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Coiled Tubing And Corrosion

Table of Contents
Procedures to Minimize CT Corrosion......................................................................................................3 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................3 Corrosion and Environmental Cracking of Coiled Tubing ......................................................................3 General Corrosion.............................................................................................................................3 Pitting Corrosion...............................................................................................................................4 Galvanic Corrosion ...........................................................................................................................4 Industrial Atmospheric Corrosion ......................................................................................................4 Marine Corrosion..............................................................................................................................4 Filiform Corrosion ............................................................................................................................5 Corrosive fluids....................................................................................................................................5 Production fluids...............................................................................................................................5 Completion fluids..............................................................................................................................5 Acidizing fluids.................................................................................................................................5 Spent Acid ........................................................................................................................................6 Nitrogen............................................................................................................................................6 H2S Containing Environments...............................................................................................................6 Coiled Tubing Storage Guidelines ............................................................................................................8 General ................................................................................................................................................8 Covers..................................................................................................................................................8 Freeze Protection..................................................................................................................................9 Bedwrap Protection ..............................................................................................................................9 Tubing OD Protection ........................................................................................................................ 10 Tubing ID Protection .......................................................................................................................... 10 Option 1.......................................................................................................................................... 10 Option 2.......................................................................................................................................... 11 Option 3.......................................................................................................................................... 11 Pre-Job Guidelines ................................................................................................................................. 12 Post-Job Guidelines................................................................................................................................ 13 Tubing OD......................................................................................................................................... 13 Tubing ID .......................................................................................................................................... 13 Acid................................................................................................................................................ 13
Option 1 ............................................................................................................................................... 13 Option 2 ............................................................................................................................................... 13 Option 3MB TechServ 6 ........................................................................................................................ 14

Workover and Completion fluid....................................................................................................... 14
Option 1 ............................................................................................................................................... 14

Halliburton
© 1998, Halliburton Company

1

Best Practices Series

.......................................................................................................................Coiled Tubing And Corrosion Option 2 ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 15 References: ................................. 15 Case 3 .................................................................................................................. 15 Maintenance Recommendations ............................................................................ 14 Option 3 ................................................................................................ 18 Halliburton © 1998.............................................................................................................................................................. 15 Case 2 ................................MB TechServ....................... Halliburton Company 2 Best Practices Series ................................................................Special Cases............................................................................................ 14 H2S.......................................... 15 Case 1 ..

the use of QT-1000 may be prohibited or stress cracking inhibitors may be required. unexpected premature failures. Operations should have realistic inventory plans to insure that there is not excessive tubing in storage. General Corrosion The result of general corrosion is uniform wall thinning of the coiled tubing. Taking proper maintenance steps to mitigate corrosion will aid in performance of consistent and successful coiled tubing jobs. Taking the proper steps to minimize corrosion will reduce the probability of unexpected failures and reduce risk to personnel safety as well as to the customer’s well. These various forms of corrosion can have several specific detrimental effects on coiled tubing. pre-job and post-job tubing maintenance practices are required to minimize coiled tubing corrosion and ensure safe and successful completion of coiled tubing services. For example. as well as maximizing service life of the tubing. Halliburton Company .Coiled Tubing And Corrosion Procedures to Minimize CT Corrosion Scope Good storage. In addition to these guidelines. It should be recognized that different locations may require different procedures but these basic guidelines and recommendations should be followed where possible to maximize service life of the coiled tubing string. General corrosion is not a common mechanism but may occur when galvanic corrosion (see below) is operative downhole. either of which can cause premature and unexpected problems and failures. For example. Coiled tubing can be attacked by corrosion externally and internally. Underutilized pipe can also create unexpected problems if the pipe is not properly protected during storage. Corrosion and Environmental Cracking of Coiled Tubing Coiled tubing corrosion considerations that operations should be aware of are described below for informational purposes. 3 Best Practices Series Halliburton © 1998. Internal pitting corrosion can be due to untreated aqueous fluids left in the tubing after a job. the more potential there is for corrosion related problems. such as reduced strength. reduced fatigue life as well as an increase in susceptibility to sudden. exposure of unprotected coiled tubing to humid atmospheric conditions will produce iron oxide (rust) which can interfere with proper functioning of the injector gripper blocks and well head stripper as well as promote pitting of the coiled tubing. reduced pressure integrity (collapse and burst). the operator must be aware of the nature of the downhole conditions and take precautions where appropriate. The longer the tubing sits. if H2S is expected.

