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Vision

Simply put, students are at the heart of our university. Together, we contribute to the Queen’s and Kingston communities in a variety of ways, fostering the spirit and passion that make our institution unique. But we are not done. It is the responsibility of the AMS to develop concrete plans that will improve the student experience and enhance student life at Queen’s. Our passion, dedication, and love of working with students have given us the skills and the drive to see this through. It won’t be easy, but we firmly believe that today’s challenges are tomorrow’s opportunities. And we’re up for the challenge.
We are Team WRL, comprised of Presidential Candidate Allison Williams, Vice President (Operations) Candidate Justin Reekie, and Vice President (University Affairs) Candidate Philip Lloyd, and we are committed to providing students with an unmatched university experience. There are many issues that we, as students, face: the rising cost of education, an increasingly competitive job market, and campus infrastructure and resources that are failing to keep up. Team WRL is not afraid to be the driver of change as we fight to address each of these challenges. Equipped with proven leadership and advocacy skills, we are ready to make progress on the issues that are the most important to you. Team WRL recognizes that many students do not feel the AMS has an impact on their Queen‟s experience. We believe in taking a proactive approach to understanding the diverse needs of students, and we will adjust our operations throughout the year to ensure we are providing value to our members. We want to work with students across all disciplines through greater interaction and mechanisms for effective
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feedback. By acknowledging the diversity on campus, we will strive to have the AMS serve the needs of all students. Queen‟s is the gold-standard for student engagement, participation, and initiative. Yet as our campus continues to grow and the demands of education shift, the AMS needs an executive that is willing to raise the standard for academic and extra-curricular achievement. Team WRL will provide students with a positive, engaging, and impactful university experience. Ultimately, we want to ensure you get the most out of your time at Queen‟s.

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Table of Contents
Pillar 1: Broader Learning Environment .............................................................. 10 Tricolour Festival ............................................................................................. 11 Improved Distribution Process for Homecoming Tickets ................................. 12 Liaising more Effectively with Clubs on Campus ............................................. 13 Fostering an Inclusive, Supportive, and Spirited Orientation Week ................. 14 Tricolour Sponsorship with Athletics and Recreation ...................................... 16 Improved Arts Council ..................................................................................... 17 Campus Pub Crawl ......................................................................................... 18 Pillar 2: Health, Wellness, and Safety ................................................................. 19 Bringing a Walk-in Clinic to DrugSmart Pharmacy .......................................... 20 Peer Support Centre ....................................................................................... 21 Accessibility of Walkhome to Faculty Societies ............................................... 23 Integrating the Marketing of Telephone Aid Line Kingston and Walkhome ..... 24 Gluten Free at The Brew by Common Ground .. Error! Bookmark not defined. Tricolour Fitness App ...................................................................................... 25 Promoting Safety and Security in Student Housing ......................................... 26 Gluten Free Options at The Brew by Common Ground ................................... 27 Grocery Delivery from the Grocery Checkout .................................................. 28 Health and Dental Plan Communication Strategy ........................................... 29 Pillar 3: Academics and Professional Development ............................................ 30 Expanded Summer Courses ........................................................................... 31 SOLUS ............................................................................................................ 32 Establishment of Courses Without Prerequisites............................................. 33 Electronic Coursepacks ................................................................................... 34 Library Text-It .................................................................................................. 35 Yearbook and Design Services Workshops .................................................... 36 Career Services for Entrepreneurs .................................................................. 37 Innovation Crowdfunding Platform .................................................................. 38 Pillar 4: Infrastructure and Campus Resources .................................................. 39 Via Rail ............................................................................................................ 40 Queen‟s-Wide Energy Management Strategy ................................................. 41 8

Open Government ........................................................................................... 42 Cell Phone Boosters........................................................................................ 43 Bringing Two New Services to the JDUC ........................................................ 44 Dynamic Furniture/Charging Stations.............................................................. 45 Transportation to the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts.................. 46 Pop-Up Shops at Tricolour Outlet.................................................................... 47 AMS Advancement Officer .............................................................................. 48 Pillar 5: Engagement and Collaboration .............................................................. 49 Commission Reviews .......................................................................................... 51 Academic Affairs Commission ......................................................................... 52 Campus Activities Commission ....................................................................... 53 Commission of the Environment and Sustainability ......................................... 55 Commission of Internal Affairs......................................................................... 57 Municipal Affairs Commission ......................................................................... 59 Social Issues Commission .............................................................................. 61 Service Reviews ................................................................................................. 63 Hospitality and Safety Services ....................................................................... 64 The AMS Pub Services ................................................................................ 64 Common Ground Coffeehouse .................................................................... 65 Queen‟s Student Constables ....................................................................... 66 Campus Services ............................................................................................ 67 Walkhome .................................................................................................... 67 Queen‟s TV .................................................................................................. 68 Queen‟s Journal........................................................................................... 69 Retail and Design Services ............................................................................. 70 Yearbook and Design Services.................................................................... 70 Tricolour Outlet ............................................................................................ 71 Publishing and Copy Centre ........................................................................ 72 Office Reviews .................................................................................................... 73 Marketing and Communications ...................................................................... 74 Information Technology Office......................................................................... 75 Human Resources Office ................................................................................ 76 Student Centre Officer..................................................................................... 77

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Pillar 1: Broader Learning Environment
At Queen‟s, a significant portion of learning takes place outside the confines of the classroom. To support this extra- and co-curricular development, Team WRL is committed to fostering an engaging, inclusive, and adaptive broader learning environment. We recognize that every student wants something different out of their university experience, and we are committed to ensuring your campus remains flexible enough to support this diversity. Students have the ability to explore all facets of school life through their involvement in a wide array of clubs, committees, and teams. We run services, organize events, and create new initiatives that benefit us all. Not only do these activities help develop a number of life skills, they help to forge our strong sense of community. In many ways, the broader learning environment remains one of the most unique and important elements of the Queen‟s experience and it is an element that is provided entirely by students.

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Tricolour Festival
With the return of Homecoming in 2013, students were once again given with the opportunity to join our alumni in celebration of their time at Queen‟s. Homecoming was largely heralded as a success and students are optimistic that we will be able to welcome our alumni back to campus again this Fall. With only minor student-oriented programming, the university failed to provide a meaningful venue for student-alumni interaction. Team WRL believes that Homecoming is a chance for alumni – both current and future – to come together in celebration of our university and community. As such, our team is committed to creating the Tricolour Festival: a largescale, sanctioned event put on by the University and the AMS with the objective of engaging alumni and students alike. We hope to host this event on University Avenue, providing ample space for interaction and celebration at the heart of campus. This event would take place on a Friday or Saturday evening and would encompass a range of attractions, ranging from food vendors and beer stands to music and entertainment. The AMS would operate as a partner with the University in financing the event. Team WRL plans to work with the new Advancement Officer to raise the start-up funding and title sponsors required to make the festival a success, with the hope that the event could eventually transition towards a self-sustaining funding model. In addition, our team believes it is important to introduce a charitable component to this event. In doing so, we would aim to commit a portion of event proceeds towards initiatives in the Kingston community, ensuring the festival is able to operate as a positive platform for interaction with our City. Fundamentally, it is important that we create avenues for student-alumni interaction over Homecoming. This flagship event acknowledges the important role students play in welcoming our alumni back to campus and supports initiatives across Kingston; we could create a powerful vehicle for uniting the many facets of the Queen‟s community.

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Improved Distribution Process for Homecoming Tickets
With the return of Homecoming in 2013, students were given the opportunity to welcome our alumni back to Queen‟s. A cornerstone element of this celebration was the Homecoming football game, providing a venue for students and alumni to unite in support of our Gaels. Unfortunately, the distribution process for homecoming tickets, facilitated by Athletics and Recreation, in consultation with the AMS, saw a host of problems. Many students were denied tickets after a lengthy wait on the first day, only to have them made available online for exorbitant prices hours later. After many students had purchased student-side or alumni-side tickets, a second round was released to minimal demand. Team WRL believes in the importance of Homecoming in promoting our athletics and welcoming our alumni back to Queen‟s. We are committed to working with Athletics and Recreation to revise the ticket procurement process with the objective of establishing a planned and coordinated distribution model that would roll out over several pre-determined periods. It is our hope that this would prevent students from facing significant roadblocks in coming out to greet our alumni and cheer on our Gaels.

