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British Standard

Licensed Copy: Sheffield University, University of Sheffield, 17 July 2003, Uncontrolled Copy, (c) BSI

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17 July 2003

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DRAFT FOR DEVELOPMENT

DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997

Eurocode 6: Design of masonry structures —
Part 1-2: General rules — Structural fire design —
Licensed Copy: Sheffield University, University of Sheffield, 17 July 2003, Uncontrolled Copy, (c) BSI

(together with United Kingdom National Application Document)

ICS 13.220.50; 91.080.30

DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997

Committees responsible for this Draft for Development
The preparation of this Draft for Development was entrusted to Technical Committee B/525, Building and civil engineering structures, upon which the following bodies were represented: Association of Consulting Engineers British Cement Association British Constructional Steelwork Association Ltd. British Masonry Society Building Employers Confederation Department of the Environment (Building Research Establishment) Department of the Environment (Construction Sponsorship Directorate) Department of Transport Federation of Civil Engineering Contractors Institution of Civil Engineers Institution of Structural Engineers National Council of Building Material Producers Royal Institute of British Architects Timber Research and Development Association The following bodies were also represented in the drafting of the document, through subcommittees and panels: Autoclaved Aerated Concrete Products Association Brick Development Association British Ceramic Research Ltd. British Precast Concrete Federation Ltd. Calcium Silicate Brick Association Limited Concrete Block Association National House-building Council

Licensed Copy: Sheffield University, University of Sheffield, 17 July 2003, Uncontrolled Copy, (c) BSI

This Draft for Development, having been prepared under the direction of the Sector Board for Building and Civil Engineering, was published under the authority of the Standards Board and comes into effect on 15 November 1997 © BSI 05-1999 The following BSI reference relates to the work on this Draft for Development: Committee reference B/525 ISBN 0 580 28359 3

Amendments issued since publication Amd. No. Date Comments

17 July 2003. University of Sheffield. (c) BSI © BSI 05-1999 i . Uncontrolled Copy.DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Contents Committees responsible National foreword Text of National Application Document Text of ENV 1996-1-2 Page Inside front cover ii v 5 Licensed Copy: Sheffield University.

ENV 1996-1-2:1995 results from a programme of work sponsored by the European Commission to make available a common set of rules for the design of building and civil engineering works. when used in conjunction with this NAD. Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. particularly in relation to safety. Users of this document are invited to comment on its technical content. 389 Chiswick High Road. The values for certain parameters in the ENV Eurocodes may be set by CEN members so as to meet the requirements of national regulations. This standard has been updated (see copyright date) and may have had amendments incorporated. an inside front cover. pages 2 to 20 and a back cover. During the ENV period of validity. pages i to xiv. This Draft for Development also includes the United Kingdom (UK) National Application Document (NAD) to be used with the ENV for the design of buildings to be constructed in the UK. At the end of the trial period. ease of use and any ambiguities or anomalies. British Standards House. ii © BSI 05-1999 . draws attention to the potential use of ENV Eurocodes as an alternative approach to Building Regulation compliance. The NAD takes precedence over corresponding provisions in the ENV. Uncontrolled Copy. University of Sheffield. The purpose of the NAD is to provide essential information. published by the European Committee for Standardization (CEN). ENV 1996-1-2 has been thoroughly examined over a period of several years and is considered to offer such an alternative approach. An ENV is made available for provisional application during a period of trial use of 3 years. the ENV title page. a proposed revision. but does not have the status of a European Standard. Comments should be sent in writing to BSI. This publication is not to be regarded as a British Standard. Chiswick. the aim is to use the experience gained to modify the ENV so that it can be adopted as a European Standard. 17 July 2003. These comments will be taken into account when preparing the UK national response to CEN on the question of whether the ENV can be converted to an EN. London W4 4AL.DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997 National foreword This Draft for Development was prepared by Technical Committee B/525 and is the English language version of ENV 1996-1-2:1995 Eurocode 6 — Design of masonry structures — Part 1-2: General rules — Structural fire design. reference should be made to the supporting documents listed in the National Application Document (NAD). (c) BSI Summary of pages This document comprises a front cover. This will be indicated in the amendment table on the inside front cover. Approved Document A 1992. to enable the ENV to be used for buildings constructed in the UK. by 15 December 1997. where possible. the relevant clause number and. The Building Regulations 1991. These parameters are designated by q (boxed values) in the ENV. quoting the document reference. Compliance with ENV 1996-1-2:1995 and this NAD does not in itself confer immunity from legal obligations.

University of Sheffield. 17 July 2003. (c) BSI © BSI 05-1999 iii . Uncontrolled Copy.DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997 National Application Document for use in the UK with ENV 1996-1-2:1995 Licensed Copy: Sheffield University.

University of Sheffield. subject to load up to a resistance of NRd ÷ average ¾f.6NRd ÷ average ¾f. Table C.DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Contents of National Application Document Page National Application Document Introduction 1 Scope 2 References 3 Partial safety factors and other values to be used in ENV 1996-1-2:1995 4 Reference documents 5 Additional information and recommendations Table 1 — Reference in ENV 1996-1-2 to other publications Table 2 — Loadbearing single-leaf walls subject to load up to a resistance of NRd ÷ average ¾f.1) Table 3 — Loadbearing single-leaf walls subject to load up to a resistance of 0. Uncontrolled Copy.5) Table 5 — Loadbearing cavity walls with one leaf loaded. separating function E1 (equivalent to ENV 1996-1-2.9) List of references v v v v v v vi ix x xi xii xiii Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. separating function REI (equivalent to ENV 1996-1-2. separating function REI (equivalent to ENV 1996-1-2. Table C. (c) BSI iv © BSI 05-1999 .2) Table 4 — Non-loadbearing single-leaf walls. Table C. separating function REI (equivalent to ENV 1996-1-2. 17 July 2003. Table C.

17 July 2003. It should be noted that this NAD. These normative references are made at the appropriate places in the text and the cited publications are listed on page xiii. It should be noted that for the purposes of using the fire resistance tables in Annex C. 4 Reference documents Where reference is made in ENV 1996-1-2 and in this NAD to “national regulations”. This definition corrects an apparent error in ENV 1996-1-2. The maximum slenderness ratio for vertically loaded walls should not exceed the numerical value 27. [SI 1990 No. any subsequent amendments to or revisions of the cited publication apply to this NAD only when incorporated in the reference by amendment or revision. as the appropriate partial safety factors for structural design will be those from ENV 1996-1-1 and its NAD. as appropriate. 2179 (S.1 Clause 1.3 (1) and Annex C (5) should be taken as 1. by dated or undated reference. provisions from other publications. 243). (SI 1991 No. b) a calibration against BS 5628-3:1985. (c) BSI 2 References 2. Editions of these publications current at the time of issue of this document are listed on page xiii. 2768) In Scotland: The Building Standards (Scotland) Regulations 1990. 5. The maximum height-to-thickness ratio for non-loadbearing walls should not exceed the numerical value 40 or exceed the relevant size limitations given in ENV 1996-2. It has been developed from the following: a) a textual examination of ENV 1996-1-2:1995. together with equivalent British Standards. slenderness ratio is defined as the effective wall height divided by effective wall thickness as given in 4.187)] as amended. in common with ENV 1996-1-2 and supporting CEN standards. © BSI 05-1999 . [1] to [4]. For undated references. For dated references.4 Symbols Paragraph (1) The partial safety factor. Uncontrolled Copy. In England and Wales: The Building Regulations 1991. such regulations are the following.3 (3)P of ENV 1996-1-2. (SRNI 1994 No.DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Introduction This National Application Document (NAD) has been prepared by Technical Committee B/525. The supporting documents to these building regulations are detailed in the list of references on page xiii.1 Scope “Non-separating functions” is not a defined term within the regulatory context of the United Kingdom and is not part of the scope of this NAD. is defined as the total design load divided by the total characteristic load. v 3 Partial safety factors and other values to be used in ENV 1996-1-2:1995 5. This definition varies from that given in 3. Reference publications cited in ENV 1996-1-2. Its application does not extend to civil engineering works. For loadbearing walls. only the edition cited applies. the latest edition of the cited publication applies.4 of ENV 1996-1-1 and its NAD. together with any amendments. “Fire wall” is not a defined term within the regulatory context of the United Kingdom and is not part of the scope of this NAD. The criterion “M” for mechanical impact is not used within the regulatory context of the United Kingdom and is not part of the scope of this NAD.35. but reference should be made to the latest editions.1 Normative references This NAD incorporates. are listed in Table 1 of this NAD. 1 Scope This NAD provides information to enable ENV 1996-1-2:1995 (Eurocode 6: Part 1-2) to be used for the design of buildings to be constructed in the United Kingdom.1. uses a comma where a decimal point would traditionally be used in the United Kingdom.2 Clause 1. In Northern Ireland: The Building Regulations (Northern Ireland) 1994.3 Definitions The numerical value of average ¾f to be used in satisfying 3. 5 Additional information and recommendations 5. 2. it will not normally be necessary to apply this value of average ¾f when the design of loadbearing members is carried out in accordance with the recommendations of ENV 1996-1-1.2 Informative references This NAD refers to other publications that provide information or guidance. supporting standards and test data. Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. “Non-separating wall” is not a defined term within the regulatory context of the United Kingdom and is not part of the scope of this NAD. University of Sheffield. average ¾f.3 Clause 1.

