters are also being used and are highly desirable.
To view the rest of the definitions in the
Additives Handbook, visit www.pcimag.com or e-mail
Andrea Kropp at kroppa@pcimag.com to purchase the CD.
JUNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 50
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
2010 Additives Products
ABRASION RESISTANCE
IMPROVERS
C.E.D. Process Minerals Inc.
N Cabot
Clariant Corporation
Cray Valley Ltd.
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Electro Abrasives LLC
Honeywell
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Laurel Products
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
N Michelman
Mineral Development LLC
N Troy Corp.
N Unimin Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
ABSORBENTS
N Cabot
ACID SCAVENGERS
P.A.T. Products Inc.
ADHESION PROMOTERS
Ashland Distribution
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
Gelest Inc.
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
LANXESS
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
N Michelman
OMG Americas
P.A.T. Products Inc.
N Rhodia Inc.
N Sartomer USA LLC
N Troy Corp.
N Wacker Chemical Corporation
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
AMINE NEUTRALIZERS
ANGUS Chemical Company
Taminco
W.D. Service Co.
ANTI-BLOCKING AGENTS
Ashland Distribution
N Buhler Inc.
C.E.D. Process Minerals Inc.
Chemguard
Cognis Corporation
Cray Valley Ltd.
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Esprix Technologies
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
Expancel
Honeywell
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
N Michelman
N Micro Powders Inc.
P.A.T. Products Inc.
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
ANTI-CRATERING AGENTS
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
OMG Americas
PCI Group Inc.
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
ANTI-CRAWLING AGENTS
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
ANTI-FLOAT AGENTS
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
OMG Americas
PCI Group Inc.
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
ANTI-FLOODING AGENTS
Cognis Corporation
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
OMG Americas
PCI Group Inc.
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
ANTI-FOULING AGENTS
C.E.D. Process Minerals Inc.
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Laurel Products
Lintech International LLC
ANTI-FREEZING AGENTS
Ashland Distribution
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
Sasol North America
ANTI-GELLING AGENTS
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
ANTI-LIVERING AGENTS
Lintech International LLC
ANTI-MARRING AGENTS
Ashland Distribution
N BYK USA Inc.
Clariant Corporation
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Honeywell
Intercorp Inc.
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Laurel Products
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
N Michelman
N Micro Powders Inc.
OMNOVA Solutions Inc.
PCI Group Inc.
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
N Siltech Corporation
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
ANTI-RUST AGENTS
Buckman
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Heucotech Ltd.
N King Industries Inc.
LANXESS
Lintech International LLC
R. T. Vanderbilt Co. Inc.
Sphere One Inc.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
ANTI-SAG AGENTS
Ashland Distribution
N Cabot
N COATEX
Cray Valley Ltd.
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Dow Coating Materials
N King Industries Inc.
Lintech International LLC
NYCO Minerals Inc.
PCI Group Inc.
N Troy Corp.
ANTI-SETTLING AGENTS
N BYK USA Inc.
N Cabot
N COATEX
Cognis Corporation
Cray Valley Ltd.
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Dow Coating Materials
N Elementis Specialties
N Evonik Degussa Corporation
Honeywell
Huber Engineered Materials
N King Industries Inc.
Lintech International LLC
N Micro Powders Inc.
OMG Americas
PCI Group Inc.
R. T. Vanderbilt Co. Inc.
Rio Tinto Minerals
N Troy Corp.
ANTI-SILKING AGENTS
Lintech International LLC
PCI Group Inc.
N Troy Corp.
ANTI-SKINNING AGENTS
Ashland Distribution
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Lintech International LLC
OMG Americas
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
ANTI-STATIC AGENTS
(Anti-Stats)
Clariant Corporation
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
P.A.T. Products Inc.
ANTIOXIDANTS
Ashland Distribution
Clariant Corporation
Electro Abrasives LLC
Emerald Performance Materials
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
N King Industries Inc.
LANXESS
Lintech International LLC
R. T. Vanderbilt Co. Inc.
Technical Industries Inc.
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
ANTIMICROBIALS
Algicides
Arch Chemicals Inc.
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Dow Microbial Control
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
LANXESS
Lintech International LLC
N Troy Corp.
Bactericides
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Dow Microbial Control
LANXESS
Lintech International LLC
Mytech Inc.
N Troy Corp.
Biocides
N American Chemet Corp.
Arch Chemicals Inc.
Ashland Distribution
Buckman
Clariant Corporation
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Dow Microbial Control
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
LANXESS
Lintech International LLC
Mytech Inc.
R. T. Vanderbilt Co. Inc.
N Troy Corp.
Refer to pages 58-65 for supplier contact information.
Refer to pages 66-72 for a list of additive distributors.
N See our ad in this issue.
PAI NT & COATI NGS I NDUS TRY Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
51
Cuprous Oxide
N American Chemet Corp.
Enzyme-Based Additives
N Troy Corp.
Fungicides
N American Chemet Corp.
Arch Chemicals Inc.
Buckman
Clariant Corporation
Cognis Corporation
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Dow Microbial Control
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
LANXESS
Lintech International LLC
N Troy Corp.
ZOCHEM Inc.
In-Can Preservatives
Clariant Corporation
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Dow Microbial Control
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
LANXESS
Lintech International LLC
N Troy Corp.
Misc. Preservatives
N American Chemet Corp.
Arch Chemicals Inc.
Buckman
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Dow Microbial Control
Lintech International LLC
N Troy Corp.
ZOCHEM Inc.
Non-Mercurial
Arch Chemicals Inc.
Buckman
N Dow Microbial Control
N Troy Corp.
BODYING AGENTS
Lintech International LLC
N Troy Corp.
BRIGHTENERS (Optical)
C.E.D. Process Minerals Inc.
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
KaMin Performance Minerals
Lintech International LLC
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
BURNISH-RESISTANT
ADDITIVES
N Troy Corp.
CATALYSTS
Ashland Distribution
Buckman
N Buhler Inc.
N BYK USA Inc.
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Emerald Performance Materials
Gelest Inc.
N King Industries Inc.
OMG Americas
Prox-Chem America Inc.
Vertellus Specialty Materials
CAUSTICS & CAUSTIC SODA
Ashland Distribution
CHELATING AGENTS
Ashland Distribution
N Troy Corp.
COAGULANTS
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
COALESCENTS (Coalescing
Agents)
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
Cognis Corporation
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
Lintech International LLC
N R. E. Carroll Inc.
N Rhodia Inc.
Sasol North America
N Soy Technologies LLC
Taminco
CORROSION INHIBITORS
N Air Products and Chemicals Inc.
Ashland Distribution
Buckman
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Electro Abrasives LLC
Gelest Inc.
N Heucotech Ltd.
Intercorp Inc.
N King Industries Inc.
LANXESS
Laurel Products
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
NYCO Minerals Inc.
Prox-Chem America Inc.
R. T. Vanderbilt Co. Inc.
Rio Tinto Minerals
Sphere One Inc.
N Troy Corp.
Vertellus Specialty Materials
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
CORROSION-INHIBITIVE
PIGMENTS
Buckman
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Heucotech Ltd.
Lintech International LLC
NYCO Minerals Inc.
Rio Tinto Minerals
Sphere One Inc.
COUPLING AGENTS
Ashland Distribution
N Buhler Inc.
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Gelest Inc.
Prox-Chem America Inc.
Taminco
N Wacker Chemical Corporation
CROSSLINKING AGENTS
Ashland Distribution
N Buhler Inc.
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Gelest Inc.
LANXESS
Lintech International LLC
Perstorp Polyols Inc.
N Siltech Corporation
N Wacker Chemical Corporation
CURING AGENTS
N Air Products and Chemicals Inc.
Ashland Distribution
N Buhler Inc.
Cardolite Corp.
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Emerald Performance Materials
Gelest Inc.
Lintech International LLC
Mitsubishi Gas Chemical
America Inc.
OMG Americas
N Reichhold Inc.
Technical Industries Inc.
DEAERATORS
Ashland Distribution
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Emerald Performance Materials
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
OMG Americas
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
DEFLOCCULANTS
Ashland Distribution
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
OMG Americas
DEFOAMERS
Misc. Defoamers
N Air Products and Chemicals Inc.
Ashland Distribution
Buckman
N BYK USA Inc.
Clariant Corporation
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Elementis Specialties
Emerald Performance Materials
Ethox Chemicals LLC
Hydrite Chemical Co.
Visit ads.pcimag.com
JUNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 52
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
2010 Additives Products
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
N King Industries Inc.
Lintech International LLC
N Munzing
Prox-Chem America Inc.
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
Non-silicone
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
N BYK USA Inc.
Clariant Corporation
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Emerald Performance Materials
Ethox Chemicals LLC
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
Hydrite Chemical Co.
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
N King Industries Inc.
Lintech International LLC
N Munzing
OMG Americas
N Rhodia Inc.
Sasol North America
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
Silicone
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
N BYK USA Inc.
Clariant Corporation
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Emerald Performance Materials
Esprix Technologies
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
Hydrite Chemical Co.
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
N King Industries Inc.
Lintech International LLC
N Munzing
OMG Americas
N Siltech Corporation
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
DEGASSING AGENTS
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
DRIER STABILIZERS
Cytec Industries
N Troy Corp.
DRIERS
Drying Salts
Emerald Performance Materials
N Troy Corp.
Misc. Driers
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
OMG Americas
N Troy Corp.
Naphthenates
N Munzing
OMG Americas
N Troy Corp.
Neodecanoates
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
OMG Americas
N Troy Corp.
Octoates
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
H.L. Blachford Ltd.
OMG Americas
N Troy Corp.
Water Dispersible
N Buhler Inc.
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
OMG Americas
N Troy Corp.
Waterborne
N Buhler Inc.
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
OMG Americas
N Troy Corp.
DYES (For Use in Stains)
Emerald Performance Materials
LANXESS
United Color Manufacturing Inc.
ELECTROCONDUCTIVE
ADDITIVES
P.A.T. Products Inc.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
EXTENDERS
N Burgess Pigment Co.
C.E.D. Process Minerals Inc.
N Cabot
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Dow Coating Materials
Huber Engineered Materials
KaMin Performance Minerals
Lintech International LLC
Mineral Development LLC
NYCO Minerals Inc.
Pacer Corporation
R. T. Vanderbilt Co. Inc.
Rio Tinto Minerals
Sasol North America
Sphere One Inc.
N Unimin Corp.
FILLERS - NATURAL,
CELLULOSIC, POLYMERIC
Ashland Distribution
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Esprix Technologies
N Evonik Degussa Corporation
Expancel
KaMin Performance Minerals
Lintech International LLC
Marshall Additive Technologies
NYCO Minerals Inc.
Pacer Corporation
N R. E. Carroll Inc.
Sphere One Inc.
FISH EYE PREVENTERS
Ashland Distribution
Chemguard
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
FLAME RETARDANTS
Buckman
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Electro Abrasives LLC
Huber Engineered Materials
LANXESS
Laurel Products
Lintech International LLC
Marshall Additive Technologies
P.A.T. Products Inc.
N R. E. Carroll Inc.
FLATTING AGENTS
Dispersed
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Lintech International LLC
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
Misc. Flatting Agents
C.E.D. Process Minerals Inc.
N Cabot
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Elementis Specialties
N Evonik Degussa Corporation
H.L. Blachford Ltd.
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Lintech International LLC
N Micro Powders Inc.
NYCO Minerals Inc.
Plasticolors Inc.
Rio Tinto Minerals
Sasol North America
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
N Unimin Corp.
Non-Metallic
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Expancel
Honeywell
Intercorp Inc.
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Lintech International LLC
NYCO Minerals Inc.
FLOCCULANTS
Ashland Distribution
Buckman
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
Lintech International LLC
FLOW & LEVELING AGENTS
BASF Corporation
N Cabot
Chemguard
N COATEX
Cognis Corporation
Cook Composites & Polymers
Cray Valley Ltd.
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Evonik Degussa Corporation
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
Lintech International LLC
OMG Americas
OMNOVA Solutions Inc.
PCI Group Inc.
Prox-Chem America Inc.
Rio Tinto Minerals
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
FLUORESCENT ADDITIVES
Lintech International LLC
United Color Manufacturing Inc.
FOAMING AGENTS
Ashland Distribution
Chemguard
Cytec Industries
Expancel
FREEZE-THAW STABILIZERS
Ashland Distribution
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
Sasol North America
GELLING AGENTS
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
H.L. Blachford Ltd.
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
GLOSS IMPROVERS
Ashland Distribution
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
KaMin Performance Minerals
Lintech International LLC
N Siltech Corporation
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
GLYCERINE
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Ashland Distribution
Lintech International LLC
Perstorp Polyols Inc.
GREEN ADDITIVES
Ashland Distribution
N Cabot
Cardolite Corp.
N COATEX
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Laurel Products
Sasol North America
GRINDING AIDS
Electro Abrasives LLC
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
Lintech International LLC
N Troy Corp.
HALS (Hindered Amine
Light Stabilizers)
BASF Corporation
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
P.A.T. Products Inc.
HAMMER FINISH ADDITIVES
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
PAI NT & COATI NGS I NDUS TRY Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
53
HARDENERS
Ashland Distribution
Cardolite Corp.
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
Mitsubishi Gas Chemical America
Inc.
N Reichhold Inc.
N Rhodia Inc.
HASE THICKENERS
BASF Corporation
N COATEX
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Elementis Specialties
HEAT STABILIZERS
Ashland Distribution
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
HEUR THICKENERS
BASF Corporation
N COATEX
N Elementis Specialties
Lintech International LLC
OMG Americas
HUMECTANTS
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Ashland Distribution
Clariant Corporation
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
HYDROPHILES
Sasol North America
HYDROPHOBIC AGENTS
Ashland Distribution
N Cabot
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Gelest Inc.
Sasol North America
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
HYGIENIC COATING
ADDITIVES
Clariant Corporation
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
IMPACT RESISTANCE
IMPROVERS
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Marshall Additive Technologies
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
INK ADDITIVES
3M Energy and Advanced Materials
Division
N Air Products and Chemicals Inc.
