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ESSAYS - II

QUESTION NO. 6
Write an essay, with outline, of 300-350 wor s on the to!i" #$ole of Wo%en in So"iety#.

$O&E O' WO(EN IN SO)IET*
OUT&INE (i) In the past women did not enjoy many rights. They were expected to limit their activities to the kitchen. (ii) Now women are conscious of their rights as citizens and consider themselves e ual to men in every field of life. (iii) They have proved their worth in every field of life. Now they cannot !e kept as slaves in the house. (iv) They are !iologically different from men. Their main function is to produce and look after children. (v) "ur religion Islam is not against the education of women. It does not for!id them from taking part in the social activities of life. ESS+* In the past# women were looked upon as slaves. Their main profession was to o!ey and entertain their hus!ands. $s %uskin puts it# # + true wife in her hus,an -s house is his ser.ant, it is in his heart that she is a /ueen#. &pto the '(th century# it was thought that marriage and home life were the !est outlets for a woman)s energies. Thus a woman)s activities were confined to the kitchen and the nursery. Towar s the en of the 01th "entury, there "a%e the re.olt of wo%en. *iterature of '(th century made them conscious of their

duties and privileges. +ducation more than anything else was responsi!le for the emancipation of women. ,ith education came the realization that she could do what man had done. -he made a great demand for the right to vote. -he succeeded in it. $t present a num!er of women are mem!ers of the parliament. Today# women are working as typists in offices# telephone operators# teachers# doctors and what not. In %ussia and .apan# they were trained as soldiers to serve in the -econd ,orld ,ar. +ven in /akistan# we have women athletes# writers# leaders and administrators. They are leaving /urdah and taking an active part in the social life of the country. 0owever# there is a group of thinkers who !elieve that women should not take part in the social and cultural activities of the country. They ,elie.e that %an is for the swor an wo%an for the nee le, %an is to "o%%an an wo%an is to o,ey. Their judgment is !ased on prejudice and it is one sided. The real danger is that women are making a wrong use of their emancipation. They are trying to imitate man in everything. ,ith the result# they are losing their essential womanhood. They are losin2 the si2ht of the fa"t that eli"a"y an %o esty are two of their finest .irtues. ,ithout them# they would !e simply apologies for women. *et us discuss the pro!lem in the light of human psychology. ,omen are different from men in their !odily form and constitution. It is her sacred duty to produce children and look after them. Not only this !ut she has also to !uild a nation of morally sound people. -he has to play the role of a teacher for her children. The 0oly /rophet has said# #3ara ise lies un er the feet of %other#. This

shows that in Islam# a woman enjoys great status. 0er rights are e ual with men !ut her duties are different. Nepolean once said# #4i.e %e 2oo %others an I shall 2i.e you a 2oo nation#. This means that morally good mothers !uild a nation of !rave and strong people. Islam does not prohi!it women to do jo!s. ,omen can do any jo! provided they do it within the framework of Islam. ,omen can !ecome doctors and nurses in hospitals. They can also !ecome teachers# typists# clerks and receptionists. ,omen should do a jo! when they are actually in need of it. They should first of all look after their children and make them good citizens. 5owe.er, in "ase of ire ne"essity, they "an ta6e !art in so"ial an "ultural a"ti.ities.

QUESTION NO. 7
Write an essay, with outline, of 300-350 wor s on the to!i" #I%!ortan"e of (ass (e ia#.

I(3O$T+N)E O' (+SS (E8I+
OUT&INE (i) The mass media mean the sources of information and entertainment which are availa!le to the pu!lic or masses of a country. They are divided into two kinds# print media and electronic media. (ii) The mass media control our mind. (iii) They are great source of !uilding pu!lic opinion. (iv) They educate the masses from the art of cooking to the philosophy of casting a vote. (v) Internet is the latest addition to the mass media.

ESS+* The mass media mean the diversified sources of information and entertainment which are availa!le to the pu!lic or masses of a country !y mass communication. These media play an important role in !uilding pu!lic opinion in a democratic country. They are divided into two kind1 !rint %e ia an ele"troni" %e ia. 3rint %e ia include physical o!jects such as newspapers# !ooks# pamphlets# comics and magazines etc whereas ele"troni" %e ia consist of radio# television and internet. 2edia has a great source of information and entertainment to all type of people. No!ody can deny their influence. +very!ody looks to them to get information a!out their country# nation# religion and culture. They exercise a great influence on the workers# teachers# doctors# !usinessmen and all type of professionals. If media are stopped from yielding information to the pu!lic# the entire world would plunge into darkness and ignorance. They !uild our knowledge and strengthen our opinion a!out different things. The mass media control our mind. ,e !elieve whatever they propagate.,e came to know a!out our life of villages# cities and towns through mass media.,e come across the rise and fall in !usiness# agriculture and industry through mass media. *et a minor incident happen in any part of the world# we come to know each detail of it through mass media. 2ass media make a record of everything which takes place in the world. They do not hide anything from the pu!lic eye. The electronic media have governed and dominated the mind of the pu!lic in a very forceful manner. The radio

and television !ring to everyone the pleasures of music# songs# dances# dramas and films. They make us aware of the religious and cultural life of every country of the world. +ven a lay man knows many things a!out the latest discoveries and inventions taking place in the world. It is !ecause of electronic media that people were a!le to watch the murder of ..3. 4ennedy and attack on %egon. They were also a!le to watch live coverage of the funeral of 5iana# attack on ,orld Trade 6entre and !om! !last at different places. The mass media tell us a!out hurricanes# earth uakes and river floods in a graphic manner. They record for the masses the details of !om! !lasts# suicide attacks and other acts of violence and aggression. The %ass %e ia are a 2reat sour"e of ,uil in2 !u,li" o!inion. They !uild our knowledge and educated our sentiments. ,e form our own opinion a!out politics# religion and !usiness under the influence of mass media. +ven the man on the street has his opinion a!out the performance of the rulers. 0e can easily decide whom he should vote in the coming election. 0e can form relia!le judgment a!out the !usiness trends going on in the country. The mass media educate a domestic woman a!out cooking# medicine and elementary nursing of children. The children have informative and entertaining programme of their mental standard. They can !uild their knowledge a!out different !ranches of knowledge at a very early stage. Internet is the latest addition to the mass media. Through it# we are connected with the computer network of the world. Through it# we are connected with the

activities of the world within no time. ,e are connected with the universities# offices# firms# !usiness concerns and other nerve centres of life within no time. ,e can pay our !ills# fees of admission and adjust our !ank accounts through internet. Internet provides us jo!s and suita!le matches for marriage. It connects us with the latest discoveries in the field of medicine# surgery# wireless# industry and latest technology of every field within no time. ,e can plan our journey and devise a !etter route for the journey through the weather report forecast !y mass media.

QUESTION NO. 9
Write an essay, with outline, of 300-350 wor s on the to!i" #3leasures of )hil hoo #.

3&E+SU$ES O' )5I&85OO8
OUT&INE (i) 6hildhood is the earliest period of a person)s life. In this period of life# the memory of child is very temporary. (ii) 6ares# trou!les and worries are not the part of life in childhood. (iii) $ child receives great love and affection from different mem!ers of his family. (iv) 2y childhood was marked with freedom of action. It was free from worries of life. (v) The childhood memories are often praised !y poets and thinkers. ESS+*

6hildhood is the earliest period of a person)s life. This is the period when memory is not very sharp and lasting. &p to the age of two to three# a child easily forgets happy or unhappy moments. 0e has only animal instincts to pursue. The emotional moments do not have strong impact on a child)s mind. 3rom that age onwards# his emotional senses start developing# while philosophical and spiritual selves rest need rest of the life to !e developed. $s a child grows up# he feels more and more attached with his childhood !ecause the overgrowing responsi!ilities# overpowering demands of life and rapid awakening of the world around force him to !e nostalgic a!out childhood. The oppressing demands of life force him to take refuge in the dim# happy and carefree memories of childhood# when life was smooth sailing without any worries# anxieties or work. &ife was nothin2 %ore than eat an ,e %erry. The unforgetta!le charm of childhood keeps coming !ack to make him happy and move forward in life. This is the reason that all the grown up claim that childhood is the !est part of life. No dou!t# it is the golden period of life !ecause cares# worries and trou!les are not part of this period. $ child has parents to serve him and pamper him. $ll the family is ready to shower him with !lessings of love. -o the kindness of parents# love of !rothers and sisters# merry games and fun with friends at school# hide and seek in the !ackyard# old dear home# chocolates and cakes# parties and family gatherings# everything try to come !ack and make them smile. -o comparison !etween past and present would make them wish that they could !e children again.

-imilar is the case with me. ,hen I recall the days of my childhood# I feel happy and excited to remem!er the golden period of my life. $t that time# I was carefree# high spirited and easily delighted with life. I used to wander like a free soul in the open fields enjoying the natural !eauty in the pastures. I would clim! trees# run like deer across the pastures# ride a pony and swim in shallow ponds. There was no !urden of homework or anxiety over unfinished !usiness. +veryday was a new day to discover and enjoy the small delight of life. *ife was !eautiful# pure# innocent and without any feeling of corruption around. 2y childhood is full of incidents which still have the power to make me smile and relax. ,henever I see a juggler with monkeys# I am reminded of my childhood. I used to love the tricks of monkey !y which he tried to attract the attention of his !eloved. 0e was always successful in the end and two of them would jump upward and !ackward happily. I was very happy to see them happy together. I still remem!er the hot summer noons# when my cousins and I used to catch sparrows. The immense pleasures of catching# caging and then setting the sparrows free would give me a feeling of power and domination over those helpless tiny creatures. Then generous act of freeing them would fill my heart with childish pride. The childhood memories have often !een praised !y poets and writers. The poetry of ,ordsworth is full of verses which had !een written in memory and praise of childhood. ,henever ,ordsworth recalled his childhood# he was filled with happy# carefree and pleasing memories

'E+TU$ES O' + 3+:IST+NI WEE8IN4 OUT&INE (i) 2arriage in /akistan is a legal union !etween a man and a woman. -o I cherish the happy memory of my childhood. of 300-350 wor s on the to!i" #'eatures of a 3a6istani We in2#. (v) . (ii) $n engagement is a formal ceremony held !efore the marriage. with outline. (iii) 2ehndi# the 0enna ceremony# or the %asm7e7henna ceremony# typically takes place one or two days prior to the main wedding day. ESS+* . The memory of my childhood still has power over my grown up mind.alima is the final day of the wedding. 1 Write an essay.which had the power to make him happy in later years of life. (iv) 8araat is the procession of the family# relatives# and friends of the groom and they accompany the groom to the !ride9s home or marriage hall for the official wedding ceremony. -ometimes I do wish that golden period of my life come !ack# !ut I know that it is impossi!le. This is traditionally organised !y the groom and his family. QUESTION NO. I cannot enjoy that period again.