After ENV 1996-2 is published. Uncontrolled Copy. 2. (c) BSI Construction Products Directive [5] Essential Requirement no. Safety in case of fire 6] ENV 1991-1 Eurocode 1: Basis of design and actions on structures— Part 1: Basis of design ENV 1991-2-2 Eurocode 1: Basis of design and actions on structures — Part 2-2: Actions on structures — Actions on structures exposed to fire ENV 1996-1-1 Eurocode 6: Design of masonry structures — Part 1-1: General rules for buildings — Rules for reinforced and unreinforced masonry ENV 1996-2 Eurocode 6: Design of masonry structures — Part 2: Design. © BSI 05-1999 vi .DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Table 1 — Reference in ENV 1996-1-2 to other publications Document referred to Document title Status UK documenta 89/106/EEC ID Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. University of Sheffield. 17 July 2003. the corresponding UK document will be DD ENV 1996-2. selection of materials and execution of masonry EN 771-1 Specification for masonry units — Part 1: Clay masonry units EN 771-2 EN 771-3 EN 771-4 EN 771-5 EN 771-6 EN 772-13 EN 998-2 EN 1363-1 EN 1364-1 EN 1365-1 EN 1366-2 EN 1366-3 EN 1366-4 ISO 1000 a The b EC Directive Interpretative Document Published 1994 Published 1995 Published 1995 — — DD ENV 1991-1:1996 DD ENV 1991-2-2:1996 DD ENV 1996-1-1:1996 In preparation BS 5628:-3:1985b In preparation BS 3921:1985 (1995) BS 6649:1985 BS 4729:1990 In preparation BS 187:1978 BS 6649:1985 BS 4729:1990 In preparation BS 6073-1:1981 In preparation BS 6073-1:1981 In preparation BS 6457:1984 In preparation BS 5390:1976 (1984) In preparation — In preparation — In preparation BS 476-20:1987 In preparation BS 476-22:1987 In preparation BS 476-21:1987 In preparation — In preparation — In preparation — Published 1992 BS 5555:1993 Specification for masonry units — Part 2: Calcium silicate masonry units Specification for masonry units — Part 3: Aggregate concrete masonry units (Dense and lightweight aggregates) Specification for masonry units — Part 4: Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry units Specification for masonry units — Part 5: Manufactured stone masonry units Specification for masonry units — Part 6: Natural stone masonry units Methods of test for masonry units — Part 13: Determination of net and gross dry density of masonry units Specification for mortar for masonry — Part 2: Masonry mortar Fire resistance tests — Part 1: General requirements Fire resistance tests on non-loadbearing elements in buildings — Part 1: Walls Fire resistance tests on loadbearing elements in buildings — Part 1: Walls Fire resistance tests on service installations — Part 2: Dampers Fire resistance tests on service installations — Part 3: Penetration seals Fire resistance tests on service installations — Part 4: Linear gap seals SI units and recommendations for the use of their multiples and of certain other units EN standards will in due course be published in the UK as correspondingly numbered BS EN standards.

4 Junctions.2 Wall types. 5.1. 5.1 Performance requirements 5.8. 5. The EN 1366 series is not yet published. Horizontal and inclined chases and recesses in non–loadbearing walls should leave at least 5/6 of the required minimum thickness of the wall.9 Clause 3. The width of individual chases and recesses in non-loadbearing walls should be not greater than twice the required minimum thickness of the wall. including any integrally applied fire resistant finishes such as plaster. 5.4 Clause 2.DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997 5. 5. 5. function 5.2 Actions Paragraph (1)P Thermal actions may be obtained from ENV 1991-2-2 or from the relevant supporting documents to the appropriate building regulations. However. 5.3 Paragraph (5) “Fire wall” is not a defined term within the regulatory context of the United Kingdom.2 Paragraph (5)P The criterion “M” for mechanical impact is not used within the regulatory context of the United Kingdom and is not part of the scope of this NAD. 5.6. but be not less than 60 mm.4. the designer may need to consider alternative performance criteria such as might be specified for insurance purposes. Loadbearing walls should additionally meet all regulatory requirements for structural stability in respect of the individual and combined actions and should be designed in accordance with ENV 1996-1-1 and its NAD. Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. including any integrally applied fire resistant finishes such as plaster. 5.7 Clause 3.2 Paragraph (3)P Delete the text of (3)P. in some instances.2 Paragraph (4) The requirements for external walls should be sought from the relevant supporting documents to the appropriate building regulations.1 Paragraph (2)P Replace the text of (2)P with the following.1 Paragraph (3) Frogs should not comprise more than 20 % of the gross masonry unit volume in order to conform to the recommendations of paragraph (3) of 3. in particular. For non-loadbearing walls.8 Clause 3.1.11 Clause 3.5 and Annex C may be used for assessing the fire resistance of loadbearing and non-loadbearing single-leaf and cavity masonry walls within the slenderness limitations given in clause 3 of this NAD. 17 July 2003. No distinction is to be made for walls less than 1.10. joints 5.2 Paragraph (6) The tables referred to in 3.2 Materials for use in masonry walls 5. and should not be positioned within the middle one-third height of the wall. integrity and insulation criteria are given in the relevant supporting documents to the appropriate building regulations. (c) BSI © BSI 05-1999 vii . shall be designed and constructed so as to meet the required fire resistance. but be not less than 60 mm.8.1 Paragraph (1)P Guidance on the structural performance required of a wall and the applicability of the loadbearing. Guidance is given in the relevant supporting documents to the appropriate building regulations on matters relating to the passage of pipes and services through separating walls and. 5. Uncontrolled Copy.6.1 Paragraph (3) “Non-separating wall” is not a defined term within the regulatory context of the United Kingdom 5. or between walls and other fire separating members.1.4. including any integrally applied fire resistant finishes such as plaster.5 Clause 2.5 and Annex C only apply to walls with filled vertical joints unless alternative jointing arrangements are shown by supporting test data to be adequate.6 Clause 3. the need for fire stopping.0 m in length. Joints in walls. pipes and cables Paragraph (1) Replace the second sentence of (1) with the following. vertical chases and recesses should leave at least 2/3 of the required minimum thickness of the wall.3 Cavity walls Paragraph (3) The fire resistance period for a non-loadbearing cavity wall is limited to a maximum of 240 min when fire resistance is determined by this method.1.6.5 Fixtures.3 Additional requirements related to masonry walls Paragraph (3)P The tables referred to in 3.10. University of Sheffield.2 5.10 Clause 3.