ANGUS Chemical Company
Ashland Distribution
N BYK USA Inc.
Clariant Corporation
Clariant Corporation
Cognis Corporation
Cook Composites & Polymers
Cray Valley Ltd.
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Electro Abrasives LLC
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
H.L. Blachford Ltd.
Honeywell
Huber Engineered Materials
KaMin Performance Minerals
N King Industries Inc.
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Laurel Products
Lintech International LLC
N Michelman
N Micro Powders Inc.
N Munzing
OMG Americas
OMNOVA Solutions Inc.
P.A.T. Products Inc.
N Rhodia Inc.
Sasol North America
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
N Siltech Corporation
N Soy Technologies LLC
N Troy Corp.
N Unimin Corp.
United Color Manufacturing Inc.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
INTUMESCENT ADDITIVES
Clariant Corporation
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Expancel
LANXESS
Perstorp Polyols Inc.
Rio Tinto Minerals
LEAFING AGENTS
N Troy Corp.
LUBRICANTS (Solids)
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Laurel Products
LUMINESCENT ADDITIVES
Lintech International LLC
MASKING AGENTS
Lintech International LLC
MICROSPHERES
3M Energy and Advanced Materials
Division
Dow Coating Materials
Expancel
Lintech International LLC
Sphere One Inc.
MISC. OTHER ADDITIVES
3M Energy and Advanced Materials
Division
ANGUS Chemical Company
Ashland Distribution
N BYK USA Inc.
N Cabot
N COATEX
Cook Composites & Polymers
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Electro Abrasives LLC
Ethox Chemicals LLC
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
Expancel
Intercorp Inc.
KaMin Performance Minerals
N King Industries Inc.
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Laurel Products
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
N Michelman
N Munzing
NYCO Minerals Inc.
OMNOVA Solutions Inc.
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
N Troy Corp.
N Unimin Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
MISC. OTHER CHEMICAL
SPECIALTIES
3M Energy and Advanced Materials
Division
Acme-Hardesty Co.
ANGUS Chemical Company
Ashland Distribution
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
H.L. Blachford Ltd.
Laurel Products
Lintech International LLC
N Munzing
OMG Americas
Perstorp Polyols Inc.
N Troy Corp.
VanDeMark Chemical Inc.
MISC. POWDER COATING
ADDITIVES
3M Energy and Advanced Materials
Division
N Air Products and Chemicals Inc.
Cray Valley Ltd.
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Evonik Degussa Corporation
Intercorp Inc.
KaMin Performance Minerals
N King Industries Inc.
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
N Micro Powders Inc.
OMG Americas
OMNOVA Solutions Inc.
Fillers•Extenders•Oils•Lubricants
1570 North Olden Avenue Trenton, NJ 08638
Ph. 800-257-9365 Fax 609-695-0102
www.recarroll.com
What you put in your formulation
matters as much as what you get
out of it...
Introducing.....
American eChem
Coalescing Agents, PEG Esters,
and Non-Phthalate Plasticizers
ICRM
Hydrocarbon Resins & Coumarone Indene
KLJ Group
Chlorinated Paraffins, Plasticizers
Yil-Long Chemical Group Ltd.
Cellulose Ethers, Redispersable Powder
Polymers, Micronized Iron Oxides
For more information on these products
visit our website or email us at paintinfo@recarroll.com
Visit ads.pcimag.com
Refer to pages 58-65 for supplier contact information.
Refer to pages 66-72 for a list of additive distributors.
N See our ad in this issue.
JUNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 54
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
2010 Additives Products
Prox-Chem America Inc.
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
N Troy Corp.
N Unimin Corp.
MISC. VISCOSITY & FLOW-
CONTROL AGENTS
3M Energy and Advanced Materials
Division
Ashland Distribution
N BYK USA Inc.
N Cabot
N COATEX
Cook Composites & Polymers
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Dow Coating Materials
N Elementis Specialties
N Evonik Degussa Corporation
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
Expancel
Huber Engineered Materials
N King Industries Inc.
Lintech International LLC
OMG Americas
OMNOVA Solutions Inc.
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
N Troy Corp.
MOISTURE SCAVENGERS
N Cabot
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
OMG Americas
VanDeMark Chemical Inc.
MONOMERS
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
Cognis Corporation
Cytec Industries
Emerald Performance Materials
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
Lintech International LLC
Perstorp Polyols Inc.
N Rhodia Inc.
N Sartomer USA LLC
Sasol North America
NANOTECHNOLOGY
ADDITIVES
N Buhler Inc.
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Esprix Technologies
Gelest Inc.
Laurel Products
OILS
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Lintech International LLC
N R. E. Carroll Inc.
N Reichhold Inc.
ORANGE PEEL PREVENTERS
Ashland Distribution
Chemguard
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
N Troy Corp.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
ORGANOCLAYS
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Elementis Specialties
Lintech International LLC
pH CONTROL AGENTS
ANGUS Chemical Company
Ashland Distribution
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
PHOTOINITIATORS
BASF Corporation
Cognis Corporation
Cytec Industries
Lintech International LLC
PHOTOSENSITIZERS
Lintech International LLC
PINHOLE PREVENTATIVES
Ashland Distribution
Chemguard
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
Lintech International LLC
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
PLASTICIZERS
Abietates
Lintech International LLC
Adipates
Ethox Chemicals LLC
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
LANXESS
Lintech International LLC
N R. E. Carroll Inc.
Sasol North America
Benzoates
Ashland Distribution
Emerald Performance Materials
Ethox Chemicals LLC
Lintech International LLC
N R. E. Carroll Inc.
Castor Oil (Polymerized/
Oxidized)
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Lintech International LLC
Vertellus Specialty Materials
Castor Oil (Raw/Refined)
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Ashland Distribution
Lintech International LLC
Vertellus Specialty Materials
Epoxidized
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Ashland Distribution
Lintech International LLC
Misc. Plasticizers
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
LANXESS
Lintech International LLC
Sasol North America
N Soy Technologies LLC
Vertellus Specialty Materials
Oil-Modified
Lintech International LLC
Phosphates
Ashland Distribution
LANXESS
Lintech International LLC
Phthalates
Ashland Distribution
Ethox Chemicals LLC
LANXESS
Lintech International LLC
Perstorp Polyols Inc.
N R. E. Carroll Inc.
Sasol North America
Polymerics
Lintech International LLC
Sebacates
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Ethox Chemicals LLC
Lintech International LLC
N R. E. Carroll Inc.
Sulfonamides
Ashland Distribution
Lintech International LLC
PRETREATMENT CHEMICALS
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
PRINTING INK DISPERSANTS
& VEHICLES
Ashland Distribution
Clariant Corporation
Cognis Corporation
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Ethox Chemicals LLC
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
N King Industries Inc.
Lintech International LLC
N Munzing
OMG Americas
Sasol North America
N Troy Corp.
Vertellus Specialty Materials
PRINTING INK VARNISHES &
COMPOUNDS
Lintech International LLC
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
Vertellus Specialty Materials
PROTECTIVE COLLOIDS
Perstorp Polyols Inc.
REACTIVE DILUENTS
BASF Corporation
Cardolite Corp.
Cytec Industries
Emerald Performance Materials
N Huntsman Advanced Materials
N King Industries Inc.
Lintech International LLC
N Rhodia Inc.
Vertellus Specialty Materials
SLIP AIDS
Ashland Distribution
N BYK USA Inc.
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Electro Abrasives LLC
N Elementis Specialties
Ethox Chemicals LLC
H.L. Blachford Ltd.
Honeywell
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Laurel Products
Lintech International LLC
N Michelman
N Micro Powders Inc.
OMG Americas
Plasticolors Inc.
Sasol North America
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
N Siltech Corporation
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
SOIL REPELLANTS
C.E.D. Process Minerals Inc.
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
Sasol North America
SPREADING AGENTS
Acme-Hardesty Co.
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
Lintech International LLC
STABILIZERS
Misc. Stabilizers
Cytec Industries
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Lintech International LLC
Non-Metallic
Lintech International LLC
STAIN-RESISTANT ADDITIVES
Ashland Distribution
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Laurel Products
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
STEARATES
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Ashland Distribution
H.L. Blachford Ltd.
Lintech International LLC
N R. E. Carroll Inc.
SURFACE MODIFIER
Ashland Distribution
Clariant Corporation
Cray Valley Ltd.
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Gelest Inc.
Honeywell
Laurel Products
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
N Michelman
OMG Americas
„The Joy of Painting...“,
Pete D. is Happy!
Worlée-Chemie GmbH · Soellerstrasse 14-16 · 21481 Lauenburg , Germany · Tel. +49(0)4153/596-0 · Fax +49(0)4153/53649 · www.worlee.de · service@worlee.de
w
w
w
.
b
j
o
e
r
k
.
d
e
Every painter is happy if the product
he is using gives long lasting protec-
tion. High performance paint will give
many more years protection than your
standard paint and reduce mainte-
nance costs dramatically. Pete D. had
the choice of four environmentally
friendly coatings which are based on
resins from Worlée. These resins
enable the paint formulator to pro-
duce high performance paints and lac-
quers for metal coatings.
If you have to choose a binder for
metal coatings, please click
www.worlee.de/metal-coatings
or call:
USA East:
J. H. Calo Company, 866-300-CALO
USA Midwest, Central, Gulf and
Pacific:
The Tryline Group, 800-682-0221
Canada:
FM Ferguson & ICC 1-800-268-3073
WorléeCryl 7158 is a water-
borne styrene acrylic dispersion for
base and top coats on metal which
provides, after drying, a water resist-
ant film. The solid content of nearly
50% and the MFFT from 32–37 °F
allow the formulations of paint s to
be applied even under unfavourable
weather conditions.
WorléeCryl A 2241 Wis a
water based hydroxyl functional acryl-
ic emulsion for two component coa-
tings for the cross-linking with hydro-
philic and hydrophobic isocyanates. It
is used for top coats with excellent
resistance and high gloss. The solid
content is 45% and the hydroxyl con-
tent is 4.1%.
WorléeKyd SD 7003 is an alkyd
resin for high solid systems which
complies with European and American
VOC guidelines. It is a low viscous air-
drying long oil alkyd resin for high
gloss or satin architectural and main-
tenance lacquers with low VOC con-
tent. WorléeKyd SD 7003 is available
with a solid content in de-aromatized
hydro carbons.
Pete D., Manager General
Maintenance
JUNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 56
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
2010 Additives Products
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
SURFACE TENSION REDUCER
Ashland Distribution
Chemguard
Clariant Corporation
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Elementis Specialties
Ethox Chemicals LLC
Lintech International LLC
OMG Americas
PCI Group Inc.
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Ashland Distribution
Chemguard
Clariant Corporation
N COATEX
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Ethox Chemicals LLC
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
Lintech International LLC
OMG Americas
Sasol North America
Taminco
SURFACTANTS &
DISPERSING AGENTS
Anionic
3M Energy and Advanced Materials
Division
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
Buckman
Clariant Corporation
N COATEX
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Dow Coating Materials
N Elementis Specialties
Ethox Chemicals LLC
Lintech International LLC
OMG Americas
N Rhodia Inc.
Sasol North America
N Troy Corp.
Vertellus Specialty Materials
Cationic
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
Clariant Corporation
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
Nonionic
3M Energy and Advanced Materials
Division
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
Clariant Corporation
N COATEX
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Dow Coating Materials
N Elementis Specialties
Ethox Chemicals LLC
Lintech International LLC
OMG Americas
N Rhodia Inc.
Sasol North America
Detergents
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
Clariant Corporation
Dispersing Agents
Acme-Hardesty Co.
N Air Products and Chemicals Inc.
ANGUS Chemical Company
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
Buckman
N BYK USA Inc.
Clariant Corporation
N COATEX
Cognis Corporation
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Dow Coating Materials
N Elementis Specialties
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
N King Industries Inc.
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
N Munzing
OMG Americas
PCI Group Inc.
Plasticolors Inc.
N Rhodia Inc.
Sasol North America
N Shepherd Color Company
N Troy Corp.
N Wacker Chemical Corporation
Emulsifiers
Acme-Hardesty Co.
N Air Products and Chemicals Inc.
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
Clariant Corporation
Cytec Industries
Dow Coating Materials
Ethox Chemicals LLC
Lintech International LLC
N Munzing
N Rhodia Inc.
Sasol North America
Flow Modifiers
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
Clariant Corporation
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Elementis Specialties
Esprix Technologies
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
OMNOVA Solutions Inc.
Plasticolors Inc.
N Troy Corp.
Vertellus Specialty Materials
N Wacker Chemical Corporation
Misc. Surfactants &
Dispersing Agents
3M Energy and Advanced Materials
Division
Acme-Hardesty Co.
N Air Products and Chemicals Inc.
ANGUS Chemical Company
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
N BYK USA Inc.
Chemguard
Clariant Corporation
N COATEX
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Dow Coating Materials
Ethox Chemicals LLC
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
OMG Americas
OMNOVA Solutions Inc.
Prox-Chem America Inc.
N Rhodia Inc.
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
N Troy Corp.
Vertellus Specialty Materials
Wetting Agents
3M Energy and Advanced Materials
Division
Acme-Hardesty Co.
N Air Products and Chemicals Inc.
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
Buckman
N BYK USA Inc.
Clariant Corporation
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Dow Coating Materials
N Elementis Specialties
Ethox Chemicals LLC
N Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation
N King Industries Inc.
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
N Munzing
OMG Americas
N Rhodia Inc.
Sasol North America
N Troy Corp.
Vertellus Specialty Materials
SUSPENSION AGENTS
Ashland Distribution
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
SYNERGISTS
Lintech International LLC
TACKIFIERS
Ashland Distribution
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
Lintech International LLC
TEXTURIZING AGENTS
Ashland Distribution
N COATEX
Ethox Chemicals LLC
N Evonik Degussa Corporation
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
Marshall Additive Technologies
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
N Troy Corp.
THICKENING AGENTS
AND RHEOLOGY
MODIFIERS
Associative Thickeners
ANGUS Chemical Company
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
N COATEX
Cognis Corporation
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Dow Coating Materials
N Elementis Specialties
Lintech International LLC
OMG Americas
N Troy Corp.