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Liaising more Effectively with Clubs on Campus
There is no doubting the critical role that clubs play on campus. Queen‟s boasts over 250 clubs, catering to those interested in the arts, community outreach, debating, religion, first aid, the environment, and so much more. These organizations provide the opportunity for students to work with likeminded individuals who have a similar passion, and to broaden their cocurricular learning. By hosting events and acting as resources, clubs also reach out to the wider Kingston community. WRL is committed to supporting all clubs on campus, building off the amazing work the Clubs Office has done in the past. While each organization is unique, the AMS must ensure that all clubs have the opportunity to thrive. Team WRL will initiate new professional development and social events designed as an avenue for club executives to interact with one another. We will continue to provide workshops on budgeting and marketing, while also organizing socials at the beginning of the year. Our intention is to have programming established in consultation with club executives to ensure the events reflect the needs and interests of their members. By helping clubs develop a stronger relationship with one another, there will be greater information and resource sharing, allowing them to reach out to more students. Clubs are primarily located throughout the JDUC, the Queen‟s Centre, and Mac Brown Hall. Recognizing that Mac Brown is not centrally located on campus, we want to improve the access and accessibility of the building. We will develop new signage that can show people were certain clubs are located and how to reach them. More broadly, we would like to work closely with clubs in the space allocation process to ensure the office they are given is able to meet their needs. We also intend to develop the “Club Street Initiative” as a means of networking more effectively with organizations throughout the year. This will encompass a dedicated group of volunteers who are willing to assist in the planning and execution of club events, and ensure clubs are aware of the resources the AMS can provide. In doing so, we hope to provide continued support while still respecting the autonomy of each group.

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Finally, we will consult with club executives more directly on the logistics surrounding the Tricolour Open House. We want every club to feel like they are given a fair chance to advertise their club to students at large, and are committed to providing the resources and support necessary to enable them to do so.

Fostering an Inclusive, Supportive, and Spirited Orientation Week
Together, we have a responsibility to provide all incoming students with an inclusive, supportive, and spirited orientation week. Through the dedication of the Orientation Round Table (ORT), in conjunction with all nine Faculty Societies, this week is often a highlight of the year. Students are given incredible authority to both plan and orchestrate all aspects of orientation week. While the week cannot function without the support of Queen‟s staff and their various departments, the administration has long recognized the integral aspect of a student-run orientation. However, in recent years, there has been increased oversight of the events by the administration, including the Senate Orientation Activities Review Board (SOARB), the Student Affairs Office, and the deans or dean designates of faculty societies. We can appreciate that all stakeholders wish to ensure that students are welcomed to Queen‟s in an appropriate fashion, with a mix of academic guidance and social activities. However, the administration has begun to micro-manage many aspects of orientation week, ranging from the hiring of leaders to daily logistics. Traditional events are being increasingly questioned and organizers are burdened by the constant scrutiny. We are not denying the importance of reflecting on the ways in which orientation week might evolve. As student needs change and as new ideas are brought forward, positive growth is always possible. However, students should be the drivers of any change. Collaboration with the administration is necessary, yet students should not be forced to make changes that are against their will. Unfortunately, we have seen too many faculties be subject to administration-led inquiries over all elements of their orientation, whereby unilateral decisions are made by those with a very different vision for the week. WRL is committed to maintaining a student-run orientation week. We will be persistent in ensuring that the administration does not overstep their
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jurisdiction. We will develop a stronger working relationship based on trust and understanding. We will be transparent with concerns that have arisen, yet will refuse to make changes without a fair and respectful deliberation process. We understand the powerful role faculty societies play in developing unique orientation weeks, and we are committed to protecting this role. We will encourage ORT to take a more unified approach between faculty societies when addressing issues with the administration. Finally, and most importantly, we will remain dedicated in having orientation week be a positive experience for all students.

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Tricolour Sponsorship with Athletics and Recreation
This year, Tricolour Outlet introduced the Gael‟s “Snapback” to its clothing merchandise collection. With the Gael‟s Snapback, 7% of the proceeds go to Queen‟s Athletics and Recreation (A&R) to support our Gaels. Team WRL believes that the AMS should recognize and support all the hard work of Queen‟s A&R. There is an opportunity for Tricolour Outlet to increase the merchandise offered to students that will ultimately help our fellow Gaels. Team WRL would like to create a „Gael‟s Clothing Line‟ at Tricolour Outlet, which will not only provide new merchandise to students, but will be supporting our athletes. Team WRL values the relationship between the AMS and Queen‟s A&R, and believes this relationship should continue to grow.

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Improved Arts Council
The opening of the Isabel Bader Centre will create a countless opportunities for the Drama, Music, Fine Art, and Film and Media departments to collaborate on courses and projects. Team WRL will strengthen the newly created Arts Council, as a way to enhance avenues for resource sharing. The Council would also provide an opportunity to cross-advertise between departments different events. We believe the AMS should provide skill development workshops, such as budgeting, to ensure this body can advocate for the arts on campus. Team WRL will reach out to the Drama, Music, Fine Art, and Film and Media Departmental Student Councils, in addition to interested arts groups on campus to create an improved Arts Council.

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Campus Pub Crawl
Team WRL believes that the AMS should be recognizing the value of our student run campus bars and clubs for providing a safe drinking space for students as well as work opportunities. Team WRL also believes that student run services should be supporting each other and collaborating as much as possible to ensure the success of these services Team WRL is proposing a Campus Pub Crawl, which would include the Grad Club, Clark Hall Pub, the Queen‟s Pub and The Underground Nightclub. In the fall of 2014, students of legal drinking age can purchase a low cost wristband that allows them entry into the four establishments to see live bands and DJs, involving as many student groups as possible. We believe that this will not only support our services, but build a relationship between the services, promote the services to students, and to showcase as many student music groups as possible. Team WRL would like to recognize that due to the nature of the services, this event would exclude students who are underage to participate. We would like to involve Common Ground Coffeehouse and the Tea Room to also showcase student music groups on campus in a setting accessible to all students.

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Pillar 2: Health, Wellness, and Safety
To enable students to excel academically, Team WRL believes we must first be committed to fostering an environment that provides a robust range of supports that promote health, wellness, and safety. As the pressures of university mount, students may feel stressed, anxious, or depressed. At times, they may feel unsafe on campus or in the near-campus community. No matter their circumstance, we want students to have the resources available to help them maintain a healthy, well-balanced lifestyle and to ensure they are safe to take advantage of all the opportunities the university has to offer.

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Bringing a Walk-in Clinic to DrugSmart Pharmacy
In recognizing the long wait times and limited hours of Health Counseling and Disability Services (HCDS), Team WRL would like to work with the University and DrugSmart Pharmacy to bring a walk-in clinic to the Queen‟s Centre. Since the summer, DrugSmart has been investigating the possibility of offering a walk-in clinic. From an infrastructure perspective, the space has been assessed, and the conversion of the back half of the store into a clinic has been deemed feasible. A physician must be secured and supplies must be purchased to adopt the space. While this decision is up to the tenant of the pharmacy, Team WRL is committed to assisting them in doing so. Finally, the stipulations of their lease currently include a non-compete with HCDS, meaning a clinic may not be possible to add until the lease has been changed. Team WRL proposes that the clinic be open primarily at times when HCDS is not, and that we work with HCDS, the tenant, and the University, in amending the terms of the lease.

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Peer Support Centre
The Peer Support Centre (PSC) embodies what WRL values most about our student body; that no matter circumstance, we care for one another. While there is a multitude of highly-regarded support systems in the Queen‟s and Kingston community, the PSC offers something different: peer-to-peer support. While not a counseling service, the PSC gives students the opportunity to discuss their frustrations or share their worries with someone who best understands the current issues they are facing. WRL is committed to further developing the training given to PSC volunteers. Consistent with the university‟s “hub and spoke” model of counseling, we would like to provide volunteers with the opportunity to better engage with both residence and faculty-specific support systems on campus. It is imperative that all volunteers are equipped to support any student who comes to them for support, whether they are in first year biology or fourth year film studies. In recognizing that a unique set of pressures exists in every program at Queen‟s, WRL will work with the PSC director to include an opportunity for volunteers to interact with counselors from residence and faculties as a component of their training. During this training, volunteers will be provided with an avenue to discuss ideas and share best practices for the year ahead. WRL is committed to strengthening the PSC‟s relationship with faculty society executives. We would like to have faculty executives inform the PSC director on specific projects or events that have transpired that may result in increased student stress, anxiety, or fear. This will help volunteers prepare for prospective sessions and improve the support given. In an effort to expand the awareness and improve the effectiveness of the service, WRL is determined to expand the Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) training to include the PSC managers, in addition to the PSC director, social issues commissioner, and Vice-President (University Affairs). WRL views the PSC as an invaluable service on campus. Over the past seven years, dedicated groups of volunteers have developed the service from the ground up, assisting more and more students each year. In particular, the
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12 managers devote dozens of hours each month to manage volunteers, develop new outreach initiatives, and assist in the daily operations of the Centre. We also realize, and appreciate, that managers are often placed in highly stressful of emotional situations. We intend to work with the PSC to discuss a specific form of volunteer appreciation for PSC managers.