Non-loadbearing walls are assumed to carry no actions other than their own self-deadweight. In the United Kingdom. In all instances the finish should be not less than 13 mm plaster or rendering on each face of a single-leaf wall and on the fire-exposed face of a cavity wall. R. Uncontrolled Copy. Their UK alternatives. applicable in the UK. NRd. 5. usually achieve higher fire resistance performance in respect of the stability criterion. None of these standards has yet been published.13 Annex B Guidance on the selection of fire resistance periods Paragraphs (2) and (3) The CEN/TC 127 standards referred to are EN 1363.1. as listed in Table 1 of this NAD. Where the tables show no wall thickness for a particular combination of construction material and fire resistance. specific fire resistance test data may be used to support wall thicknesses less than those given in the tables.2.6NRd ÷ average ¾f.2 gives recommendations for walls loaded up to 0.14 Annex C Assessment by tables 5.0 m in length. than those which are fully loaded.12 Annex A Testing the fire resistance of masonry walls Paragraph (2) None of these standards has yet been published. 17 July 2003. separating function REI. separating function EI. Their UK alternatives. The data in the tables is based on currently accepted and published information derived from fire tests carried out in the United Kingdom. (c) BSI Note that Table C. only the following tables of fire resistance are applicable for use in the United Kingdom. BS 476-21:1987 or BS 476-22:1987. where available.2 Paragraph (2) The data in row a) of the tables applies to walls with no plaster finish and to walls with a sand-cement/sand-gypsum plaster finish. Use may also be made of alternative sources of data on the results of fire resistance tests of masonry systems undertaken in accordance with BS 476-20:1987. Loadbearing walls which are not subjected to full design load. separating function REI.1 Paragraph (1) Fire resistance data for loadbearing masonry in the United Kingdom is based on tests undertaken on walls which are normally subjected to full design load. however. Table C. C.2 of ENV 1996-1-2:1995) Loadbearing single-leaf walls subject to load up to a resistance of 0. 5. Table 2 (Table C.9 of ENV 1996-1-2:1995.14. EN 1364. Perlite gypsum plaster may be used on fired-clay masonry units and other materials with similar surfaces without affecting the fire performance indicated in these tables.1 of ENV 1996-1-2:1995) Loadbearing single-leaf walls subject to load up to a resistance of NRd ÷ average ¾f. are given in Table 1 of this NAD.1. 5.DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997 5. this is either because no standard thickness of the relevant material will provide that fire resistance. Table 3 (Table C.3 3) and Table 4 should be limited to a maximum fire resistance period of 240 min. No method has yet been established for incorporating European fire test data into harmonized tables. For particular applications.5 of ENV 1996-1-2:1995) Non-loadbearing single-leaf walls. The loading of both leaves is not. fire walls or walls less than 1. As United Kingdom regulations for the fire safety design of masonry walls do not define or regulate for non-separating walls. subject to load up to a resistance of NRd ÷ average ¾f. Data for these cases should not be extrapolated from the remainder of the table.6NRd. Cavity walls comprising two non-loadbearing leaves designed in accordance with 3.9 of ENV 1996-1-2:1995) Loadbearing cavity walls with one leaf loaded. where available. or because no suitable fire test data is available. These tables give the thicknesses which should be used in the United Kingdom to provide standard fire resistance periods for the types of masonry wall construction given in Tables C. Table 4 (Table C. row b) of the tables refers to walls finished with vermiculite gypsum plaster (1½ : 1 to 2 : 1 by volume).5 and C. © BSI 05-1999 . C. are given in Table 1 of this NAD. separating function REI.9 of ENV 1996-1-2 purports to cover loadbearing cavity walls with both leaves loaded. Table 5 of this NAD therefore gives the appropriate values for loadbearing cavity walls with one leaf loaded. NRd.14. Table 5 (Table C. viii Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. University of Sheffield. EN 1365 and EN 1366. Information on types of masonry wall other than those described in Tables 2 to 5 is given in BS 5628-3:1985 and Building Research Establishment Report BR 128 [7]. The tables in this NAD are presented in the format used in ENV 1996-1-2. Table 1 to Table 5 provide generalized data which has been derived from fire resistance tests carried out in accordance with the relevant Parts of BS 476 or its predecessors.

(c) BSI Group 1 units Ô $ 1 000 kg/m3 laid in general-purpose mortar Group 1 solid units Ô $ 1 200 kg/m3 laid in general-purpose mortar Group 2a units Ô $ 700 kg/m3 laid in general-purpose mortar Group 2b units Ô $ 700 kg/m3 laid in general-purpose or lightweight mortar Group 3 units laid in general-purpose mortar Calcium silicate units conforming to EN 771-2. C. see clause 3 of this NAD.14.7 and C.3. 5.4 Paragraph (6) Tables C. C.8 of ENV 1996-1-2:1995 are not applicable in the United Kingdom.6.14. C. thin-layer or lightweight mortar Group 1 units 500 k Ô k 1 500 kg/m3 Group 1 units Ô > 1 500 kg/m3 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) 70 60 75 60 75 75 90 75 75 60 75 75 90 75 100 90 90 75 90 75 90 75 125 90 90 75 90 75 100 90 140 125 100 90 100 90 125 100 140 125 100 90 140 100 140 125 150 140 Group 2 units 500 k Ô k 800 Group 2 units Ô > 800 kg/m 3 © BSI 05-1999 ix . laid in general-purpose or thin-layer mortar a) b) a) b) 90 90 90 90 100 90 90 90 100 100 100 90 170 100 100 100 190 170 170 100 — — 190 190 Group 1 units 400 k Ô k 550 kg/m3 Group 1 units Ô > 550 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) 100 90 90 90 100 100 90 90 100 100 100 90 120 100 100 90 140 120 120 100 150 150 150 100 Aggregate concrete units conforming to EN 771-3 and manufactured stone units conforming to EN 771-5.DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997 5. 17 July 2003. Table 3 — Loadbearing single-leaf walls subject to load up to a resistance of 0. laid in general-purpose or thin–layer mortar a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) 90 90 90 90 — — — — — — 100 90 90 90 — — — — — — 100 100 100 90 — — — — — — 140 100 100 100 — — — — — — 170 140 170 100 — — — — — — 200 170 170 140 — — — — — — Group 1 units Ô $ 1 000 kg/m3 Group 1 solid units Ô $ 1 600 kg/m3 Aerated concrete units conforming to EN 771-4.4.6NRd ÷ average ¾f. Uncontrolled Copy. separating function REI (equivalent to ENV 1996-1-2.2) Material Finisha Minimum masonry thickness mm Standard fire resistance min 30 60 90 120 180 240 Clay units conforming to EN 771-1 Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. University of Sheffield. laid in general-purpose.35.3 Paragraph (5) The average value of ¾f to be used in the United Kingdom is 1. Table C.

5) Material Finisha Minimum masonry thickness mm Standard fire resistance min 30 Clay units conforming to EN 771-1 60 90 120 180 240 Group 1 units Ô $ 1 000 kg/m3 laid in general-purpose mortar a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) 65 65 65 65 215 215 215 — — — 100 65 65 65 215 215 215 — — — 100 90 90 90 215 215 — — — — 100 100 100 100 215 215 — — — — 170 140 170 100 — 215 — — — — 200 170 170 140 — 215 — — — — Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. Table C. separating function EI (equivalent to ENV 1996-1-2.2. (c) BSI Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 200 kg/m3 laid in general-purpose mortar Group 2a units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general-purpose mortar Group 2b units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general-purpose or lightweight mortar Group 3 units laid in general-purpose mortar Calcium silicate units conforming to EN 771-2. Uncontrolled Copy. b): for walls finished with vermiculite gypsum plaster (1½ : 1 to 2 : 1 by volume). laid in general-purpose or thin-layer mortar a) b) a) b) 65 65 65 65 100 65 65 65 100 90 90 90 100 100 100 100 170 140 170 100 — — 170 170 Group 1 units 400 k Ô k 550 kg/m3 Group 1 units Ô > 550 kg/m3 Aggregate concrete units conforming to EN 771-3 and manufactured stone units conforming to EN 771-5. Table 4 — Non-loadbearing single-leaf walls. see 5. 17 July 2003. University of Sheffield.14. see 5. b): for walls finished with vermiculite gypsum plaster (1½ : 1 to 2 : 1 by volume). laid in general-purpose or thin-layer mortar Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 600 kg/m3 Aerated concrete units conforming to EN 771-4. laid in general-purpose.14. thin-layer or lightweight mortar a) b) a) b) 65 50 50 50 65 65 60 50 70 70 60 50 70 70 65 65 100 100 100 90 100 100 100 100 Group 1 units 500 k Ô k 1 500 kg/m3 Group 1 units Ô > 1 500 kg/m3 Group 2 units 500 k Ô k 800 kg/m3 Group 2 units Ô > 800 kg/m3 a a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) 50 50 50 50 50 50 95 70 70 50 75 60 70 50 100 80 75 60 90 75 75 70 125 90 75 70 90 75 100 75 140 100 90 75 100 90 115 90 140 125 100 75 100 100 125 100 140 125 a): for walls with no plaster finish and walls with a sand-cement/sand-gypsum plaster finish.DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997 a a): for walls with no plaster finish and walls with a sand-cement/sand-gypsum plaster finish.2. x © BSI 05-1999 .

NOTE 3 The cavity should not be less than 50 mm wide. where the non-loaded leaf is not directly subjected to fire. a © BSI 05-1999 xi . but should otherwise conform to the above material specifications. (c) BSI Group 1 units Ô $ 1 000 kg/m3 Aerated concrete units conforming to EN 771-4.2 b Note that this table gives values for loadbearing cavity walls with one leaf loaded. not with both leaves loaded as stated in the title of Table C.1. thin-layer or lightweight mortar a) b) a) b) 100 90 90 90 100 100 90 90 115 100 100 90 120 100 100 90 — — — — — — — — Group 1 units 500 k Ô k 1 500 kg/m3 Group 1 units Ô > 1 500 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 100 90 100 90 100 100 100 100 — — — — — — — — NOTE 1 The tabulated thicknesses are for the loaded leaves of cavity walls where the loaded leaf is subjected to fire. b): for walls finished with vermiculite gypsum plaster (1½ : 1 to 2 : 1 by volume) on the fire-exposed face of the loaded leaf.DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Table 5 — Loadbearing cavity walls with one leaf loaded. the minimum masonry thickness is 100 mm.9 of ENV 1996-1-2. such as those in some external wall constructions. subject to load up to a resistance of NRd ÷ average ¾f. Table C. the minimum masonry thickness of the non-loaded leaf may also be reduced to 90 mm. For cavity walls where the minimum masonry thickness required is 90 mm. 17 July 2003. a): for walls with no plaster finish and walls with a sand-cement/sand-gypsum plaster finish on the fire-exposed face of the loaded leaf. laid in general-purpose or thin-layer mortar a) b) 90 90 90 90 100 100 100 100 — — — — Group 1 units 400 k Ô k 550 kg/m3 Group 1 units Ô > 550 kg/m3 Aggregate concrete units conforming to EN 771-3 and manufactured stone units conforming to EN 771-5. laid in general-purpose or thin-layer mortar a) b) 90 90 90 90 100 90 100 100 — — — — Licensed Copy: Sheffield University.9)b Material used for the fire-exposed face of the wall Finisha Minimum masonry thickness mm Standard fire resistance min 30 Clay units conforming to EN 771-1 60 90 120 180 240 Group 1 units Ô $ 1 000 kg/m3 laid in general-purpose mortar Calcium silicate units conforming to EN 771-2. The non-loaded leaf may be of a dissimilar material to the loaded leaf.3 of ENV 1996-1-2 and to the relevant tables for single-leaf walls. NOTE 2 For the non-loaded leaves of cavity walls. Uncontrolled Copy. University of Sheffield. see 5. reference should be made to clause 3. laid in general-purpose. NOTE 4 For loadbearing cavity walls where both leaves are loaded and for non-loadbearing cavity walls.14. separating function REI (equivalent to ENV 1996-1-2.