Cellulosics
Ashland Distribution
Dow Coating Materials
Clays
BASF Corporation
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
PAI NT & COATI NGS I NDUS TRY Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
57
N Elementis Specialties
KaMin Performance Minerals
Lintech International LLC
R. T. Vanderbilt Co. Inc.
Fumed Silica
N Cabot
N Evonik Degussa Corporation
Lintech International LLC
N Wacker Chemical Corporation
Misc. Thickeners
Ashland Distribution
N BYK USA Inc.
N Cabot
Cray Valley Ltd.
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
H.L. Blachford Ltd.
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
N Munzing
OMG Americas
Plasticolors Inc.
Prox-Chem America Inc.
Rio Tinto Minerals
Sasol North America
N Troy Corp.
Precipitated Silica
N Evonik Degussa Corporation
Huber Engineered Materials
Lintech International LLC
N R. E. Carroll Inc.
Solvent
Ashland Distribution
N BYK USA Inc.
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Elementis Specialties
N King Industries Inc.
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
OMG Americas
Sasol North America
N Troy Corp.
Water
Ashland Distribution
N COATEX
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Dow Coating Materials
N Elementis Specialties
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
OMG Americas
R. T. Vanderbilt Co. Inc.
N Troy Corp.
TRIBO-CHARGING ADDITIVES
N Evonik Degussa Corporation
UV ABSORBERS & LIGHT
STABILIZERS
BASF Corporation
Buckman
Cytec Industries
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Elementis Specialties
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Lintech International LLC
R. T. Vanderbilt Co. Inc.
ZOCHEM Inc.
VARNISHES
Cook Composites & Polymers
Lintech International LLC
VISCOSITY MODIFIERS
Ashland Distribution
N Cabot
N COATEX
Cray Valley Ltd.
Cytec Industries
Ethox Chemicals LLC
N Evonik Degussa Corporation
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
OMG Americas
WATER REPELLENTS
Ashland Distribution
N Cabot
Chemguard
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Laurel Products
N Michelman
OMNOVA Solutions Inc.
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
N Troy Corp.
N Wacker Chemical Corporation
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
WATER-REMOVAL AGENTS/
SCAVENGERS
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
Lintech International LLC
OMG Americas
VanDeMark Chemical Inc.
WATER-TREATMENT
CHEMICALS
Ashland Distribution
Clariant Corporation
Esprix Technologies
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
LANXESS
Lintech International LLC
N Munzing
WAX EMULSIONS
BASF Corporation
N BYK USA Inc.
Cook Composites & Polymers
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
N Michelman
N Micro Powders Inc.
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
WAXES
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Ashland Distribution
N BYK USA Inc.
Cook Composites & Polymers
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
N Elementis Specialties
Esprix Technologies
H.L. Blachford Ltd.
Honeywell
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
Lintech International LLC
Lubrizol Advanced Materials Inc.
N Michelman
N Micro Powders Inc.
Sasol North America
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
WETTING AGENTS
Acme-Hardesty Co.
Ashland Distribution
BASF Corporation
Chemguard
Clariant Corporation
Cognis Corporation
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
International Specialty Products
(ISP)
Lintech International LLC
OMG Americas
N R. E. Carroll Inc.
N Rhodia Inc.
Sasol North America
N Siltech Corporation
N Worlee Chemie GmbH
XANTHAN GUM
Ashland Distribution
Lintech International LLC
Selecting the best
Additives is Child’s Play
Serving the Paint and Coatings Industry with innovative silicone additives
for better flow, leveling, slip, mar resistance, and foam control.
Innovative Silicones for your Technology
SILTECH CORPORATION
225 Wicksteed Avenue,
Toronto, Ontario, Canada,
M4H 1G5
Tel: (416) 424-4567
Fax: (416) 424-3158
www.siltechcorp.com
Manufacturer of organo
modified & reactive silicones.
Visit ads.pcimag.com
Follow PCI on Facebook at
www.facebook.com/PCIfan
and on Twitter at
http://twitter.com/PCIMag.
2010 Additives Suppliers
3M Energy and Advanced
Materials Division
3M Center, Bldg. 223-6S-04
St. Paul, MN 55144-1000
(800) 367-8905 Fax: (800) 810-8514
eamdcustomerservice@mmm.com
www.3m.com/paintsandcoatings
Kathy Powell, Mktg. Comm. Supv.;
Paints & Coatings Customer Service
Fluorochemical surfactants, ceramic
microsphere additives, glass
microspheres.
Acme-Hardesty Co.
450 Sentry Pkwy. E., Ste. 140
Blue Bell, PA 19422
(215) 591-3610 Fax: (215) 591-3620
bhuston@acme-hardesty.com
www.acme-hardesty.com
Bryan A. Huston, V.P.-Sales/Mktg.
Vegetable and animal-based
oleochemicals for the coating market.
Products include castor oil and
derivatives, fatty acids, glycerine,
surfactants and polyols.
Air Products and Chemicals Inc.
7201 Hamilton Blvd.
Allentown, PA 18195-1501
(800) 345-3148 (US & Canada);
(610) 481-6799
Fax: (610) 481-4381
cheminfo@airproducts.com
www.airproducts.com/coatings
Product Info Center (800) 348-3145;
Europe, Air Products Chemicals
Division Europe; Brazil, Air Products
Brazil Ltda.
We offer full lines of performance-
oriented epoxy curing agents
and modifiers; specialty resins;
polymer emulsions; and surfactants,
defoamers, and pigment grind aids to
serve the paint and coatings market.
SEE OUR ADS ON PAGES 13, 45
American Chemet Corp.
740 Waukegan Rd., Ste. 202
Deerfield, IL 60015
(847) 948-0800; (847) 597-7107
Fax: (847) 948-0811
sklatt@chemet.com
www.chemet.com
Skip Klatt; Kim Klatt; Bill H
Shropshire; Jeff King
Cuprous oxide for anti-fouling paint,
preservatives, zinc oxide, cupric
oxide, copper powder copper catalyst.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 51
ANGUS Chemical Company, Dow
Advanced Materials (a wholly
owned subsidiary of the Dow
Chemical Company)
1500 E. Lake Cook Rd.
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089
(800) 447-4639; (989) 832-1560
Fax: (989) 832-1465
angus@dow.com
www.angus.com
Justin Conklin; Esin Busche
Performance-enhancing additives for
coatings and inks.
Distributors:
Ashland Distribution Company,
www.ashland.com
E.T. Horn Company, www.ethorn.com
M.F. Cachat Company, www.mfcachat.com
Arch Chemicals Inc., Biocides
5660 New Northside Drive, Ste. 1100
Atlanta, GA 30328
(800) 523-7391 Fax: (866) 705-0465
sales@archbiocides.com
www.archbiocides.com
Mark Kenline, Global Bus. Dir.-Arch
Bldg. Prod.; Craig Waldron, Global
Mkt. Mgr.-Arch Bldg. Prod.
Preservatives for dry film and wet
state preservation; architectural
paints, algaecides, antifoulants;
marine paints.
Ashland Distribution,
Chemicals
P.O. Box 2219
Columbus, OH 43216
(800) 531-7106 (option 3)
Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashdist.com
Tony Gutierrez, Ind. Mgr.-Spec.
Distribute resins, thickeners,
additives, surfactants and
dispersants, solvents, plasticizers,
monomers, pigments, lubricants,
preservatives, foam control, etc. Call
us at 1-800-531-7106.
Distributors:
Ashland Distribution, www.ashland.com
BASF Corporation
100 Campus Dr.
Florham Park, NJ 07932
(800) 962-7829 Fax: (800) 971-1123
www.basf.us/coatingsindustry
Jeff Allara, Mgr.-Formulation
Additives; Ron Lee, Mktg. Mgr.-
Coatings/Construction; Jonathan
Fecteau, Prod. Mgr.-UV Absorbers/
HALS; Steve Jose, Mgr.-Kaolin
A complete portfolio of organic and
inorganic pigments, dispersions and
additives.
Buckman
1256 McLean Blvd., P.O. Box 80305
Memphis, TN 38108
(901) 278-0330 Fax: (901) 276-5343
ewfrye@buckman.com
www.buckman.com
C. E. Carncross, V.P.; Dr. C. L. Wiatr,
Techl. Mgr.
Preservatives, anti-foaming agents,
dispersants, anti-rust agents,
corrosion inhibitors, catalysts, flame
and smoke retardants, printing
ink dispersants, water treatment
chemicals.
Distributors:
D.B. Becker Company Inc.,
www.dbbecker.com
Dunleary Inc., www.dunleary.com
D.N. Lukens Inc., www.dnlukens.com
Maroon Inc., www.marooninc.com
MPSI, www.mpsi-sw.com
Buhler Inc., PARTEC
13105 12th Ave. N.
Plymouth, MN 55441
(763) 847-9900; (512) 466-8005
Fax: (763) 847-9911
nano@buhlergroup.com
www.buhlergroup.com
Steffen Pilotek, Bus. Devel. Dir.-
PARTEC
Oxylink performance additive for
water-based coatings and paints,
increases cross-linking for stronger
films and accelerates drying for
higher productivity.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 30
Burgess Pigment Co.
P.O. Box 349
Sandersville, GA 31082
(478) 552-2544 Fax: (478) 552-4281
pci@burgesspigment.com
www.burgesspigment.com
Information Request
Extender pigments, thermo-optic
silicates with both true opacity and
flatting efficiency, complete line of
calcined and hydrous clays.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 47
BYK USA Inc., A member of
Altana
524 S. Cherry St.
Wallingford, CT 06492
(203) 265-2086 Fax: (203) 284-9158
cs.usa@byk.com
www.byk.com/additives
Bruce Seeber; Phil Saglimbeni
Product range: wax additives,
adhesion promoters, wetting
and dispersing additives, surface
additives, defoamers, rheological
additives, surfactants.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 23
C.E.D. Process Minerals Inc.
1653 Merriman Rd.
Akron, OH 44313
(330) 869-0248 Fax: (330) 869-0104
juchno@cedakron.com
www.cedprocessminerals.com
James Uchno
Manufacturers of Cristobalite, GoreSil
and CristolBrite products for several
applications in the paints and coatings
industry.
Cabot
157 Concord Rd., P.O. Box 7001
Billerica, MA 01821
(978) 663-3455; (800) 526-7591
Fax: (978) 670-6149
james_brown@cabot-corp.com
www.cabot-corp.com
Jim Brown; David Reynolds
Provides a full portfolio of carbon
black pigments and functional
additives that includes silica, alumina
and aerogel.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 41
Cardolite Corp.
500 Doremus Ave.
Newark, NJ 07105
(973) 344-5015 Fax: (973) 344-1197
jkruzel@cardolite.com
JUNE 2010
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PAI NT & COATI NGS I NDUS TRY Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
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www.cardolite.com
John Kruzel, Sales Mgr.; Sales
Phenalkamine epoxy curing agents and
flexible reactive modifiers for marine/
protective coatings, transportation
primers, pipe/tank linings and concrete
coatings.
Chemguard
204 S. 6th Ave.
Mansfield, TX 76063
(817) 473-9964 Fax: (817) 473-0606
bgilbert@chemguard.com
www.chemguard.com
Bob Gilbert, Sr. Sales/Mktg. Mgr.
Provide a line of high-performance short
chain specialty fluorosurfactants for
the coatings industry that are based on
telomer chemistry.
Clariant Corporation, Industrial
& Consumer Specialties
625 East Catawba Ave.
Mount Holly, NC 28120
(800) 942-7239; (704) 822-2613
fun.us@clariant.com
www.ics.clariant.com
Customer Service, Industrial &
Consumer Specialties; Michael
Haspel, Coatings & Construction
Chemicals Business Manager
Pigment and additive dispersants,
wetting agents, emulsifiers,
copolymerizable emulsifiers,
biocides, defoamers, humectants,
glycol ethers, and polyethylene
glycols.
Distributors:
Dowd & Guild, www.dowdandguild.com
TH Hilson Company, www.thhilson.com
PT Hutchins, www.pthutchins.com
Charles Tennant, www.ctc.ca
Ashland Distribution, www.ashdist.com
Clariant Corporation, BU
Additives
4000 Monroe Rd.
Charlotte, NC 28205
(704) 331-7222
www.additives.clariant.com
Additives, antioxidants, and waxes.
COATEX
547 Ecology Ln.
Chester, SC 29706
(800) 238-5120; (803) 379-8739
Fax: (803) 581-0956
bill.rosenthal@coatex.com
www.coatex.com
Bill Rosenthal
Coatex is a broad-based company
offering acrylic dispersants,
thickeners, and polyurethanes.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 59
Cognis Corporation, Functional
Products
5051 Estecreek Dr.
Cincinnati, OH 45232
(800) 922-0605 Fax: (513) 482-5536
cognis.coatings-inks@cognis.com
www.cognis.com
Michael Hoppe, Prod. Group Mgr.
A modern range of thickeners,
defoamers, wetting agents and
dispersants that improve efficiency,
ensure easy handling and serve to
reduce environmental impact.
Cook Composites & Polymers
820 E. 14th Ave., P.O. Box 419389
Kansas City, MO 64141
(800) 821-3590 Fax: (816) 391-6141
www.ccponline.com
Ken Moran; Dennis Ryer, Prod. Mgr.-
Liquid Powder/Resins
Resins and additives for coatings and
inks.
Cray Valley Ltd., Additives -
North America
P.O. Box 419389
Kansas City, MO 64141-6389
(800) 821-3590; (816) 391-6241
Fax: (816) 391-6236
piggott@ccponline.com
www.crayvallay.com
Mark Piggott; Neil Tariq
Provides a growing additive product
line (rheology, surface and flow
and leveling modifiers) for solvent-
based, solvent-free and waterborne
applications.