Traditionally# the !ride and the groom were not seated together# and the rings are placed on the !ride)s finger !y the groom)s mother or sister# and vice versa.2arriage in /akistan is a legal union !etween a man and a woman. of /akistan)s population is 2uslim# the Islamic law is usually o!served.hen the wedding proposal is accepted# a day is usually fixed for the en2a2e%ent "ere%ony. /rayer and !lessings for the couple are then . 2arriages are often arranged within the family or within the same community or ethnicity. 6ulturally# it is not only a link !etween the hus!and and wife# !ut also an alliance !etween their respective families. 8ecause a!out (:. . +ngagement is usually a small ceremony that takes place in the presence of a few close mem!ers of would7!e !ride)s and groom9s families. The wedding customs and cele!rations differ significantly depending on the geographical location as well as the families involved. $rranged marriages have !een an integral part of /akistani society for years and are still prevalent. + !ro!osal !arty goes to the !ride)s house# where the groom)s parents and family elders formally ask the !ride)s parents for her hand in marriage. In recent years# however# segregated functions have !ecome a rarity and rings are usually exchanged !etween the couple.alima offered !y the groom)s family. 0owever# a typical /akistani wedding has at least three main customs involving the 0enna ceremony (%asm7e7 0enna)# the vows or the Nikah which is a part of the actual wedding or -haadi ceremony# and a su!se uent . %ings and other items of jewelry among affluent families are exchanged !etween the would7!e !ride and groom.

3emale guests are sometimes offered mehndi at the host)s discretion. Today# this ceremony has also !een reduced to a single night of singing and is often com!ined with 2ehndi or 0enna ceremony. . Traditionally# since there were separate functions for !oth the !ride and the groom# the groom)s function was called )Tael) (oil) where female guests put some oil into the groom)s hair.ith the ceremony now held simultaneously for !oth the groom and the !ride# the use of the term )tael) has diminished greatly. The groom makes his way to the !ride)s home or the marriage . In the !ride)s ceremony# the groom normally does not participate# and similarly on the groom)s event# the !ride stays at home.recited# and the wedding date is decided. $ procession of the family# relatives# and friends of the groom called . In some cases# the entire ceremony is instead referred to as #Tael (ehn i# ceremony. $fter the Tael 2ehndi# the main wedding ceremony takes place. The groom)s friends and family !ring along sweets and henna for the !ride# and the !ride)s family does the same for the groom. This is called the 8hol6i or 5holak cele!ration.arat go to the !ride9s home or marriage hall for the official wedding ceremony. Traditionally# many days or even weeks !efore the actual wedding day# women gather in the house of the !ride at night to sing and dance while accompanied !y percussion instruments. The event is traditionally held separately for the !ride and the groom. The henna is sym!olically placed on the couple)s hands. (ehn i# the 0enna ceremony# or the %asm7e7henna ceremony# typically takes place one or two days prior to the main wedding day.

The groom normally opts for a formal . The groom is given a warm welcome !y the !ride9s family with flower garlands and rose petals thrown upon the procession !y the !ride)s sisters# cousins and friends. &sually they are also accompanied !y a !and playing wedding songs. $fter the walima ceremony# the married couple usually go to honey%oon. $fter the Nikkah# a inner is served which consists of several dishes with meat featuring heavily in the meal. -o to make . If the couple are 2uslim# a Ni66ah is performed. The groom)s family# specifically his parents# invite all of the !ride)s family and their guests to their home for a feast. The .hall on a richly decked horse or car and the <!arat= follows in different vehicles. It is at this ceremony that they are formally and pu!licly show cased as a married couple. This is traditionally organised !y the groom and>or his family thus# without his parents# this ritual normally cannot !e performed.alima is typically the most festive event of the wedding ceremony and intends to pu!licize the marriage.estern suit or tuxedo. The !ride wears a heavily decorated dress with gold jewellery provided !y the groom)s family. Wali%a is the final day of the wedding held !y the couple as they host their first dinner as hus!and and wife. 00 .alima valid# the parents) !lessing and presence is the most important factor. 3inally# the $u6hsati takes place# when the groom and his family leave together with the !ride. QUESTION NO. 2ore commonly nowadays# this is held in a marriage hall or hotel instead.

ers the followin2 to!i"s< =i> Ener2y )risis =ii> Une%!loy%ent =iii> Terroris% =i.ii> Inflation .> So"ial an E"ono%i"al 3ro.e22ary =?.asion =?i?> @iolen"e =??> 3o.ri.> InAusti"e an Ine/uality -----------------------------OUT&INE . of 300-350 wor s that "o.erty =??i> 3oliti"al Insta.iii> O.i> )orru!tion =. with outline.iii> Ta? E.er-3o!ulation =i?> En.> .> .le%s =??.Write a 2eneral essay.la"6 (ar6etin2 =.$isin2 3ri"es =.ery =?.ility =??ii> &awlessness =??iii> So"ial an E"ono%i" )risis =??i.> E"ono%i" )risis =?.iron%ental 3ollution =?> S%u22lin2 =?i> (ass Illitera"y =?ii> 8ru2 Traffi"6in2 =?iii> Se"tarianis% =?i.ii> Ne!otis% =?.i> .> 8ru2 + i"tion =.

*awlessness . It indicates our moral# social and religious downfall. 0owever# a close analysis reveals that craze for wealth and power is the !ase of all kind of ??????????. (iii) It !reeds social# economical# political and moral pro!lems (iv) 6auses of ??????????. It is a matter of great shame that in spite of !ecoming a nuclear power# we are far !ehind other nations in the way of character and faith. It creates and spreads the feelings of uncertainty# insta!ility and insecurity among the masses. It desta!ilizes and demoralizes nations and gives !irth to depression and frustration in the society and state. There are many factors which are responsi!le for ??????????. It is full of danger of evil impacts. (vi) 6onclusion ESS+* ?????????? is a major pro!lem in most !ackward and developing countries. ?????????? has !ecome one of the most important pro!lem of all the world especially of the third world countries like /akistan.(i) Introduction (ii) +vil impacts and complications of ??????????. It destroys its outer splendor# economic prosperity# social peace and national unity. 6onse uently# a nation)s good image is spoiled in all over the world. They do not know the virtues of love# sympathy and sacrifice. /eople have !ecome greedy and selfish. If it creeps in a society# it eats into its vitals and soon roots out its inner strength. (v) %emedies of ??????????. Illiteracy# poverty and false ideas of society are the major causes of this social evil.

The main causes of ?????????? are illiteracy# poverty# economic policies of government and man)s !urning desire to !ecome rich and !igwig over night. It also paves way for !loody revolutions and military take7overs. "nly then we can raise our heads as a . 3eudalism# capitalism and uneven distri!ution of wealth and opportunities# non7availa!ility of !asic necessities and fundamental rights also spread ??????????.!ecomes order of the day due to poverty# corruption# violence# indiscipline and mass illiteracy. If the evil of ?????????? is not nipped in the !ud# it may spread like a !ush fire and engulf the whole nation or region like and epidemic. ????????? !adly shatters people)s faith in institution and supremacy of the constitution. It deprives masses from mental# physical# spiritual# moral and economic health. ?????????? creates economic pressure# social and economic injustice. +xternal factors like agencies of neigh!ouring states like India also play a vital role in spreading ?????????? in /akistan in order to desta!ilize it. ??????????? is highly dangerous and devastating for a country like /akistan that has a weak economy and political insta!ility. In the end we can say that our officers as well as the scholars# educationists# political parties# N@")s and national mass media should take necessary steps to eradicated this wicked pro!lem for the !est national and human interest. It it is not effectively# properly and promptly checked# the entire judicial# moral and economic fa!ric of a nation will !e collapsed. Non7 availa!ility of education# health care and jo!s also paves the way to spread ??????????.

It is a difficult form of @overnment.I QUESTION NO. (v) 5emocracy has failed in /akistan mainly !ecause of low literacy rate# senseless political parties# poor people . (ii) 5ictatorship is a system of @overnment in which one party or one person rules the country. It is practised successfully in many countries of the world. with outline. (iii) In democracy there is a full freedom of expressing pu!lic opinion.free and dignified nation. ESSAYS . 0 Write an essay. 1. (iv) 5emocracy has many defects. of 300-350 wor s on the to!i" #8e%o"ra"y#. It is not successful in a country where most of the people are uneducated. 8E(O)$+)* OUT&INE (i) 5emocracy is a popular form of @overnment.

They take part in election. The rest of the parties are supposed to sit on the opposition !enches. 8i"tatorshi! is a system of @overnment in which one party or one person rules the country. In a democratic country# there are many political parties. . The party which wins !y the majority of vote is declared successful. The party comes into power after election.and feudal system. $ll the votes are cast in favour of one party. The entire power rests with that party or the ruler. The decision on different pro!lems of the country is taken after much deli!eration. It is called to form the @overnment. In the assem!ly# important issues are de!ated and discussed !y !oth the ruling party as well as the opposition party. for the people. It is practised successfully in many countries of the world." 8e%o"ra"y is a popular form of @overnment. In i"tatorshi! no one "an o!!ose the ruler . ESS+* +. In this form of @overnment# people elect their own rulers. (vi) 5emocracy in spite of all its defects is !etter than dictatorship. 0owever# unlike democracy# there is no opposition party.raha% &in"oln defined democracy asA "Government of the people. by the people.

The radio# the television# the newspaper and other mass media conceal facts. 8e%o"ra"y is a iffi"ult syste% of 4o. In our country and in many other $sian countries# most of people are uneducated and !ackward. In democracy there is full freedom of expressing pu!lic opinion. This form of @overnment is popular in communist countries as %ussia# 6hina and +ast @ermany. Their main !usiness is to admire and praise the ruling party. They cannot understand and real spirit and structure of a .apan. The policies of the @overnment are de!ated and discussed freely in the newspapers as well as in the $ssem!ly 0all.ern%ent. 5emocracy has failed in under7 developed countries like /akistan. It has not worked successfully in many of the $sian countries. +very!ody has e ual right in the eye of law. The press is completely free. $n individual enjoys full freedom to think# write and express his views. This form of @overnment is popular and successful in $merica# 8ritain# India and . In democracy# a person enjoys respect and importance. The voters can choose and remove their rulers according to their own will. $n individual does not enjoy any type of freedom. The reasons for its failure are the following. In dictatorship an individual does not enjoy any respect. 5emocracy is linked with justice.There are many restrictions on the freedom of people. "nly the educated and sensi!le people can understand and run it.

. The candidates of the rival party are kidnapped. QUESTION NO. It is !etter than dictatorship. B Write an essay. The national issues of great importance are de!ated and discussed in the $ssem!ly. 2ost of the people in our country are poor. $t the time of election# the voters are !ri!ed and tempted to give their votes in favor of irresponsi!le and uneducated candidates. with outline. In a democratic form of @overnment# the candidates use unfair means to win the election. It takes a long time to arrive at any decision. It is known for its inefficiency and slowness. The !allot !oxes are !roken and undue pressure is exercised on the officers who conduct the election. 5emocracy has many merits !ut it has many demerits also. . In this way# in democracy# the responsi!le and educated candidates do not return to $ssem!ly.e can say that democracy in spite of its defects is still a popular form of @overnment. $t the time of national emergencies# it fails to cope with the situation. of 300-350 wor s on the to!i" #)o%!uter E u"ation#. In this way# many pro!lems of utmost importance remain unsolved in the light of a!ove discussion. In this way# the elections open the gateway to corruption# !ri!ery and selfishness.democratic system of @overnment.