Structure (1992 Edition).94. DD ENV 1996-1-1:1996. [3] THE NORTHERN IRELAND OFFICE. Specification for reconstructed stone masonry units. Code of practice for stone masonry. BS 6073. regulations and administrative provisions of the Member States relating to construction products. [6] EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES. Basis of design (together with United Kingdom National Application Document). London: HMSO. BS 5555:1993. [5] EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES. C62/23. Code of practice for use of masonry. 28. BS 476-22:1987. Specification for clay and calcium silicate modular bricks. Eurocode 6: Design of masonry structures. Technical Standards for compliance with the Building Standards (Scotland) Regulations 1990. Statutory Rules of Northern Ireland 1990 No. [4] THE SCOTTISH OFFICE. 1990. Methods for determination of the fire resistance of non-loadbearing elements of construction. Uncontrolled Copy. Official Journal of the European Communities. Specification for precast concrete masonry units.2. BS 5628. London Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. design and workmanship. 2. 89/106/EEC Council Directive of 21 December 1988 on the approximation of laws. 17 July 2003. DD ENV 1991-1:1996. Essential Requirement no. Method for determination of the fire resistance of elements of construction (general principles). Official Journal of the European Communities. The Building Regulations 1991. BS 5390:1976. Fire tests on building materials and structures. 59. The Building Regulations (Northern Ireland) 1990.2. The Building Regulations 1991. Belfast: HMSO. 11.89. DD ENV 1991-2-2:1996. BS 5628-3:1985. Safety in case of fire. Specification for SI units and recommendations for the use of their multiples and of certain other units. Approved Document A. 1991. Edinburgh: HMSO. University of Sheffield. BS 6073-1:1981. BS 4729:1990. 1990.DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997 List of references (see clause 2) Normative references BSI publications BRITISH STANDARDS INSTITUTION. BS 476-21:1987. Informative references [1] DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND THE WELSH OFFICE. BS 6649:1985. [2] DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND THE WELSH OFFICE. L40/12. General rules for buildings— Rules for reinforced and unreinforced masonry (together with United Kingdom National Application Document). Methods for determination of the fire resistance of loadbearing elements of construction. xii © BSI 05-1999 . London: HMSO. BS 476-20:1987. Fire Safety (1992 Edition). DD ENV 1996. BS 6457:1984. (c) BSI BS 187:1978. 1991. Materials and components. Specification for calcium silicate (sandlime and flintlime) bricks. DD ENV 1991. Eurocode 1: Basis of design and actions on structures. Actions on structures exposed to fire (together with United Kingdom National Application Document). Precast concrete masonry units. Specification for dimensions of bricks of special shapes and sizes. BS 476. Interpretative Document. Specification for clay bricks. BS 3921:1985. Approved Document B.

E.E. Guidelines for the construction of fire resisting structural elements. Report BR 128.H. 1988. Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. Building Research Establishment. (c) BSI © BSI 05-1999 xiii .A..DD ENV 1996-1-2:1997 [7] MORRIS W. 17 July 2003. University of Sheffield. and COOKE G.. Department of the Environment. READ R. Uncontrolled Copy.M.

University of Sheffield. (c) BSI xiv blank . 17 July 2003. Uncontrolled Copy.Licensed Copy: Sheffield University.

Ireland. Uncontrolled Copy. Portugal. ENV 1996-1-2:1995 E . Belgium.080. CEN members are the national standards bodies of Austria. CEN European Committee for Standardization Comité Européen de Normalisation Europäisches Komitee für Normung Central Secretariat: rue de Stassart 36. (c) BSI Eurocode 6: Calcul des ouvrages en maçonnerie — Partie 1-2: Règles générales — Calcul du comportement au feu Eurocode 6: Bemessung und Konstruktion von Mauerwerksbauten — Teil 1-2: Allgemeine Regeln — Tragwerksbemessung für den Brandfall This European Prestandard (ENV) was approved by CEN on 1994-06-10 as a prospective standard for provisional application. Iceland.220.50. 91. fire tests English version Eurocode 6: Design of masonry structures — Part 1-2: General rules — Structural fire design Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. Netherlands. computation. B-1050 Brussels © 1995 All rights of reproduction and communication in any form and by any means reserved in all countries to CEN and its members. Norway. 17 July 2003. Switzerland and United Kingdom. No. Luxembourg. Germany. Ref. University of Sheffield. particularly on the question whether the ENV can be converted into an European Standard (EN).30 ENV 1996-1-2 July 1995 Descriptors: Buildings. The period of validity of this ENV is limited initially to three years. building codes. construction. Finland. Greece. Spain. Sweden. After two years the members of CEN will be requested to submit their comments. Denmark. It is permissible to keep conflicting national standards in force (in parallel to the ENV) until the final decision about the possible conversion of the ENV into an EN is reached. mansonry work. Italy.EUROPEAN PRESTANDARD PRÉNORME EUROPÉENNE EUROPÄISCHE VORNORM ICS 13. CEN members are required to announce the existance of this ENV in the same way as for an EN and to make the ENV available promptly at national level in an appropriate form. France.

2) They cover execution and control only to the extent that it is necessary to indicate the quality of the construction products. EN 1997 Eurocode 7: Geotechnical design. health and other matters covered by the essential requirements of the Construction Products Directive (CPD). some of the Structural Eurocodes cover some of these aspects in informative annexes. Additional parts of Eurocode 6 which are planned are indicated in clause 1. the CEC transferred the work of further development. CEN members will be invited to submit formal comments to be taken into account in determining future actions. after consulting their respective Member States. EN 1995 Eurocode 5: Design of timber structures. EN 1996 Eurocode 6: Design of masonry structures. will be issued by each member country or its standards organisation. Eurocode programme 7) Work is in hand on the following Structural Eurocodes. EN 1998 Eurocode 8: Design of structures for earthquake resistance. 9) This Part 1-2 of ENV 1996 is being published as a European Prestandard (ENV) with an initial life of three years.3 of ENV 1996-1-1. issue and updating of the Structural Eurocodes to CEN. 5) In 1990. 6) CEN Technical Committee CEN/TC 250 is responsible for all Structural Eurocodes. Background of the Eurocode programme 4) The Commission of the European Communities (CEC) initiated the work of establishing a set of harmonized technical rules for the design of building and civil engineering works which would initially serve as an alternative to the different rules in force in the various member states and would ultimately replace them. It is therefore anticipated that a National Application Document (NAD) giving any substitute definitive values for safety elements. and the standard of workmanship needed on and off site to comply with the assumptions of the design rules. (c) BSI 8) Separate sub-committees have been formed by CEN/TC250 for the various Eurocodes listed above.1. EN 1994 Eurocode 4: Design of composite steel and concrete structures. 3) Until the necessary set of harmonized technical specifications for products and for the methods for testing their performance are available. EN 1999 Eurocode 9: Design of aluminium alloy structures.1. each generally consisting of a number of parts:— EN 1991 Eurocode 1: Basis of design and actions on structures.1 of ENV 1996-1-1 and the scope of this Part of Eurocode 6 is defined in clause 1. Matters specific to this prestandard 16) The scope of Eurocode 6 is defined in clause 1. certain safety elements in this ENV have been assigned indicative values which are identified by (“boxed values”). referencing compatible supporting standards and providing guidance on the national application of this prestandard. 10) This prestandard is intended for experimental application and for the submission of comments.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Foreword Objectives of the Eurocodes 1) The Structural Eurocodes comprise a group of standards for the structural and geotechnical design of buildings and civil engineering works. 17 July 2003. 11) After approximately two years. Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. and the EFTA secretariat agreed to support the CEN work. National Application Documents (NAD’s) 13) In view of the responsibilities of authorities in member countries for safety. These technical rules became known as the Structural Eurocodes. 14) Some of the supporting European or International standards may not be available by the time this prestandard is issued. 2 © BSI 05-1999 . EN 1992 Eurocode 2: Design of concrete structures. University of Sheffield. Uncontrolled Copy. EN 1993 Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures. 12) Meanwhile feedback and comments on this prestandard should be sent to the Secretariat of CEN/TC 250/SC6 at the following address:— DIN Burggrafenstrasse 6 D-10787 Berlin Germany or to your national standards organization. 15) It is intended that this prestandard is used in conjunction with the NAD valid in the country where the building and civil engineering work is located.1. The authorities in each member country are expected to review the “boxed values” and may substitute alternative definitive values for these safety elements for use in national application.

