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Advanced Research in Scientific Areas 2012 December, 3. - 7. 2012

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Simulation of three-phase induction motor in Scilab


Mgr in. Madejski Rafa
Politechnika Czstochowska, Wydzia Inynierii Procesowej, Materiaowej i Fizyki Stosowanej Instytut Przerbki Plastycznej Inynierii Bezpieczestwa Zakad Automatyzacji Procesw Przemysowych . Position: PhD student City, Country- Poland e-mail address rmadejski@wip.pcz.pl
Abstract - The paper presents the structure of the model used to simulate processes in a three-phase induction motor. Considerations are implemented in Scilab environment and apply the induction motor with a power PN = 75kW and input parameters for the model 5AM280S6 electric motor. Computer simulation shows the results of the engine at idle and short circuit. Keywords-component; model; silnik indukcyjny; scilab.

I. INTRODUCTION. At present, simulation programs are an essential tool for research and engineering in the field of electric drive and power electronics. Over the last ten years there have been many universal simulation packages (eg SCILAB, MATLAB / Simulink), containing models of electric machines and power electronics components, significantly accelerating and facilitating the process of modeling and simulation of complex drive systems, which include the induction motor drive system . The literature on modeling of induction motor drives and use of certain mathematical methods, due to the specific characteristics and properties of induction motors, electrical machines (non-linear mathematical models of electric machines leading to the description of the motor drive systems with a rigid, non-linear differential equations) is very poor. Especially descriptions of the methods of analysis and simulation of induction motors such as high power 75kW. Due to the scope and objectives of this Article and the complexity of the mathematical model of induction motor mathematical modeling of induction motor systems was carried out in the Scilab library using this program. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS FOR INDUCTION MOTOR IN D Q SYSTEM. One of the most popular models of induction motors from the system dq Model Krause is described in detail in the book [1] According to the model Kraus differential equation of motion for the induction motor in dq system has the following form: II.

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.(2) .(3) ....(4) (5) (6) ...(7)

Figure1. Dynamic or d-q equivalent circuit of an induction machine.

Current equation:: ...... (8) ... (8.1) ... (8.2)

.(1)

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Xlr = eLlr - rotor leakage reactance, Xls = eLls- stator leakage reactance, Rs stator resistance, Rr rotor resistance, e = stator angular electrical frequency, e = 4/p prdko ktowa pola elektrycznego stojana, r = rotor angular electrical speed, b = motor angular electrical base frequency, TABLE 1. Listing function Vdqfun Listing f function Vdqfun 1. function [ xdot]=Vdqfun(t , x, Vm, fHz) 2. xdot=zeros(5,1); 3. ********************************* 4. // MACHINE PARAMETERS INDUCTOR 5. ********************************* 6. // Stator resistance [Ohm] 7. Rs=0.435; 8. // Rotor resistance [Ohm] 9. Rr=0.64; 10. // Stator winding inductance [H] 11. Ls=0.0477; 12. // Rotor winding inductance [H] 13. Lr=0.0577; 14. Lm =0.012; 15. // Coefficient of drag 16. D=0.001; 17. // Moment of inertia 18. J=0.28; 19. // Number of pole pairs 20. p=6; 21. // Stator angular electrical frequency 22. we=4*%pi*fHz/p; 23. // Motor angular electrical base frequency 24. wb=2*%pi*50 25. // Load torque 26. Tl=0; 27. Xls=wb*Ls; 28. Xlr=wb*Lr; 29. Xm=wb*Lm; 30. Xml=1/(1/Xls+1/Xm+1/Xlr); 31. //x=[Fqs;Fds;Fqr;Fdr;wr] 32. // Stream Fqs 33. Fqs= x(1); 34. // Stream Fds 35. Fds= x(2); 36. //Strumie Fqr 37. Fqr= x(3); 38. // Stream Fdr 39. Fdr= x(4); 40. // Rotor angular electrical speed [rad/sek] 41. wr= x(5); 42. // q and d-axis stator currents 43. iqs=(Fqs-Xml*(Fqs/Xls+Fqr/Xlr))/Xls; 44. ids=(Fds-Xml*(Fds/Xls+Fdr/Xlr))/Xls; 45. iqrr=(Fqr-Xml*(Fqs/Xls+Fqr/Xlr))/Xlr; 46. idrr=(Fdr-Xml*(Fds/Xls+Fdr/Xlr))/Xlr; 47. // Electrical output torque 48. Te=3/4*p*(Fds*iqs-Fqs*ids)/wb; 49. // q and d-axis stator voltages 50. Va= Vm*sin(2*%pi*fHz*t); 51. Vb= Vm*sin(2*%pi*fHz*t -2*%pi/3); 52. Vc= Vm*sin(2*%pi*fHz*t+2*%pi/3); 53. ********************************* 54. //MODELOWANIE STANU ZWARCIA 55. //if t>=3 then 56. //Va=0; 57. //Vb=0; 58. //Vc=0; 59. //end 60. fi=2*%pi*fHz*t ; 61. // The transformation of the voltage to the d-q 62. [Vab]=2/3*[1,0.5,-0.5;0,sqrt(3)/2,-sqrt(3)/2]*[Va;Vb;Vc] 63. [Vdq]=[cos(fi),sin(fi);-sin(fi),cos(fi)]*Vab; 64. // Vdq(1)=Vq Vdq(2)=Vd

Electromechanical equation: ..(12) ..(13)


, ,

The transition from the system voltage in 3-phase abc to the dq in a stationary coordinate system using the transformation Park'a: (14) where:

The transition from the dq to abc coordinate system for the stator currents

IMPLEMENTATION OF DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS IN SCILABIE. The differential equations are implemented in the function Vdqfun (), in which the input parameters are: t - vector time, x - vector of state variables x=[Fqs;Fds;Fqr;Fdr;wr] Vm- voltage amplitude, fHz the frequency of supply voltage,

III.