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Accessibility of Walkhome to Faculty Societies
Walkhome is a confidential and non-judgmental service that walks a patron from one location to another, on campus or in the near-campus community. With approximately 160 employees, Walkhome is among the most successful safe walk programs in the nation, playing an important role in enhancing student health and safety. Walkhome is also a defining element of the Queen‟s community, offering jobs to students and increasing the accessibility of extra-curricular involvement by providing safe transportation to and from activities. There are many opportunities for Walkhome to partner with Faculty Societies to ensure that campus events are able to benefit fully from safewalk services. Team WRL is committed to engaging with Faculty Societies and Clubs to discuss how the service can best integrate into the daily lives of student groups. As a component of this, Team WRL would like to introduce a “Satellite Request Form”. This would allow a student group to request a Walkhome station to be set up at their event, providing all students with easy access to safewalk services. These Satellite Request Forms would be provided to all Faculty Societies and Clubs, ensuring Walkhome is able to be where you need it, when you need it.

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Integrating the Marketing of Telephone Aid Line Kingston and Walkhome
Team WRL believes that the AMS and the University should continue to develop mental health initiatives and awareness on campus. Telephone Aid Line Kingston (TALK) is a member of the Distress Centres Ontario, and is a confidential, non-judgmental and anonymous listening service serving the Kingston community. Team WRL believes that this public service should be better advertised by the AMS to its students and to the Kingston community. Similar to TALK, Walkhome provides a confidential and non-judgmental safe walk program to students and members of the community. As a safety service, Walkhome holds the risk of being approached by patrons needing not only a safe walk home, but someone to talk to regarding mental health. Walkhome employees are not trained professionals regarding mental health, and therefore hold a large liability with no outlets to refer to the patron. Team WRL would like to integrate the marketing of TALK into the mandate of Walkhome, not only promoting this service to Queen‟s students and the community, but to provide a partnership between Walkhome and a service trained in mental health. Walkhome and TALK‟s hours of operation are currently the same, so Walkhome‟s hours of operation wouldn‟t need to be changed. This partnership will provide preventative measures to Walkhome to ensure they are equipped to handle any mental health issue that comes their way.

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Tricolour Fitness App
Team WRL has a strong commitment to the physical wellness of Queen‟s students. In recognizing the benefits of active living in enhancing mental health, physical well-being, and student success, we would like to ensure it is as easy as possible for AMS members to access our on-campus facilities. The Tricolour Fitness App will feature a variety of Queen‟s-specific functionalities that would allow you to reserve a treadmill, sign up for a class, or book a locker. You will also be able to track your healthy eating habits and exercise to ensure you‟re getting the most out of your time at the ARC. In partnership with Athletics and Recreation, Team WRL is committed to bringing you everything you need to stay fit … from the convenience of your own pocket.

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Promoting Safety and Security in Student Housing
When deciding on living accommodations in upper years, students are informed on how to search for a place to live, what an acceptable lease looks like, and tenant rights and responsibilities. One area that needs greater focus is how to toughen safety and security measures, particularly in high-density areas like the university district. WRL is committed to working with the Housing Grievance Centre to provide students with “do it yourself” security mechanisms. "We recognize that many landlords do not go out of their way to provide a secure home for student tenants. While we believe that is the fundamental responsibility of landlords to ensure the safety and security of their properties, it is important that we also enable our students to obtain any additional security measures at low cost. We will equip the Housing Grievance Centre (HGC) with a number of items designed to strengthen security, including, but not limited to bars for windows, locks for bedrooms, blinds, safes, and bright exterior lights. Students can conveniently purchase materials for minimal cost. In addition, landlords who are interested in purchasing security retrofits are welcome to use this service. In addition, we would like to strengthen the education surrounding safety and security in homes. We will work with residence dons to provide information sessions to interested students in January and February. Students will visit the HGC, learn about the services that are available to them, purchase any materials, and ask questions. There are a number of housing services that the AMS offers, including the Student Property Assessment and Dwelling Education and Greenovations, that many students aren‟t aware of. We want to ensure that students can access these services before they move into their homes. In addition, we will have these services be more visible in April during move-in/move-out periods and in September when students are arriving back on campus.

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Gluten Free Options at The Brew by Common Ground
This year, The Brew has become a successful satellite location to Main Common Ground by increasing seating and offering a more diverse selection of menu items. Team WRL is committed to building upon the success of The Brew, and would like to start by offering gluten-free options to students. The Brew is equipped with the appropriate infrastructure to integrate glutenfree stations into its day-to-day operations without compromising the quality of service. Team WRL would like to ensure the AMS is proactive in meeting the needs of the diverse student population, and we believe that bringing gluten-free options to campus is the place to start.

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Grocery Delivery from the Grocery Checkout
Grocery Checkout is the on-campus grocery store, operating as a commercial tenant within the Student Life Centre. It is the Kingston branch of a chain appearing in several university communities, providing convenient service to students. Team WRL is committed to improving this service. Grocery Checkout branches located in other university towns deliver groceries to the nearcampus area. These locations are similar in size and infrastructure to our leaseholder, with the operational aspects of this additional service integrated within the store‟s current offerings. Through negotiations with this commercial leaseholders, we are committed to ensuring Queen‟s students benefit from the same service. While we recognize the advantages of having a store on campus, we would like to take this one step further; through the implementation of this program, your grocery store is only as far as your front step.

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Health and Dental Plan Communication Strategy
Every student in the AMS is automatically enrolled in the AMS Health and Dental Plan in order to ensure they are covered throughout their time at Queen‟s. This Health and Dental Plan provides a wide variety of benefits, including health, dental, vision and travel. Team WRL believes that these benefits and what is available for its constituents should be effectively communicated. We believe that it is our job to be transparent to students as to where their money is going and what they get out of the plan. This year, money has been allocated in the budget to implement a communication strategy to students. Team WRL is committed to implementing an effective communication strategy to its constituents to ensure that students with the AMS Health and Dental Plan can take advantage of what they have at their disposal.

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Pillar 3: Academics and Professional Development
A strong academic program is what drives a university. Through lectures, group projects, and individual study, students are continuously being challenged to think critically and develop new ideas. The AMS must advocate for strong academic programming, defined by experienced professors, engaging content, and extensive resources. We are dedicated to ensuring students are equipped with the skills necessary to succeed, both on and off campus; at the end of the day, we are all at Queen‟s to receive an exceptional education.

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Expanded Summer Courses
Team WRL recognizes that students often struggle to balance many competing commitments as they work towards the completion of their degree. From part-time jobs to extra-curriculars, Queen‟s students require flexible course schedules to be successful. While the University offers a wide breadth of courses throughout the year, though, the availability of summer courses at our institution remains low. To ensure our students are able to meet their degree requirements and pursue courses of interest without turning to Athabasca, Team WRL will push to have a comprehensive complement of summer courses offered in every department. Through this process, we will work closely with faculty societies and AMS members to prioritize areas of high interest and unmet need before bringing specific recommendations forward to the University and its respective faculties.

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SOLUS
Team WRL is aware of the difficulties students face in navigating the process of course registration every year. The challenges associated with finding and enrolling in a full complement of classes are augmented by a lagging system that frequently crashes during periods of high traffic. Team WRL is committed to enhancing the performance of SOLUS by working with the Office of the University Registrar to implement a series of hardware and software updates that would expand its capacity. These changes will optimize the functionality of the program to ensure the process of course registration is supported, and not hindered, by our technological infrastructure. In the end, our team believes that you should be able to compile a timetable that meets your needs without having to hit the refresh button or restart your computer.