They are no longer speciali!ed tools to be used by specially trained people. By computer education. They are also an effective audio-visual media. ac&uiring computer education is the need of the day. we mean. Their increasing utility has made computer education the need of the day. . Those with knowledge of computers are considered trainable for many kinds of jobs. "s computers are widely used today. )igher education involving network administration. computer education has become the need of the day. Computers are the best means for storage and management of data. hardware maintenance or software skills open doors for brighter job opportunities. Computers are not only storage devices and processing units. Computers can be used to access a vast knowledge base and search for information archives over the Internet. they have gained immense importance in day-to-day life. They have changed the face of society. education facilitates the use of computers for purposes of communication and (iv) Computer education (v) Computer education helps ESS+* increases one's chances of getting a job one manage one's own business assets and personal finances. computer education is an eligibility criterion for almost all the modern-day jobs. "s computers are a daily utility.)O(3UTE$ E8U)+TION OUT&INE (i) The increasing utility of computers in every sphere of life has made computer education the need of the day. Computer knowledge coupled with certain other job skills increases one's chances of getting a job. "s most of the jobs involve the use of computers. we mean. they can serve as huge knowledge bases and can be harnessed for all sorts of financial transactions owing to their processing power and storage capacities. the basic concepts behind the use of computers and the know-how of some of the elementary computer applications constitutes computer education. gaining the know-how of the basic concepts and operations related to a computer. $earning about the computer basics followed by a practical e%perience of using a computer is the key to computer education. gaining the know-how of the basic concepts related to a computer and gaining the basic knowledge of computer operation. Computers have brought about a revolution across all industries. (iii) Computer entertainment. ith an increase in their widespread use and their ever-so-increasing popularity. but also are e%cellent communication media. They are ubiquitous and used in almost every sphere of life. (ii) By computer education. (nly computer education can facilitate the use of computers for purposes of communication and entertainment. Computers find a wide variety of applications in different spheres of life. They are the means to access the 'nternet and get connected to the world. #nowing about the basic components of a computer.

*ersonal financial assets. (iv) 2odern technology should !e introduced in the villages for the improvement of agriculture. +imilarly.Computer education helps one manage one's own business assets and personal finances. (ii) 2uch emphasis should !e given on the education of villagers. medical records and important documents can be stored in an electronic format in a computer system. Computers serve as efficient means for management of information. The word processing applications of a computer serve as an effective means of documentation. are indeed ruling society. Today. @I&&+4E U3&I'T OUT&INE (i) The condition of villages in /akistan is very misera!le and deplora!le. To be in the race. To keep up the pace in this fast life of today. banking transactions and payments of bills can be done over the 'nternet. of 300-350 wor s on the to!i" #@illa2e U!lift#. computer education is e%tremely important. it is very important to take computer education. (v) Billagers should !e advised to shake off a num!er of old customs and social evils. with outline. (iii) 6leanliness of streets and water is !adly needed in villages. The database management software that are a part of computer systems serve as the means of managing large amounts of data. 3 Write an essay. ESS+* . Computers. which have such a wide variety of applications. Computers are an integral part of life and so is computer education. QUESTION NO. The networking capabilities of a computer facilitate connecting to the 'nternet to reach out to the world. online shopping is becoming widely popular.

-truggle and misery are their lot. They villagers have !een suffering in misery and poverty for centuries. The farmers and the artisans who inha!it the villages are mostly poor# uneducated and !ackward. 5irty water collects in pools everywhere. If he ignores the laws of health and sanitation# runs into enormous de!ts# of follows ancient methods of agriculture# it is !ecause he lacks enlightenment. They work hard !ut their hard work !rings them no profit. 5iseases and epidemics kill hundreds of persons every year. $ village is the !asis of human civilization. @overnment should construct re uired schools and colleges in the villages.$ group of houses and associated !uildings# larger than a hamlet and smaller than a town# situated in a rural area is called a village. The remedy suggested is that primary education should !e made compulsory for !oth !oys and girls. There are practically no arrangements for sanitation. -teeped in age old ignorance the peasant does not know his own interest. 0owever# with the growth of cities the villages have !een considera!ly neglected. 3irstly# much emphasis should !e given on the education of village folks. Ignorance more than anything else# is responsi!le for the !ackwardness of the /akistani peasant. The landlords# the money lenders and the petty government officials exploit them in every way they like. . &nder these circumstances we must try to improve our villages. 3or the uplift of villages we can do the following things.

-o they should !e advised to shake off a num!er of old customs and social evils from which they suffer. Thirdly# modern technology for agriculture should !e provided to the peasants. The government should not convert cities into large cities# rather they should convert villages into cities. *astly# the villagers are superstitious and conservative folks. They are still using the old methods of farming. The ignorant villager is content with passing his days in unhealthy surroundings. They . Thus villager is to !e exhorted to keep his houses and streets clean !y throwing the dung hills and ru!!ish into pits. 0e allows dirty water to collect in pits and ponds situated a!out the village.-econdly# cleanliness is very essential for the uplift of villages. They work hard !ut of no avail. 2ost of them still !elieve that what was good for their forefathers is good enough for them. $griculture is the main profession of villagers. 0e does not care much if streets of the villages are dirty or if houses have no arrangement for fresh air. @overnment should provide tractors# threshers# fertilizers# !etter seed and other farming e uipment to the peasants so that they can make farming a paying profession and the economy of the country can go round.# with the result that they attract mos uitoes in and who spread malaria# dengue and trou!le. It is seen that they spend money lavishly on marriages and !irths and are prone to !e extravagant when they come !y money.

QUESTION NO. (iii) The people of /akistan have great love for collecting .ils#. 8y uplifting our villages# we can keep pace with the comity of nations. with outline.are over fond of litigation. C Write an essay. -o it is the duty of educated people as a nation and o!ligation of government to uplift the misera!le and deplora!le condition of villages. They commit murders over trifles# and resort to the court so often that they pay the !est part of their income to the lawyers. $griculture is the !ack!one of our economy. (ii) The unfair and im!alanced distri!ution of wealth is at the root of every social evil. .e can get progress and prosperity. Billagers constitute the seventy percentage of our population. of 300-350 wor s on the to!i" #So"ial E. The peasant# thus# should !e advised to get rid of all these evils. +ven the developed countries like $merica and 8ritain suffer from them. SO)I+& E@I&S IN 3+:IST+N OUT&INE (i) -ocial evils are present in every country.

They cause great loss to the peace and happiness of people. 3irstly# the unfair and im!alance distri!ution of wealth is at the root of every social evil. They are many causes for the growth and spread of social evils. Their excessive fondness for collecting wealth has given !irth to many social evils. ESS+* -ocial evils are present in every country. In /akistan# social evils have developed into an institution. (v) 8ri!ery and corruption have !een a routine matter in every field of life. They have !ecome selfish. +ven the developed countries like $merica and 8ritain suffer from them. (iv) -ocial evils generate an atmosphere of disorder# anarchy and injustice. They have !idden good !ye to the life of simplicity and contentment. -ocial evils eat the very root of every civilized society. (vi) 0oarding# !lack marketing# child lifting# smuggling# horse racing and drinking are some of the social evils that are found in /akistan. They generate an atmosphere of disorder# . -econdly# the people are /akistan are greedy and am!itious of collecting wealth !y fair and foul means. Their excessive fondness for collecting worldly gains has given !irth to many social evils. -ocial evils surround us like diseased tress.wealth.

-uch a society !ecomes a curse for mankind. The government cannot collect taxes on the smuggled goods. They are listed !elow. 3oreign goods are smuggled into the country on a large scale. It has !lackened the face of merit in every walk of life.ery an "orru!tion have !ecome a routine matter in every office# department and field of life. Therefore inferior goods as medicine# foodstuff may cause a serious damage to human health. . It ceases to have the spark of creativity and growth. S%u22lin2 is an other social evil which is very harmful to society.ri. 5oar in2 an . The smugglers cause great harm to the economy of country. -ometimes inferior goods are smuggled and the government cannot exercise any control on them. It has put a stop to true progress# e uality and development. The forces of injustice and evil have a sway.ouritis% an ne!otis% exist everywhere.la"6-%ar6etin2 are the twin evils that cause a!normal inflation. 'a. 6onse uently the local industry# !usiness or agriculture suffer. . They cause the shortage of foodstuff and are responsi!le for the increase of prices of different commodities. The !lack marketeers are the enemies of people. Its growth !ecomes stunted. This has defeated the very concept of justice in /akistan. $ society surrounded !y evils remains !ackward forever. They are traitors.anarchy and injustice. There are many social evils which have eaten the very roots of our society#.

with outline.ish e?!en iture on ceremonies like marriages like marriages and funerals have !ecome the order of the day. &a. %ich people make a show of their wealth on the marriage of their children. of 300-350 wor s on the to!i" #$eli2ious E?tre%is%#.+ ulteration is an other social evil which is very harmful to society. 2oreover# this reflects an attitude which feeds on greed# selfishness and vanity.e can eliminate these social evils !y two ways1 !y the enforcement of law and !y educating the people against the harms through electronic media. It causes a sense of deprivation among the people. -ocial evils like gam!ling# horse racing# honour killing# drinking are a rampant in our society. QUESTION NO. 5 Write an essay. . The adulterators mix cheap and harmful things in food items like milk# honey# spices# pulses and wheat etc. . The wastage of wealth for the fulfillment of such !ad customs cannot !e approved !y any sane person. They play with the health of the people. They are a curse to society. -ocial evils are widespread !ecause of ignorance# illiteracy# poverty and injustice.

/akistan is a religious country. It came into !eing in the name of Islam. (vi) It !reeds hostility and tension among different groups. It came into !eing in the name of Islam. It produces distrust and fear. (iv) *ack of extremism. modern knowledge !reeds religious (v) It has generated many evils. The unity of the 2uslims lies in pieces. ESS+* %eligious extremism is very common and popular in /akistan. (ii) %eligious extremism means that one religious group considers its thinking correct and truthful.$E&I4IOUS EDT$E(IS( OUT&INE (i) /akistan is a religious country. 8ut unfortunately# its religious ulemas and thinkers divided the country into many sects. 8ut unfortunately# the unity of the 2uslims lies in pieces. This leads to hostility against other groups. $eli2ious . This atmosphere of strife halts the economic progress. The people of one sect hate strongly the people of other sect. (iii) %eligious extremism is produced !y our emotional and non scientific thinking.

0e thinks that the views held !y it are final and conclusive. This thing generates a clash !etween ignorance and knowledge. It is only scientific and o!jective thinking which can save us from the menace of religious extremism. They claim that we !ecome too much su!jective and too much involved in our own thinking. This leads to hostility against the other group. $ large num!er of our people are uneducated. They are !lind to the modern trends of knowledge in all fields of life. "ur thinking attains personal colour. The religious views of the other groups are incorrect. . &a"6 of %o ern 6nowle 2e !reeds religious extremism. %eligious extremism is produced in the people !y the following factors. They try to force their views on the other !y force. In this way# every person adheres to his point of view and considers the other group wrong. The religious scholars# ulemas# and thinkers stick to their point of view. This produces and atmosphere of fear# suspicion and mistrust.e?tre%is% %eans that one reli2ious 2rou! "onsi ers its thin6in2 "orre"t an truthful. The o!servers and thinkers consider that religious extremism is produced !y our e%otional an nons"ientifi" thin6in2. C. '. 0e hates the other group and feels uncomforta!le with it.