The effects of general corrosion may be minimized by using chemical inhibition. sea salt can be found a great distances from the sea (often as much as 100 miles inland) and can come down both as dry dust and in rainfall. calcium and sulfate ions. Chloride salts are hygroscopic and the chloride ion promotes pitting in coiled tubing steels. However. worse. effective inhibition and care of coiled tubing is essential. the coiled tubing will become the anode and accelerated corrosion (wall thinning) of the coiled tubing may occur. promoting development of fatigue cracking that could quickly lead to a pinhole leak or. complete tubular failure. Since pitting is difficult to detect. This type of corrosion is a common form of coiled tubing damage and is particularly insidious because pitting creates stress concentration when the tubing is being worked. It has been found that steel will corrode 12 times faster when located 80 ft from the coastline than when it is located 800 ft from the coastline. Pitting corrosion also occurs in aerated brines under atmospheric conditions. However. Low pH (acidic) and higher temperature environments tend to initiate pitting corrosion. Halliburton Company 4 Best Practices Series . Condensation also occur inside the coiled tubing itself and collect in bottom wraps. Galvanic Corrosion Galvanic corrosion is not usually a problem when coiled tubing is used in wells containing low alloy steel components. in corrosive wells. In contact with an electrolytic fluid. Once pitting is established. Marine Corrosion Corrosion of coiled tubing occurs through contact with marine salts. magnesium. limiting the exposure time or using thicker wall coiled tubing Industrial Atmospheric Corrosion Sulfur compounds are the major cause of increased corrosion rates in industrial areas. This is due to extensive localized loss of wall thickness which compromises the integrity of the entire string. Corrosion will be accelerated in areas of high humidity and warmer temperatures. downhole tubulars may be made of duplex stainless steels. Timeof-wetness is also a critical variable. primarily sodium chloride but also potassium. penetration can occur at accelerated rates.Coiled Tubing And Corrosion Pitting Corrosion Pitting can represent a more severe form of corrosion than uniform metal loss. Halliburton © 1998. Time-of-wetness is a critical variable in determining the level of corrosion and salt tends to increase time-of-wetness by absorbing water at lower humidities. Wetness is greater inside the wraps than on top. due to the level of marine salts present at the two locations. Water which condenses and is trapped within the tubing wraps as the pipe “breathes” with temperature changes can result in permanent wetness in the wraps. nickel based superalloys or titanium alloys.

Elimination of aqueous fluids from the tubing ID will eliminate filiform corrosion. then inhibited acid. Acidizing fluids Acid corrosion inhibitor systems are designed to protect coiled tubing from pitting and unacceptable wall thickness loss under downhole conditions. particularly in marine environments. can cause corrosion rates to increase by up to 5 to 7 times the corrosion rate if exposed only to inhibited acid. When the acidized tubing is exposed air (oxygen) back on the surface. Halliburton © 1998. narrow pits. H2S in brine with or without CO2 is more corrosive than H2S in oil. Risk of corrosion or cracking in dry gas wells containing H2S is low. Also. Corrosive fluids Production fluids Production fluids can be corrosive to coiled tubing if they contain the acid gases H2S and/or CO2. Warm temperatures usually worsen the situation. memoid ENGZ101). These gases lower pH of the aqueous phase. chlorides. then air. a program for evaluation and determination of corrosion in steels) is available for use in predicting the extent of corrosion losses from exposure to reservoir fluids (contact Terry McCoy. production water containing brines increase the overall corrosivity of the production fluids. However. Research has shown that alternate exposure of coiled tubing to inhibited acid. It can be caused by condensing water solutions containing carbon dioxide.Coiled Tubing And Corrosion Filiform Corrosion Filiform corrosion is localized corrosion in the form of randomly distributed filaments or streaks of sharp and long. An expert software (CLI International’s Predict. etc. sulfates or sulfides. Completion fluids Brines used in workovers and completions increase in corrosivity as temperature increases and as the specific gravity of the brine increases. corrosion inhibitors do not impede the ability of the acid to dissolve rust. Halliburton Company 5 Best Practices Series . Aerated brines are also more corrosive than deaerated brines. then the freshly cleaned surface now has a significantly increased susceptibility to atmospheric corrosion (rusting).