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Establishment of Courses Without Prerequisites
Team WRL believes in the benefit of enrolling in courses that are not directly tied to a student‟s program of study or specified degree requirements. In the interest of providing a breadth of impactful in-classroom opportunities, our team is committed to ensuring students are able to pursue courses of interest and benefit from a comprehensive learning experience. In recognizing that prerequisites present a substantial barrier for students looking to enroll in classes external to their degree program, we would like to ensure select upper-year courses are available without prerequisites in every department in Arts and Science. This change would allow students from every faculty to access a wider variety of courses, and would encourage interdisciplinary collaboration, ultimately enriching the Queen‟s community as a whole.

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Electronic Coursepacks
The Publishing & Copy Centre is a valued service on campus, and has been instrumental in providing custom-made course packs to students. As technology becomes a defining element of the learning experience, it is important that students are able to access course material through a variety of modern mediums. Team WRL believes in the importance of providing a diverse selection of products to meet student needs. As such, we will investigate the possibility of offering electronic versions of course packs sold through the Publishing & Copy Center. To bring this idea to fruition, we would procure “one time use” electronic course packs from an external publication source to be sold as a complement to P&CC‟s traditional product line. We would also look into revising our contract with Access Copyright, the provider of our copyrighted materials, to ensure electronic offerings can be accommodated. This would allow our students to interact with their learning materials in new ways, and would provide an additional avenue for professors to support our student-run services.

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Library Text-It
Team WRL is committed to making it easier for you to conduct library research. Modeled after the University of Victoria, we plan to install a “text me this code” function on the library website to help you navigate the Dewy Decimal System. This would allow students to collect research materials without having to write down a lengthy call number, and it will provide you with directions to the material you are looking for. While browsing, you can just type in your cellphone number and you will be sent the title, call number, and location in which the resource can be found.

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Yearbook and Design Services Workshops
With the influence of technology on the landscape of social media and design, the demand for skills in Photoshop has significantly increased in recent years. Whether this program is required for academics, extracurricular projects, or personal use, there are few resources to support students in acquiring these skills. With this in mind, Team WRL would like to introduce Photoshop Workshops through Yearbook and Design Services (YDS). Currently, YDS does not make full use of the student fee it receives, opening the door for increased services to benefit AMS members. We would like to use the additional revenue the service has accumulated to create the position of Photoshop Director, creating the infrastructure to provide complementary Photoshop support and workshops to all students. Through this change, YDS would greatly expand its design capacity while ensuring students receive optimal value for the fees they provide.

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Career Services for Entrepreneurs
Career Services provides comprehensive assistance to students looking to access employment opportunities, enhance their knowledge of career options, or enter into the job market. Students are able to receive assistance from career counselors at any stage of education, and are provided with the resources to assist them in making decisions regarding life after graduation. Team WRL recognizes the importance of this Office‟s work, and would like to extend the same form of support to entrepreneurs. While an increasing number of Queen‟s students have expressed an interest in pursuing a start-up, the University currently houses little infrastructure to support them in entering into this field. Information on pitch competitions, local innovation incubators, and networks of support can be vital to a young company‟s success, and providing an avenue for these opportunities could dramatically enhance the start-up culture at Queen‟s. Team WRL would like to work in partnership with the Queen‟s Innovation Connector (the University‟s on-campus business accelerator) and Career Services to ensure students who wish to pursue a start-up are appropriately equipped to do so. Through this partnership, students would have access to information and support through a variety of outlets, providing important resources to expand the budding community of entrepreneurs at Queen‟s and in Kingston.

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Innovation Crowdfunding Platform
From the establishment of on-campus clubs and start-up competitions to participation in programs such as the Queen‟s Summer Innovation Initiative, Queen‟s students have demonstrated an interest in expanding entrepreneurship on campus. Team WRL believes that the availability of seed funding is a fundamental element of any start-up community, and would like to see more funding opportunities introduced at Queen‟s. In an effort to enhance the culture of entrepreneurship on campus, our team would like to implement a crowdfunding platform for start-ups and innovative initiatives stemming from Queen‟s students. This would come in the form of a website featuring companies, their business plans, and the level of funding they are seeking. Additionally, it would have the ability to offer different tiers of rewards to potential donors dependent upon their level of investment. This crowdfunding platform would be accessible to students, alumni, and the public, and would create infrastructure for a community of support surrounding innovation on campus. With the introduction of microinvestment to our burgeoning entrepreneurial ecosystem, the Queen‟s community will be provided with the opportunity to invest in its own success.

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Pillar 4: Infrastructure and Campus Resources
The Queen‟s campus has a long and proud history as the backdrop for student life and learning. The physical space and services provided are intrinsically linked to student success, and it is important that we ensure the campus is prepared to respond to changing demands as the student experience evolves. Simply put, as our mechanisms for delivering an education shift, so to must our infrastructure. The AMS has the responsibility to ensure that our campus has the capacity to foster high academic and extracurricular achievement. Students across all disciplines must have the capacity to work and learn in an environment equipped to respond to their growing interests. WRL views the need to improve our campus infrastructure and increase the availability of educational resources as a top priority.

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Discounted Via Rail Tickets for Students
Team WRL recognizes how costly transportation can be for students travelling to and from campus. As a student population coming to Queen‟s from a variety of cities and countries, it is crucial that we have access to affordable and convenient transportation services. Tricolour Outlet already provides bus services in the form of the Tricolour Express. Team WRL believes in the importance of this service, particularly in its accessibility from campus and the near-campus community. That being said, we also recognize its limitations. With finite space and a small range of destinations, not all students are able to fully benefit from what this service has to offer. Team WRL would like to provide our members with expanded and enhanced transportation services by making discounted Via Rail tickets available to students. As premier users of Via Rail‟s services, the university, alumni, students over the age of 25, and the AMS already receive discounted rates. As your Executive, we would like to bring these discounts to you. Our team will facilitate the sale of discounted tickets to all AMS members, as a complement to existing bus services, through the negotiation of a new contract with Via Rail. This will ensure students are able to get to where they need to go for a reasonable price any time of the year.

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Queen‟s-Wide Energy Management Strategy
Team WRL believes that the University and the AMS have a responsibility to be environmentally responsible. However, the importance of maintaining costeffective operations often presents a substantial barrier in improving our environmental impact. Through the implementation of a Queen‟s-wide energy management strategy, the University can do both. Currently, the John Deutsch University Centre (JDUC) is being used as a test case for environmentally responsible facilities management. Through a series of retrofits and upgrades, the building is looking to transition to more sustainable operations while dramatically decreasing its utilities bills. Team WRL is committed engaging the University in undertaking a similar project across the entirety of campus. We will work in consultation with the Office of the Associate Vice-Principal Facilities and Physical Plant Services to secure a contractor. This contractor will be responsible for designing and implementing a process that will assess the scope of possible changes and prioritize suggested updates to our infrastructure. In concert with this initiative, we will lobby the administration to operationalize the recommendations stemming from the process, ensuring front-end funding and support is committed to its success. In the end, this will transition Queen‟s towards sustainable facilities management, both environmentally and financially.

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Open Government
Team WRL recognizes the importance of an open and transparent student government. Particularly with the advent of market research in the AMS, our team is passionate about making our resources available to you. Team WRL intends to adopt an open data philosophy, ensuring our information is readily accessible for student use in the creation of apps, completion of research projects, or for personal interest. This will provide a new avenue for students to improve their university, and will allow our members to benefit more widely from their AMS. Furthermore, as an Executive we would lobby the administration to make university data available in a similar manner. As an institution that collects information in every area of its operations, this will allow students to assist in developing real solutions to the problems facing our University. This mentality is already increasingly present in our library system through open access to published works, and we would like to see it expanded into every facet of our institution.

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Cell Phone Service Boosters
As information and resources move towards mobile delivery, it is evident that cell phone use has become an integral element of student life. Whether for personal or academic use, cell phone reception is critical in connecting students with the services they require. That being said, there are many areas on campus that lack adequate cell phone reception. Ultimately, this leads to spaces on campus that are unable to meet student needs. In recognizing the limited availability of space on campus, Team WRL believes that all space must be functional. We would like to undertake an analysis of our campus buildings with the objective of installing cell phone boosters in areas where cell phone reception is low or does not exist. Implementing these cell phone boosters would not only enhance students‟ ability to communicate, but would also ensure all spaces are accessible to campus safety services if needed.