In /akistan such groups exist and they kill one another mercilessly. -uch type of religious extremism is very harmful to society and country. %eligious extremism leads to the formation of religious groups and organizations. . C. The unity of the country is at stake due to the presence of this form of religious extremism. It has produced tyranny and violence. It can !reak up the integrity and unity of country.D.ils. /eople !egin to hate one another and suspect each others) intention. These groups organize themselves into armed groups and use force to intimidate and horrify the rival groups. They have killed innocent people which include thinkers# scholars# doctors# teachers and other civilized mem!ers of society. This thing has !uilt a strife !etween -Shias an Sunnies-. They take every !elief granted and do not analyze it.ils. It has urged the religious extremists to resort to use force against those who do not agree with their views. These two religious groups have killed many people of the rival group. %eligious extremism takes place in those minds which are simple and credulous. It !uilds an atmosphere of distrust and fear. $eli2ious e?tre%is% has 2enerate %any e. $eli2ious e?tre%is% !ro u"es the followin2 e. '. The use of force leads to enmity and !itter hostility.

. The teachings of Islam should !e propagated through electronic media a!out human dignity. . $n atmosphere of strife# tension and horror halts the economic progress of the county. (ii) %eligious extremism comes into action for lack of tolerance.D. $ campaign should !e started on electronic media which should teach people the real principals of Islam. Isla% is a reli2ious of !ea"e an Austi"e .e can overcome religious extremism !y taking the following steps. The people should !e taught to show tolerance to each other. (i) 2odern education should !e given to the students who study in 2adrassas. The foreign investors stop investing their money in !ig projects.

They drink coffee# divide !aits and go to the coast. 6onsidering EFth a lucky day# he gets up very early in the morning. (c) 5escri!e the old man)s struggle with the sharks. (!) 5escri!e the old man)s struggle with the marlin. =a> Sear"h for the 'ish 3or eighty7four days# -antiago has !een going on fishing without success. NOVEL QUESTION NO. In the dark of the early morning# he soon reaches the part of the sea that the fishermen call Gthe 2reat well# !ecause of its sudden depth and the presence of all sort of . 2anolin !ids him good!ye and -antiago rows out to the sea in search of a really !ig fish.5. B0 (a) 5escri!e -antiago)s search for the fish. 0e goes to 2anolin)s house and wakes him up.

0e is struggling with poverty# loneliness and old age. 8ut it is only a small fish and the search for the great fish still continues. $t dawn# he prepares four !aits and throws them at different depths. In fact# a giant fish starts ni!!ling the !ait. $t noon# the marker of one hundred fathoms deep line dips.fish here. 0e propels his skiff smoothly. 0owever# his struggle with the marlin is the most exciting event in the novella. 0e o!serves !irds and schools of fish. -antiago)s prayers and sardines) taste compel the hungry marlin to swallow the !ait. 0e pulls the line and succeeds in catching an +l. In short# the search for the fish ends and the fight with the fish starts from here. -antiago has fished here on previous days !ut has had no game.-s stru22le with a 2reat white whale in (o.> Stru22le With the (arlin -antiago)s life is full of struggles. . =. -antiago)s epic struggle with the giant marlin continues for almost three days in the open sea.a"ore of a!out ten pounds.y 8i"6. 2eanwhile# the stern line !ecomes taunt. -antiago guesses it to !e a (arlin. -o this day# he plans to row far out to the sea in uest of a huge fish. It resem!les )a!tain +ha.

0owever# he stands up and says# #I-ll stay with you until I a% ea #. ="> 'i2ht With the Shar6s $fter killing the marlin# -antiago lashes the corpse alongside his !oat and starts for the shore. 0e also sleeps at night !ut soon the fish wakes him up with a jerk. 0e tries to pull the line !ut fails. . . "n the third day# the fish starts circling and -antiago starts gaining the line. Thus the struggle with the marlin is over. -o the circles grow smaller and smaller in radius. $t night# he places a sack as a paddling !etween his !ack and the line. "n the second day# the fish jumps into the air and -antiago is surprised to see its size. 8ut the !lood oozing form the wounded marlin invites the sharks. 0e lashes the corpse alongside his !oat and starts for the shore."n the first day# it is noon when -antiago hooks the marlin.hen the fish comes close to the skiff# -antiago drives the harpoon into its !ody. The fish leaps and falls in death. -o he eats tuna and remem!ers his hand7game with the Negro to give himself strength and confidence. "nce the fish lunges and pulls him down on his face. Instead the fish starts towing his skiff. -antiago)s right hand has a line !urn and his left hand is cramped.

0owever# -antiago still hopes that he may save the remaining half. 0e sta!s the knife into their heads.e estroye . Their eating reduces the fish to half. $fter an hour# a giant %a6o shark appears.el nose shar6. $lasH they steal away a!out a uarter of the fish. 0owever# he encourages himself !y saying# #+ %an "an .ut not efeate #. Then he !eats them with the tiller !ut it also !reaks. The third attacker is a single sho.ust !efore sunset# two more marauding 2alanos come to dine on the marlin. . The shark jerks !ackwards as it rolls and the !lade of the knife snaps and is lost in the water. . $fter two hours# two plundering 2alanos come to feast on the marlin.0owever# -antiago !ravely fights off the successive sharks five times. -antiago fights them with his clu!. 8y midnight# the sharks come in packs. 8ut he not only loses the harpoon !ut also a!out forty pounds flesh of the fish. The fighting tools end and then the prey)s meat ends and finally the Sisy!hean fi2ht ends. The old man lets it hit the fish and then drives the knife into its !rain. -antiago hits it with his harpoon. 0e hits them with the clu! !ut is deprived of it during the com!at. -antiago fights them with the knife lashed to the oar.

ein2 sy%.ein2 @enerally# a sea is a large !ody of salt water. 5escri!e 2anolin)s role in the light of a!ove remarks. -antiago considers it female !ecause of its fertility# and !ecause it em!odies !oth kindness and cruelty.e. 0owever# in this novella# the sea has !een presented as a setting and plausi!le character.# female. 3irstly# the sea is a personified character. -econdly# the colour of sea water is mostly !lue which is a sym!ol of life. =a> Sea a a &i.e. Thirdly# the sea is the great mother of all living things. (c) 8ring out the comparison !etween -antiago and 5i2aggio. +la!orate. This si%ile again proves the sea as a living !eing. (!)GThe !oy keeps me aliveG.# male while the others take it la mar i. $lmost all religions and sciences !elieve that life emerged . -ome fishermen deem it el mar i.QUESTION NO. $nd his eyes are the most living part of his !ody. BB (a) The sea is a living !eing. $s a character# it is a living !eing !ecause it is personified# !lue and the great mother of all living things. 2oreover# -antiago)s eyes are of the same colour as that of the sea. Thus the sea is a hu%an .oli"ally.in2 .

0e is not only -antiago)s apprentice !ut also acts as his son. . -econdly# 2anolin gives -antiago company. Manolin is his last and deepest human relationship. 0e has neither children nor any relatives. The poor -antiago has !een failing to catch a fish for eighty7four consecutive days. *ooked at in this perspective# the sea is definitely the #&i.in2 Infinite#. 2anolin)s company keeps him emotionally sound and psychologically !alanced. 0e says to -antiago# #*ou-ll not fish without eatin2 while I-% ali. These also agree that living things are only !orn from living ones.e#. 0owever# critics have esta!lished his exact age as BB# !ased on his reference to the !ase7!all player# 5ick -isler. 0e is the greatest )prop) for -antiago. 0e helps him with his gear. 2anolin)s character is functional. =. 0e keeps -antiago alive !ecause he provides -antiago food# company and help.> The $ole of (anolin The novella introduces 2anolin in the second starting sentence as a -.ithout his company# -antiago)s survival would have !een impossi!le. 3irstly# 2anolin provides -antiago food and !everage. In this predicament# 2anolin saves him from starving to death !y serving him with !eer# coffee and sumptuous suppers. -antiago)s wife has died.from water. 0e supplies him with .oy-. Thirdly# 2anolin renders -antiago help and assistance.

0e earned the title of #El )a%!eonG !y defeating a Negro from 6ienfuegos. -antiago muses three times throughout the novella that the great 5i2aggio)s father was a fisherman.etween Santia2o an 8i(a22io -antiago compares himself with two things1 2arlin and 5i2aggio. 5i2aggio)s father# 4iuse!!e# was a fisherman.fresh !aits. -antiago compares his left cramped hand with the !one spur of 5i2aggio. 0e emulates him !ecause !oth are !orn fishermen# champions and handicapped. 0e !rings ointment for his lacerated hands. 0owever# the figure to cult is 5i2aggio. -antiago never calls him 5i2aggio !ut the #2reat 8i(a22io#. 0e !elieves that if 5i2aggio can play !ase!all with his osteotype# he can also continue his struggle against the . In fact# it is 2anolin)s help which ensures that -antiago will live on. Thirdly# !oth are handicapped. -antiago calls him a player who Gmakes the differenceG. Thus !oth have same !ackgrounds. 5i2aggio# otherwise know as the G*an6ee )li!!er## is a !ase!all champion. $nd -antiago is a veteran fisherman of 6ojimar in 6u!a. -econdly# !oth are champions. ="> )o%!arison . $nd -antiago is a hand7wrestling champion. 3irstly# !oth are !orn fishermen.

giant 2arlin with his cramped hand. . (!)G+very day is a new dayG# says -antiago. 3urther four hours could make no decision !ut a new referee. The !ettors !ecame hopeless so they started leaving and entering the room. QUESTION NO. +vening advanced so the oil lamps were lit. Ioung -antiago and the Negro sat on opposite chairs# placed their el!ows on a ta!le !etween them# gripped their right hands and the match started. (c)G$ man can !e destroyed !ut not defeatedG. B3 (a) +la!orate -antiago)s hand game with the Negro. +ight hours passed !ut nothing happened except a new referee. =a> 5an -4a%e With a Ne2ro 5uring the struggle with the 2arlin# -antiago remem!ers his hand7game with a Negro. 5iscuss. 6omment. $t night# the Negro was entertained with rum and cigarettes so he put a tremendous tor ue and inclined -antiago)s arm down three inches off the !alance. 0owever# -antiago raised his hand up to dead even again. It was a Sun ay morning at an inn in 6asa!lanca. In this situation# the wrestlers strained themselves so severely that !lood !egan to ooze from under their fingernails.

> E. -antiago felt it# so he applied his whole might and forced the Negro)s hand down and down until it kissed the ta!le. The cycle of time in which the earth makes a complete rotation on its axis is called a day. .$ll the night# the odds and the referees kept on changing !ut the match remained a tie. . It is a clean slate. It has a different name# different date and different possi!ilities. $ man is re!orn every day. 3irstly# every day is a different day. -econdly# every day is a new !eginning. =. $lthough# a day is a repetitive natural phenomenon yet no day is same. If man performs !ad of good deeds the day !efore# the canvas is wiped clean as soon as he wakes up the next morning.ery 8ay is a New 8ay Nature has its own cycles. Thus no day is like !ygone days. $t last# -antiago had won the match and earned the title of #El )a%!eon#.hen 2anolin reminds -antiago of his an erstwhile unlucky spell of E: days# -antiago says# #It "oul not ha!!en twi"e#. +very day is a new day !ecause it is extremely different# a new !eginning and a new opportunity. The !ettors wanted the match to !e declared a draw !ecause they were to go to their jo!s. It is the first day of the rest of his life. It is a!solutely new. The sun of the (on ay morning rose.