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.. (8.3)

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Fmq=Xml*(Fqs/Xls+Fqr/Xlr); Fmd=Xml*(Fds/Xls+Fdr/Xlr); // Differential equations: xdot(1)=wb*(Vdq(1)we/wb*Fds+Rs/Xls*(Xml/Xlr*Fqr+(Xml/Xls-1)*Fqs)); xdot(2)=wb*(Vdq(2)+we/wb*Fqs+Rs/Xls*(Xml/Xlr*Fdr+(Xm l/Xls-1)*Fds)); xdot(3)=wb*(-(wewr)/wb*Fdr+Rr/Xlr*(Xml/Xls*Fqs+(Xml/Xlr-1)*Fqr)); xdot(4)=wb*((wewr)/wb*Fqr+Rr/Xlr*(Xml/Xls*Fds+(Xml/Xlr-1)*Fdr)); xdot(5)=p/(2*J)*(Te-wr*D-Tl); endfunction fHz=50; Vm=380;

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65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73.

Differential equations (1 ... 4) are implemented in lines {68th .. 71}. Equation (13) is implemented in line {72}. Before the differential equations were implemented equations determine the value of the parameters and variables. In line {62 and 63} Park'a implemented transformations (equation (14)). The value of current IQS, ids, idr, IQR were determined from equations (8 ... 8.4) and have been implemented in the lines {43.46}.
TABLE 2.Currents. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. 82. // Simulation parameters t=0:0.001:4; t0=0; fHz=50; Vm=380; // Initial conditions y0=[0;0;0;0;0] // Calling the function ode y=ode(y0,t0,t,list(Vdqfun,Vm,fHz)); Figure 3Mileage electromagnetic torque Te.

Before calling the function in lines {75 ... 80} are defined values: simulation time, amplitude, frequency and initial conditions (assuming zero initial conditions). The values of the motor parameters such as winding resistance and inductance, mutual inductance, coefficient of drag bearings are defined inside a function VdqFun (). Since the function returns the value streams, and angular velocity, for the determination of the electromagnetic torque and currents auxiliary variables and parameters must be recalculated [2]. IV. SIMULATION OF INDUCTION MOTOR IN SCILABIE.
Figure 6. Current waveform ic [A]. Figure 5. Current waveform ib[A].

1) Simulation of start-up and idle The induction machine - a compact induction motor with the following parameters:
Rs=0.435 - stator resistance [Ohm]; Rr=0.64 - rotor resistance [Ohm]; Ls=0.0477 -stator winding inductance [H] ; Lr=0.0577 - rotor winding inductance [H]; Lm =0.012; D=0.001 - coefficient of drag; J=0.28 - moment of inertia; p=6 - number of pole pairs;

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Figure 2. Mileage angular velocity wr [rpm].

Figure 4. Current waveform ia [A].

Figure 2 shows the course of the rotor speed at the time of start-up and operation sterile induction machine. Speed is set at about 985 rev / min. In Figures 4, 5, 6 show the course of the phase currents. Figure 3 shows the course of the electromagnetic torque during start-up and idle.[3] 2.) 3-phase fault simulation engine. Simulation of a short circuit in the power supply circuit is modeled in the lines {40 ..... 45}:

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Condition if t> = 3 then determines the second stator windings short to ground. For modeling faults at different stages of the parameters should be set in the environment. After calling the function from () displays the results of the simulation.

Figure 7. Speed stages, power supply circuit w 3 sek.

Figure 8. Mileage electromagnetic torque.

Figure 9. Current waveform ia[A].

Figure 10. Current waveform ib[A]. [4]

Figure 11. Current waveform ic [A].

Short circuit (short circuit 3 phase) of power induction machine is modeled in 3 seconds.

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SUMMARY

From the analysis of velocity waveforms to the rotation of the machine to determine the value of the electromagnetic torque should decrease, while the average value of the results set point is set at a value greater than the values occurring during start-up.. To validate the model, the model was built in the environment maltab / Simulink, which is implemented exactly the same structure equations. Figure 12 shows a time course of the electromagnetic environment of the model matlab/simulink.[4].
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Figure 12. Mileage electromagnetic torque at start-up - model in the environment Matlab

Because the model is implemented in an environment like Scilab and Matlab are identical (in terms of mathematical equations, and the implementation of the program itself), the differences between the results are not the result of the mathematical model is not correct, but the difference and computational capabilities of both environments. For Scilab environment simulations were carried out for different time periods and different solvers sampling. A further analysis of the induction machine operation should be carried out on a model made in Matlab or implement equations describing the motion of the machine in a different form, because due to the error introduced by Scilab environment does not allow for the correct analysis of the results. REFERENCES
[1] [2] P.C. Krause, Analysis of Electric Machinery ,McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1986. Akpinar E., Pillay P.: A Computer program to predict the performance of slip energy recorery induction motor drire, IEEE Trans, on Energy Conv.. 5. 2. 1990. 357-265 Pasek W., Dynamics of AC machines, Publisher HELION, Gliwice, 1998. Zalas P., Zawilak J., Influence of the excitation current control system for the synchronization process synchronous motor, operating problems of electric machines and drives: BOBRME "Komel" 2006, 83 88.

[3]

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