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Bringing Two New Services to the JDUC
The AMS has several commercial leaseholds in the Student Life Centre, including the Drugsmart Pharmacy and the Grocery Checkout in the Queen‟s Centre, and Ye Olde Tuck Shoppe in the JDUC. Currently, the AMS has the potential to bring two new commercial tenants to the JDUC. In partnership with the JDUC revitalization project, this will help reinvigorate student life space while serving to enhance to the resources available to students. Team WRL would like to kick start a consultative process with the objective of identifying potential services that would benefit students, and would use this information to secure appropriate tenants with the capability to meet student needs. Several initial ideas regarding the services that could occupy the space include: A dental office on campus A pop-up shop A drycleaner/tailor

That being said, Team WRL believes that this process should ultimately be responsive to you. At the end of the day, we are committed to ensuring the consultative process results in the additional of 2 new services that are driven by student needs.

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Dynamic Furniture and Charging Stations
Team WRL believes all student life spaces should offer up-to-date resources and accessories, allowing students to gain optimal utility from their space. Currently, the JDUC and the area surrounding Common Ground provide few power outlets. Ultimately, this deters students from using spaces that should be the hub of student life. Team WRL would like to introduce dynamic furniture to these spaces to ensure they are appropriately tailored to student needs. This would include moveable furniture with built-in power outlets in tables, allowing these spaces to be more productively and actively inhabited. This furniture would optimize the space for individual study, group work, and social interaction. The Queen‟s Pub faces a similar challenge regarding lack of power outlets for its customers. Team WRL would also like to invest in charging stations, to be made available to patrons at their table in the Queen‟s Pub, with the objective of enhancing the comfortable customer experience.

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Transportation to the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts
This year, the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts will be opening its doors to Queen‟s and the Kingston community. This specialized building will provide world class resources to the Drama, Music, Fine Arts, and Film and Media departments. This building will provide an amazing opportunity for greater collaboration between these departments. One issue, however, is transportation for students travelling back and forth from the Centre multiple times a day. This upcoming year, the Kingston Transit contract will be negotiated with the AMS. Team WRL will work with Kingston Transit to implement a new bus route that will easily transport students to and from the Centre, from both main and west campus. Team WRL recognizes the value in this specialized building and want to make the building as accessible as possible to not only students in these four departments, but to the Kingston Community.

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Pop-Up Shops at Tricolour Outlet
Tricolour Outlet contributes positively to the Queen‟s community by offering the convenience of apparel, used textbooks, and school supplies. However, Tricolour Outlet currently does not have an online store, limited the accessibility of this service. An online store would overcome geographical limitations for Queen‟s alumni and parents who wish to purchase apparel. It would also allow Tricolour Outlet to better compete with the Campus Bookstore. Overall, it will enhance customer experience Team WRL believes that an online store will soon be an essential component to Tricolour Outlet. However, it must be implemented very carefully. Creo Solutions, a nonprofit, student run consulting group, has provided Tricolour Outlet with a detailed outline for the implementation of an online store, including all of the potential risks. We would like to work the managers of Tricolour Outlet to determine how these risks could be alleviated. In order to ensure that the implementation of a fully-functional online store is a smooth process, Team WRL would like to execute Pop-Up Shops next school year. Pop-Up Shops would act as temporary online stores for Tricolour Outlet. Through Pop-Up Shops, we can observe what operational challenges we would face, and correct them before instituting a full online store.

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AMS Advancement Officer
The AMS has five Officers, each performing roles that service the Society as a whole. They include Marketing and Communications, Human Resources and IT support to the management of our student life facilities. The AMS benefits from the expertise and work of these bodies on a daily basis, and they are an integral part of corporate and government side operations. That being said, the AMS currently has little advancement capacity. While we currently hold a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the University‟s Office of Advancement, this only provides a passive opportunity for donorship. This makes it difficult for the AMS to secure consistent sponsors for events and causes us to rely on student dollars as our sole means of revenue generation. Team WRL believes the AMS should implement the best programming possible, while also making the best use of student dollars. As such, we would like to ensure the AMS is able to generate new revenue streams through sponsorship and donations, under a new Advancement Officer position. This Officer would fall under the President, and would work closely in conjunction with the Executive Director and the Office of Advancement for the University. In doing so, they would have the ability to introduce subsidies for event tickets, implement new scholarships and bursaries, or fundraise in support of broad student priorities. They would also be capable of better leveraging the AMS‟ contact and alumni base to ensure consistent and productive communication. The position would be funded in part by the Office of Advancement in recognition of the important role students can play in Advancement efforts that are of mutual benefit to the students and the University. Ultimately, the savings and enhancements this position would create would flow directly back to students. Through the creation of this position, the AMS would become a more self-sustaining body, offering improved and lower-cost events and alleviating in part the Society‟s budgetary pressures.

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Pillar 5: Engagement and Collaboration
The AMS has a fundamental responsibility to ensure that students at Queen‟s University receive the most well rounded, favourable, and dynamic education possible. Through volunteer and employment opportunities, a variety of professional, social, and safety services, and resources to enhance academic success, the AMS has a mission to serve and represent the diversity of student‟s at Queen‟s. Throughout its long history, the AMS has passionately worked to improve the student experience. Even after 150 years, new services, projects, and initiatives are continuously being developed to enhance the quality of life at Queen‟s. It is unfortunate, then, that many students still don‟t understand what the AMS is…or what it can do for them. One of the common sentiments discussed with every Faculty Society Executive was that many of their students don‟t feel that the AMS is beneficial to them. This is major problem, and something we are committed to changing. Accusations of being irrelevant, exclusionary, and elitist have plagued the AMS for years. And while efforts have been made to change this perception, it hasn‟t been enough. There are too many students who feel like the AMS isn‟t working in their best interest. Team WRL has made it a priority to better engage with students. We are dedicated to communicating effectively; we want to interact with students to a higher degree; we want to listen to student concerns; and we want to collaborate on new ideas for the future. We will develop marketing “street teams,” to better understand the needs of students throughout the year. Street teams will be comprised of volunteers who will participate in various faculty and residence activities, attend meetings, and interact with students at large. They will be responsible for gathering feedback on the AMS, including its strengths and weaknesses. When issues arise, the street teams will listen to what students have to say and relay it to the appropriate bodies. As an Executive, we will request to attend one meeting of every faculty and residence society in the fall semester in order to understand how our faculties operate, projects they‟re working on, and issues they face. The AMS
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President will endeavour to have at least one meeting, either in person or over the phone, with each Faculty Society Executive during their first month of office. This meeting will be used to introduce one another, discuss their respective goals for the year, and brainstorm ways in which they could work together. On the last Friday of each month, the AMS Executive will host a morning show, designed to share our thoughts on the events of the year, promote upcoming activities, and showcase the work being completed by members of the Queen‟s community. We intend to feature guests on each show to highlight the unique initiatives they are engaged with. At the second-last AMS Assembly meeting in November, we will distribute mid-year reviews, whereby every member of Assembly will be required to outline the strengths, weaknesses, and suggests areas of improvement for the Executive. While this process is done amongst AMS Council, we intend to expand this process to include all of Assembly. Feedback, including constructive criticism, is crucial if you intend to govern effectively. WRL is passionate about working with students to make their university experience this best it can be. Through these initiatives and an openness to new ideas, we intend to make it happen.

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Commission Reviews
The AMS is comprised of six Commissions: the Academic Affairs Commission; the Campus Activities Commission; the Commission on the Environment and Sustainability; the Commission of Internal Affairs; the Municipal Affairs Commission; and the Social Issues Commission. Each one is responsible for organizing events, distributing resources, providing support, and advocating on behalf of students in different areas of university life. Team WRL has recognized areas of strength, areas of improvement, and long-term goals for each of the Commissions.

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Academic Affairs Commission
The Academic Affairs Commission (AAC) plays an integral role in fostering a fair, challenging, and dynamic educational environment at Queen‟s. The AAC is responsible for informing students on issues affecting postsecondary education, working with the administration to address student concerns, lobbying alongside the Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance (OUSA), and providing students with resources and services designed to ensure academic success. This year, the AAC has been instrumental in drafting new policies outlining the AMS‟ position on current educational issues such as online learning, tuition rates, and student employment. Team WRL will continue to ensure the AAC engages in extensive student consultation to draft more policies that can be used as lobbying tools with the administration and provincial government. This will allow the AMS to gain greater credibility and operate in a more professional when advocating on behalf of students. Team WRL is committed to ensuring that the Academic Grievance Centre (AGC) remains a formidable service for students. As such, we will continue to strengthen the training provided to the AGC director and officers. Training will be done at multiple times of the year and various case studies will be used to ensure preparedness in all situations. Team WRL will broaden the mechanisms to solicit student feedback. The Academic Affairs Commissioner will continue to use Academic Caucus as a way to garner input while enhancing the AAC‟s presence on social media. In recognition of the declining attendance at recent town hall discussions, Team WRL will investigate new ways to engage students in smaller group settings to support greater collaboration. We will use various events on campus as an opportunity to receive input in large numbers. This input will be used to inform AAC decisions within the university and during OUSA discussions. In 2011, the Senate approved the University‟s Academic Plan. The plan outlined, among other things, their commitment to increase the interaction between students and instructors, eliminating barriers in the cross-listing of courses, and instituting a curriculum rich in international and domestic content. The AAC will be persistent in ensuring that the university makes the

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recommendations listed in the plan a priority in educational and financial planning.