Distributors:
Bossco Industries,
www.bosscoindustries.com
D H Litter, www.dhlitter.com
Northspec Chemicals,
www.northspec.com
Palmer Holland, www.palmerholland.com
Peninsula Polymers, www.penpoly.com
Cytec Industries
5 Garrett Mountain Plz.
Woodland Park, NJ 07424
(800) 652-6013; (973) 357-3193
Fax: (973) 357-3050
custinfo@cytec.com
www.cytec.com
Coatex is a BROAD
based company offering
acrylic Dispersants,
Thickeners, and
Polyurethanes
Visit ads.pcimag.com
JUNE 2010
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2010 Additives Suppliers
Cytec is a pioneer in the development
of liquid coating resins, additives and
crosslinkers, leading the way with the
broadest range of coatings solutions
that enable our customers to create
sustainable change for the markets
they serve.
D.B. Becker Co., Inc.
46 Leigh St.
Clinton, NJ 08809-1267
(800) 394-3991; (908) 730-6010
Fax: (908) 730-9118
dtcanavan3@dbbecker.com
www.dbbecker.com
Daniel T. Canavan
Chemical specialties, resins,
pigments, dispersions, additives,
biocides/fungicides, adhesion
promoters, driers and tackifiers.
Dow Coating Materials
100 Independence Mall W.
Philadelphia, PA 19106
(800) 693-3311; (215) 592-3000
www.dowcoatingmaterials.com
Rusty Johnson, Field Mktg. Mgr.-Arch
Ctngs.; Fernanda Tavares, Field Mktg.
Mgr.-Ind. Ctngs.
Associative and cellulosic thickeners,
rheology modifiers, dispersants,
polymeric opacifiers, surfactants and
wetting agents.
Dow Microbial Control
1500 E. Lake Cook Rd.
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089
(800) 447-4369; (989) 832-1560
Fax: (989) 832-1465
iorcutt@chempetitive.com
www.dowmicrobialcontrol.com
Nanette Hermsen, Global Mktg. Mgr.;
Ioana Annis, North American Cust.
Appl. Spec. Leader
In-can preservatives, dry film
preservatives and industrial hygiene
biocides.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 37
Electro Abrasives LLC
701 Willet Rd.
Buffalo, NY 14218
(716) 822-2500 Fax: (716) 822-2858
info@electroabrasives.com
www.electroabrasives.com
Kristine Ramming
Manufactures ceramic powders used
in the following coatings applications:
fillers in resin or epoxy systems as fire
retardants, strengtheners, corrosion
inhibitors, wear resistant, non-skid, or
slip resistant. Manufactures black silicon
carbide and aluminum oxides.
Elementis Specialties
329 Wyckoffs Mill Rd.
Hightstown, NJ 08520
(609) 443-2000; (800) 866-6800
Fax: (609) 443-2207
contactus.web@elementis.com
www.elementis-specialties.com
William Reynolds, Techl. Mgr.; Sel
Avci, Mktg. Mgr.
Specialty additives for solvent and
waterborne coatings including
rheology modifiers, defoamers,
dispersants, anti-settling agents,
wax dispersions, flow modifiers,
coalescents and many other
performance additives. Elementis
offers a wide range of pigment
dispersions and tinting systems.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 61
Emerald Performance
Materials, Hilton Davis, Kalama
Chemical, CVC, Foam Control
2020 Front St., (HQ only)
Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44221
(330) 916-6700
corporate@emeraldmaterials.com
www.emeraldmaterials.com
Manufacturer of resins and additives
incl.: color/black/white pigments,
dyes, dispersions; plasticizers;
defoamers; antifoams; AOs; epoxy
resins, monomers and accelerators.
Esprix Technologies,
Performance Chemistries
7680 Matoaka Rd.
Sarasota, FL 34243
(800) 237-7748 x305; (941) 355-5100 x305
Fax: (941) 358-1339
mcowger@esprixtech.com
www.esprixtech.com
Philip W. Nace, Jr., Pres.
Esprix products include primary
absorbent resins, dye fixatives,
crosslinkers and peripherals, delivering
consistency, predictability, quality and
performance with R&D capability.
Ethox Chemicals LLC
1801 Perimeter Rd.
Greenville, SC 29605
(864) 277-1620 Fax: (864) 277-8981
egodwin@ethox.com
www.ethox.com
Edward R. Godwin; Charles (Chip) Palmer
Produce dispersants, polymer
emulsifiers, alkyd emulsifiers, defoamers,
nanodispersants, plasticizers, antistats,
emulsifiers, and wetting agents.
Evonik Degussa Corporation,
Inorganic Materials
379 Interpace Pkwy.
Parsippany, NJ 07054
(800) 233-8052
michael.lev@evonik.com
www.evonik.com
Michael Lev; Maria Nargiello
Fumed silica, fumed metal oxides,
fumed silica and metal oxide
dispersions, matting agents, pigment
blacks, pigment preparations, silanes.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 35
Evonik Goldschmidt
Corporation, Coating Additives
& Specialty Resins / Tego
P.O. Box 1299
Hopewell, VA 23860-1299
(800) 446-1809 Fax: (804) 541-6290
andrea.napalowski@evonik.com
www.tego.us
Frances Eggleston; Andrea
Napalowski
As a leading brand of the paint and
graphic arts additives industry Tego
offers a broad variety for waterborne,
UV and high solids systems.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 35
Expancel, Eka Chemicals Inc.
2240 Northmont Pkwy.
Duluth, GA 30096-5835
(678) 775-5102; (800) 786-4630
Fax: (770) 813-8639
info.expancel@akzonobel.com
www.expancel.com
Chris Rosenbusch, Mktg. Mgr.; Mark
Timmers; Maf Ahmad; Chip Gill, Sales
Engr.
Ultralow-density hollow plastic
microspheres for VOC and density
reduction, property enhancement. Heat-
expandable microspheres for foaming.
Distributors:
Chem-Materials Company
Gelest Inc.
11 E. Steel Rd.
Morrisville, PA 19067
(215) 547-1015 Fax: (215) 547-2484
info@gelest.com
www.gelest.com
Craig Smith; Gabrielle Horvath; Joel
Zazyczny
Specialty organosilanes, silicones and
organometallics for adhesives, sealants,
paints and coatings.
H.L. Blachford Ltd., Chemical
Specialties Division
2323 Royal Windsor Dr.
Mississauga, ON L5J 1K5 Canada
(905) 823-3200 Fax: (905) 823-9290
www.blachford.com
Aldo Pighin, Prod. Mgr.-Stearates/Metallic
Soaps
Manufacturers of stearates and metallic
soaps, including aluminum, barium,
calcium, magnesium, zinc stearates,
aluminum octoates, and EBS wax.
Heucotech Ltd.
99 Newbold Rd.
Fairless Hills, PA 19030
(215) 736-0712 Fax: (215) 736-1699
sales@heubachcolor.com
www.heubachcolor.com
David B. Thompson, Coatings Ind.
Mgr.
Manufactures a full color spectrum
of aqueous dispersions; also
markets anticorrosive pigments,
organic pigments, specializing in
phthalocyanine green, indanthrone
blue, as well as inorganic colors.
Distributors:
Intertrade SA de CV
Precept International
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 25
Honeywell, Specialty Materials
101 Columbia Rd.
Morristown, NJ 07962-1053
(800) 451-9961; (973) 455-5382
Fax: (973) 455-5120
ernest.ballester@honeywell.com
www.honeywell.com/additives
Kurt Severyns, Field Mktg. Mgr.-
EMEAI; Andrew Huang, Field Mktg.
Mgr.-ASIA; Ernie Ballester, Field Mktg.
Mgr.-Americas
A-C and ACumist polyethylene,
polypropylene homopolymers/
copolymers to improve the surface
properties and performance of paints
and coatings.
Distributors:
Canada Colors & Chemicals Ltd.,
www.canadacolors.com
Univar USA Inc., www.univarusa.com
The MF Cachat Company,
www.mfcachat.com
Huber Engineered Materials
1000 Parkwood Circle, Ste. 1000
Atlanta, GA 30339
(866) 564-8237 Fax: (678) 247-2797
hubermaterials@huber.com
www.hubermaterials.com
Huber Engineered Materials has
product offerings in silica, alumina
trihydrate, magnesium hydroxide,
barium sulfate and ground calcium
carbonate.
JUNE 2010
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2010 Additives Suppliers
Huntsman Advanced Materials
10003 Woodloch Forest Dr.
The Woodlands, TX 77380
(888) 564-9318 Fax: (281) 719-4047
ronny_marc_konrad@huntsman.com
www.huntsman.com/advanced_
materials
Peter Chetcuti; Ronny Konrad
Epoxy resins, epoxy curing agents,
reactive diluents, water-based epoxy
systems, TGIC.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 31
Hydrite Chemical Co.
P.O. Box 0948
Brookfield, WI 53008-0948
(262) 792-1450 Fax: (262) 792-8721
chris.crawford@hydrite.com
www.hydrite.com
Bruce Schimmel; Chris Crawford, Bus.
Group Dir.
Hydrite Chemical Co. offers a
complete line of defoamers in all
chemistries for the paint, coatings,
ink and adhesive markets.
Intercorp Inc., Functional Fillers
& Extenders
P.O. Box 341337
Milwaukee, WI 53234-1337
(414) 383-2020 (M-F 8-5 CT)
Fax: (414) 383-6725
trettinp@intercorp-minerals.com
www.intercorp-minerals.com
Peter Trettin
Engineered reinforcements, functional
fillers and extenders; natural and treated
wollastonite, glass hollowspheres, ceramic
mircrospheres, metallic fibers, chips, and
other minerals.
International Specialty
Products (ISP)
1361 Alps Rd.
Wayne, NJ 07470
(973) 628-4000 Fax: (973) 628-4117;
(973) 872-1583
www.ispcorp.com
Pierre Varin, Dir.-Sales N.A.-
Performance Chemicals/Biocides;
Scott Edris, Dir.-Global Mktg.-
Performance Chemicals; Joe Druga,
Mgr.-Biocides
Monomers, dispersing agents,
solvents, specialty solvents, reactive
diluents for radiation-cured coatings,
industrial biocides and acrylate
technologies.
KaMin Performance Minerals
822 Huber Rd.
Macon, GA 31217
(478) 750-5410
askus@kaminllc.com
www.kaminllc.com
Jason Maxwell; Thomas Anderskow;
Maureen Halstead
High-quality hydrous, calcined and
delaminated kaolin clays for paints, inks,
coatings, adhesives, sealants and free-
flow applications. Please contact us at
AskUs@kaminllc.com.
King Industries Inc.
Science Rd., P.O. Box 588
Norwalk, CT 06852
(800) 431-7900; (203) 866-5551
Fax: (203) 866-1268
bburk@kingindustries.com
www.kingindustries.com
Dave Deters, V.P./Gen. Mgr.-Ctgs. Div.;
Steven Knight, Ctgs. Sales Mgr.; Bob
Burk, Mktg. Mgr.
Acid and blocked acid catalysts,
polyester polyols and urethane
diols, dispersants, rust and corrosion
inhibitors, non-aqueous additives,
polyurethane crosslinkers, rheology
and surface control agents, PUR
associative thickeners.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 20
Kromachem Inc., Farmingdale
30 Southard Ave., P.O. Box 744
Farmingdale, NJ 07727
(732) 751-0980 Orders; (800) 640-1932
Tech Service
Fax: (732) 751-0981 Orders;
(845) 782-8359 Tech Service
ricke@kromachem.com
www.kromachem.com
Kay O’Connor
Specialty additives including in-can
stabilizers and surface modifiers for
the radiation curing industry.
LANXESS
111 RIDC Park W. Dr.
Pittsburgh, PA 15275
(412) 809-1000; (800) 526-9377
info@lanxess.com
www.us.lanxess.com
Terri Fitzpatrick
Industrial chemicals, biocides,
preservatives, plasticizers, dyes and
pigments, polyamide and EVA resins,
flame retardants, water treatment
chemicals.
Laurel Products
47 Park Ave.
Elverson, PA 19520
(610) 286-2534 Fax: (610) 286-2540
sales@laurelproducts.com
www.laurelproducts.com
James Downing, Jr., Dir.-New Business
Devel.
Designs, processes and supplies
fluoropolymer dry-film lubricants,
micropowder and dispersion
additives under the Ultraflon trade
name.
Lintech International LLC
7705 N.E. Industrial, P.O. Box 10225
Macon, GA 31297
(800) 652-9297; (478) 784-1900
Fax: (478) 784-1745
sales@2lintech.com
www.2lintech.com
Dennis Gillespie, Pres.; Randy
Waldman, V.P.-Sales; Julie Hinson Van
Brunt, Exec. V.P.
Specialty chemicals for paints and
coatings plus inks, rubber, plastics,
cleaners, textiles and process
chemical industries.
Lubrizol Advanced Materials
Inc.
9911 Brecksville Rd.
Cleveland, OH 44141
(216) 447-5000 Fax: (216) 447-5238
coatings@lubrizol.com
www.lubrizolcoatings.com
High-performance additives for
paint and coatings, engineered to
help solve tough problems faced by
formulators.
Marshall Additive Technologies
26776 W. 12 Mile Rd.
Southfield, MI 48034
(248) 353-4100; (800) 338-7900
Fax: (248) 948-6460
salesinfo@rjmarshall.com
www.rjmarshall.com
Stephanie Nichols, Techl.; Richard
Marshall, Sales
Paint and coating texturizers, accent
colorants, polymeric antiskid texturizing
abrasives, fillers (natural) cellulosic,
polymeric, hydrated aluminas, smoke
suppressants, flame retardants.
Michelman
9080 Shell Rd.
Cincinnati, OH 45236
(513) 793-7766; (800) 333-1723
Fax: (513) 793-2504
general@michem.com
www.michelman.com
Steve Ruehrwein, Comm. Sales Mgr.-
Chemical Spec.; Marty Riehemann,
V.P.-Chemical Spec.; David Towell,
Global Mktg. Mgr.-Chemical Spec.;
Philip Holden, Inside Sales Rep.
Technology leaders in water-based
surface modifiers, polymers and
coatings.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 75
Micro Powders Inc.
580 White Plains Rd.
Tarrytown, NY 10591
(914) 793-4058 Fax: (914) 472-7098
mpi@micropowders.com
www.micropowders.com
Warren Pushaw, Pres.; Gary Strauss,
V.P./Gen. Mgr.; John McAllister,
Domestic Sales Mgr.