0owever# failure is a temporary detour or delay# not defeat.e estroye . 0owever# man cannot !e defeated if his spirit is gallant# his failure is avoida!le and his attitude is optimistic. +very new day lies ready for him# as perfect# as unspoiled. Thirdly# man)s attitude determines a fact.Thirdly# every day is a new opportunity. 2an can !e destroyed !ecause human !ody is weak and mortal. -econdly# destruction leads to #failure#. No dou!t# -antiago has failed !ut is undefeated !ecause he has eluded defeat !y hope# pride and faith. ="> 8estroye . The chief !eauty a!out a new day is that no man can consume it in advance. -o man should !e optimistic a!out every day. 0owever# defeat implies #s!iritual a%a2e#. #+n !ain . In fact# -antiago rightly hopes that 95th will . The sharks destroy the marlin and -antiago fails to fetch the whole on the shore. -antiago)s lacerated hands# fatigued !ody and )something !roken) in his chest show that he is destroyed.ut not efeate # is the most important sentence in the novella. -antiago)s refusal to uit prove that he has a gallant spirit that can never !e defeated.e a lu"6y ay. 3irstly# destruction connotes #!hysi"al a%a2e#.ut Not 8efeate #+ %an "an .

0e possesses sound information a!out sea fish# turtles# !irds and plants. -o the trails of time have taught him tricks and skills. BC (a) 5iscuss the old man as a skillful fisherman. 0is art of !aiting# knowledge a!out sea creatures and accurate guesses all prove that he is a skillful fisherman.e estroye .hen he ventures his odyssey# he carries four kind of !ait7fish1 sardines# tunas# !lue runners and yellow jacks. QUESTION NO. -econdly# he is a sea . . 2oreover# he throws the !aits at four different depths very skillfully. 0e has !een fishing for a!out half a century. 3irstly# he is adept in !aiting.iolo2ist.+ S6illful 'isher%an -antiago is a fishing specialist. 0e hooks them so skillfully that each part of the hook !ecomes yummy for preys. 0e even . 0e identifies the names of all the fish he encounters.oes not %atter to a %an# is a fact for -antiago !ecause he thinks it so. (c) 5escri!e the old man as a religious figure. =a> Santia2o -.ut not efeate # is a fact# a principle# a philosophy and a morality for all those people who think it so. -imilarly# #+ %an "an . (!) Is -antiago a superstitious manJ +xplain.

e. 0e thinks #Ei2hty-fi. 0e accurately estimates that the marlin is 'E feet long and 'FKK pounds heavy without any measuring device. This !elief is purely superstitious. Thirdly# his accurate guesses are another proof of his prowess. 0e rightly predicts that the fish ni!!ling his hook at one hundred fathoms down is a #%ale %arlin#. =. 3irstly# -antiago !elieves in numerology. $ person who has such a !elief is called superstitious. $t noon of the first day on the sea# a fish ni!!les the !ait of one hundred fathoms deep line time and again. In fact# only a skillful fisherman can do so. 0e is a superstitious man !ecause he !elieves in numerology# shi!!oleths and luck.+ Su!erstitious (an $ credulous !elief or notion that is not !ased on reason# fact or knowledge is called superstition. 0e has !een failing to catch a fish for eighty7four consecutive days. 2oreover# he wants to !uy a terminal of the lottery with an eighty7 five. -econdly# he !elieves in shi!!oleths i.> Santia2o -. -antiago is definitely a superstitious man !ut positively and optimistically.knows their !ehaviour# sex# taste and nourishment. -antiago hopes that it will swallow the !ait !ut he does not .er#. Now he hopes to catch a !ig fish on the eighty7fifth day. 0e also knows that different fish swim at different levels.# common sayings.e is a lu"6y nu%.

+ $eli2ious 'i2ure -antiago is a )atholi" )hristian. Stay with the%#. $nd this attitude is the very uintessence of all religions. This notion is also superstitious. *or-re with a lu"6y . . $t the end of the novella# the !oy again wants to go with him !ut he says# #No. 3irstly# -antiago is a love incarnate. it %i2ht not ha!!en#. I a% not lu"6y any%ore# . Thus he !elieves in a super7power that rules the destiny of man.say !ecause he deems# #If you say so%ethin2 2oo . ="> Santia2o -. -econdly# in trou!le# -antiago says #Our 'athers# and #5ail (arys# and pledges to say more prayers to get divine help in his mission. 0is sympathy for the !irds# praise for the fish# willingness to drink !eer at Terrace# and remem!ering 2anolin and 5i2aggio at sea# do show his love for all creatures. 0owever# religion for him is as dead as !ase!all is alive. Thus his !elief in luck proves him a superstitious man. 0e also vows to make a pilgrimage to the Birgin of 6o!re if his fishing is successful.oat. I a% not lu"6y. $t the start of th novella# 2anolin wishes to go with him for fishing !ut he says# #No. 0e himself admits not !eing religious !ut his love for all creatures# prayers for divine help and resem!lance with 6hrist cast a religious air around him. Thirdly# he trusts in luck.

QUESTION NO.+ Stran2e Ol (an 0e who is different from average# ordinary and common people is called a strange person. B5 (a) 5escri!e -antiago as a )strange old man). 3irstly# -antiago)s senses are uni ue. -antiago himself admits# #I a% a stran2e ol %an#. (!) 5escri!e the old man as a tragic hero. 0is return late in night carrying the mast on his shoulders# is evocative of 6hrist)s march towards )al.Thirdly# -antiago is a 6hrist in disguise. (c) . .# all his senses are acute.e. 0e is strange in the sense that his senses# eating patterns and ideas are not like that of general people.ary. *ooked at in this perspective# -antiago is definitely a religious figure.hen he ventures his odyssey# he muses on the smells# sights and sounds i. +ven turtling# early sun and old age have not weakened the eyesight of -antiagoH -econdly# -antiago is almost a superman in his eating . *ike 6hrist# he suffers on the wood 77 his !oat for three days.hat is the significance of -antiago)s dreamsJ =a> Santia2o -. Ironically# 0emingway)s eyesight was weak !ut his hero)s vision is sharp.

0e is also in internal conflict when he considers it a sin to . 0e has a tragic flaw or hamartia that causes his downfall. $mazingly# he eats turtle eggs and drinks the nauseous shark liver oil. 3irstly# a perfect tragic hero is imperfect. $!ove all# he is a hunter who loves his prey and says# #'ish.+ Tra2i" 5ero -antiago is a modern tragic hero. -econdly# a tragic hero is always in conflict.e.# imperfection# hamartia# anagnorisis# conflict and cathersis. =. 3or him# eating is not a!out pleasure !ut a painful act that he must endure for strength. 0owever# he possesses all the ualities of an ideal tragic protagonist i.patterns. I lo. Thirdly# his ideas are unconventional.ery %u"h#. /ride and humality co7 exist in him. -antiago is in external conflict against fishermen# 2arlin and sharks. -antiago also suffers from a hamartia which is his pride that presses him to G 2o far out# into the sea. 0e is !etter !ut not the !est. 0e does not follow the $ristotelian principle of the high lineage of the tragic hero. -antiago also shows anagnorisis !y admitting his !lunder at four different places. 0e remains dedicated to his principles a!ove concerns of material gain or survival. 2oreover# he does not hunger for food as normal people do.e you an res!e"t you .> Santia2o -. 0is concept of pain differs from common people.

0owever# -antiago)s !elief# #+ %an "an .erythin2 6ills e. These things make his dreams significant !ecause these tell his past# show his gallant spirit and !oast up his morale. ="> Si2nifi"ane of Santia2o-s 8rea%s -antiago dreams three times a!out four things.e estroye . This shows that he moved to 6ojimar in 6u!a as a young man. 3irstly# the dreams highlight -antiago)s past.ut not efeate # gives us relief.e fear !ecause we recognize similar possi!ilities in us.erythin2 else in so%e way#. . 2oreover# he dreams of $frica when he was a !oy. 0e sees coasts# mountains# lions and porpoises in his dreams. 0e dreams !efore going to the fishing expedition# during the fishing expedition and after the fishing expedition. -antiago)s poverty# solitude and downfall excite feelings of pity in us.kill the fish and then justifies the killing !y saying# #E. -econdly# the dreams imply that -antiago has a gallant spirit. The coasts of $frica in his dreams indicate that he was !orn at *anza %ota in the 6anary Islands. Thus -antiago is not a 6u!an !ut a S!anish e?!atriate. The mountains in his dreams signify that his spirit possesses the capacity of suffering and sense of . Thirdly# a tragic hero invokes in us feelings of pity# fear and relief called cathersis.

hat in your opinion is the most fanciful image in GTartaryGJ (c) .commitment e ual in magnitude to mountains.hat are the new year resolutions of +liza!eth -ewellJ =a> 3E$SONI'I)+TION IN &EISU$E .!efore whom the other fishermen are -!y2%ies. (!) . The porpoises in his dreams show his love for sea7creatures. 06 (a) . POETRY QUESTION NO. Thirdly# the dreams !aost up the old man)s morale. The lions in his dreams function as sym!ols of youth# pride# power# action and !etter future.hat is personificationJ +xplain personification in G*eisureG. In fact# his spirit makes him a -2iant. These make him feel strong# youthful# confident and happy. In fact# the lions are his prop in predicament.who can !e cowed down !y considerations of fate. 4.

In his poem #&eisure## . . =. ./ersonification is a literary device. It is an ontological metaphor in which an inanimate o!ject or a!straction is represented as a living person. These are the optical organs of her figure which have attraction and perception. These are the terminal structures of her !ody which have !ones# muscles and joints. -econdly# 8eauty is !lessed with eyes. Ironically# modern man has grown !lind to his surroundings.illiam 5avies has personified .eauty. &nfortunately# modern man has no time to enjoy the !allet of this !allerina.> T5E (OST '+N)I'U& I(+4E . $lthough the smile takes no time to reach the lips yet modern man is so !usy in his worldly pursuits that he cannot wait for the arrival of smile on the !eautiful face of 8eauty. 0e has given it the ualities of a young girl who has dancing feet# sensory eyes and smiling lips. 3irstly# 2adam 8eauty has feet. Thirdly# 8eauty possesses lips. These are the expressive organs of her physi ue which gain smile from the eyes.ith these anatomical structures# she is leaping# jumping# skipping# hopping and jiving.ith these sensual organs# she not only detects light !ut also smile from her milieu.