if the well is underbalanced during acidizing operations. This occurs when aqueous fluids containing H2S corrode the tubing. Also. strength. type of welds. under most conditions. QT-1000 is not usually recommended for sour service as it is more susceptible to hydrogen cracking in wet H2S environments than QT-700 or QT-800. Due to its higher strength and hardness. Halliburton © 1998. The potential for cracking and related problems depends on several factors. Presence of dissolved oxygen in water is a major factor influencing corrosion rates on coiled tubing. the produced reservoir fluid and/or gases (such as H2S) may themselves be quite corrosive and reduce the effectiveness of normal acid corrosion inhibitors. The corrosion reaction releases atomic hydrogen which enters the steel matrix potentially causing hydrogen embrittlement of the coiled tubing. However. end connectors which are designed to induce mechanical damage (dimpling. pre-existing mechanical damage.). H2S Containing Environments Coiled tubing strength can be reduced by exposure to wet H2S. Also. water equilibrated with air will contain 7 to 8 ppm oxygen and corrosion rates up to 600 mils per year have been measured under turbulent conditions. The effects of oxygen on corrosion is magnified by highly erosive environments. some of which will adsorb in the formation more easily than others. Flowback acid from sandstone reservoirs may not be totally spent. Membrane generated nitrogen typically contains 2% to 6% oxygen at typical pumping rates. it should be noted that QT-1000 has been used in some low H2S sour service situations. severity of applied stresses and condition of tubing. such as partial pressure of the H2S. Also. In addition. Most of the corrosion inhibitor may be lost to the tubing or formation leaving highly corrosive acid. duration of exposure. The result is that the inhibitor composition in flowback fluids may not be the same as that originally pumped and its effectiveness may be compromised. spent acid can be more corrosive than properly inhibited live acid. Halliburton Company 6 Best Practices Series . Nitrogen Nitrogen generating units (excluding cryogenic nitrogen) can also generate oxygen which will increase corrosion downhole. Even at a temperature of 75°F. etc. for instance) cause the coiled tubing to be more susceptible to failure. metallurgy of the coiled tubing (chemistry. QT-700 and QT-800 are suitable for H2S service.Coiled Tubing And Corrosion Spent Acid Because of the depletion and/or dilution of acid inhibitors. For example. use of coiled tubing with butt welds in wet H2S fluids should be avoided if possible as butt welds are more susceptible to cracking than bias welds. Formation brine may dilute both the acid and the inhibitor concentration. properly inhibited 15% HCl is not as corrosive as 5% HCl with 1/3 the original inhibitor concentration. Also. inflow of reservoir fluids is possible. corrosion inhibitors are blends of components.

Also. As an example.05 % to 0. in the concentrations listed below. SCA-130 was developed for use in acid solutions. chemical inhibition may be required where underbalanced conditions may exist and inflow of H2S is possible.4 % to 4 % 0. one location’s general practice is to use an inhibitor whenever H2S concentration is 10% or more and contact time is over 8 hours. For instance.Coiled Tubing And Corrosion When H2S is present in the reservoir. then some judgment must be exercised. the inhibitor would be periodically injected into the reel at rates of 1 to 4 liters/hour.20 % SCA-130 Anhib II Acids Mixed Brines Fresh Water 0. in Canada. the use of new (or relatively new) tubing may be in order. Halliburton Company 7 Best Practices Series . The inhibitor. Crack Chek-97 is an inhibitor that is particularly effective for preventing corrosion and sulfide stress cracking of high strength carbon steel in sour brine waters. It may also be advisable to use an inhibitor for lower concentrations of H2S. would be circulated from the start of the job to protect tubing OD. In these cases.4 % Note: Also see Chemical Stimulation Manual or HalWeb. In cases where only nitrogen was being pumped. Halliburton © 1998. especially if extended time downhole is a possibility. Inhibitor Crack Chek-97 Treating Fluid Produced Fluids Drilling Mud Oil Concentration (by volume) see note 0.1 % to 0. Note: Never use Crack Chek-97 in acid solutions. Most commonly used range for SCA-130 is 1 % to 2%. various inhibitors would be used depending on the type of fluid being pumped.