Synthetic waxes, polyethylene
waxes, polypropylene waxes, PTFE,
combinations of polyethylene waxes
and PTFE, and wax emulsions and
dispersions.
Distributors:
TH Hilson Company, www.thhilson.com
McCullough & Associates,
www.mccanda.com
The NP Group Inc., www.npgrouinc.com
Pacific Coast Chemicals Co.,
www.pcchem.com
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 2
Mineral Development LLC
P.O. Box 15872
Little Rock, AR 72231-5872
(501) 988-0700 Fax: (501) 988-4843
cargosolutions@msn.com
www.mineraldevelopment.com
C.E. Cummings, Managing Partner
Distributors of nephleline syenite from
Little Rock, AR.
Mitsubishi Gas Chemical
America Inc.
655 Third Ave., 24th Flr.
New York City, NY 10017
(212) 687-9030 ext. 104
Fax: (212) 687-2810
www.aromaticchemicals.com
Performance amines and dilutions for
epoxy hardeners. Aromatic aldehydes
and aromatic acids. Featuring 1,3-
PAI NT & COATI NGS I NDUS TRY Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
63
BAC, a highly-reactive cycloaliphatic
diamine used as an intermediate
for a variety of chemicals, as well as
an epoxy curing agent where color
stability, fast ambient cure and good
chemical resistance are required.
Munzing
1455 Broad St.
Bloomfield, NJ 07003
(800) 524-0055; (973) 279-1306
Fax: (973) 338-0420
info@munzing.com
www.munzing.com
Jim Krejci, Regl. Mgr.; Joe
Kettenacker, V.P.-Global Sales
Defoamers/antifoaming agents,
rheology modifiers, ink additives,
thickening agents, dispersing and
wetting agents.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 76
Mytech Inc.
4813 Carson’s Pond Rd.
Charlotte, NC 28226
(704) 608-9694; (704) 541-3425
Fax: (704) 541-5646
mdai@mytechchemicals.com
www.mytechchemicals.com
Robert Wooten
OBPA (10,10-oxybisphenoxarsine) is an
organometallic compound widely used in
coatings and adhesives industries. It is a
broad spectrum anti-microbial, effective
against fungi, pink staining organisms,
bacteria and algae.
NYCO Minerals Inc.
803 Mountain View Dr., P.O. Box 368
Willsboro, NY 12996
(518) 963-4262 Fax: (518) 963-4187
info@nycominerals.com
www.nycominerals.com
Tim Laflin
NYCO Wollastonite-A specialty
mineral that gives improved corrosion
protection and durability. Acts as
an auxiliary pigment extender in
performance coatings.
OMG Americas
811 Sharon Dr.
Westlake, OH 44145-1522
(440) 899-2950; (800) 321-9696
Fax: (440) 808-7117
shelley.parkerson@na.omgi.com
www.omgi.com
Shelley Parkerson, Mkt. Devel. Mgr.
Additives, including: dispersants;
anti-foaming, thickening and flow
control agents; rheology modifiers;
surfactants; emulsifiers and driers.
New technology: Cobalt-free paint
curing additive.
OMNOVA Solutions Inc.,
Performance Chemicals
1476 JA Cochran By Pass
Chester, SC 29706
(888) 253-5454
richard.thomas@omnova.com
www.omnova.com
Dr. Richard R. Thomas
Acrylic, styrene-acrylic, vinyl-acrylic,
vinyl acetate and styrene-butadiene
emulsions; epoxy-acrylate UV/
EB oligomers; fluorochemicals;
fluorosurfactants.
P.A.T. Products Inc.
44 Central St.
Bangor, ME 04401
(207) 942-6348 Fax: (207) 942-9662
info@patproducts.com
www.patproducts.com
Leo Coyle, Pres.; Erik Espling, V.P.-Sales/
Mktg.
Organic matting agents, quaternary
ammonium anti-stats, flame retardants,
phenolic resins, ink additives, shellac,
urethanes, epoxy resins and adhesion
promoters.
Pacer Corporation
245 Mt. Rushmore Rd.
Custer, SD 57730
(800) 568-2492 Fax: (605) 673-4459
pacer@gwtc.net
www.pacerminerals.com
Kurt Wacker, Sales/Mktg. Dir.; Jim Barton,
Sr. Sales Devel. Mgr.; Jeanine Gould, V.P.-
Cust. Serv.
Muscovite mica, micronized feldspar.
Distributors:
George C. Brandt
Canada Colors & Chemicals
R.E. Carroll Inc.
Chemarco
William B. Tabler Company Inc.
PCI Group Inc.
5424 S. 39th St., Ste. 1
Phoenix, AZ 85040
(602) 414-0300 Fax: (602) 414-0303
info@pcigroupinc.com
www.pcigroupinc.com
Kevin M. Sullivan, Dir.-Sales/Mktg.
Flow agents (non-silicone & silicone),
anti mar and slip agents, surface tension
modifiers, defoamers, anti-flood and
anti-float agents, and other special
chemistries.
Perstorp Polyols Inc.
600 Matzinger Rd.
Toledo, OH 43612-2695
(419) 729-5448 Fax: (419) 729-3291
www.perstorppolyols.com
Toni Del Bene; Rashel Prochnow; Jeffrey
Jones
World’s largest producer of
pentaerythritol and trimethylolpropane;
producer of many specialty polyalcohols,
isocyanates, allyl ethers, dendritic
polymers and caprolactone polyols.
Plasticolors Inc.
2600 Michigan Ave.
Ashtabula, OH 44005
(440) 997-5137 Fax: (440) 992-3613
pci-sales@plasticolors.com
www.plasticolors.com
Sue Ann Spang; Michael McCormick
Manufactures high-quality colorants
in acrylic, polyurethane, epoxy,
plasticizer, polyetheramine,
unsaturated polyester, polysiloxane,
waterborne, solvent, UV, and zero-
VOC vehicles.
Prox-Chem America Inc.
8 Ricker Ave.
Londonderry, NH 03053
(828) 449-8555 Fax: (828) 322-7003
randycox@proxcheminc.com
www.proxcheminc.com
Randy Cox
Offers a diverse line of specialty
additives from Synthron S.A. for
liquid and powder coatings. Products
are available for solvent- and water-
based coatings.
R. T. Vanderbilt Co. Inc.
30 Winfield St., P.O. Box 5150
Norwalk, CT 06856
(203) 853-1400 Fax: (203) 853-1452
paint@rtvanderbilt.com
www.rtvanderbilt.com
Vergil Carlson, Sales Mgr.; Janis
Anderson, Paint Lab. Mgr.; Lynn Peel,
Comm. Mgr.
Driers, flatting agents, preservatives,
dispersing agents, thickening agents,
extender pigments.
R. E. Carroll Inc.
1570 N. Olden Ave.
Trenton, NJ 08638
(609) 695-6211; (800) 257-9365
Fax: (609) 695-0102
paintinfo@recarroll.com
www.recarroll.com
Contact Andrea Kropp at
kroppa@pcimag.com to order your CD.
TTh h e e 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 A A ddd d i i t t i i v v ees s C C D D p p r r o o vvi i d d e e s s a a m m o o r r e e The 2010 Additives CD provides a more
cco o m m p p l l e e t t e e s s o o u u r r c c e e o o f f a a d d d d i i t t i i v v ee d d e e s s c c r r i i p p t t i i o o n n s s complete source of additive descriptions
tth h a a n n f f oouun n d d i i n n t t h h e e P P C C I I 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 J J u u n n e e i i s s s s u u e e ! ! than found in the PCI 2010 June issue!
The PCI Coatings Additives Handbook CD contains the most
current information regarding the multitude of additives
used in the coatings industry. Correct additive selection is
important to formulation success. The Additives Handbook
ofers a full description of various coating additives along
with some generic examples. The majority of
additive types are represented.
This is an extensive compilation, and the
CD is of great beneft to all formulators,
manufacturers and applicators of coatings
in addition to resource centers such as
libraries and educational facilities.
Many ‘seniors’ in the industry have remarked how benefcial
this tool would have been when they frst joined the
industry years ago. Make additive selection easy with the
PCI Coatings Additives Handbook CD.
Order it today for just $29.95 plus shipping!
JUNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 64
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
2010 Additives Suppliers
Robert E. Carroll III, Pres.; David
Carroll, Dir.-Mktg.
Wholesale distribution of raw
materials for the paint and coatings
industry. Also offering liquids
repackaging and warehousing
services.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 53
Reichhold Inc.
P.O. Box 13582
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709
(919) 990-7500; (800) 448-3482
Fax: (919) 990-7670
productinfo@reichhold.com
www.reichhold.com
Randall Vasseur, Dir.-Sales N.A.
Coatings
Alkyds, emulsions, urethanes, epoxy
resins and curing agents as well as
polyester and acrylic resins for both
liquid and powder applications.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 19
Rhodia Inc.
8 Cedar Brook Dr.
Cranbury, NJ 08512
(888) 776-7337; (609) 860-4000
Fax: (609) 860-0463
rhd-namcustomerconcierge@
us.rhodia.com
www.rhodia.com
Ning Chen, Regl. Bus. Dir.-Coatings
Additives for waterborne paints and
coatings, defoamers, dispersants,
emulsion polymers, freeze-thaw
stabilizers, open time extenders,
phosphate esters, wetting agents.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 65
Rio Tinto Minerals
8051 E. Maplewood Ave., Bldg. 4
Greenwood Villiage, CO 80111
(303) 713-5000; (303) 713-5219
www.riotintominerals.com
Forrest Hentz, Techl. Mgr.-Paints/Coatings
Additives that improve coatings
performance, lower formulation costs,
and add value and functionality across a
wide range of applications.
Sartomer USA LLC
502 Thomas Jones Way, Oakland
Corporate Center
Exton, PA 19341
(610) 363-4100; (800) Sartomer
Fax: (610) 363-4140
contact@sartomer.com
www.sartomer.com
Michael Rose, Sales Dir.
Acrylic and methacrylic monomer
epoxy, urethane and specialty
oligomers, and other specialty
chemicals.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 10
Sasol North America
900 Threadneedle, Ste. 100
Houston, TX 77079-2990
(281) 588-3000 Fax: (281) 368-1531
info@us.sasol.com
www.sasoltechdata.com
Melanie Sharp, Tech. Serv.; Victoria
Stolarski, Mkt. Devel. Mgr.
Supplier of APEO-free surfactants,
wetting agents, dispersing aids,
emulsifiers, solvents, alumina, waxes,
alcohols, paraffins, and more.
Shamrock Technologies Inc.
Foot of Pacific St.
Newark, NJ 07114
(973) 242-2999 Fax: (973) 242-8074
eschneider@shamrocktechnologies.
com
www.shamrocktechnologies.com
Mike Oliveri; Joe Coffey
Specialty powdered additives,
micronized PTFE, polyethylene,
polypropylene, waxes for slip, mar
and abrasion resistance, matting,
textured appearance, hydrophobicity,
and flow control.
Shepherd Color Company
4539 Dues Dr.
Cincinnati, OH 45246
(513) 874-0714 Fax: (513) 874-5061
salesusa@shepherdcolor.com
www.shepherdcolor.com
Chris Manning, Sales/Mktg. Mgr.
Complex inorganic color pigments
(CICPs) for the most demanding
applications, including premium coil
coatings.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 16
Siltech Corporation
225 Wicksteed Ave.
Toronto, ON M4H 1G5 Canada
(416) 424-4567 Fax: (416) 424-3158
sales@siltechcorp.com
www.siltechcorp.com
Organo-modified siloxanes, silicone
additives and reactive silicones for
inks and coatings.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 57
Soy Technologies LLC
1050 Elizabeth Dr., Unit 4
Nicholasville, KY 40356
(800) 769-8748; (859) 881-1200
Fax: (866) 767-7902
lsmith@soytek.com
www.soytek.com
Paul Coty, Ind. Mgr.; Randy Frees,
Pres./CEO
The Soyanol line of soy-based
specialties includes coalescents,
plasticizers, and emulsion systems
for many coatings. Soyanol improves
performance while reducing VOC,
HAPS.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 22
Sphere One Inc.
601 Cumberland Ave.
Chattanooga, TN 37404
(423) 629-7160 Fax: (423) 698-0614
info@sphereone.net
www.sphereone.net
John Kish; Brian Richards; Mark Bonne
Lightweight microspheres, ceramic
spheres, plastic spheres and mica
products.
Distributors:
Kish Company Inc.,
www.kishcompany.com
Taminco
Two Windsor Plz., Ste. 411, 7540
Windsor Dr.
Allentown, PA 18195
(888) 826-4680; (610) 366-6730
Fax: (610) 366-6784
conor.dowling@taminco.com
www.specialtyamines.com
Conor Dowling; Robert Ash
Manufactures amine additives and
solvents used in coatings as well as
intermediates for the production of
paints and resins.
AQUEOUS Q
Technical Industries Inc.
217 Church St., P.O. Box 65
Peace Dale, RI 02883-0065
(401) 783-5887 Fax: (401) 789-2270
sales@tidispersion.com
www.tidispersion.com
A. Rose; F. Steven DiMasi, V.P.-Quality/
Mfg.; Eric A. Rose, Pres.
Pigment dispersions (aqueous);
aqueous dispersions and emulsions
for latex cure systems; ISO 9001:2008.
Troy Corp.
8 Vreeland Rd., P.O. Box 955
Florham Park, NJ 07932
(973) 443-4200 Fax: (973) 443-0843
marketing@troycorp.com
www.troycorp.com
David E. Faherty, V.P.-Mktg.; Marie
Williams, Dir.-Corp. Mktg. Serv.
Manufacturers of a wide range of
biocides that include fungicides,
bactericides, algaecides and specialty
additives to the paint and coating
industry.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 17
Unimin Corp.
258 Elm St.
New Canaan, CT 06840
(618) 747-2311; (203) 966-1306
Fax: (618) 747-9318; (203) 972-1378
contactus@brilliantadditions.com
www.brilliantadditions.com
Customer Service
Functional mineral fillers and
extenders; including nepheline
syenite, calcium carbonate,
kaolin clays, and ground and
microcrystalline silicas.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 18
United Color Manufacturing Inc.