Campus Activities Commission
The Campus Activities Commission (CAC) has a longstanding tradition of facilitating a variety of programs designed to enhance student life on campus. As the oldest commission in the AMS, the CAC has hosted a number of dynamic events that cater to a diverse student body. Team WRL is committed to undertaking an extensive review of all events under the CAC. We need to ensure that they are each unique and relevant to students, while positively contributing to campus life. Certain events require particular critiquing, as they have experienced significant drops in attendance. We will meet with event co-chairs to discuss how their event can be improved, and also analyze participant satisfaction surveys. We will place an emphasis on developing fresh and innovative events. Through better promotion of the new events grant, established last year, we will encourage committee members and students-at-large to create new and novel events. In recent years, the CAC has had difficulty securing sponsorship for the many of their events and conferences. Team WRL is intent on establishing an Advancement Officer within the AMS. The Advancement Officer would be responsible for coordinating sponsorship among committees in the AMS, with an area of focus for the CAC. With greater continuity in this responsibility, the AMS can work to develop a stronger and more professional relationship with businesses in the surrounding area. The establishment of an Advancement Officer will allow for the development of a sponsorship strategic plan, aiding in the security of long-term contributions. With the Isabel Bader Center for the Performing Arts scheduled to open in September 2014, it is an exciting time for artists on campus. We will continue to prioritize the work of the newly created Arts Council. Through the centralization of resources and the opening of new avenues for crosspromotion, Team WRL is intent on ensuring that all groups have the opportunity to thrive. As discussed earlier in the platform, Team WRL will ensure that there is more student-centered programming during Homecoming 2014.
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Commission of the Environment and Sustainability
The creation of the Commission of the Environment and Sustainability (CES) in 2011 signified the AMS‟ ongoing commitment to promoting sustainability efforts across the Queen‟s community. WRL is passionate about initiating both educational and infrastructural projects that help to reduce our carbon footprint. We are particularly interested in developing long-term proposals that will produce quantifiable change each year. Team WRL will lobby to have the CES and the Municipal Affairs Commissioner sit on City Hall‟s Kingston Environmental Advisory Forum. Currently, the university has representatives from the Sustainability Office and the Department of Geography. A student delegate will allow the AMS to be more attune to city environmental initiatives. This will create more opportunities for students to participate in the discussions, collaborate on ideas, and develop joint projects. In the spirit of collaboration, Team WRL will also use the knowledge and experience of the Environmental Studies Departmental Student Council to provide feedback on the work of the commission. This year, the CES launched new waste stations, many of which included the university‟s first organic waste bins. In conjunction with the Sustainability Office and Physical Plant Services, we will examine the effectiveness of this initiative at the end of the year. Depending on the results, we will place more unified waste stations around campus. Team WRL is committed to highlighting environmentally friendly behaviour at Queen‟s. We recognize that when it comes to sustainable action, many people participate only once they know others are participating as well. We intend to use social media to let students know what environment conscious action their peers have taken. Any student can submit a description of projects they have been working on, initiatives they have engaged with, and/or activity they have seen within the Queen‟s and Kingston community. Submissions can be large or small as long as they clearly highlight environmentally friendly behaviour. In this spirit, while promoting the Sustainability Action Fund, we will showcase how other groups on campus have benefitted from this support.

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Acknowledging the success of the tree planting initiative during Homecoming 2013, Team WRL intends to explore other areas on campus where trees could be planted. Team WRL is dedicated to having every AMS commission, office, and service feature one environmentally friendly change they will make to their respective entity. This change will be outlined in their goal plan at the beginning of the year.

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Commission of Internal Affairs
Team WRL is steadfast about making AMS Assembly as engaging and effective as possible. The September “meet and greet”, during which incoming Assembly members gathered to introduce themselves, clarify procedures, and discuss upcoming initiatives, was successful this year. Team WRL will add a similar meeting in April, preceding the official start of Assembly‟s term. Given that many projects begin in the summer, and taking into account the hectic September schedule, this meeting will allow for Assembly members to benefit from their colleagues insight and resources before arriving on campus in the fall. We will place a greater emphasis on having Assembly members better informed on (1) educational issues affecting Queen‟s and the university landscape and (2) the AMS finances. Assembly makes a number of critical and long lasting decisions that affect the current and future undergraduate student body. It is imperative that members have the most comprehensive understanding of the outcome of their decision. Team WRL intends to have all Assembly members receive a 1-2 page “educational briefing” each month that surrounds topics like online education, student employment, and government funding. We intend to have the CIA work in conjunction with the AAC, particularly the University Issues Committee, to complete this task. At the first meeting in September, the Vice President (Operations), in conjunction with the Chair of the Board of Directors, will be responsible for conducting a “crash course” on how the AMS budget works. While this is often done at the Corporate Annual General meeting in November, we feel it is important that Assembly members are made aware as early as possible. Team WRL is committed on making students-at-large more aware of the discussions taking place at AMS Assembly. We will work with the Speaker to create Assembly promotional videos designed to encourage participation by attending the meetings. The AMS Archives Assistant was a position established last year in order to create an electronic archive system. The Archive Assistant works alongside the VPUA and AMS Information Officer to scan, upload, and catalogue past AMS documents, including annual reports, submissions to the government, strategic plans, discussion papers, and eventually Assembly and Board of Directors agendas/minutes. Team WRL is passionate about expanding the role to include beautifying the JDUC, and specifically the Queen‟s Pub with
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relics of the university‟s history. The Archives Assistant will work to add Queen‟s memorabilia to the hub of student life. Team WRL is committed to working protecting the AMS‟s authority over nonacademic discipline (NAD). In recent years, the administration has questioned the AMS‟s jurisdiction with regards to NAD, while attempting to alter its fundamental principles. NAD was established in 1898 after both students and faculty recognized the benefits of peer-to-peer discipline. NAD is built on valuing a holistic and non-adversarial approach to settling conflict, with an emphasis on restorative, as opposed to punitive, sanctions. Team WRL is open to working with the administration to critically analyze and improve various elements of NAD without altering its core principles.

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Municipal Affairs Commission
It is the role of the Municipal Affairs Commission (MAC) to develop a strong relationship with the City of Kingston in a way that serves the needs of both constituent groups; students and permanent residents. For the past 20 years, the Commission has worked with the City to improve property standards, expand economic opportunities, enhance safety measures in the University District, and develop programs to engage students in community initiatives. Team WRL is committed to further developing the newly created Housing Grievance Centre (HGC). The HGC is intended to provide information to students with concerns about their current or potential housing situation, including issues with landlords, property standard violations, and clauses within a lease. We intend to place an emphasis on marketing and outreach for the Centre, ensuring that students are aware of this valuable service. The Centre will be discussed at the “Housing 101” talk in conjunction with Town Gown Relations. After a year as a corporate service, the Student Maintenance and Resource Team (SMART) will be moved back under the MAC in 2014-2015. We must ensure that students and landlords are better aware of SMART‟s mandate and how it can benefit the Queen‟s and Kingston community. Team WRL will continue to discuss the City‟s ongoing concerns with student behaviour during Homecoming. While the traditional Aberdeen street party can put student safety in jeopardy, and lead to disrespectful behaviour towards community members, we recognize that students will undoubtedly congregate in large numbers and many will choose to drink alcohol. Nonetheless, we will work hard to curtail unsafe or disrespectful actions. In advance of these events, students will be reminded of the particular by-laws they should be aware of and contacts they should call in the case of an emergency. The success of the “Let‟s Not Fuck it Up” campaign is reassuring as we are committed to ensuring that Homecoming is here to stay. As a municipal election is scheduled for October 2014, the MAC will be responsible for promoting student engagement. In the wake of the AMS victory with the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) appeal, it is extremely important that we have high student participation. It is crucial that the AMS works in conjunction with stakeholder groups like the Office of Public and
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Government Affairs and campus political groups to get students involved. We will organize a candidate‟s forum on campus, where students can pose questions to the candidates. In addition, we will work with faculty societies to determine where and when to erect polling stations that would engage a maximum number of students.