Covers are not the answer to external coiled tubing corrosion problems but may be useful in some limited situations. In warm climates with high humidity. pitting corrosion will be accelerated. Unfortunately. it may be necessary to store the coiled tubing inside and out of the weather. In dry climates.Coiled Tubing And Corrosion Coiled Tubing Storage Guidelines General Local conditions must be taken into account when determining the amount of maintenance required to prevent external CT corrosion while tubing is being stored. Covers Use of weather resistant covers may be helpful in minimizing amount of water and contaminants (such as chlorides from salt spray at sea or in some coastal areas) that the coiled tubing is exposed to and in preventing previously applied inhibitors from being washed off. Halliburton Company 8 Best Practices Series . Halliburton © 1998. covers can also be detrimental to the tubing since they act to trap moisture (condensation) and not let the tubing “breathe”. damaging corrosion can occur within a short time and can be especially severe near coastal areas. storage protection requirements may be minimal. Changing conditions during day and night hasten corrosion when temperature of coiled tubing falls below the dew point. Infrequently used coiled tubing is also subject to internal corrosion and is usually attributed to aqueous solutions remaining is the tubing for extended period of times. even if the bottom of the cover is open. For long-term storage. Application of a corrosion inhibitor is still recommended if environmental conditions (temperature and relative humidity) are not controlled and can be damaging. Moisture may be trapped for extended periods between the tubing wraps and if chlorides are present.

Other inhibitors may be satisfactory. in order of expected performance. only lab tests have been run on the other inhibitors. humid coastal areas. Note: No Halliburton part numbers have been assigned to these products but may in the future if usage warrants. The following inhibitors are recommended. Approximate Inhibitor PermaStopRust’s Isotrol/Isoguard 1 (Best) Cortec’s VCI-386 2 Nalco/Exxon’s CT-Armor 3 (neat) Exxon’s Rust Ban 343 4 Relative Cost 33 6 2 1 On storage or shipping reels. then it may be advisable to pump an antifreeze (ethylene glycol) mixture through the string.Coiled Tubing And Corrosion Freeze Protection Although the tubing should be free of water during storage. however. VCI-386 is thought to be suitable for export shipments. To date. Halliburton Company 9 Best Practices Series . Expected Lowest Temperature (°F) -10 -20 -30 -40 -50 Recommended Concentration in water 40% 44% 48% 52% 56% Bedwrap Protection Initial external protection of the bedwrap tubing is recommended when CT is used in warm. Commerciallly available antifreeze has the added advantage of containing corrosion inhibitors. it should be cautioned that no field trials have been conducted at this time on the Isotrol/Isoguard or VCI-381. Quality Tubing expects that Rust Ban 343 is a suitable inhibitor to protect coiled tubing during shipments to North America locations with expectations that tubing would not be stored over 30 days. No significant loss in injector force capabilities is expected when using the above inhibitors. Halliburton © 1998. Rust Ban 343 has a proven field record for internal storage conditions. If the tubing is to be stored at a location where temperature is expected to drop below the freezing point. the inhibitor could be applied when the tubing is spooled onto the working reel. there is always the possibility of unintended residual moisture in the tubing string.

The solution must be continually mixed as the fluid is pumped into the tubing as CT-Armor is water dispersible but not water soluble. (Note: a wiping mechanism is currently being developed). Option 1 Use dry nitrogen to displace specific volume of 10% CT-Armor (1 part CT-Armor and 9 parts fresh water) through the tubing to achieve a 3 mil coating thickness. Approximate Inhibitor Cortec’s VCI 386 (Best) Nalco/Exxon’s CT-Armor (neat) Oil Research Center’s Wireline Spray 782 5 Exxon’s Rust Ban 343 Relative Cost 6 2 1. Note: Nalco/Exxon’s CT-Armor is most effective in neat (concentrated) form. in order of expected performance. The tubing should be as clean as possible for maximum effectiveness of the inhibitor. Note: No Halliburton part numbers have been assigned to these products but may in the future if usage warrants. Halliburton © 1998. Tubing ID Protection (also see notes below). It can be used diluted (10% in water) but when applied. Halliburton Company 10 Best Practices Series . Inhibitor should be pumped behind wiper ball(s) if another fluid is being displaced (see note 1). apply a corrosion inhibitor to the tubing OD after each job. Recommended corrosion inhibitors are shown below. CT-Armor is water dispersible but not water soluble. Seal ends of tubing to prevent loss of inhibitor or air ingression (see note 2).5 1 Note: Wireline Spray 782 is the only environmentally friendly. Other inhibitors may be satisfactory.Coiled Tubing And Corrosion Tubing OD Protection When required (also see paragraph 6). See Table 1 for recommended volume of inhibitor needed to coat tubing ID. completely biodegradable corrosion inhibitor listed above. Inhibitor should be applied to the tubing by wiping to ensure complete coverage of the tubing. the inhibitor must be continually mixed to insure proper inhibitor coverage. Corrosion testing seemed to indicate that the inhibitor would perform well for a few weeks then performance would decrease at a more rapid rate with time.