660 Newtown-Yardley Rd., Ste. 205, P.O.
Box 480
Newtown, PA 18940
(215) 860-2165; (800) 852-5942
Fax: (215) 860-8560
rec@unitedcolor.com
www.unitedcolor.com
Thomas Nowakowski, Pres.; Robert Cwik
Jr., Natl. Sales Mgr.; Dr. Haresh Doshi, Techl.
Dir.; John Wilson, Bus. Devel. Mgr.
Dyes-liquid, highly concentrated liquids
and powder forms. Sub-micron pigment
dispersions.
VanDeMark Chemical Inc.
One N. Transit Rd.
Lockport, NY 14094
(716) 433-6764; (800) 836-8253
Fax: (716) 433-2850
sales@vdmchemical.com
www.vdmchemical.com
Michael A. Kucharski, Pres./CEO; Paul
A. Ameis, COO; John M. Dobrolsky Jr.,
Sales Mgr.; Candice Gancasz, Sales/
Customer Service
P-toluenesulfonyl isocyanate (PTSI) is
a water scavenger used in urethane-
based coatings, sealants adhesives
and energy-curable inks.
PAI NT & COATI NGS I NDUS TRY Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
65
Vertellus Specialty Materials
2110 High Point Rd.
Greensboro, NC 27403-2642
(336) 292-1781 Fax: (336) 854-4058
spipher@vertellus.com
www.vertellus.com
David Borowski, Sales Devel. Mgr.
Offers an extensive product line of
Castor oil-based polyols, prepolymers,
surfactants, plasticizers and rheological
additives for paint and coatings
applications. Global leader in CITROFLEX
citric acid esters with low toxicity profiles,
for solvent replacement and coalescent
function. Also offered is a complete line
of organometallic catalysts for urethane
and silicone systems.
W.D. Service Co.
P.O. Box 147
Bellmawr, NJ 08099
(800) 366-9326 Fax: (856) 931-4505
paul@wdserviceco.com
www.wdserviceco.com
Paul A. Cuccinello; Susan T. Calabro
Ammonia solutions, reagent grade, all
size containers: 1 gal., 5 gal., 50 gal.,
totes-200,250, 300 gallon and bulk.
Any concentration available. Private
labeling.
Wacker Chemical Corporation,
Wacker Silicones
3301 Sutton Rd.
Adrian, MI 49221
(888) 922-5374 Fax: (517) 264-4068
info.usa@wacker.com
www.wacker.com/coatings
Laurent Morineaux, Business Team
Leader-Construction Chemicals;
Kenneth Fiorvanti, Comm. Dir.-
Americas
Siloxane high-temperature resins
and intermediates for industrial/
protective coatings, polymer
dispersions and silicone resins for
decorative coatings; silane additives,
silicone-based water repellents.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 43
Worlee Chemie GmbH
Soellerstr. 14-16
21481 Lauenburg, Germany
011 49 4153 5960
Fax: 011 49 4153 53649
kkoehler@worlee.de
www.worlee.de
Klaus D. Koehler
Acrylics, polyester and additives,
waterborne alkyds and acrylics.
Distributors:
J.H. Calo Company, www.jhcalo.com
Ferguson Chemical Innovation
The Tryline Group, www.tryline.com
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 55
ZOCHEM Inc.
1 Tilbury Ct., P.O. Box 1120
Brampton, ON L6V 2L8 Canada
(905) 848-3813 Fax: (905) 848-9477
sgilliard@zochem.com
www.zochem.com
Dwayne Dietrich; Scott Gilliard
Produce and market high-quality ZOCO
brand zinc oxide to all markets and
locations; ISO 9002 certified.
Distributors:
R.E. Carroll Inc., www.recarroll.com
Chemcore
ChemRep, www.chemrep.com
Cypress Color & Chemical
PT Hutchins, www.pthutchins.com
Meyers, www.meyerschemical.com
Monson, www.monsonco.com
Palmer Holland, www.palmerholland.com
Tara Chemical Co., www.tarachemical.com
Univar-Corapolis, www.univarusa.com
Univar-Norcross, www.univarusa.com
Walsh, www.walsh-assoc.com
Visit ads.pcimag.com
ALABAMA
Ashland Distribution
3300 Ball St.
Birmingham, AL 35234
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
701 Western Dr.
Mobile, AL 36607
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
CheMarCo Inc.
(864) 234-6735
sales@chemarco.com
(See South Carolina Headquarters)
McCullough & Associates
(See Georgia Headquarters)
ARIZONA
Ashland Distribution
6839 W. Chicago St.
Chandler, AZ 85226
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
E.T. Horn Company
(800) 422-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
cbm@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
(See California Headquarters)
Pacific Coast Chemicals Co.
4625 N. 45th Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85031
(800) 348-1579 Fax: (510) 549-0890
marykeane@pcchem.com
www.pcchem.com
Mary Keane
(See California Headquarters)
Ribelin Sales Inc.
Phoenix, AZ
(877) Ribelin; (877) 742-3546
www.ribelin.com
(See Texas Headquarters)
TAVCO Chemicals Inc.
7444 W. Foothills Dr.
Glendale, AZ 85310
Len M. Lowski
(See California Headquarters)
ARKANSAS
Ashland Distribution
1900 W. 65th St., Ste. 11
Little Rock, AR 72209
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
E.T. Horn Company
(800) 442-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
cbm@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
(See Texas Listing)
CALIFORNIA
Ashland Distribution
20915 S. Wilmington
Carson, CA 90810
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
291 W. Adams St.
Colton, CA 92324
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
2461 Crocker Cir.
Fairfield, CA 94533
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
*E.T. Horn Company,
Western Region
16141 Heron Ave.
La Mirada, CA 90638
(800) 442-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
ethorn@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
James F. Calkin, V.P.-Mktg.; Bob Ahn, Pres.-
Indl. Groups; Vince Anderson, V.P.-Sales
Representing:
3M, Air Products & Chemicals, Albemarle,
Ashland Aqualon Functional Ingredients,
Ashland Performance Products, BASF-
Minerals, BASF-Pigments & Additives, Bayer
MaterialScience, COIM, Cabot Corporation,
Dow Chemical, Dow Microbial Control,
Eliokem Inc., Evonik, Genovique Special-
ties, Georgia Pacific Resins, King Industries,
NYCO Minerals, Nano Resins, Silberline,
Unimin Specialty Minerals, Zeeospheres
Ceramics LLC
The Kish Company Inc.
City of Industry, CA
(440) 205-9970 Fax: (440) 205-9975
info@kishcompany.com
www.kishcompany.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Pacific Coast Chemicals Co.
5100 District Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90058
(323) 771-7700 Fax: (323) 771-0520
customerservice@pcchem.com
www.pcchem.com
(See California Headquarters)
*Pacific Coast Chemicals Co.,
San Francisco Bay Area
2424 Fourth St.
Berkeley, CA 94710
(510) 549-3535 Fax: (510) 549-0890
customerservice@pcchem.com
www.pcchem.com
Dominic Stull; Bob Robyns; Roy Blackburn
*TAVCO Chemicals Inc.
25401 Cabot Rd., #121
Laguna Hills, CA 92653
(949) 770-7666 Fax: (949) 770-8889
paul@tavcochem.com or ted@tavcochem.
com
www.tavcochem.com
Ted Venia, Pres.; Paul Bethke, V.P.; Bob
Newcomb, Saleman; Len Milowski, Regl. Mgr.
Representing:
Burgess Pigment Company, Deltech Resins,
Dow Wolff Cellulosics, Ferro Pigments,
Munzing Group, Nubiola, Shepard Bros.,
United Minerals & Chemicals
*TCR Industries Inc.
26 Centerpointe Dr., Ste. 120
La Palma, CA 90623
(714) 521-5222; (877) 827-1444 toll-free
Fax: (714) 521-1636
kathrynr@tcroffice.com
www.tcrindustries.com
Sam Rumfola; Don Smith; Dan Coots
Representing:
3V Inc., American Talc Company, CR Miner-
als, Cinic America, Columbia River Carbon-
ates, Columbian Chemicals, Dianal, Dover
Chemical, Durez, Elementis Specialties,
Fawcett, Frank B. Ross, Fuji Silysia, Hexion
Specialty Chemicals, Imerys, Instrumental
Polymers Technology, Kronos, LCP Tech-
nology, Nuroz LLC, Perstorp, Reichhold Inc.,
Rockwood Pigments, Specialty Polymers,
TOR Minerals, Taminco, Toyo, Troy Corpo-
ration, Vitro Minerals, Wayne Pigments,
World Minerals
Univar USA Inc.
2600 S. Garfield Ave.
Commerce, CA 90040
(971) 563-9538
william.chelf@univarusa.com
www.univarusa.com
Bill Chelf
(See Washington Headquarters)
COLORADO
Ashland Distribution
156 W. 56th Ave.
Denver, CO 80216
(800) 531-7106
Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
E.T. Horn Company
(800) 422-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
cbm@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
(See California Headquarters)
Pacific Coast Chemicals Co.
5150 Colorado Blvd.
Denver, CO 80216
(800) 348-1579 Fax: (510) 549-0890
petewilliams@pcchem.com
www.pcchem.com
Pete Williams
(See California Headquarters)
CONNECTICUT
E. W. Kaufmann Co.
(800) 635-5358 Fax: (215) 364-4397
info@ewkco.com
www.ewkaufmann.com
(See Pennsylvania Headquarters)
DELAWARE
E. W. Kaufmann Co.
(800) 635-5358 Fax: (215) 364-4397
info@ewkco.com
www.ewkaufmann.com
(See Pennsylvania Headquarters)
FLORIDA
Ashland Distribution
200 N.E. 181st St.
Miami, FL 33162
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
5125 W. Hanna Ave.
Tampa, FL 33634
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
CheMarCo Inc.
(864) 234-6735
sales@chemarco.com
(See South Carolina Headquarters)
JUNE 2010
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W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 66
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
2010 Additives Distributors
PAI NT & COATI NGS I NDUS TRY Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
67
McCullough & Associates
Tampa, FL
(727) 834-8523 Fax: (727) 834-8561
jc@mccanda.com
www.mccanda.com
Jeff Crawford
(See Georgia Headquarters)
GEORGIA
Ashland Distribution
4550 N.E. Expressway
Atlanta, GA 30340
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
400 Telfair Ave.
Savannah, GA 31401
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
CheMarCo Inc.
(864) 234-6735
sales@chemarco.com
(See South Carolina Headquarters)
*Lintech International LLC
P.O. Box 10225
Macon, GA 31297
(800) 652-9297; (478) 784-1900
Fax: (478) 784-1745
sales@2lintech.com
www.2lintech.com or
www.lintechinternational.com
Julie Hinson Van Brunt, Exec. V.P.; Dennis
Gillespie, Pres.; Randy Waldman, V.P.-Sales
Representing:
ANGUS Chemical, Additives International,
Air Products, Chitec, Dow Microbial Control
*McCullough & Associates
P.O. Box 29803
Atlanta, GA 30359
(404) 325-1606 Fax: (404) 329-0208
is@mccanda.com
www.mccanda.com
Anne M. Campbell; George L. McCullough;
Earl T. Tveit
Representing:
Active Minerals, Albemarle, American Col-
loid, Arde Barinco, Bayer Material Science,
Bendel, Boule, Burgess, C R Minerals, C.W.
Brabender, Cabot Corporation, Cognis
Corporation, Cortec, Disti, EMD Chemicals,
EMI, Eliokem, Fawcett, Grace Davison, ICM
Corporation, ISP, Ideal Mfg., LanXess, Lans-
co Pigments, MM Industries, Micro Pow-
ders, Myers Engineering, Neville Chemical,
Plasticolors, Silberline, World Minerals
Ribelin Sales Inc.
Atlanta, GA
(877) Ribelin; (877) 742-3546
www.ribelin.com
(See Texas Headquarters)
Univar USA Inc.
2145 Skyland Ct.
Norcross, GA 30071
(404) 395 9682
thomas.watson@univarusa.com
www.univarusa.com
Tom Watson
(See Washington Headquarters)
IDAHO
E.T. Horn Company
(800) 422-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
cbm@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
(See California Headquarters)
ILLINOIS
Ashland Distribution
11524 W. Addison St.
Franklin Park, IL 60131
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
8500 S. Willow Springs Rd.
Willow Springs, IL 60480
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Chem-Materials Co. Inc.
6800 W. 68th St.
Chicago, IL 60638
(800) 585-0808
cmc@chem-materials.com
www.chem-materials.com
Larry Caughlin
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Maroon West
7750 Industrial Dr.
Forest Park, IL 60130
(877) 627-6661
jgacek@marooninc.com
www.marooninc.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
*TH Hilson Company
1761 S. Naperville Rd.
Wheaton, IL 60189
(800) 665-3087 Fax: (630) 665-0196
sales@thhilson.com
www.thhilson.com
Lori Hilson; Bruce Weihrauch; Matt Krause
Representing:
Cabot, www.cabot-group.com, Clariant,
www.clariant.com, Dover Chemical, www.
doverchem.com, EPS/CCA, www.epscca.
com, K&S Industries, www.kandsepoxy.
com, King Industries, www.kingindustries.
com, Lansco, www.pigments.com, Micro
Powders, www.micropowders.com, Nev-
ille, www.nevchem.com
Univar USA Inc.
8500 W. 68th St.
Bedford Park, IL 60501
(708) 728-6740
christopher.ernst@univarusa.com
www.univarusa.com
Christopher Ernst
(See Washington Headquarters)
INDIANA
Ashland Distribution
3501 Cooper Dr.
Elkhart, IN 46514
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
8315 E. 33rd St.
Indianapolis, IN 46226
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
15280 Heriman Blvd.
Noblesville, IN 46060
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
1817 W. Indiana Ave.
South Bend, IN 46613
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Chem-Materials Co. Inc.