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Social Issues Commission
Team WRL values the diversity on campus. We appreciate that students at Queen‟s come from an array of ethnic, religious, and socio-economic backgrounds. The Social Issues Commission (SIC) is a tremendous resource, dedicated to educating the student body on issues surrounding equity and equality on campus, while simultaneously offering support to those in need. Over the years, the SIC has made remarkable advances in making university a positive experience for every student. Team WRL intends to work with the Publications Deputy to critically reflect on how the new publications structure was received this year. We support the consolidation of all publications while maintaining their individuality. We are interested in expanding marketing and outreach to ensure that all stakeholder groups have access to the information and resources available. In order for students to see the progress of the publication, we would like to have a “snapshot” of select articles available in advance of the release date in April. In order to make Equity Caucus as effective as possible, Team WRL will explore the possibility of having a dedicated equity representative within each faculty and residence society. The Food Centre plays an instrumental role in helping students pursue academic success without having to worry about where they next meal is coming from. As a confidential and non-judgmental food service, the Centre assists hundreds of students every year. Team WRL wants to reach out to as many students as possible by assisting in the development of a Food Centre website. The website will contain information on the availability food products, sponsors, and educational resources. We will also support the creation of a Food Centre advisory board, comprised of members of the Queen‟s and Kingston community. This advisory board will ensure continuity and professionalism when dealing with sponsors and patrons. Finally, we will work with the Centre to have a more efficient payment system that allows for increased autonomy. Mental health has become an important topic of discussion on campus. Through student driven initiatives by the Peer Support Centre, Mental Health Awareness Committee, The Jack Project, and many more, mental health education and support has been greatly expanding. Team WRL intends to
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make addressing mental health issues a priority in our term. We will foster a more effective relationship with Health, Counseling, and Disability Services, equip the Peer Support Centre with the training necessary to reach out to students across all faculties, and support the work of both organized clubs and students at large with mental health initiatives on campus. We will also extend the “mental health awareness” budget to include specific projects. Finally, by strengthening the role the social issues deputies, including volunteer recruitment and marketing, Team WRL will ensure that the Commissioner has sufficient time for accessibility advocacy throughout Queen‟s.

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Service Reviews
As businesses managed and operated entirely by students, the AMS corporate services are unique and Canada. They provide a diverse range of opportunities to students, from flexible part-time work to management positions. Further, they occupy an important place in the Queen‟s community, enhancing student life through the provision of unique services.

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Hospitality and Safety Services
The AMS Pub Services
The AMS Pub Services (TAPS) includes the Queen‟s Pub as well as The Underground Nightclub, providing students with a safe drinking environment on campus. TAPS provides quality service and affordable food and drink prices, and is an important piece of the Queen‟s tradition. The Queen‟s Pub has maintained consistent success over the past few years, even with increased competition on campus. Formally The Quiet Pub, The Queen‟s Pub has remained an attractive food option for students on campus for lunch and dinner. An area of focus for next year is to continue improving consistent customer service for our patrons. That being said, very little needs to be changed operationally. The Underground Nightclub, formerly Alfie‟s nightclub, was re-branded over the past summer in response to students‟ concerns that the nightclub name was not an appropriate way to pay respects to Queen‟s legend, Alfred Piece. The Underground was the original name of the nightclub, having been switched to Alfie‟s in 1979; it was changed back in an effort to bring the service back to its roots. Declining attendance and sales at Alfie‟s over the past few years indicated to the AMS Board of Directors that students wanted a significant change in the service. The Underground re-branding provided better lighting, increased seating, student artwork, a higher quality wine, and “Re-Think the Pre-drink” to promote safe drinking on campus. Since its re-opening, it has not been as successful as the AMS would like it to be. A survey was released to students to collect market research regarding further operational changes they would like to see. This semester, Throwback Thursdays and Top 40 Fridays were introduced in response to student feedback. It is important to protect the value in a student run nightclub, providing students a safe space to drink. Student consultation will have to be a number one priority moving forward in order to ensure The Underground Nightclub brand is one that students can identify with.

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Common Ground Coffeehouse
Common Ground and The Brew provide students with a recreational, social, and cultural space on campus, while offering reasonably priced food and drink options. Common Ground and The Brew pride themselves in excellent customer service and programmed entertainment in response to student interest, such as Open Mic Nights. This year, Common Ground has focused on increasing efficiency and consistency within its operations to ultimately provide the best customer experience. Common Ground modified its hours of operation in response to times of decreased use, ultimately eliminating unnecessary costs. Improved pre-made options, a more efficient and consistent espresso machine, and a permanent prep position have improved the customer service overall. The Brew, formerly Common Ground Express, was re-branded to reflect what students valued most about Common Ground. The Brew provides increased seating, additional menu items, and debit and credit. The changes allow The Brew to remain relevant to students and competitive in the market. We must continue to be proactive in engaging with students to ensure we are meeting their demands. Gluten-free bagels will be implemented at The Brew to continue to be an accessible food option by all students.

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Queen‟s Student Constables
The Queen‟s Student Constables provide a high quality peer-to-peer security and support service to ensure a safe and welcoming social environment at Queen‟s. The Queen‟s Student Constables are committed to upholding AMS and University policies regarding the liquor license. Queen‟s Student Constables work both on and off campus to ensure that our students are safe and can ultimately relate to students being students themselves. Last year, Queen‟s Student Constables was allocated a portion of the Queen‟s Safety Grant as an additional revenue stream to address issues surrounding retention and recruitment. Queen‟s Student Constables implemented a tiered wage system above Ontario minimum wage to attract students to apply for these jobs. The tiered wage system increases a staff member‟s hourly wage as they gain experience with the service. A bonus system was also implemented to discourage staff from resigning from the service, a portion of the bonus distributed in January and the other in April. Understanding why people apply for a position with the Queen‟s Student Constables will help the AMS understand what kinds of benefits should be offered to students to attract applicants. Mental health initiatives should be a major focus next year for the Queen‟s Student Constables. Service staff face issues regarding harassment while on duty, and the service must ensure this does not affect their health and wellness. This year, communication between staff and the management team has increased, and informal incident reports have been implemented as an outlet for staff to express how they personally felt about a situation. Initiatives such as these should continue to ensure the well-being of our staff.

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Campus Services
Walkhome
Walkhome is an anonymous, confidential, and non-judgmental safe walk service for Queen‟s students and members of the Kingston community. Walkhome will walk a patron from one location to another location within general boundaries of the city, ensuring a patron gets to their destination safely. Each Walkhome team carries a radio so they can easily communicate to necessary bodies, the kiosk, Queen‟s First Aid, and Campus Security, and Emergency Services. Queen‟s Walkhome is the most used safe walk service in all of Canada. This year, Walkhome has made to a priority to ensure the service as patroncentric as possible. It is important to recognize that Walkhome‟s revenue comes from a student fee and grants, therefore Walkhome must commit to utilizing each dollar responsibly. Initiatives undertaken to move toward a patron-centric service include moving all the service staff away from the kiosk to keep the kiosk as approachable as possible. Walkhome eliminated volunteers working the service to ensure we are providing a consistent and accountable service that students are paying for. Walkhome must strive to continue making the service as patron-centric as possible and remain fiscally responsible.

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Queen‟s TV
Queen‟s TV affords students to the opportunity to write, produce, edit, and broadcast quality videos. This television service provides Queen‟s and the Kingston community with content that is created completely by students. This year, Queen‟s TV has developed a new brand and website to lever themselves as a more professional media service for students. They have shifted toward more news-orientated programming, and have provided a diverse array of content. An extended Athletics contract has allowed Queen‟s TV to add live broadcasting to its services, which allows new opportunities for volunteers to get involved with the service. Queen‟s TV has continued to expand their Video Factory Projects, capitalizing on this additional source of revenue. The Queen‟s TV Business Manager has been establishing connections regarding avenues for potential revenue from advertisements, which included an advertisement negotiation with Queen‟s Athletics and Recreation. Queen‟s TV must continue to grow as a professional media service on campus to eventually offer the best play-to-view news updates on campus.