875” 3. a tight polyurethane wiper ball or dart or should precede the pumped fluid. The following guidelines can be used in choosing the proper size of wiper ball. TX.whenever displacing tubing containing fluid(s). The oil has alkalinity as well as corrosion inhibitors that will help protect the coiled tubing.00854). 77032 (Tel: 281-590-0566. The wiper ball aids in the effectiveness of its “chaser” by (1) separating the different fluids preventing intermixing and (2) wipes the tubing walls from the preceding fluid. Option 3 Fill tubing with diesel fuel. Tubing OD 1. Proper mixing is required to insure that Anhib II is well dispersed in the fluid.00” 2. 2 automotive diesel) should be used to avoid possibility of water contamination. A good grade of diesel fuel (such as No. then displacing volume should be 5 times tubing volume. Fax: 281-590-8174). Purge with nitrogen until dry and seal ends (see notes 2 and 3). it is recommended that at least one (1) quart of API 30 wt. Suite #103. If gas is being used to push a fluid through the coiled tubing. motor oil be used per 100 gallons of diesel. use at least 2 wiper balls. If standard wiper balls are not available. Halliburton Company 11 Best Practices Series . Houston. If residual water is in the tubing prior to filling with diesel.375” 2.25” 1. use 1-3/4”) 2-1/4” 2-1/2” 2-3/4” 3-1/4” 3-7/8” Wiper balls can be purchased from Laser Plastics. Note 1: Wiper Balls . If chlorides are to be removed.50” 1.50” Wiper Ball Diameter 1-1/4” 1-1/2” 2” (for thick wall. Halliburton © 1998. it may get mixed in with the diesel (causing a cloudy appearance) and will separate out in the tubing causing corrosion to occur.2% Anhib II (HES part number 516. If diesel fuel is used. a tightly made wad of foam rubber (seat cushion type of material) may be used.00” 1. Displacing volume should be a minimum of 2 times tubing volume.Coiled Tubing And Corrosion Option 2 Pump fresh water that has been adjusted to a pH 8 to 9 using sodium bicarbonate and that is also treated with 0.75 2. 903 Hodgkins.

the ends of the tubing must be sealed such that a slight positive pressure (say. This is accomplished by pumping nitrogen at a high rate to mobilize and remove all free water. The second step is to dry the film of fluid that remains. Volume of nitrogen required would be 10 x 1000 = 10. If necessary. Note 3 .Displacement of fluids such as water from a coil tubing reel after a job is critical to the life of the pipe and the safe operation of the unit. If the water in the exit stream is clear. 5 to 10 psig) is maintained to prevent air ingression. Use of wiper balls to remove the water is recommended (see note 1). This systems requires fittings on both ends of tubing. the ID can be pickling with 5 % HCl + 0.1 % HAI-81M + 2 % Ferchek. a plastic or metal cap is placed on the tubing and taped. Halliburton © 1998. For information purposes. Quality Tubing also offers a system to install a ball valve on each end of tubing with a pressure gage to monitor internal pressure. If significant rust is present in the initial portion of the exit stream then the condition of the tubing ID should be questioned. Pre-Job Guidelines If unsure of the condition of the tubing ID. Halliburton Company 12 Best Practices Series . flush coil tubing with fresh water. The first is to remove the free water. Quality Tubing’s present procedure is to place a Drilltec thread protector on the male half of 1502 fittings on all nitrogen purged strings. An example would be displacing a reel that has 10 bbls of fluid. Drying works best at low pressure. decrease the rate to 100 to 400 scf/min. Each barrel of tubing volume requires 1000 scf of nitrogen to displace and dry the pipe. When nitrogen breaks through.000 scf. Initial rate would be 400 to 1000 scf/min. In general displacement with nitrogen to remove water takes two steps. See Best Practices Series “Purging Fluids from Coiled Tubing” for other information. On the free end. Larger size tubing will require the higher range of rates while smaller tubing will require the lower rate. then the coiled tubing ID probably has been sufficiently protected during previous storage and no further fluid maintenance work is required. Volume of nitrogen required is a function of tubing volume. This means pumping as slow as possible to keep the friction pressure down.Coiled Tubing And Corrosion Note 2: Sealing Ends of Pipe .When using nitrogen in tubing to prevent corrosion.Purging Water from Coiled Tubing with Nitrogen .