. I.# This is the most fanciful image !ecause it is totally different from reality and is very wonderful.e an s"i%itar. . -o it is difficult to say which of the images is more fanciful than the others.alter 5e *a 2are has employed at least twenty concrete images.# unreal and wonderful image# then it is the kinetic image made in the last four lines of the third stanza of the poem. In his poem# #Tartary#.e. The other images 77 the !ed of ivory# the throne of gold# peacocks in the court# tigers in the forests# fish in the pools# colourful lamps# musical instruments and o!jects of Nature 77 are delightful images !ut they represent real scenes. 0owever#the image of gorgeously attired potentate of Tartary# riding a chariot driven !y seven ze!ras is pure fancy. 0ere the poet saysA #+n ere shoul wane the %ornin2-star. +n Ee.In *iterature# a word or expression that refers to an o!ject or uality which appeals to one or more of the senses and the feelings is called image. 0owever# if we are forced to select the most fanciful i.on %y ro.ras se. In fact# the whole poem is a succession of visual# auditory# olfactory# gustatory# tactile and kinetic images.en shoul raw %y "ar Throu2h Tartary-s ar6 2la es.

-econdly# she pledges that she will engage herself in introspection two times everyday. -he is a realist and !elieves in the fact# #Truth is .> 8is"uss the !oe% #3atriot into Traitor# as a ra%ati" %onolo2ue. Instead of drinking wine# she will # rain lon2 rau2hts of /uiet# as a medical tonic to purify her soul. 8ut she is not an escapist like . In her poem# #New *ear $esolutions## +liza!eth -ewell has mapped out three revolutionary resolutions !efore the dawn of the new year.alter 5e *a 2are and 2aya $ngelou. -he will remind herself of her responsi!ilities and lia!ilities. 3irstly# she resolves that she will not talk# chat# murmur or whisper much in her future. No dou!t# reality has G!ony armsG. Thirdly# she decides to gra!!le with the realities of life.="> $ESO&UTIONS O' T5E 3OETESS +ver since the 8a!ylonian $ge# people have !een making new year resolutions to improve their life style. -he thinks that uietude will cure her spiritual and moral diseases like lie# !ack!iting and slander etc. QUESTION NO. =. -he hopes that reality will give her self7satisfaction# !lessed relief and spiritual exultation. -he will try to discover the reality a!out her inner personality. . -he resolves to remain most of the time silent# think a!out what she is and face the realities with contention.eauty#. 07 =a> Write a "hara"ter-s6et"h of the wo%an as e!i"te in #Wo%an Wor6#. -he thinks that self7identity will !e a school of profundity# morality and wisdom for her.

In her poem# #Wo%an Wor6## 2aya $ngelou has delineated a type of a traditional house woman who represents the hardworking women of proletariat. .="> 8o you a2ree with EliEa. -he is a poor and responsi!le woman who loves nature very much. 0er sense of responsi!ility has made her a dutiful# hardworking and patient !eing. -he !uys# cooks and serves the food.isho! that the art of losin2 is not har to %asterF =a> )5+$+)TE$ O' WO(+N In *iterature# a mental image of a person is called character and a character who represents a class or group is called type. -he looks after the children. -he is una!le to get the expensive pleasures of life. -he not only manages her house !ut also maintains her garden.eth . In short# she is a !usy machine. 3irstly# she is a poor lady. -he has no spare money to get the clothes mended !y a tailor. -he cannot keep a gardener to look after her garden. -he cannot afford a maid to do her domestic chores. -he lives in a ramshackle hut. -he does at least twelve works from dawn to dusk !ut has no complains. -econdly# she is a responsi!le matron. In fact# these are the o!vious signs of her poverty.

*ike many other dramatic monologues of 8rowning #3atriot into Traitor# is also a fine example of this genre !ecause it has a single speaker# a silent audience and dramatic situation. -econdly# the poem has a silent audience. This audience consists of people who adore or a!hor someone unexpectedly. It is a #%ono.erse#. There is no dialogue !etween the speaker and the audience. 0e is# in fact# #a soul in a"tion#. This implied presence of an auditor .ra%a in .> + 8$+(+TI) (ONO&O4UE 5ramatic monologue refers to a type of poetry and %o!ert 8rowning is master in it. Instead of enjoying the company of her children# she wants to enjoy the company of nature.Thirdly# she is a lover of nature. 3irstly# the poem has a solitary speaker who is patently not the poet. -he has idealized nature !ecause idealization is necessary for survival. In this critical situation# he is freely giving vent to his feelings to reveal the inner working of his mind. 0e is an erstwhile worshipful leader who is receiving unearned punishment. -he wishes to enjoy sunshine# rain# dewdrops# storms and snow7flakes. =. $ddressing the o!jects and phenomena of nature she says# #*ou-re all that I "an "all %y own#.

e fear !ecause we recognize similar possi!ilities in us. 0owever# we do not agree with her !ecause material things are never lost# real losses are eternal and the poetess herself fails to master this so7called art. ="> T5E +$T O' &OSIN4 #One +rt# is a !eautiful villanelle in which +liza!eth 8ishop claims# #The art is losin2 isn-t har to %aster# . Time can assuage the pain of . If they mislaid permanently# we can get their su!stitutes. .e may run into them any time. They have chances of retrieval. The leader)s downfall excites feelings of pity in us. . Thus tangi!le things are never lost. -econdly# the real losses are the losses of those things that lose their existence. 5oor keys# watches and houses etc are not lost !ecause they retain their existence. 0owever# the leader)s !elief# #-Tis 4o shall re!ayG I a% safer so# gives us relief. 3irstly# material things are never lost !ut misplaced. The death of our dear ones is an example of these losses. Thirdly# the poem presents a tragic dramatic situation. It invokes in us feelings of pity# fear and relief called catharsis.distinguishes this dramatic monologue from a solilo uy in which the speaker is alone.

It is !ecause the reaper is alone# her voice is superior to that of a nightingale and the poet himself is prone to melancholy. -o how can we agree with her flippancyH QUESTION NO.ordsworth calls the song of the solitary reaper )a melancholy strain) even though he does not understand the language of the song. The rhythm of the poem is choked up.> Why oes Sha6es!eare "all ol "hil ishness-F a2e -a se"on ="> 5ow a!!ro!riate is the title of the !oe% #+ 3oison Tree#F =a> + (E&+N)5O&* ST$+IN )$ melancholy strain) means a sad song. 0ence it is impossi!le to master the art of losing. Thirdly# the poetess herself fails to master this art.loss !ut can never return us a lost mother# father or friend. . In his poem# #The Solitary $ea!er## . 09 =a> Why oes Wor sworth "all the solitary rea!er-s son2 -a %elan"holy strain-F =. There are many glottal pauses# signifying that the poetess is trying to hold !ack the tears and having trou!le controlling her view point.

=.+ SE)ON8 )5I&8IS5NESS *ife is a cycle and old age is a stage where the cycle is returned to its !eginning i. Thus he naturally calls the song of the solitary reaper )a melancholy strain).3irstly# the reaper is alone 77 an idea emphasized five times in the poem. In G$ll the .e.ordsworth has compared the voice of the solitary reaper with that of the nightingale so the song of the solitary reaper is also )a melancholy strain). The 0oly Luran states# G0e whom we !ring unto old age# we reserve him creationG. 2any poets use nightingales as a sym!ol of melancholy in their poems. It means there is no one in the society with whom she can share her pent7up emotions. $t the end of this poem# he mentions that he sometimes finds himself in a )pensive mood). Thirdly# the poet himself is prone to melancholy. -econdly# it is a traditional idea that nightingales are connected to the idea of melancholy. Thus she shares her emotions with Nature in loneliness and the poet rightly calls her song )a melancholy strain).> O&8 +4E . This has made her life melancholic. To prove this# we jump to his poem #8affo ils#. 8ecause .# childishness.orld)s a -tageG# -hakespeare calls .

The memory of a grandparent corresponds the memory of a grand child. They cannot think a!out their lives wisely. They !ecome forgetful like that of children. Their immune system is very poor. This similarity again proves that man is )once a man and twice a child). They are una!le to concentrate on anything. They cannot talk clearly and audi!ly. Thus senile dementia is a return to infancy. 3irstly# oldsters !ecome weak and fee!le like that of infants. ="> TIT&E O' T5E 3OE( $ good title of a poem corresponds the content of the poem. It is a common experience of life that aged people are dependent on others in the same way as kids are dependent on others. Thirdly# decrepit people !ecome victims of amnesia. Thus -hakespeare rightly calls old age )a second childishness). 8oth lack retention. 8oth cannot earn their !red and !utter# and a caretaker is necessary for them. -econdly# old people are helpless like that of children. The title #+ 3oison Tree# is not very appropriate . They cannot walk at ease. They often forget persons# places and things. 8oth lack physical and mental energies.old age )a second childishness) !ecause old people !ecome weak# dependent and forgetful like that of children.

e"ause I )oul Not Sto! for 8eath#F =.> #&i2hts Out# . 8ut this analogy is not suita!le. $dam and +ve did not die after eating the apple from this tree !ut the poet)s enemy dies. 0owever# if the foe represents the poet)s mental disharmony and the poison tree his wrath# then the title matches the content of the poem.illiam 8lake stands for the tree in /aradise. 2oreover# @od does not rejoice in killing 0is enemies like that of the poet. -econdly# the poison tree is a physical manifestation of poet)s anger# growing in his mind for his enemy. "nly if the foe sym!olizes the poet)s mental distur!ance then the title is uite appropriate.orate.!ecause !i!lical tree was not like this tree and the poet)s foe approaches this tree without the poet)s knowing which is un!elieva!le. . QUESTION NO. 01 =a> Why oes E%ily 8i"6inson use the i%a2e of Aourney in #. In the end the poet is happy !ecause his wrath has killed the demons in his mind# and his mind is at peace now. 3irstly# the poison tree of . Ela. 8ut how does the enemy get into the poet)s mind without the poet)s knowingJ 0ow does poisonous thoughts kill the enemyJ "nly its shows the inappropriateness of the title.y E war Tho%as wells on the !ower of slee!. In short# ia%on has "ut ia%on .

The poetess has mentioned three major turns in life1 childhood# youth and old age. -econdly# on the route of a common journey# there are many o!stacles1 !ad roads# frosts# !umpers and !lockages etc. +arthly life is a journey !ecause journey and life !oth have turns# o!stacles and destinations. *ife also come to a halt when death !locks the route and pushes the traveler into the grave 7 the final destination. -imilarly# on the course of life# ups and downs are common. -urprises and losses give violent jolts. -orrows and worries cause injuries.arrel si2nify in #+fter +!!le 3i"6in2#F =a> T5E I(+4E O' HOU$NE* #. It has also several turns except a &7turn. The dominant one is the image of journey. Thirdly# a common journey comes to an end when the destination is approached. In short# the sojourn of life on .e"ause I )oul Not Sto! for 8eath# is a highly sym!olic poem in which +mily 5ickinson has employed many images. 6orrespondingly# life is traveled on the route called #ti%e#. It is# in fact# a metaphor for life7after7!irth and life7after7 death. 3irstly# a common journey is traveled on the routes called highways which have many turns. Thus the route of life is full of impediments.="> What oes the e%!ty .