(800) 585-0808
cmc@chem-materials.com
www.chem-materials.com
Ken Burdick
(See Ohio Headquarters)
IOWA
Chem-Materials Co. Inc.
(800) 585-0808
cmc@chem-materials.com
www.chem-materials.com
Scott Stayart
(See Ohio Headquarters)
KANSAS
Ashland Distribution
5420 Speaker Rd.
Kansas City, KS 66106
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Chem-Materials Company
(800) 585-0808
Sean Wagner
(See Ohio Headquarters)
KENTUCKY
Ashland Distribution
549 Blue Sky Pkwy.
Lexington, KY 40509
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
4185 Algonquin Pkwy.
Louisville, KY 40211
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Chem-Materials Co. Inc.
(800) 585-0808
cmc@chem-materials.com
www.chem-materials.com
Ken Burdick
(See Ohio Headquarters)
LOUISIANA
Ashland Distribution
11109 S. Choctaw Dr.
Baton Rouge, LA 70815
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
E.T. Horn Company
(800) 442-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
cbm@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
(See Texas Listing)
JUNE 2010
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W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 68
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
2010 Additives Distributors
McCullough & Associates
(See Georgia Headquarters)
MAINE
E. W. Kaufmann Co.
(800) 635-5358 Fax: (215) 364-4397
info@ewkco.com
www.ewkaufmann.com
(See Pennsylvania Headquarters)
MARYLAND
Ashland Distribution
1730 Twin Springs Rd., Ste. 217
Baltimore, MD 21227
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
E. W. Kaufmann Co.
(800) 635-5358 Fax: (215) 364-4397
info@ewkco.com
www.ewkaufmann.com
(See Pennsylvania Headquarters)
McCullough & Associates
(See Georgia Headquarters)
MASSACHUSETTS
Ashland Distribution
400 Main St.
Tewkbury, MA 01876
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
170 Lockhouse Rd.
Westfield, MA 01085
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
E. W. Kaufmann Co.
(800) 635-5358 Fax: (215) 364-4397
info@ewkco.com
www.ewkaufmann.com
(See Pennsylvania Headquarters)
MICHIGAN
Ashland Distribution
2011 Turner St.
Lansing, MI 48906ax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
12005 Toepfer Rd.
Warren, MI 48089
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Chem-Materials Co. Inc.
(800) 585-0808
cmc@chem-materials.com
www.chem-materials.com
Phil Haagensen
(See Ohio Headquarters)
The Kish Company Inc.
Waterford, MI
(440) 205-9970 Fax: (440) 205-9975
info@kishcompany.com
www.kishcompany.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
MINNESOTA
Ashland Distribution
4401 Valley Industrial Blvd.
Shakopee, MN 55379
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
395 James Ave.
St. Paul, MN 55102
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Chem-Materials Co. Inc.
(800) 585-0808
cmc@chem-materials.com
www.chem-materials.com
Scott Stayart
(See Ohio Headquarters)
MISSISSIPPI
McCullough & Associates
(See Georgia Headquarters)
MISSOURI
Ashland Distribution
7710 Polk St.
St. Louis, MO 63111
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Chem-Materials Company
(800) 585-0808
Sean Wagner
(See Ohio Headquarters)
MONTANA
E.T. Horn Company
(800) 422-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
cbm@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
(See California Headquarters)
NEBRASKA
Chem-Materials Company
(800) 585-0808
Sean Wagner
(See Ohio Headquarters)
NEVADA
E.T. Horn Company
(800) 422-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
cbm@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
(See California Headquarters)
NEW HAMPSHIRE
E. W. Kaufmann Co.
(800) 635-5358 Fax: (215) 364-4397
info@ewkco.com
www.ewkaufmann.com
(See Pennsylvania Headquarters)
NEW JERSEY
Ashland Distribution
350 Roosevelt Ave.
Carteret, NJ 07008
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
E. W. Kaufmann Co.
(800) 635-5358 Fax: (215) 364-4397
info@ewkco.com
www.ewkaufmann.com
(See Pennsylvania Headquarters)
*Landman Chemical Corp.
24 Shadowlawn Dr.
Livingston, NJ 07039-3216
(973) 533-9198 Fax: (973) 535-5705
landmanchem@aol.com
Alan D. Bass, Pres.
Representing:
Lanxess Corp., Polysat Inc., Troy Corp.,
Vertellus
*R. E. Carroll Inc.
1570 N. Olden Ave.
Trenton, NJ 08638
(609) 695-6211; (800) 257-9365
Fax: (609) 695-0102
paintinfo@recarroll.com
www.recarroll.com
David Carroll, Dir.-Mktg.; Robert E.
Carroll III, Pres.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 53
NEW MEXICO
E.T. Horn Company
(800) 422-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
cbm@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
(See California Headquarters)
NEW YORK
Ashland Distribution
3 Broad St.
Binghamton, NY 13902
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
3701 River Rd.
Tonawanda, NY 14150
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Chem-Materials Co. Inc.
(800) 585-0808
cmc@chem-materials.com
www.chem-materials.com
Phil Haagensen
(See Ohio Headquarters)
E. W. Kaufmann Co.
(800) 635-5358 Fax: (215) 364-4397
info@ewkco.com
www.ewkaufmann.com
(See Pennsylvania Headquarters)
PAI NT & COATI NGS I NDUS TRY Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
69
NORTH CAROLINA
Ashland Distribution
3930 Glenwood Dr.
Charlotte, NC 28208
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
CheMarCo Inc.
(864) 234-6735
sales@chemarco.com
(See South Carolina Headquarters)
McCullough & Associates
9303-C Monroe Rd.
Charlotte, NC
(704) 845-9141 Fax: (704) 845-4028
gm@mccanda.com
www.mccanda.com
George McCullough
(See Georgia Headquarters)
OHIO
*Ashland Distribution,
Chemicals
P.O. Box 2219
Columbus, OH 43216
(800) 531-7106 (option 3)
Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashdist.com or
www.go2ashland.com
Tony Gutierrez, Ind. Mgr.-Spec.
Representing:
Akzo Chemical, Albermarle, Angus,
Arkema, BASF, Clariant, Cristal Global,
Dover Chemical, Dow Chemical, Dow
Corning, Eastman Chemical, Ferro, Hexion,
ICL Supresta, LCY Elastomers LP, Lyondell
Basell, Merisol, Oxea Corp., Pilot Chemical
Company, Rhodia, Texas Petrochemical LP,
UCAR Emulsion Systems, XIAMETER
Ashland Distribution
5399 E. Providence Dr.
Cincinnati, OH 45246
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Columbus, OH headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
2788 Glendale-Milford Rd.
Cincinnati, OH 45241
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Columbus, OH headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
3849 Fisher Rd.
Columbus, OH 43228
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Columbus, OH headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
5200 Blazer Pkwy.
Dublin, OH 43017
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Columbus, OH headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
3250 Southwest Blvd.
Grove City, OH 43123
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Columbus, OH headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
2854 Springboro W.
Moraine, OH 45439
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Columbus, OH headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
1842 Enterprise Pkwy.
Twinsburg, OH 44087
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Columbus, OH headquarters)
*Chem-Materials Co. Inc.
16600 Sprague Rd.
Cleveland, OH 44130-6318
(440) 243-5590; (800) 585-0808
Fax: (440) 243-1940
cmc@chem-materials.com
www.chem-materials.com
Bob Morsek, Pres.
Representing:
Arakawa Hydrocarbon Resins, www.araka-
wa-usa.com, Arkema Molecular Sieves,
www.arkema.com, Evonik Industries, cor-
porate.evonik.com, Expancel Thermplastic
Spheres, www.expancel.com, Fillite Glass
Beads, www.fillite.com, General Carbon
Lampblack, www.generalcarboncompany.
com, Hanse-Chemie, www.hanse-chemie.
com, Mace Polyurethanes, www.maceco.
com, Nano Resins, www.hanse-chemie.
com, Nubiola Anti Corrosive Pigments,
www.nubiola.com, Ona Polymers, Pan
Technology, www.pantechnology.com,
Prom Biocides, www.prom.co.uk, REAXIS
Catalysis, www.reaxis.com, RT Vanderbilt,
Visit ads.pcimag.com
JUNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 70
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
2010 Additives Distributors
www.rtvanderbilt.com, Tate & Lyle, Tego
Coatings & Ink Additives, www.tego.de,
Tolsa Rheological Additives, www.tolsa.
com, United Initiators
*The Kish Company Inc.
8020 Tyler Blvd., Ste. #100
Mentor, OH 44060
(440) 205-9970 Fax: (440) 205-9975
info@kishcompany.com
www.kishcompany.com
John Kish; Brian Richards
Representing:
Cardinal Color, Cimbar, Mississippi Lime,
Potters Corp., Specialty Minerals, Sphere
One, US Gypsum
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 22
*Maroon Inc.
1390 Jaycox Rd.
Avon, OH 44011
(440) 937-1000 Fax: (440) 937-1001
mmckenna@marooninc.com
www.marooninc.com
Mark Reichard; Mark Maroon
Representing:
AllCoat Technology, Asahi Glass Co.,
Brilliant Pigments, Buckman Labs, CCP
Melamines, Century Container, ChemMet
Maroon PTSI, Chitec Technologies, Eliokem,
Evonik, Gellner Polymers, Huntsman,
Hydrite Chemical, Inchem, LCP Technology,
Microchem, Nan Ya Epoxy, Norac, Nubiola,
Phoenix Container, Polystar Inc., Rianlon
Chemical, SNCZ, Solutia, Zeochem
*Schibley Chemical Co. Inc.
1570 Lowell St.
Elyria, OH 44135
(440) 322-1350 Fax: (440) 322-1430
rschibley@schibley.com
www.schibley.com
Reed Schibley
Representing:
Akzo Nobel, Arkema Organic Peroxide
Initiators, BASF, Blachford, Chattam Chemi-
cal, Clariant, Dura Gelcoats, Fiberglass
Reinforcements, Hexion Resins, Magnum
Venus Equipment, Mason, Pergan, Rhodia,
Sasol, Specialty Products Release Agents,
Uniqema/Vantage Oleochemicals
OKLAHOMA
Ashland Distribution
3535 W. 21st St.
Tulsa, OK 74107
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Listing)
E.T. Horn Company
(800) 442-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
cbm@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
(See Texas Listing)
McCullough & Associates
(See Georgia Headquarters)
OREGON
Ashland Distribution
7425 N. Leadbetter
Portland, OR 97203
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
E.T. Horn Company
(800) 422-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
cbm@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
(See California Headquarters)
Pacific Coast Chemicals Co.
2720 N.W. 35th
Portland, OR 97210x: (510) 549-0890
mikeharris@pcchem.com
www.pcchem.com
Mike Harris
(See California Headquarters)
PENNSYLVANIA
Ashland Distribution
150 W. 4th Ave.
Freedom, PA 15042
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
Buncher Industrial Park, Ave. B
Leetsdale, PA 15056
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
1101 New Ford Mill Rd.
Morrisville, PA 19067
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
*Brenntag North America
5083 Pottsville Pike
Reading, PA 19605
(610) 926-6100 x3858
Fax: (610) 926-0420
brenntag@brenntag.com
www.brenntagnorthamerica.com
Lance Kitzelman, ACES Specialties
Mktg. Dir.
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 7
Chem-Materials Co. Inc.
(800) 585-0808
cmc@chem-materials.com
www.chem-materials.com
Phil Haagensen
(See Ohio Headquarters)
*E. W. Kaufmann Co.
140 Wharton Rd.
Bristol, PA 19007
(800) 635-5358 Fax: (215) 364-4397
boconnor@ewkco.com
www.ewkaufmann.com
Brian O’Connor; Thomas Rudeau;
Stephen Schmidt
Representing:
Akcros Chemicals America, Burgess
Pigment Company, Chimista, Cognis,
DisperseTech, Disti-Kleen Inc., Eco-Shells
Inc., Horsehead Corporation (Formerly
Zinc Corp. of America), Huntsman Tioxide,
ICIESSE, IMI-FABI LLC, Ideal Manufacturing,
Ineos Chlor, Ineos Melamines, Invotech,
Kumho P & B Chemicals, MM Industries,
Inc, Mix-Mor Incorporated, Myers Engi-
neering Inc., NiCHEM Corp., OMYA Inc.,
Polyaziridine LLC, Reichhold Inc., State Mix,
Toyal America, Trelleborg Fillite, Unimin
Specialty Minerals, Vertellus Specialties
Inc. (Formerly Caschem Inc.), Werner G.
Smith, Westdry Industries, Yuen Liang/
TRInternational
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 69
E. W. Kaufmann Co.
(800) 635-5358 Fax: (215) 364-4397
info@ewkco.com
www.ewkaufmann.com
(See Pennsylvania Headquarters)
The Kish Company Inc.
Reading, PA
(440) 205-9970 Fax: (440) 205-9975
info@kishcompany.com
www.kishcompany.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Univar USA Inc.
200 Dean Sievers Pl.
Morrisville, PA 19067
(215) 337-6202
michael.zibit@univarusa.com
www.univarusa.com
Michael Zibit
(See Washington Headquarters)
RHODE ISLAND
E. W. Kaufmann Co.
(800) 635-5358 Fax: (215) 364-4397
info@ewkco.com
www.ewkaufmann.com
(See Pennsylvania Headquarters)
SOUTH CAROLINA
Ashland Distribution
105 Chapman Rd.
Anderson, SC 29625
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
729 Mauney Dr.
Columbia, SC 29201
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
*CheMarCo Inc.
63 Pelham Davis Cir.
Greenville, SC 29615
(864) 234-6735 Fax: (864) 234-6975
sales@chemarco.com
www.chemarco.com
Martin Carter, Pres.; Richard P. Carter, CFO
Representing:
Air Products & Chemicals, CB Mills, Chang
Chun Plastics, Chartwell International, CoA-
tex, Deltech Resins, J. Rettenmaier USA, JLS
Chemical, Keim-Additec Surface, Kemira
Chemicals, PCC-Chemax, Pacer Minerals,
TOR Minerals, US Borax, Vitro Minerals,
Hanse Chemie, Nanoresins
McCullough & Associates
(See Georgia Headquarters)
TENNESSEE
Ashland Distribution
5263 National Dr.
Knoxville, TN 37914
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
2351 Channel Ave.
Memphis, TN 38113
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
2315 Clifton Ave.
Nashville, TN 37209
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
PRODUCED BY:
OCTOBER 5-6, 2010
WESTIN LOMBARD YORKTOWN CENTER
LOMBARD, IL
C U R R E N T S P O N S O R S
You’re Invited to Enhance your
Knowledge of Coatings for Plastic,
Wood and Metal Substrates.