3. Aeration occurs between jobs so it is important that the tubing be cleaned and protected with a corrosion inhibitor as soon as possible after an acid job. Option 1 1.15186). Continue flush until pH of exit stream is approximately 7. Neutralize/flush acid remaining in tubing using 1% K-34 (sodium bicarbonate. However. then seal ends. HES part number 70. Halliburton Company 13 Best Practices Series .00854). Displace with water adjusted to pH 8 to 9 using 1% K-34 (sodium bicarbonate. 2.20% Anhib II (HES part number 516. Option 2 1. See Table 1 for recommended volumes for specific tubing sizes. Purge with nitrogen (see note 3. Use dry nitrogen to push the inhibitor mixture through the tubing.15186) and 0. Displace fresh water with 10% CT-Armor.Coiled Tubing And Corrosion Post-Job Guidelines Tubing OD . paragraph 3. the tubing should be treated as per one of the options listed below. laboratory tests on tubing exposed to inhibited acid and air indicate that oxygen is a secondary corrosive agent and can cause corrosion rates to increase 5 to 7 times that in acid alone.6) until tubing is dry. HES part number 70. Halliburton © 1998.refer to Tubing OD Protection Tubing ID Acid After acid jobs. Seal ends of tubing to prevent inhibitor loss or air ingression. 4. Flush with fresh water. Research indicates that coiled tubing does not undergo excessive corrosion when exposed to properly inhibited acid being pumped at treatment velocities. Flush with fresh water (or seawater when necessary). 3. 2.

Halliburton Company 14 Best Practices Series . 3. 4.MB TechServ Same as above. 3.6) to displace excess water. Dry (onshore) . Displace with water adjusted to pH 8 to 9 using 1% K-34 (sodium bicarbonate. Clean (onshore) .Flush with fresh water to remove seawater and any corrosive contaminants.00854). etc. Option 2 1.20% Anhib II (HES part number 516.Charge MBT with VCI 609 powder. This process has not been utilized in other locations. Allow coil to depressurize fully to atmosphere. Seal ends of tubing to prevent inhibitor loss or air ingression.Coiled Tubing And Corrosion Option 3MB TechServ 6 This is a specialized process used by Quality Tubing’s service center in Aberdeen. Purge with nitrogen (see note 3. acid. paragraph 3. paragraph 3.6) until tubing is dry.15186) and 0. contact Brian Hunt. If available.Remove debris. by flushing coiled tubing with fresh water (onshore) or seawater (offshore) immediately after use. purge with nitrogen (see note 3. Halliburton © 1998. then seal ends. Preserve (onshore) . Allow coil to depressurize fully then seal ends. Displace fresh water with 10% CT-Armor. Establish constant flow of dry air through coil to remove residual moisture.Connect MBT injection unit (see note below) with 120 psi compressed and filtered air supply to the coiled tubing. Flush with fresh water. 2. 1. Pig with wiper ball(s) and purge with nitrogen to remove residual water. Workover and Completion fluid These fluids may be corrosive to the coiled tubing and should be removed before the tubing is stored. MB TechServ at 44-1224-879696. Use dry nitrogen to push the inhibitor mixture through the tubing. Option 3 . 2. Flush . Release charge to the coiled tubing until fog emission is detected. See Table 1 for recommended volumes for specific tubing sizes. Flush with fresh water. 2. brine. HES part number 70. Option 1 1. 3. For further information.