Table 1 — Design procedure Thermal actions given in ENV 1991-2-2 Design by prescriptive rules/tabulated data given in this Part of ENV 1996 Design by calculation methods given in this Part of ENV 1996 standard temperature-time curve mainly from fire resistance tests other nominal temperature-time curves not yet applicable not yet applicable not yet applicable © BSI 05-1999 3 . (c) BSI 22) This Part 1-2 of ENV 1996. At the present time a full analytical within the works are limited procedure is not available for masonry. 26) Application of this Part of ENV 1996 with the Where fire safety engineering for assessing passive thermal actions given in ENV 1991-2-2 is illustrated and active measures is accepted. 23) A full analytical procedure for structural fire Requirement for the limitation of fire risks: “The construction works must be designed and built design would take into account the behaviour of the structural system at elevated temperatures. together with 17) The general objectives of fire protection are to ENV 1991-2-2. if not all. 17 July 2003. supplements to ENV 1996-1-1 which are necessary so that structures designed according to this set of directly exposed property. (though not explicitly) the features and 20) The Structural Eurocodes deal with specific uncertainties described above. University of Sheffield. Structural Eurocodes may also comply with 18) The Construction Products Directive 89/106/EEC gives the following Essential structural fire resistance requirements. gives differences from or the limit risks with respect to the individual and society. requirements by in Table 1. works is limited 24) At the present time it is possible to undertake a procedure for determining adequate performance — the occupants can leave the works or can be which incorporates some. Nevertheless. However. may be observed by following various fire safety The grading system in regulations. which call for strategies. aspects of passive fire protection in terms of 25) Due to the limitations of the test method. that. in the event of an outbreak of potential heat exposure and the beneficial effects of fire: active fire protection systems. in the case of fire. — mostly in terms of standard fire resistance rating.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. where required. the principal 19) According to the Interpretative Document current procedure in European countries is one “Safety in Case of Fire” the Essential Requirement based on results from standard fire resistance tests. Uncontrolled Copy. including passive and active fire specific periods of fire resistance. the in such a way. — the safety of rescue teams is taken into or its components. authorities will be less prescriptive and may allow for alternative strategies.” in a real building fire. will give adequate performance consideration. of these rescued by other means parameters and to demonstrate that the structure. but one is — the spread of fire to neighbouring construction being developed. further designing structures and parts thereof for adequate tests or analyses may be used. takes into account protection measures. neighbouring property and. the load-bearing capacity and for limiting spread as results of standard fire tests form the bulk of the relevant. together with the — the load-bearing capacity of the construction uncertainties associated with these three features can be assumed for a specified period of time and the importance of the structure (consequences — the generation and spread of fire and smoke of failure). This prestandard therefore deals in the are generally specified by the national authorities main with design for the standard fire resistance. input to calculation methods for structural fire 21) Required functions and levels of performance design.

3 Additional requirements related to masonry walls 3.0 m subject to load up to a resistance of 0.5 — Non-loadbearing walls separating function EI Page 2 5 5 5 5 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 8 9 10 10 10 11 11 11 3 9 Table C.4 — Loadbearing walls subject to load up to a resistance of 0.1 Scope 1.1 — Loadbearing walls subject to load up to a resistance of NRd ÷ average ¾f separating function REI Table C.6 NRd ÷ average ¾f separating function REI Table C.2 Normative references 1.1 General information on the design of walls 3.8 — Fire walls separating and mechanical impact function REIM Table C.5 Units 2 Basic principles 2.4 Symbols 1.3 — Loadbearing walls subject to load up to a resistance of NRd ÷ average ¾f non-separating function R Table C.0 m subject to load up to a resistance of NRd ÷ average ¾f non-separating function R Table C.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Contents Foreword 1 General 1.2 — Loadbearing walls subject to load up to a resistance of 0. (c) BSI 20 12 13 14 15 16 4 © BSI 05-1999 .6 — Loadbearing walls of length < 1.3 Definitions 1.3 Design values of material properties 2.4 Assessment by testing 3.6 NRd ÷ average ¾F non-separating function R Table C.2 Actions 2.1 — Requirements for grouping of masonry units Table C.4 Assessment methods 3 Fire resistance of masonry walls 3.7 — Loadbearing walls of length < 1.6 NRd ÷ average ¾f non-separating function R Table C. Uncontrolled Copy.2 Materials for use in masonry walls 3.9 — Loadbearing cavity walls with both leaves loaded subject to load up to a resistance of NRd ÷ average ¾f separating function REI Page 17 18 19 Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. University of Sheffield.6 Assessment by calculation Annex A (normative) Testing the fire resistance of masonry walls Annex B (informative) Guidance on selection of fire resistance periods Annex C (informative) Assessment by tables Table 1 — Design procedure Table 3.5 Assessment by tables 3. 17 July 2003.1 Performance requirements 2.

or parts thereof. EN 771-1. Eurocode 1: Basis of design and actions on structures — Part 2-2: Actions on structures exposed to fire. Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. 2) This Part deals only with passive methods of fire protection. the following definitions are used (further definitions are given in ENV 1991-2-2): fire compartment an enclosed space in a building that is separated from other parts of the same building by enclosing construction having a specified period of fire resistance. EN 1366. Specification for mortar for masonry — Part 2: Masonry mortar. Methods of test for masonry units — Part 13: Determination of net and gross dry density of masonry units. 17 July 2003. subsequent amendments to. For dated references. Fire resistance tests of loadbearing elements in buildings — Part 1: Internal walls — Part 2: External walls. Specification for masonry units — Part 2: Calcium silicate masonry units. ENV 1991. Specification for masonry units — Part 3: Aerated concrete masonry units. This Part identifies only differences from or supplements to normal design. Fire resistance tests of non-loadbearing elements in buildings — Part 1: Partitions — Part 2a: External walls.3 Definitions 1) In addition to those definitions given in ENV 1996-1-1. for reasons of general fire safety. — loadbearing internal walls with separating or non-separating functions. Material properties — Part 5: Masonry. — limiting fire spread (flames. provisions from other publications. © BSI 05-1999 5 . in terms of: — avoiding premature collapse of the structure (load-bearing function). EN 771-2. Specification for masonry units — Part 5: Manufactured stone masonry units. EN 772-13. within which a fire can be contained (or from which a fire can be excluded). EN 1365. — non-loadbearing external walls. These normative references are cited at the appropriate places in the text and the publications are listed hereafter. Uncontrolled Copy. EN 771-5. without spreading to (or from) another part of the building 1. For undated references the latest edition of the publication referred to applies.1 Scope 1) P This Part 1-2 of ENV 1996 deals with the design of masonry structures for the accidental situation of fire exposure and shall be used in conjunction with ENV 1996-1-1 and ENV 1991-2-2. hot gases. 4) This Part gives Principles and Application Rules (see 1. or revisions of. EN 1364. EN QQQ. ENV 1996. This Part deals with the following: — non-loadbearing internal walls.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 1 General 1. Active methods are not covered. (c) BSI EN 771-3. Specification for masonry units — Part 4: Aggregate concrete masonry units.2 in ENV 1996-1-1) for designing structures for specified requirements in respect of the aforementioned functions and levels of performance. excessive heat) and temperature rise beyond designated areas (separation failure). EN 771-4. EN 998-2. — loadbearing external walls with separating or non-separating functions. are required to fulfil certain functions in exposure to fire. 1) ENV 1996-2 is in course of preparation. University of Sheffield. Eurocode 6: Design of masonry structures — Part 1-1: General rules for buildings — Rules for reinforced and unreinforced masonry — Part 2: Design and selection of materials and use of masonry. 2) Normative reference is made to the following ISO standard ISO 1000 SI Units 1. 3) This Part 1-2 of ENV 1996-1 applies to elements of building structures which. 5) This Part applies only to those masonry structures.2 Normative references 1) This European prestandard incorporates by dated or undated reference. Specification for masonry units — Part 1: Clay masonry units. any of these publications apply to this European prestandard only when incorporated in it by amendment or revision. that are described in ENV 1996-1-1 and ENV 1996-21) and are designed accordingly. Fire resistance tests of service installations in buildings — Part 2: Dampers — Part 3: Penetration seals — Part 4: Linear gap seals.