SPONSORSHIPS
AVAILABLE FROM
$350 TO $3500!
Opportunities include:
• Lanyard Sponsor
• Tote Bag Sponsor
• Networking Reception Sponsor
• Breaks
• Luncheon
• Tabletop Sponsors
and many more.
Contact your rep today or visit
www.coatingsconference.com
to learn more.
Top 5 Reasons
to Attend:
1. Broaden your understanding of the coatings industry;
2. Attend sessions led by experts exploring coatings for
plastic, wood and metal;
3. Build relationships with well-informed colleagues;
4. Visit with Exhibitor representatives who can offer
solutions for your business;
5. Stay up to date with the latest trends and technology.
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At this 2-day conference, you will have the opportunity to participate in the robust
exchange of ideas and information related to today’s most important coatings issues.
This event is designed to be the place where you can come to hear the leading and
most important sources of information on research trends, technical advances,
field applications and other critical issues related to the coatings industry.
JUNE 2010
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W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 72
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
2010 Additives Distributors
CheMarCo Inc.
(864) 234-6735
sales@chemarco.com
(See South Carolina Headquarters)
The Kish Company Inc.
Chattanooga, TN
(440) 205-9970 Fax: (440) 205-9975
info@kishcompany.com
www.kishcompany.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
McCullough & Associates
(See Georgia Headquarters)
TEXAS
Ashland Distribution
3101 Wood Dr.
Garland, TX 75041
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
8901 Old Galveston Rd.
Houston, TX 77034
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
10919 Country Rd.
Midland, TX 79711
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
*E.T. Horn Company,
Southwest Region
16141 Heron Ave. (Corporate
Headquarters)
La Mirada, CA 90638
(800) 442-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
cbm@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
James F. Calkin, V.P.-Mktg.; Bob Ahn, Pres.-
Indl. Groups; Vince Anderson, V.P.-Sales
Representing:
3M, A.B. Colby, Albemarle, American Leci-
thin, Bayer MaterialScience, Dow Chemical,
Eliokem Inc., Genovique Specialties, Geor-
gia Pacific Resins, King Industries, Lansco,
Nanoresins, Silberline (TX and OK only)
McCullough & Associates
(See Georgia Headquarters)
Ribelin Sales Inc.
Houston, TX
(877) Ribelin; (877) 742-3546
www.ribelin.com
(See Texas Headquarters)
*Ribelin Sales Inc.,
Headquarters
3857 Miller Park Dr.
Garland, TX 75042
(972) 272-1594; (800) 374-1594
Fax: (972) 535-1231
dweiss@ribelin.com
www.ribelin.com
Dan Weiss; Jordan Muller
Representing:
Aqualon, BASF, Hexion, Huntsman
Advanced Materials, Kronos, Rockwood
Pigments, Ropak, Unimin, Wacker Polymers
Univar USA Inc.
3636 Dan Morton Dr.
Dallas, TX 75236-1071
(972) 467-7814
john.grimes@univarusa.com
www.univarusa.com
John Grimes
(See Washington Headquarters)
UTAH
Ashland Distribution
P.O. Box 160367, Freeport Center
Bldg. 12
Clearfield, UT 84016
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
E.T. Horn Company
(800) 422-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
cbm@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
(See California Headquarters)
Pacific Coast Chemicals Co.
1812 S. Empire Rd.
Salt Lake City, UT 84104
(800) 348-1579 Fax: (510) 549-0890
petewilliams@pcchem.com
www.pcchem.com
Pete Williams
(See California Headquarters)
VERMONT
E. W. Kaufmann Co.
(800) 635-5358 Fax: (215) 364-4397
info@ewkco.com
www.ewkaufmann.com
(See Pennsylvania Headquarters)
VIRGINIA
CheMarCo Inc.
(864) 234-6735
sales@chemarco.com
(See South Carolina Headquarters)
E. W. Kaufmann Co.
(800) 635-5358 Fax: (215) 364-4397
info@ewkco.com
www.ewkaufmann.com
(See Pennsylvania Headquarters)
McCullough & Associates
(See Georgia Headquarters)
WASHINGTON
E.T. Horn Company
(800) 422-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
cbm@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
(See California Headquarters)
Pacific Coast Chemicals Co.
530 Andover Park W.
Tukwilla, WA 98188
(800) 348-1579 Fax: (510) 549-0890
robertrobyns@pcchem.com
www.pcchem.com
Bob Robyns
(See California Headquarters)
*Univar USA Inc.
17425 N.E. Union Rd.
Redmond, WA 98052
(708) 325-2436; (800) 234-4588
Fax: (708) 594-7021
stephen.hollman@univarusa.com
www.univarusa.com or www.
univarusa.com/pagesi/case
Steve Hollman; Dave Johnson; Nicole
Bradley
Representing:
Dow Chemical Company, www.dow.
com, Dow Corning, www.dowcorning.
com, DuPont, www.dupont.com, Eastman,
www.eastman.com, Rohm & Haas,
www.rohmhaas.com
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 21
WEST VIRGINIA
E. W. Kaufmann Co.
(800) 635-5358 Fax: (215) 364-4397
info@ewkco.com
www.ewkaufmann.com
(See Pennsylvania Headquarters)
WISCONSIN
Ashland Distribution
204 Madison St.
Menasha, WI 54952
(800) 531-7106 Fax: (800) 791-8498
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Chem-Materials Co. Inc.
(800) 585-0808
cmc@chem-materials.com
www.chem-materials.com
Scott Stayart
(See Ohio Headquarters)
WYOMING
E.T. Horn Company
(800) 422-HORN (4676)
Fax: (714) 670-6851
cbm@ethorn.com
www.ethorn.com
(See California Headquarters)
CANADA
ALBERTA
Ashland Distribution
1720 106 Ave.
Edmonton, AB T6P 1X9
(800) 563-3435
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Ashland Distribution
9750 McCarthy Rd.
Kelowna, BC V4V 1S5
(800) 563-3435
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
Ashland Distribution
2060 Viceroy Pl.
Richmond, BC V6V 1Y9
(800) 563-3435
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
MANITOBA
Ashland Distribution
1591 Dugald St.
Winnipeg, MB R2J OH3
(866) 201-0051
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
ONTARIO
Ashland Distribution
2463 Royal Windsor Dr.
Mississauga, ON L5J 1K9
(866) 201-0051
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
QUEBEC
Ashland Distribution
10515 Rue Notre Dame E.
Montreal, QC H1B 2V1
(866) 650-3800
www.ashland.com
(See Ohio Headquarters)
PAI NT & COATI NGS I NDUS TRY Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
73
C LL AA SS SS II FF II EE DD SS L A S S I F I E D S
EQUIPMENT POSITIONS AVAILABLE EQUIPMENT
HOCKMEYER
EQUIPMENT CORPORATION
A leader in the grinding and
dispersion industries
New & Used Equipment
Dispersers • Mills • Mixers •
Tank & Tote Washers •
Particle Size Analysis • Vessels
Visit us at
www.hockmeyer.com
or call us at 252-338-4705
Wanted to purchase:
Used Dispersers
& Mixers
CONSULTING & TESTING
REPS WANTED
Stainless IT Stainless ITT
The CONN Blade®s
Most Efficient & Aggressive Available
UHMW Poly
w w w . c o n n b l a d e . c o m
(814) 723-7980
856-467-3399
www.heinkelusa.com
Horizontal Peeler Centrifuges
Vertical Basket Centrifuges
Inverting Filter Centrifuges
www.pcimag.com/classifieds
Phoenix Plastics, LP in Conroe
Texas is accepting applications for:
MANAGEMENT ANALYST
Responsible for performing testing and
verifying materials to match purchase
orders; test and verify in-process
production materials; certify and create
COAs. Maintain project/sampling tracker
system, monthly, weekly and daily quality
reports. Create processing procedures for
lab equipment and maintenance history
fles. Main contact with internal and
external costumers. MBA or Masters in
Industrial Engineering plus three years of
experience required.
PROCESS TECHNICIAN
5 years of experience in a process, set-up
or maintenance capacity in plastics, twin
screw experience, strong leadership and
the ability to perform and recognize
operating ef ciency. The PT will perform
basic troubleshooting, follow correct
housekeeping and safety procedures,
will be responsible for maintaining ISO
standards and must be team oriented.
Need High School diploma or equivalent.
Send resume/cover letter by fax to
(936) 760-2322. No walk-ins please.
To place your classified ad, contact
Andrea Kropp
Ph: (810) 688-4847 Fax: (248) 502-1048
Email: kroppa@pcimag.com
Salesperson for
SE Region
Experienced Powder Coating
Salesperson needed.

Contact Trimite Powders Inc.
vickie.owens@trimiteusa.com
JUNE 2010
|
W W W . P C I M A G . C O M 74
Ⅲ Ⅲ Ⅲ
C LL AA SS SS II FF II EE DD SS L A S S I F I E D S
Visit ads.pcimag.com
AD INDEX
CUSTOM MANUFACTURING RECRUITMENT SERVICES CUSTOM MANUFACTURING
13th Annual Coatings
Trends & Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . 71
www.coatingsconference.com
Air Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13, 45
www.airproducts.com/newdawn
American Chemet Corp.. . . . . . . . . . 51
www.chemet.com
Brenntag North America. . . . . . . . . . 7
www.brenntagnorthamerica.com
Buhler Inc. (PARTEC). . . . . . . . . . . . 30
www.buhlergroup.com
Burgess Pigment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
www.burgesspigment.com
BYK USA Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
www.byk.com/innovation
Cabot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
www.cabot-corp.com/coatings
Chesapeake Energy. . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 33
www.chk.com/cemi
CINIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
www.cinic.com
Coatex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
www.coatex.com
Conn and Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
www.connblade.com
Dow Microbial Control . . . . . . . . . . . 37
www.dowmicrobialcontrol.com
Elcometer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
www.elcometer.com
Elementis Specialties. . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
www.elementis.com
Evonik Industries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
www.smartformulating.com
E.W. Kaufmann Company. . . . . . . . 69
www.ewkaufmann.com
Heubach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
www.heubachcolor.com
Huntsman Advanced Materials. . . 31
www.huntsman.com/advanced_
materials
Jyoti Ceramic Industries. . . . . . . . . . . 3
www.jyoticeramic.com
King Industries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
www.kingindustries.com
Kish Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
www.kishcompany.com
MACE Polymers & Additives, Inc.. . .22
www.maceco.com
Mason Color Works, Inc. . . . . . . . . . 11
www.masoncolorpigments.com
Michelman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
www.michelman.com
Micro Powders, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
www.micropowders.com
Münzing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
www.munzing.com
PCI 2010 Coatings Additives
Handbook CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
kroppa@pcimag.com
R.E. Carroll, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
www.recarroll.com
Reichhold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
www.reichhold.com/resin
Reitech Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
www.reitechcorporation.com
Rhodia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
www.rhodia.com
Ross, Charles & Son. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
www.PowderInjection.com
Sartomer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
www.sartomer.com
The Shepherd Color Company . . . . 16
www.shepherdcolor.com
Siltech Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
www.siltechcorp.com
Soy Technologies, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 22
www.soytek.com
TRICOR Systems Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
www.tricor-systems.com
Troy Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
www.troycorp.com
Unimin Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
www.BrilliantAdditions.com
Univar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
www.univarcorp.com
Wacker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
www.wacker.com/e-business
Wacker Chemical Corporation. . . . 43
www.wacker.com
Worlée-Chemie GmbH . . . . . . . . . . . 55
www.worlee.com
Yuron Chemical Industry . . . . . . . . 27
www.yulongchem.com

PUBL I S HI NG/ S AL ES S TAF F
Publisher/ Donna M. Campbell
East Coast/Europe/ Tel: 610/650.4050 • Fax: 248/502.1091
Far East Sales E-mail: campbelld@pcimag.com
Midwest/ Lisa Guldan
West Coast Sales Tel: 630/882.8491
E-mail: guldanL@bnpmedia.com
China Media Rep. Arlen Luo
0086-10-88579899
E-mail: nsmchina@126.com
Inside Sales Manager Andrea Kropp
Tel: 810/688.4847
E-mail: kroppa@pcimag.com
Production Manager Monica Hackney
Tel: 248/244.6434 • Fax: 248/244.3915
E-mail: hackneym@bnpmedia.com
EDI TORI AL S TAF F
Editor Darlene R. Brezinski, Ph.D.
Tel: 906/779.9498
E-mail: darpaint@aol.com
Managing Editor Kristin Johansson
Tel: 248/641.0592 • Fax: 248/502.2094
E-mail: johanssonk@bnpmedia.com
Associate Editor Karen Parker
Tel: 248/229.2681
E-mail: parkerpcimag@gmail.com
Art Director Clare L. Johnson
OPERATI ONS S TAF F
Single Copy Sales Ann Kalb
E-mail: kalba@bnpmedia.com
Reprint Manager Jill L. DeVries
248/244.1726
E-mail: devriesj@bnpmedia.com
For subscription information or service,
please contact Customer Service at:
Tel: 847/763.9534 or Fax: 847/763.9538 or
e-mail PCI@halldata.com
Toll Manufacturing,
Converting, Packaging,
Fill Off and Private Labeling
Ⅲ Urethanes, Solvent & Water-Based Systems,
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Contact Mike Lombard
Ph: 978-988-0880, ext. 304
FAX: 978-658-3366
info@allcoattech.com www.allcoattech.com
www.pcimag.com/classifieds
Specializing in paint/coatings industry. Seeking
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SEARCHLIGHT PARTNERS
30092 Ivy Glenn Dr., Suite 210
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The Industry Standard in Defoamers
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