$t last we have to surrender !efore the alluring force of sleep. 3irstly# sleep is so potent that its invasion is irresisti!le. -leep is cumulative1 if we resist it one day# it attacks the next day. +ven the no!lest task# the favourite !ook or the dearest face cannot keep us awake for a long time. its dominance of a panacea and its end is a new !eginning. -leep is so powerful that its invasion is inescapa!le.al% of hurt %in s#. It magically heals all despairs and miseries# and puts an end to all trou!les and pro!lems. It has so much potential in it that no passion or sentiment can challenge it. . =. -econdly# sleep is so powerful that its hold or dominance is a panacea. In fact# a sound sleep is the !est natural cure in the doctors) !ooks. Thirdly# the end of sleep is a new !eginning. .e are helpless in the hands of sleep.hen our . In his poem# #&i2hts Out#. .> 3OWE$ O' S&EE3 -leep is a state of rest for !ody# mind and spirit. +dward Thomas ex uisitely expounds the power of sleep.illiam -hakespeare rightly says a!out sleepA Gthe . *ife is a journey and sleep is a #!ower-fillin2 station#.earth ends and the odyssey of life7after7death starts from here.

-leep restores the energy in us. Thus when we wake up# we recommence the journey on "many a road track" that !ecome visi!le !y "the dawn's first crack".+$$E& #+fter +!!le 3i"6in2# is a highly sym!olic poem !y %o!ert 3rost.The most suggestive sym!ol is empty !arrel. 3irstly# the empty !arrel stands for the unfulfilled human desires. The poet has emptied many !arrels of apples in the cellar !ut is not satisfied !ecause his !arrel is still empty. The poet has emptied many !arrels of common and usual apples in . There are a few more apples on the !oughs to !e picked !y him. 0e yearns to get more and more. *iterally# an empty !arrel means Gan unfilled containerG !ut sym!olically it signifies the unfulfilled human desires# the greediness of the people and the hope for !right future.power to continue the journey ends# we# the travelers# go to sleep. Thirdly# the empty !arrel signifies the hope or expectation that we attach for the !right future. 8ut if he manages to pick the remaining few# his !arrel will still not !e filledH -econdly# the empty !arrel sym!olizes the greediness of the people. Though# in his sleep# he gets many !ig apples !ut his sleep remains uneasy due to greediness. The poet has desired for a !umper harvest of apples !ut in the end his !arrel remains empty. ="> SI4NI'I)+N)E O' E(3T* .

5. 0e worries that his premature death will leave his poetry in parenthesis.the cellar.ohn 4eats gives expression of his desolate fears.> Why oes *eats wish to . QUESTION NO. 0is death is hovering over him. The first uatrain descri!es his fear of not getting fame as a poet.e 'ears#F =. 0e fears that he will not !e a!le to achieve fame# enjoy !eauty and savour love !ecause he will sooner die of tu!erculosis. &awren"e thin6 of his e u"ation as #a""urse #F =a> :E+TS-S 'E+$S #When I 5a. Though he has a Gteeming !rainG# full of ideas# images and thoughts yet he will not !ecome a -hakespeare. 8ut now he wants to fill his empty !arrel with newer# fresher# more ripened and more juicy apples. The impending demise of 4eats creates limitations which !ecome his fears.e youn2 a2ain in #3oliti"s#F ="> Why oes 8. B0 =a> What are :eats-s fears as you fin in #When I 5a. The second uatrain highlights his fear of not getting .e 'ears# is a !eautiful sonnet in which .

E *OUN4 +4+IN Ieats composed #3oliti"s# in 2ay CM# '(DE when he was :D years old. =. Now he fears that he will never !ecome an inamorato of any!ody. In this poem# when he sees a !eautiful young girls standing !efore him# he wishes to !e young again. Thus to romance with the young girl# the poet wishes to !e young again.> WIS5 TO . 0is erstwhile !eloved# 'anny . The third uatrain expresses his fear of not getting a chance to develop a love7affair. 0e wishes so !ecause youth is the !est period for romance# escapism is always pleasant and he found a new vigour after undergoing the -teinach "peration. 0e says that heaven is !oasting of its !eauty with its starry nights and shadowy clouds. 3irstly# youth is the prime period for romance. -he needs the excitement of youth which the aged poet lacks. &nfortunately# his anticipated death will deprive him of relishing these !eautiful scenes. The girl standing !efore the poet is uite young to !e his daughter.rawn# has already deserted him. -econdly# the poet is an escapist. In order to avoid the stark realities of life like politics# traveling# war and war)s . The development of love affair !etween the aged and the young is almost impossi!le.enough time to enjoy the physical !eauty of Nature. Thus he says in the last couplet# #On the shore of the wi e worl I stan alone#.

3irstly# he thinks of his education as accursed !ecause it demolishes his feelings of affection for the snake.0owever# the educated man in the poet warns him that snake is a mortal foe of man. +ducation is considered a !lessing.e. It is !ecause it crushes his feelings of affection and sense of !eauty for the snake# and it induces him to kill it. 0owever# in his poem# #Sna6e## 5. Thirdly# after undergoing the -teinach "peration in '(DM# when he was aged N(# he found a new machismo in himself. . It is evident from !oth his poetry and his intimate relations with young women. 0ence the natural feelings of affection are defeated !y the rational feelings of hatred. 0is past was full of amour when he used to love (au 4onne# his childhood !eloved. 0e wants to em!race her. ="> +))U$SE8 E8U)+TION The process !y which society transmits its accumulated knowledge# skills and values from one generation to another is called education. In other words# he wants to !e his young lover.alarms# he wants to flee into his past. Thus he wants to hold the girl standing !efore him in his arms.# his youth. 0ence to get pleasure# he wants to escape into his past i. *awrence thinks of it a curse. The natural man in the poet is delighted and honoured to have this reptile at his water7trough.0.

Thus the attempt to kill the snake was not an act of !ravery !ut of Bandalism committed !y an educated man. Thirdly# he condemns his education !ecause it misleads him. It compels him to assassinate the snake. MODERN ESSAYS QUESTION NO. No dou!t# the uni ue shape# colouration and locomotion of snake makes it the most enjoy the !eauty# fairness and grace of the snake !ut !eautiful animal in the world. 3. 0e hits it with a log. The instincts of the poet wants tothe o!hi io!ho.ia generated !y his education ceases him to do so. 0owever# the snake does not come !ack to !ite him. 00 . It proves the innocence and harmlessness of the snake.-econdly# he calls his education accursed !ecause it does not allow him to appreciate the !eauty of the snake.

=a> )ir"u%stan"es for the )reation of 3a6istan Irreconcila!le differences eventually lead to inevita!le separation. =.iliEation was %o ele an %oul e #F ="> #Whistlin2 of . Ela.> What is the si2nifi"an"e of the "on"lusion that #the whole fa. %eligiously# the 2uslims were monotheists while the 0indus were polytheists. -ocially# . e?!lain the "ir"u%stan"es whi"h le to the "reation of 3a6istan.ri" of "i.e for nature.ir s# shows its writer-s lo. 5emographically# the 2uslims were a minority as compared with the 0indus.=a> In the li2ht of &ia/uat +li :han-s s!ee"h. These circumstances were# in fact# the deep7rooted differences !etween the 2uslims and the 0indus.orate. In his speech G3a6istan an the (o ern Worl # delivered at 4ansas &niversity $merica in '(FK# Luaid7e72illat# *ia uat $li 4han !rought to light the circumstances which led to the creation of /akistan. Thus 0indu72uslim unity and amity were impossi!le in the su!7continent. The 2uslims and the 0indus were poles apart demographically# religiously# socially and economically.

Their co7existence was incongruous. It was also in the interest of the world peace. The !ogus peace enforced !y the 8ritish would have ended after the departure of the 8ritish from the su!7continent. +conomically# the 2uslims advocated private ownership and the 0indus attached weight to the concentration of wealth.the 2uslims !elieved in the e uality of all men whereas the 0indus adhered to a caste system. In short# a separate homeland was inevita!le for the 2uslims to live peacefully and according to their own political# religious# social and economical life style. 2oreover# the su!7continent was vast enough for two large countries.0. Thus the 2uslims and the 0indus were different in everything and must need different territories. /ayne) =. $s far as the conclusion of the essay #The E"li!se# !y Birginia . The demand of the 2uslims for divorce was very genuine and reasona!le as it was in the interest of !oth the 2uslims and the 0indus.e a ho%e of their own (..> Si2nifi"an"e of the )on"lusion 6onclusion is# in fact# a logical end of something. There is no !la"e li6e ho%e +ll %ust ha.

0owever# the return of light in the sun gives us a message of hope and su!stantiates our faith in $llah $lmighty ..ho is controlling all the processes of the universe. This light transforms the entire structure of human civilization into its original shape and splendor. $fter the eclipse# the light is restored in the sun. $n eclipse is a natural phenomenon. -econdly# the conclusion strengthens our trust in $llah $lmighty. 0owever# when it is revived we realize that nothing is more important to us than the sun. "nce again# the world !ecomes !right# colourful and popolous. The sun is lost for twenty7four seconds during this eclipse. Thus the sun is the flesh and !lood of this world. Thirdly# the conclusion implies that losing something makes us realize the importance of that thing.ri" of "i. It warns that man)s place on this earth is very precarious.oolf is concerned# it is very significant. $ll the advancements in knowledge and science cannot overcome this helplessness of man. 3irstly# the conclusion signifies the importance of the sun for the world.iliEation was %o elle an %oul e # shows the importance of the sun in the system of universe# strengthens our !elief in $llah $lmighty and discloses the worth of those things which are found after their loss. The phrase #the whole fa. The farmhouses# the villages and railway lines !ecome the centre of activity. .

0is faithful description of o!jects of nature# !eautiful presentation of phenomena of nature and acknowledgement of nature)s merciless potential# are evidence of his love for nature. 3irstly# his faithful description of o!jects of nature shows his strong affinity with nature.e for Nature 5.asif) ="> Writer-s &o.0. The presence of lam!s# turtles and doves etc# in this essay# sym!olizes his love for animals whereas daphne# crocus and celandine denote his love for plants. 8oth animals and plants are the living o!jects of nature and the writer is a lover of them. -econdly# his !eautiful presentation of the spectacular phenomena of nature demonstrates his love for nature. That is why he has given the .The thin2 that is foun after its loss is "alle hea. *awrence is a platonic lover of nature so he loves nature from !oth sides of the coin. 0owever# the writer)s love for nature is the greatest natural phenomena. (. Thirdly# the writer)s love for nature has recognized nature)s merciless potential.ir s# shows his a!sor!ing love for nature.asif $li . 0e has presented these divine acts to portray two other great natural phenomena1 winter and spring. 0e descri!es frost# wind# sunset and twilight as a lover descri!es the features of his !eloved. 0is essay #Whistlin2 of .en.

In short# the writer is an a. E%erson-s e?!erien"e of =. 0B =a> 8es"ri.e an a""ount of the isaster o""urre on +u2ust 1.> 4i. as 2i.er of nature-s uality. 01C5 at Na2asa6i. ="> Why oes *eats in"lu e a "o%!arison of his 2ran %other with his 2ran fatherF =a> E?!erien"e of 3ara"hute Hu%!in2 The act of exiting an aircraft and returning to earth with the aid of a parachute is called parachute jumping. In her essay #Ta6e the 3lun2e## @loria +merson has !eautifully descri!ed her personal experience of parachute jumping.en .ohn 5onne) QUESTION NO.e 4loria !ara"hute Au%!in2. -he has given a candid detail of all the major stages of parachute jumping1 diving# descending and landing. Then she !oarded #)essna 090# .dismal details of lacerated cadavers of lapwings# starlings# thrushes# red7wings and numerous other creatures.eauty hath su"h 2ra"e +s I ha. No s!rin2 nor su%%er .e seen in one autu%nal fa"e (.i lo.y I"hi%aru. $fter completing her training# she wore her jump suit# !oats and parachute.