. for supporting vertical loads. 17 July 2003.. .a member meeting the mechanical resistance criterion for 90. . with appropriate support and boundary conditions. minutes in standard fire exposure. or 60.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 fire resistance the ability of an element of a building construction to fulfil for a stated period of time the required load-bearing function. University of Sheffield. for example floor loads.a member meeting the integrity criterion for 30. . to carry a load up to a resistance of NRd divided by average ¾f after a certain period of time temperature analysis the procedure of determining the temperature development in members on the basis of the thermal actions (net heat flux) and the thermal material properties of the members and of the protective surfaces. membrane-like component predominantly subjected to compressive stress. except those resulting from thermal gradients non-loadbearing wall flat membrane-like building component that is loaded predominantly only by its dead weight and does not provide bracing for loadbearing walls. integrity and/or thermal insulation specified in the standard fire resistance test fire wall a wall separating two spaces (generally two buildings) which is designed for fire resistance and structural stability. thermal insulation) during the relevant fire exposure separating member structural and non-structural member (wall or floor) forming the enclosure of a fire compartment standard fire resistance the ability of a structure or part of it (usually only members) to fulfill required functions (loadbearing function. for example wind loads member analysis (for fire) the thermal and mechanical analysis of a structural member exposed to fire in which the member is considered as isolated. or 60.a member meeting the load bearing criterion for 30. calculated in accordance with ENV 1996-1-1. . I 30 or I 60. . for exposure to heating according to the standard temperature-time curve. however. and also for supporting horizontal loads. the definition above should not be confused with that more limited one.. minutes in standard fire exposure. .4 Symbols 1) Supplementary to ENV 1996-1-1. it may have to transfer horizontal loads acting on its surface to loadbearing building components such as walls or floors non-separating wall loadbearing wall exposed to fire on two or more sides normal temperature design ultimate limit state design for ambient temperatures according to ENV 1996-1-1 for the fundamental combination (see ENV 1991-1) 1. in case of fire and failure of the structure on one side of the wall. including resistance to horizontal loading (Criterion M) such that. integrity criterion “E” a criterion by which the ability of a separating member to prevent passage of flames and hot gases is assessed loadbearing criterion “R” a criterion by which the ability of a structure or member to sustain specified actions during the relevant fire is assessed loadbearing wall flat. 6 © BSI 05-1999 . (c) BSI NOTE In some countries fire wall has been defined as a separating wall between fire compartment without a requirement for resistance to mechanical impact. and/or separating function). where relevant thermal insulation criterion “I” a Criterion by which the ability of a separating member to prevent excessive transmission of heat is assessed Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. . or 120. for a stated period of time structural failure of a wall in the fire situation when the wall loses its ability. minutes in standard fire exposure. fire spread beyond the wall is avoided separating function the ability of a separating member to prevent fire spread by passage of flames or hot gases (cf. minutes in standard fire exposure. the following units and symbols are used: NRd design load bearing capacity taking into account the effects of slenderness and eccentricity. Uncontrolled Copy. R 30 or R 60. average ¾f total characteristic load divided by total design load (see ENV 1991-1).a member meeting the thermal insulation criterion for 30.. E 30 or E 60. M 90 or M 120. Indirect fire actions are not considered. or 60.. integrity) or ignition beyond the exposed surface (cf.

— temperature: °C. which are large enough to cause fire penetration by hot gases or flame — criterion E.1 Performance requirements 1)P Where mechanical resistance in the case of fire is required. or non-separating walls as required. 4)P The permissible average temperature rise at the non-exposed surface is limited to 140 K and the maximum rise to 180 K. as follows: — loadbearing only: R — loadbearing and separating: R. University of Sheffield.1 General 1) This Part applies to walls designed and built in accordance with Principles and Application Rules of ENV 1996-1-1 and ENV 1996-23). 5)P Members shall comply with criteria R. 2. 3. They are exposed to fire on one side only. but are subjected to fire on two or more sides. 2.1.5 Units 1)P SI units shall be used in conformity with ISO 1000.0 m in length should be treated as non-separating walls. E. they are loadbearing.1 General information on the design of walls 3. 3 Fire resistance of masonry walls 3.3 Design values of material properties 1)P Design values of thermal and mechanical material properties shall be obtained according to the requirements of the calculation method2). 2 Basic principles Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. — sizing and detailing structural members according to tabulated data.2 Actions 1)P Thermal and mechanical actions shall be obtained from ENV 1991-2-2. I and M 2. E and I — separating only: E and I — loadbearing.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 1. 2) In this Part. E. — calculation. this is identified in the relevant clauses. Uncontrolled Copy. They serve to prevent fire propagating from one place to another. 2) No detailed method is given in this Part. (c) BSI 2. a distinction is made between non-loadbearing walls and loadbearing walls and between separating walls and non-separating walls. M. structures shall be designed and constructed in such a way that they maintain their loadbearing function during the relevant fire exposure — criterion R. 2) Deformation criteria should only be used where the relevant product specifications for means of protection require consideration of the deformation of the loadbearing structure.1) may be by: — testing structural members according to Annex A. 2) Supplementary to ENV 1996-1-1 the following units should be used in calculations. 4) External walls may be separating walls. 3) ENV 1996-2 is in course of preparation.4 Assessment methods 1) Assessment of masonry walls with respect to the performance requirements in fire (see 2. separating and mechanical impact: R. holes or other openings. External separating walls less than 1.K — specific heat: J/kgK — coefficient of heat transfer: W/m2K — coefficient of thermal conductivity: W/mK 2) Where rules given in this Part 1-2 of ENV 1996 are only valid for the standard fire exposure. 3) Examples of non-separating walls are walls within a fire compartment. the respective members shall be designed and constructed in such a way that they maintain their separating function during the relevant fire exposure ie: — no integrity failure due to cracks.2 Wall types. the means of protection against fire should be achieved by following the Principles and Application Rules in Section 3. or I. 17 July 2003. — no insulation failure due to temperatures of the non-exposed surface exceeding permissible limits — criterion I.1. or compartment walls. function 1) From the point of view of fire protection. walls of stair wells. 2) Examples of separating walls are walls along escape ways. © BSI 05-1999 7 . I and M — separating and mechanical impact: E. and so no further information is given here. 3)P Where separation is required.

5 and Annex C apply to masonry built with units that comply with EN 771-1. may pass through walls only if the method of sealing the penetration has been evaluated by testing according to EN 1366-34). 4) If materials other than mortar are approved by CEN Standards.3. the fire resistance of a cavity wall with leaves of approximately equal thickness is defined as the fire resistance of an equivalent single leaf wall of thickness equal to the sum of the thicknesses of the two leaves.3 Cavity walls 1) The fire resistance of a cavity wall depends upon whether one or both leaves of the wall are loaded.5 Fixtures. not covered by EN 771-1. and be of width not greater than twice the required minimum thickness of the wall. or individual cables in holes not sealed with mortar. pipes and cables 1) Recesses and chases. including movement joints. 3.4 and 5. University of Sheffield. including any applied relevant fire resistant finishes.1. Individual cables may pass through holes sealed with mortar.9 provides resistances for cavity walls. they may be substituted. for example to separate buildings or fire compartments. for example buttresses or special ties. 3. eg.1. Uncontrolled Copy. When both leaves are loadbearing and carry approximately equal loads. chases and recesses should leave at least & of the required minimum thickness of wall. it shall be shown by test that they will meet criteria E and I (see EN 1366-4).2 indicate that a higher fire resistance for the loaded leaf of the cavity wall acting as a single leaf wall is achieved over the figure given in Table C.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 5) Fire walls are separating walls that additionally are required to resist mechanical impact. 8 © BSI 05-1999 . 17 July 2003. but not less than 60 mm. EN 771-4 and EN 771-5. EN 771-3. 2a 2b or 3 for content of holes or perforations as given in Table 3.9. 3)P Insulating layers in movement joints shall consist of mineral fibres having a melting point of not less than 1 000 °C. NOTE Table C. joints 1) This Part applies to walls that extend from one floor to the next floor or to the roof. 2)P Joints. 3. 2) When only one leaf of a cavity wall is loadbearing. When Table C. Groups of cables and pipes of combustible material.5. 3. sealed with mortar (see footnote). then this higher fire resistance rating may be taken as that appropriate to the cavity wall. (c) BSI 3) The fire resistance of a cavity wall comprising two non-loadbearing leaves may be taken as the sum of the fire resistances of the individual leaves. NOTE See note to definition of fire walls. any cavities shall be tightly sealed. Non-combustible pipes may pass through holes. 2)P Masonry units shall be grouped as Group 1. EN 771-2.2 Materials for use in masonry walls 1) The Tables referred to in 3. In non-loadbearing walls. unless its stability under normal function is achieved by other means.1 and Table C. if the conduction of heat through the pipes is not sufficient to infringe the temperature criterion I. Limitations as to strength and density of units are stated in the Tables.1. or the two leaves are both loaded to their respective capacities NRd divided by average ¾f. in walls or between walls and other fire separating members shall prevent fire spread and meet the fire resistance requirement of the wall. that are permitted in ENV 1996-1-1 to be included in loadbearing walls without the need for separate calculation. the resistance of the wall is usually enhanced over the fire resistance achieved for the loadbearing leaf when considered to act as a single leaf wall.1.4 Junctions. Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. If units. If other materials are to be used. can be assumed not to reduce the period of fire resistance given in the tables referred to in 3. evaluation by testing should be carried out. it is assumed that those floors or the roof provide lateral support to the top and bottom of the wall. are to be used.2. with unusual perforation patterns.