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Queen‟s Journal
The Queen‟s Journal provides experience for students interested in the journalism industry, and keeps the Queen‟s community informed through articles and reporting surrounding news and events affecting campus. The Queen‟s Journal is one of the oldest campus newspapers in Canada and operates as a non-academic journalism program, providing the hands-on experience necessary to pursue a career in the industry. The Queen‟s Journal provides a voice for students and also keeps groups accountable and transparent. It is this editorial autonomy that must be preserved, as the Queen‟s Journal is an integral part of Queen‟s life. Team WRL understands the financial and operational pressures the Queen‟s Journal faces in terms of increasing their digital media presence as well as advertising revenues. Team WRL believes that we need to work closely with the AMS Board of Directors and Journal Board to develop a long-term strategy to ensure the financial stability of this essential service.

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Retail and Design Services
Yearbook and Design Services
The Yearbook and Design Services provide an opportunity for students to get hands-on experience producing design projects, photography and publications. Major projects worked on within the service include the Tricolour Yearbook, Queen‟s Agenda, and Design Services. The External Design Project Manager also provides marketing materials to the AMS through a new contract under the Marketing Office. Team WRL believes that in collaboration with the Yearbook and Design Services, we should be developing a marketing and distribution strategy regarding the Tricolour Yearbook and Queen‟s Agenda to ensure students are receiving the products they are paying for. Under the new Retail and Design portfolio, there is room for collaborative initiatives with the Publishing and Copy Center and Tricolour Outlet. Team WRL recognizes the value in the Design Services provided by the External Design Project Manager and would like to turn this position into an 8-month salaried manager. This would allow for the service to grow in its capacity to take on website design and photo-shop projects. With this, Team WRL will create free appointments for clubs with the External Design Project Manager to provide our clubs with the resources they need to operate as efficiently as possible.

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Tricolour Outlet
Tricolour Outlet is your one stop shop for everything Queen‟s. This service has integrated itself in a variety of areas relating to student life, offering used books, school supplies, travel tickets, and merchandise. While Tricolour Outlet experienced incredible success in 2012-13, this year focused on refining its operations. Tricolour Outlet streamlined the operations of its inventory system and storage rooms within the store to increase accessibility and improve the overall operations. In addition to this, a custom-made Point of Sale system was installed in the service to account for the unique transactions surrounding the consignment of textbooks. Team WRL, in collaboration with the Tricolour management team, would like to capitalize on the financial success by investing in long term capital projects of the service. In consultation with CREO Solutions, Team WRL would like to work towards the integration of an online store recognizing the increasing demand for Tricolour products. Team WRL would also like to create the „Gaels Line‟, a line of merchandise where a percentage of the proceeds would go directly to Queen‟s Athletics and Recreation to support our athletes. Team WRL will also pursue negotiations with Ticketmaster to partner with Tricolour Outlet to become the sole provider of Ticketmaster in Kingston.

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Publishing and Copy Centre
The Publishing and Copy Centre provides the community with a diverse range of printing and finishing services at competitive prices. This year, the Publishing and Copy Centre purchased a new color printer and photo printer to increase the quality and diversity of their product line. The Publishing and Copy Centre was also rebranded to feature a new logo and color scheme, ensuring they continue to maintain a professional brand. Team WRL believes that the Publishing and Copy Centre should continue to be as diverse as possible in its offerings, ensuring high-quality products and services and remaining competitive in the print industry. As a component of this, we would like to renegotiate our contract with Access Copyright to integrate electronic course packs into the service. Not only does this provide an alternative learning platform, but it also helps the Publishing and Copy Centre to remain competitive in an evolving industry.

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Office Reviews
Within the AMS, there are 5 Offices providing a diverse range of internal supports which service the Society as a whole. This year, the Offices have undergone a variety of changes; they have all been moved under the President in recognizing their pan-AMS focus, they have been restructured and re-mandated, and they have seen additions and deletions in staff members. Ultimately, the Offices support the entirety of the AMS‟ operations. They are the only entities in the AMS that interact will all employees and volunteers within the Society in some capacity, and supporting and enhancing these bodies is vital to the organization‟s success.

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Marketing and Communications
This year, Board of Directors amalgamated the Marketing Office and the Communications Office into one entity. While this change has yet to come into practice, it will aid in uniting and coordinating the market research, brand coordination, and communications for the Society. This position will also oversee a Brand Coordinator and a Market Research Coordinator to ensure the restructuring doesn‟t impact the total complement of support offered. This will also allow the Officer to take on a more visionary and proactive role in receiving input from, and communicating to, students. The Marketing Office has made the transition away from Photoshop work, moving instead towards the creation of a market research hub. This supports our services and Commissions by securing feedback on our products and businesses, and telling us which issues and lobbying priorities are at front-ofmind for our members. The AMS struggles consistently with taking in genuine student feedback, and this change has finally provided a vehicle to do so. Marketing can become the input for the Society, ensuring everything we do is ultimately driven by students. Conversely, Communications represents the output. Through effective communication, the AMS is able to maintain transparency and accountability in demonstrating the work of the Society to its members. This is carried out through a variety of mediums, ranging from social media and blogs to the Annual Report which provides a detailed review of the operations and finances of the AMS. In the year to come, it is important that the new roles be supported carefully. Constant feedback will be required to assess where the positions are working, and where it may be possible to make adjustments. Further, the Executive should work to secure mentorship for these positions within the University or across our own alumni network; this is the only Office without a permanent staff member, and the highly technical nature of the roles may benefit from someone with specific expertise.

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Information Technology Office
In a recent motion at Board of Directors, the IT Office acquired a permanent staff member. This permanent staff member will support the student IT Officer, creating an opportunity for mentorship and providing issue-specific expertise. In recognizing that the IT Office has a very technical mandate and operates under the AMS‟ „no experience necessary‟ hiring policy, it is important that our student Officer have the support they require to perform its essential function. The advent of a permanent staff member will provide an extra layer of accountability to ensure the diverse portfolios that make use of our IT infrastructure continue to function optimally and benefit from the Office. Finally, the Office is looking to move away from in-house software solutions, instead looking for opportunities to contract projects out. This will increase the capacity of the Office, and will allow it to take on complex projects that it may not have had the capacity to carry out until now.

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Human Resources Office
Beyond the support it provides for day-to-day human resources issues that may arise across the AMS, the Human Resources Office serves the Society through recruiting, hiring, training, evaluations, staff and volunteer appreciation, professional development, transition, and record keeping. The mandate of this position is both wide and essential; the ability of the AMS to be successful year to year hinges upon our recruitment, transition, and training, and is affected greatly by its ability to improve and retain employees and volunteers. The Human Resources Office was moved under the purview of the President this year in recognizing the impact its activities have on the Society as a whole. This has been a positive change, and has ensured the corporate and government sides receive equal consideration in reviewing the resources the Office provides. Currently, the Office is working towards enhancing transition and training. These large-scale projects would ensure new employees receive the information and resources they require to fulfill the mandates of their positions, and excel within the AMS as an organization. Further, the importance of recruitment has been underlined with the conversion of the Opportunities and Outreach Coordinator to a 12-month Talent Manager. This position will be able to prepare recruitment over the summer months to ensure we are ready to roll out in September, and will free up the Officer for other large-scale projects.

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Student Centre Officer
The Student Centre Officer (SCO) is a relatively new position to the AMS, and was moved under the President this year. The Officer is responsible for overseeing the management and operations of the Student Life Centre as dictated through a Management and Operations agreement between the AMS, the Society of Graduate and Professional Students (SGPS), and the University. The Student Life Centre (SLC) encompasses the John Deutsch University Centre, the Queen‟s Centre, the Gray House, and MacGillivray Brown Hall. The Office liaises with student groups, the University, and leaseholders to improve and enhance the programming and space the SLC provides. This year, the AMS hired a Facilities Manager to work within the Office. This permanent staff position was missing for a portion of last year, and has provided great benefit to the organization. In communicating with Physical Plant Services and prioritizing facilities upgrades and projects, the state of our buildings has already seen improvement. The Officer also works closely with the administration and SGPS at SLC Council, which is the governance body for the Student Life Centre buildings. Because the Officer manages the SLC on behalf of this body, he or she is not a direct employee of the AMS; they are also accountable to the University and the SGPS, and consequently must form strong relationships with each of these entities. As a new and evolving Office, the SCO will require continued support. This should come from the President as the Officer‟s direct supervisor, but should also be provided by the staff structure in the Office. This means ensuring the permanent staff position is leveraged to optimal benefit, and will also require a reassessment of the management positions the Officer oversees to ensure their portfolios are functioning optimally. As the steward of student life space at Queen‟s, the health of this Office is of utmost importance.

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