Maintenance Recommendations . Halliburton © 1998. After pickling. Ideally. Halliburton Company 15 Best Practices Series .40 .0% SCA-130 (concentration of SCA-130 dependent on the amount of FeS in the tubing) may be necessary to clean the tubing.Coiled Tubing And Corrosion H2S If the tubing contains iron sulfide scale. pickling with 5% HCl + 0. follow paragraph 5.2.Special Cases Although frequency and type of maintenance depends on local conditions as well as frequency and type of service work.2. each local service center should have documented procedures to follow. Case 3 Tubing used in acid service should be treated immediately upon job completion. Caution: This process may generate H2S gas in the tubing. Case 2 Tubing stored or not expected to be used for 1 week or longer should be suitably protected on the ID and OD.1 options as needed. the following are some recommendations for consideration. Case 1 Tubing being used daily in non-corrosive service (considering both atmospheric as well as downhole and pumped fluids) probably does not need to be treated daily with corrosion inhibitors.

37 5.50 1.75 1.188 .25 1.75 1.25 1.00 1.156 .75 2.08 8.33 7.83 5.88 6.59 6.18 10.34 6.25 1.75 1.50 1.04 6.00 1.35 6.134 .51 7.12 6.26 7.41 6.26 8.080 .48 8.134 .80 8.125 .58 7.90 3.125 .25 1.08 7.00 2.21 4. Halliburton Company 16 Best Practices Series .75 1.00 2.73 8.19 5.00 2.31 5.156 .11 7.095 .06 4.49 5.00 2.00 1.25 1.175 .00 1.109 .57 Halliburton © 1998.70 7.102 .76 10.64 10.50 7.03 5.13 5.102 .11 4.90 4.30 8.375 2.14 4.34 7.375 Flash In X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Flash Free Gallons per 1000 ft 4.80 10.134 .109 .188 .080 .34 5.00 2.109 .73 8.59 6.95 7.156 .25 1.156 .04 3.81 4.28 6.56 8.109 .28 6.125 .43 5.109 .Coiled Tubing And Corrosion Table 1 Gallons of 10% CT-Armor Tubing OD 1.203 .50 1.26 5.125 .56 10.12 5.087 .72 8.50 1.82 7.09 4.125 .32 Wall .00 2.095 .93 8.54 6.97 3.109 .03 5.26 4.57 8.50 1.134 Gallons per 1000 ft 4.087 .27 5.40 10.48 6.05 4.00 1.00 2.25 1.095 .41 8.25 1.102 .375 2.50 1.134 .

91 9.15 Wall .875 2.65 15.375 2.156 .50 3.79 9.02 13.24 10.50 Flash In X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Flash Free Gallons per 1000 ft 10.84 12.08 13.875 2.42 15.64 12.69 12.188 .39 10.50 3.47 15.175 .90 15.50 3.203 .875 2.375 2.175 .203 Gallons per 1000 ft 10.188 .59 12.23 12.375 2.156 .375 2.29 15.85 12.188 .14 10.10 9.875 2.82 15.203 .175 .53 Halliburton © 1998.875 3.76 12. Halliburton Company 17 Best Practices Series .125 .156 .36 12.134 .75 15.875 2.09 15.Coiled Tubing And Corrosion Table 1 Gallons of 10% CT-Armor Tubing OD 2.55 12.01 12.

TX 77252-2180 Tel: (713) 656-5949 2 Cortec Corporation 4119 White Bear Parkway.O. LA 70507-4002 3 Nalco-Exxon Energy Chemicals. 38 Abbotswell Road Aberdeen. 7705 Hwy 90A Sugar Land.P. Halliburton Company 18 Best Practices Series . L. Paul.O. 2911 Dixwell Avenue Hamden. Box 87 Sugar Land. Pont Des Mouton Road Lafayette. TX 77487-0087 Phone: (713) 263-7836 6 MB TechServ Corrosion Technology Services. TX 77478 P. St. MN 55110 Phone: (800) 4-CORTEC (612) 429-1100 Fax: (612) 429-1122 5 Oil Research Center 626 W.Coiled Tubing And Corrosion References: 1 PermaStopRust (America). CT 06518 Tel: (800) 611-7713 (203) 287-3700 Fax: (203) 407-3840 4 Exxon Company USA P. AB12 3AB Tel: (01224) 879 696 Fax: (01224) 899 180 Halliburton © 1998. Ltd. Box 2180 Houston. Inc.