5 and Annex C shall not be used for walls either having a height to thickness ratio greater than the following: — Loadbearing — Non-loadbearing 27 40 or exceeding the relevant size limits given in ENV 1996-25). i. for example frogs. except that the mortar joint thickness is limited to a maximum of 3 mm when mortars containing organic binders are used. made with units that are designed to be used in that way.3 Additional requirements related to masonry walls 1)P Any supporting or stiffening part of a structure shall have at least the same fire resistance as the structure being supported or stiffened. Uncontrolled Copy. measured horizontally across the unit at right angles to the face of the wall.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Table 3. the wall should not be penetrated by the perforations. 3. 4) The tables referred to in 3.5 and Annex C. 3) For the purposes of the tables referred to in 3.5 and Annex C apply to masonry built with general purpose. that confirms that the safety of the masonry is not reduced acceptably when a higher proportion of holes is incorporated.5 of the overall width) (see note 3) U 20 k 2 800 mm2 except for units with a single hole when the hole should be k 18 000 mm2 No requirement NOTE 1 Holes may consist of formed vertical holes through the units or frogs or recesses. University of Sheffield. 6) Masonry having unfilled vertical joints less than 5 mm wide. grip holes or grooves in the bed face. lightweight. 5) ENV 1996-2 is in course of preparation.5 and Annex C.e. that will be filled with mortar in the finished wall. the limit of 55 % for clay units and 60 % for concrete aggregate units may be increased for masonry units that are used in the country having the national experience. 5) Perforated masonry units should not be laid so that the perforations are at fight angles to the face of the wall.5 for clay units k 25 for concrete aggregate units Limited by volume (see above) Limited by area (see below) Volume of any hole (% of the gross volume) k 12. based on tests. may be treated as being within the tables referred to in 3. NOTE 3 The combined thickness is the thickness of the webs and shells. some thicknesses of walls are further specified to be built in solid units. 3)P The tables referred to in 3. but they may contain indentations. 2) Flammable thin damp proof materials incorporated into a wall may be ignored in assessing fire resistance. (c) BSI Area of any hole Limited by Limited by volume volume (see above) (see above) U 30 Combined thickness (% U 37. such units should not contain any perforations. © BSI 05-1999 9 .5 Licensed Copy: Sheffield University.1 — Requirements for grouping of masonry units Group of masonry units 1 2a 2b 3 Volume of holes (% of the gross volume) (see note 1) k 25 > 25–45 for clay units > 25–50 for concrete aggregate units k 12. NOTE 2 If there is national experience.5 for clay units k 25 for concrete aggregate units k 70 > 45–55 for clay units > 50–60 for concrete aggregate units (see note 2) k 12. or thin layer mortars complying with EN 998-2 or 1996-1-1. 17 July 2003.

the slenderness ratio. Licensed Copy: Sheffield University.5 Assessment by tables 1) Assessment may be made by means of tables giving minimum thicknesses of masonry for stated periods of fire resistance. subassemblies or the entire structure or — a simplified calculation model for specific types of member.6 Assessment by calculation 1) The fire resistance of masonry walls may be assessed by calculation. NOTE A detailed calculation method is not yet available for masonry. Models tables are given in Annex C. 3.4 Assessment by testing 1) For all types of masonry walls the fire resistance may be obtained. 2) The calculation method may be: — a global structure analysis for simulating the behaviour of structural members. taking into account the relevant failure mode in fire exposure. using the test methods listed in Annex A. During the experimental ENV phase. the temperature dependent material properties. Uncontrolled Copy. 3) The validity of calculation methods should be assessed by comparison of calculated fire resistance with the results of tests. 10 © BSI 05-1999 . 17 July 2003. University of Sheffield. NOTE Such tables are not yet available. (c) BSI 3. it is intended to prepare such tables for the EN conversion.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 3. effects of thermal expansions and deformations.

— the slenderness of the wall. since this is the way in which the load has been traditionally determined when carrying out fire tests. for example sound. if any. c) linear gap seals. a load up to a resistance of NRd (or 0. may be greater and should then be used. Fire resistance tests of service installations in buildings. the thickness required from consideration of ENV 1996-1-1. — the type of unit — solid or hollow (type of holes. c) 3) Tests on masonry walls should be carried out if masonry units (perforation percentage or perforation type. In particular. allowance should be made for any difference from that required in the CEN/TC 127 test method in the loading system used in the fire test on loadbearing walls. © BSI 05-1999 11 . 2) In these tables. lightweight or thin layer mortar) or the combination of units and mortar that are to be used are not covered in the tables referred to in 3. Dampers. shell and web thickness. 3) The symbol Ô is the gross density of the masonry units measured according to EN 772-13.1 to Table C. the restraint system will also influence the test results and they should be evaluated against the system in the CEN/TC 127 method. free ends or one fixed end and one partly free end. the thicknesses referred to should be of the masonry itself. density. or other reasons. University of Sheffield. Partitions. Row a) is for walls without an applied finish or walls having a sand-cement rendered finish. Uncontrolled Copy. — the type of mortar — general purpose. types of mortar (general purpose mortar.5 and Annex C. it is important to base the interpretation of any existing fire test results on the requirements for the relevant test method from CEN/TC 127. 5) The tables that apply to loadbearing walls are stated to cover. autoclaved aerated concrete or dense/lightweight aggregate concrete. Internal walls.6 NRd) divided by average ¾f. 2) In arriving at values to be inserted into Table C. Fire resistance tests of loadbearing elements in buildings. External walls. Penetration seals. dimension). 2) The relevant test methods are a) EN 1364 Part 1 Part 2a EN 1365 Part 1 Part 2 EN 1366 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Fire resistance tests of non-loadbearing elements in buildings. as appropriate.1 to Table C. excluding finishes. calcium silicate.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Annex A (normative) Testing the fire resistance of masonry walls 1) In this Part 1-2 of ENV 1996 reference is made to the testing of:— a) masonry walls as building elements. 17 July 2003. made with units of: — Clay complying with EN 771-1 — Calcium Silicate complying with EN 771-2 — Aggregate Concrete complying with EN 771-3 — Autoclaved Aerated Concrete complying with EN 771-4 — Manufactured stone in accordance with EN 771-5 Natural stone walls are not covered. — the relationship of the applied load to the resistance of the wall. 4) In these tables. Licensed Copy: Sheffield University.9 by consideration of test results.9 are models of tables which should give minimum thicknesses of 0omasonry for the stated periods of fire resistance. External walls. — the density of units. thin layer or lightweight mortar. Row b) is for walls having an applied finish of gypsum plaster of minimum thickness 10 mm. b) service installation. 3) In non-loadbearing walls. Linear gap seals. percentage of holes). for example fixed ends. (c) BSI b) Annex C (informative) Assessment by tables 1) Table C. It has not been possible to tabulate the fire performance of such walls in this European prestandard. the minimum thickness of a wall for fire resistance purposes is to be given. Annex B (informative) Guidance on selection of fire resistance periods 1) The fire behaviour of a masonry wall depends on — the masonry unit material — clay.

Uncontrolled Copy. thin layer or lightweight mortar Group 1 units 500 k Ô k 1500 kg/m3 Group 1 units Ô > 1 500 kg/m Group 2 units Ô U 800 kg/m3 kg/m3 3 Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. (c) BSI Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 200 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 2a units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 2b units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar or lightweight mortar Group 3 units laid in general purpose mortar a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) © BSI 05-1999 Group 2 units 500 k Ô k 800 12 .4 is limited to walls of length greater than 1.1 — Loadbearing walls subject to load up to a resistance of NRd ÷ average ¾r separating function REI Material Minimum masonry thickness (mm) for standard fire resistance (minutes) 30 60 90 120 180 240 Clay: EN 771-1 Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) Calcium silicate: EN 771-2 Laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 600 kg/m3 Group 2 units Ô U 500 kg/m3 Aerated concrete units: EN 771-4 Group 1 units laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar 400 k Ô k 550 kg/m3 Ô > 550 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) Aggregate concrete units including manufactured stone EN 771-3 and EN 771-5 Laid in general purpose. For walls less than 1. University of Sheffield.6 and Table C.0 m.3 and Table C.0 m in length.7 should be used. 17 July 2003. Table C. Table C.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 6) The use of Table C.

17 July 2003. (c) BSI © BSI 05-1999 13 . University of Sheffield.6 NRd ÷ average ¾F separating function REI Material Minimum masonry thickness (mm) for standard fire resistance (minutes) 30 60 90 120 180 240 Clay: EN 771-1 Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 200 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 2a units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 2b units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar or lightweight mortar Group 3 units laid in general purpose mortar Calcium silicate: EN 771-2 Laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 600 kg/m3 Group 2 units Ô U 500 kg/m3 Aerated concrete units: EN 771-4 Group 1 units laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar 400 k Ô k 550 kg/m3 Ô > 550 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) Aggregate concrete units including manufactured stone EN 771-3 and EN 771-5 Laid in general purpose.2 — Loadbearing walls subject to load up to a resistance of 0. thin layer or lightweight mortar Group 1 units 500 k Ô k 1 500 kg/m3 Group 1 units Ô > 1 500 kg/m3 Group 2 units Ô U 800 kg/m3 Group 2 units 500 k Ô k 800 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. Uncontrolled Copy.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Table C.

Uncontrolled Copy. 17 July 2003. University of Sheffield.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Table C. (c) BSI 14 © BSI 05-1999 .3 — Loadbearing walls subject to load up to a resistance of NRd ÷ average ¾F non-separating function R Material Minimum masonry thickness (mm) for standard fire resistance (minutes) 30 60 90 120 180 240 Clay: EN 771-1 Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 200 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 2a units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 2b units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar or lightweight mortar Group 3 units laid in general purpose mortar Calcium silicate: EN 771-2 Laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 600 kg/m3 Group 2 units Ô U 500 kg/m3 Aerated concrete units: EN 771-4 Group 1 units laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar 400 k Ô k 550 kg/m3 Ô > 550 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) Aggregate concrete units including manufactured stone EN 771-3 and EN 771-5 Laid in general purpose. thin layer or lightweight mortar Group 1 units 500 k Ô k 1 500 kg/m3 Group 1 units Ô > 1 500 kg/m3 Group 2 units Ô U 800 kg/m3 Group 2 units 500 k Ô k 800 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) Licensed Copy: Sheffield University.

thin layer or lightweight mortar Group 1 units 500 k Ô k 1 500 kg/m3 Group 1 units Ô > 1 500 kg/m3 Group 2 units Ô U 800 kg/m3 Group 2 units 500 k Ô k 800 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) Licensed Copy: Sheffield University.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Table C. University of Sheffield.4 — Loadbearing walls subject to load up to a resistance of 0.6 NRd ÷ average ¾F non-separating function R Material Minimum masonry thickness (mm) for standard fire resistance (minutes) 30 60 90 120 180 240 Clay: EN 771-1 Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 200 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 2a units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 2b units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar or lightweight mortar Group 3 units laid in general purpose mortar Calcium silicate: EN 771-2 Laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 600 kg/m3 Group 2 units Ô U 500 kg/m3 Aerated concrete units: EN 771-4 Group 1 units laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar 400 k Ô k 550 kg/m3 Ô > 550 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) Aggregate concrete units including manufactured stone EN 771-3 and EN 771-5 Laid in general purpose. 17 July 2003. Uncontrolled Copy. (c) BSI © BSI 05-1999 15 .

5 — Non-loadbearing walls separating function EI Material Minimum masonry thickness (mm) for standard fire resistance (minutes) 30 60 90 120 180 240 Clay: EN 771-1 Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 200 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 2a units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. University of Sheffield.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Table C. thin layer or lightweight mortar Group 1 units 500 k Ô k 1 500 kg/m3 Group 1 units Ô > 1 500 kg/m3 Group 2 units Ô U 800 kg/m3 Group 2 units 500 k Ô k 800 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) 16 © BSI 05-1999 . (c) BSI Group 2b units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar or lightweight mortar Group 3 units laid in general purpose mortar Calcium silicate: EN 771-2 Laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 600 kg/m3 Group 2 units Ô U 500 kg/m3 Aerated concrete units: EN 771-4 Group 1 units laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar 400 k Ô k 550 kg/m3 Ô > 550 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) Aggregate concrete units including manufactured stone EN 771-3 and EN 771-5 Laid in general purpose. 17 July 2003. Uncontrolled Copy.

0 m subject to load up to a resistance of NRd ÷ average ¾f non-separating function R Material Minimum masonry length (mm) standard fire resistance (minutes) 30 60 90 120 180 240 Thickness (mm) Clay: EN 771-1 Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 200 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 2a units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 2b units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar or lightweight mortar Group 3 units laid in general purpose mortar Calcium silicate: EN 771-2 Laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar Group 1 or 2 units Ô U 500 kg/m3 Aerated concrete units: EN 771-4 Group 1 units laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar Ô k 400 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. Uncontrolled Copy.6 — Loadbearing walls of length < 1. University of Sheffield. 17 July 2003.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Table C. thin layer or lightweight mortar Group 1 or 2 units Ô U 500 kg/m3 a) b) © BSI 05-1999 17 . (c) BSI Aggregate concrete units including manufactured stone EN 771-3 and EN 771-5 Laid in general purpose.

thin layer or lightweight mortar Group 1 or 2 units Ô U 500 kg/m3 a) b) 18 © BSI 05-1999 . 17 July 2003. University of Sheffield.ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Table C.7 — Loadbearing walls of length < 1.6 NRd ÷ average ¾f non-separating function R Material Minimum masonry length (mm) standard fire resistance (minutes) 30 60 90 120 180 240 Thickness (mm) Clay: EN 771-1 Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 200 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 2a units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 2b units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar or lightweight mortar Group 3 units laid in general purpose mortar Calcium silicate: EN 771-2 Laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar Group 1 or 2 units Ô U 500 kg/m3 Aerated concrete units: EN 771-4 Group 1 units laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar Ô U 400 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. Uncontrolled Copy. (c) BSI Aggregate concrete units including manufactured stone EN 771-3 and EN 771-5 Laid in general purpose.0 m subject to Load up to a resistance of 0.

ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Table C.8 — Fire walls separating and mechanical impact function REIM Material Minimum masonry thickness (mm) for standard fire resistance (minutes) 30 60 90 120 180 240 Double leaf 90 Clay: EN 771-1 Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 200 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Group 2a units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) a) b) Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. Uncontrolled Copy. (c) BSI Group 2b units Ô U 700 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar or lightweight mortar Group 3 units laid in general purpose mortar Calcium silicate: EN 771-2 Laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar Group 1 or 2 units Ô U 1 300 kg/m3 Group 1 solid units Ô U 1 200 laid in thin layer mortar Group 2 units Ô U 700 kg/m 3 a) b) a) b) a) b) kg/m3 Aerated concrete units: EN 771-4 Group 1 units laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar 400 k Ô k 550 kg/m3 laid in thin layer mortar Ô > 550 kg/m laid in general purpose or thin layer mortar 3 a) b) a) b) Aggregate concrete units including manufactured stone EN 771-3 and EN 771-5 Laid in general purpose. 17 July 2003. University of Sheffield. thin layer or lightweight mortar Group 1 or 2 units Ô > 800 kg/m3 Group 1 or 2 units 500 k Ô # 800 kg/m 3 a) b) a) b) © BSI 05-1999 19 .

17 July 2003. (c) BSI Aerated concrete units: EN 771-4 Group 1 units laid in general purpose mortar and thin layer mortar 400 k Ô k 550 kg/m3 Ô > 550 kg/m3 a) b) a) b) Aggregate concrete units including manufactured stone EN 771-3 and EN 771-5. Uncontrolled Copy. thin layer mortar and lightweight mortar Ô k 800 kg/m3 800 < Ô k 1 600 Ô > 1 600 kg/m 3 a) b) kg/m3 a) b) a) b) 20 © BSI 05-1999 .ENV 1996-1-2:1997 Table C. University of Sheffield.9 — Loadbearing cavity walls with both leaves loaded subject to load up to a resistance of NRd ÷ average ¾f separating function REI Material Minimum masonry thickness (mm) for the loaded leaf for standard fire resistance (minutes) 30 60 90 120 180 240 Clay: EN 771-1 Group 1 units Ô > 1 200 kg/m3 laid in general purpose mortar Calcium silicate: EN 771-2 Group 1 units Ô U 1 000 kg/m3 Laid in general purpose mortar and lightweight mortar a) b) a) b) Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. Group 1 Units Laid in general purpose.

17 July 2003.Licensed Copy: Sheffield University. (c) BSI blank 21 . Uncontrolled Copy. University of Sheffield.

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