Then it was her turn. $t last# the most !eautiful and thrilling experience of her life came to an end. %eaching an altitude of twenty three hundred feet# her companion made a smooth jump. 0owever# on !eing harshly ordered !y her instructor# she dived in harassment.ers 6now why the . 3rom this experience she also came to know# #Only s6y i. 0owever# the landing was inevita!le. -he safely landed on her feet in a sandpit with a !ump. -he was so tingled with excitement that she wanted to stay in the air forever. ($nonymous) =. The parachute !ecame the most lova!le and docile toy. The parachute was deployed immediately. -he saw the endless sky and the !eautiful earth in wonderful colours and textures. -he was praised !y many people for her courage and determination.ir s sin2#.along with a companion. -he !ecame nervous.> 8isaster O""urre at Na2asa6i The study of the essay INa2asa6i. In a moment# her fear was gone. +u2ust 1. +ven the wind felt kind# and the trees looked soft.01C5J !y 2ichaito Ichimaru gives us a detailed narration of .

To sum up# it was an awful# horri!le and terri!le tragedy which !efell the people of Nagasaki on that day.# Thousands of people were seriously injured. -o these were piled up and !urnt with the help of woods. ="> )o%!arison . The air dose of radiation was more than :KKK raids. The dead !odies were large in num!er that it was a !ig pro!lem to dispose them off. They too died after a few days.The writer narrates that it was a sunny day.etween 4ran %other an 4ran father The essay #(y 4ran father# !y .o ies. ITheir "lothes were in ra2s an shre s of s6in hun2 fro% their . T h e n o i s e o f t h e i r c r i e s w a s un!eara!le. The atom !om! was dropped !y $llied forces.. +verywhere there was death and destruction. The picture of ruin comes alive !efore our eyes through the impressive narration of the writer. They looked like ghosts. 0owever# greater part of the essay reveals a character analysis of Ieats) grandfather and grandmother.8.apan# on $ugust (# '(MF. Ieats !asically presents the memories of writer)s childhood# especially related to maternal. .the destruction caused !y the atom !om! in Nagasaki# the city of . The !lack rain started to fall. The people who were coming !ack from hypo7center were in misera!le condition. The !lue sky turned to !lack. $ll of a sudden# at ''am a !7C( appeared and dropped an atom !om!.

. -he was kind7hearted# considerate and helpful !y nature. Though he was never harsh or unkind to him# yet it was a practice to fear and praise him. These were the writer)s views a!out his grandfather and grandmother. $s far as Ieats) grandmother is concerned# she was totally different sort of character. 0er room was !eautifully decorated with different paintings. In short# she had a personality of her own and every!ody loved and admired her. 0e could even handle the !urglars himself instead of going to the law. Though she once punished him !ecause he was playing with a servant# yet he always loved to !e in her company. 8eing the only son of his parents# he had very few friends. /hysically he was very strong !esides having a hard temper. Ieats has included a comparison of their characters to magnify the salient features of each characters.The writer says that his grandfather# Willia% 3olle? 'en# was a man of his own nature. This shows his nature of remaining alone# though he has ac uaintance with some famous people. -he always took keen interest in looking after her garden. $ll his children were afraid of their proud father. This comparison also shows the difference !etween man and woman# particularly old ones. 2oreover# she had a fantastic aesthetic nature and admirer of art.

eauty In ustry#. 0e always welcome the writer with a smiling face. 5ow far o you a2ree with ShawF =a> (y Tailor . 03 =a> Why oes &ea"o"6 re2ar the tailor as #i%%ortal#F =. 0e had !een dealing near him for the last thirty years.hen the writer came to know of his tailor)s sudden death he was shocked.> 3oint out the e?a%!les of irony an 5u?ley-s essay #The . 0ence he considered him an i%%ortal fi2ure.+n I%%ortal )hara"ter . 0e was like something fixed and permanent surrounded !y the tailoring shop.en the art of 6ee!in2 !eo!le in health#. 0e thought that he should enjoy life for ever. 0e spread the suit material on his lift knee to show it to the writer. hu%our in ="> #8o"torin2 is not e. 0owever# during this long association# he did not analyze any change in his character and nature. 0e measured only his chest and flattered him saying that it !e a little fuller than !efore.QUESTION NO. 0e always stood contained !y the !ack part of his shop with a measure tape around his neck. 0e had always found him at indistinguisha!le place and in the same posture. Then he would ask the writer if he needed anything in shirting and .

eauty In ustry# "verall research indicates that (K. of women are dissatisfied with their appearance. -o# the writer expected that his tailor would always !e near!y standing and greeting his customers. The !uilding and the payment !e always done !y correspondence. The writer has employed . In his essay #The . 0is posture# his speech and his movements remained unchanged for such a long time. In the appendage he talked a!out weather.hosiery. 3or the writer# he is a static figure# a type of personality that is not !ound to change. In order to make his point of view forceful and impressive# he has mixed humour with irony. The date of delivery !e always a weak from Tuesday. The writer had never seen any shift in the !ehavior of his tailor. 8y humour we mean presenting something in the most ridiculous manner# whereas irony is used to say something and suggest something else. =.> Irony an 5u%or in #The .eauty In ustry# $ldous 0uxley descri!es the women of modern world who indulge themselves in the ha!it of using excess of cosmetics !y using a literacy device# "o%i" irony. That is why he calls him #an i%%ortal fi2ure#.

This remark is uite justified and I too agree with him. ="> 8o"torin2 is not the art of 6ee!in2 !eo!le in health #8o"torin2 is not e..en the art of 6ee!in2 the !eo!le in health# is a thought7provoking remark of @. -haw in his essay G+re 8o"tors (en of S"ien"eF#. In short# in an ironical and humorous manner# the writer has tried to condemn the negative approach of women towards life. 0is ironical !ut a !it humorous remarks that the campaign for more physical !eauty seems to !e !oth a tremendous success and lamenta!le failure# are full of meaning and purpose.. 0e humorously says that it is all !ecause of the race to look attractive.these two literary terms uite artistically to criticize the modern women# who use cosmetics just to look attractive. Through this remark he is trying to tell us that the duty of a doctor is . The writer humorously attaches the privilege of !eing attractive and !eautiful to the feminine side and gives the figure of 'DK million pounds which is used on this activity# almost twice the revenue of India. 0owever# he# very ironically says that today)s women try to !e more attractive and less virtuous than their grandmothers.

etween =. $ doctor is always consulted when a person is only suffering from some kind of ailment. .e. 0ence# keeping oneself healthy and curing a disease# are poles apart. To keep oneself healthy demands more than just medicine i.ut iffi"ult to s!ot in oneself#. This means he is not trying to keep his patient healthy !ut only curing the particular disease. If a person has all these things# then he remains healthy.a"helorF ="> #It is .eer. Is it really soF .oh% 5osts an 4uestsF ifferentiate . QUESTION NO.# proper diet# proper exercise and proper fitness.only to cure illness and not to keep people healthy. In that case the doctor only diagnoses the ailment and prescri!es the suita!le medicine for its remedy.> What are the real !ro. 0C =a> 5ow oes (a? .ery easy to see fanati"is% in other !eo!le.le%s fa"e .en the art of 6ee!in2 !eo!le in health# is uite right and justified. These are two different fields.y a . 5octors only deal with one field and ignore the other. 0ence# -haw)s remark #8o"torin2 is not e.

"n the !asis of it# 2ax 8eer!ohm in his essay #5osts an 4uests# has divided the whole mankind into two distinct classes1 hosts and guests like @elett 8urgess has divided it into . -econdly# the writer gives the temperamental dissimilarity !etween these two groups. $ person gets the la!el of a host if he invites someone to dine with him at a restaurant# orders the meal and !ears the expenses.etween 5osts an 4uests "ffering or accepting hospitality is a uality found in every human !eing. $ person is a host if he possesses an active or positive instinct to offer hospitality.ro%i es an Sul!hites.=a> 8ifferen"e . "n the other hand a person gets the la!el of a guest if he accepts the invitation with delight# praises the food while eating# does not pay the !ill and feels a pleasant sensation of not paying for it. 0e is a !orn7 host or a !orn7guest. "n the other hand a . 3irstly# the writer tells the general difference !etween these two classes. +very human !eing is either a host or a guest !y instinct. 0is instinct dominates his personality. $lthough this classification is only on the theoratical level# he has clearly drawn the general# temperamental and circumstantial differences !etween these two classes.

=. 0e always finds himself on the verge of some dilemma. The rich and the poor is an undisputed division# however# the rich as hosts and the poor as guests is a poor one.a"helor-s 8ile%%a# !y 0er!ert @old highlights the pro!lems faced !y a !achelor in this world# especially in +%eri"an so"iety. -ome poor persons also love to entertain others.y a .> 3ro. 0is life is much disorganized.person is a guest if he has a passive or negative instinct to accept the hopitality.le%s 'a"e . The writer says a !achelor is a person who does not know where he stands in this civilized society. . 0e feels himself free without a wife or children to look . 0e always feels himself alone in this world. The mirror gives him the reflection of a healthy young man with a lot of time# chance# and money1 who can eat# drink# and roam at will.hen a !achelor looks into a mirror# he has an altogether different idea a!out himself. /ro!a!ly# he finds himself misfit in this environement !ut having no alternative where to go. %iches often nurture the instincts of a host and poverty usually fosters the instincts of a guest. 6ircumstances react on the character. 0e has no !elief# no notions# and no aims in life. Thirdly# there are circumstantial differences !etween hosts and guests. 6onventionally# the rich give and the poor receive.a"helor The essay G. 0e is often found in parties wandering alone.

If we deeply look into the matter# we find out that it is really so. In short# these are some common pro!lems faced !y an $merican !achelor as expressed in this essay. 0e always tosses in !ed !ut sometimes fortunate enough to get a meeker like him as a partner. 0e has intimacy with pretty girls only in imagination# !ut a failure in real life. They are egoists# self7confirming and findfaulters.ery easy to see fanati"is% in other !eo!le.after. . There are two %aAor ty!es of !achelors. 3orster says# #It is . 8ut same mirror sometimes gives him some displeasing aspects as well. ="> 'in in2 'anati"is% in Other 3eo!le 3anaticism means excessive intolerance of opposing views. 0e feels himself alone and unwanted !y society. It is !ecause people lack tolerance.2. In his essay #Toleran"e## +. The other is a !it mediocre# always considering himself a hero in dreams. They always need true love !ut seldom get and always get what they do not want. It is an unnecessay and unreasona!le enthusiasm for one)s doctrine or stand7point. . There is one who is handsome# charming and always in search of new girls and even getting them.ut iffi"ult to s!ot in oneself#. 8ut the pro!lem with !oth of them is that they are not satisfied with themselves.

Tolerance is a dull virtue so it is almost missing in all spheres of life 77 in the ueue# in the street# in the railway station# in the office# at the factory# at the telephone and a!ove all among classes# races and nations. 05 . 8ut are they not e ually guilty of !eing prejudicial to the 8lackJ Thus the writer rightly says# GIt is very easy to see fanaticism in other people# !ut difficult to spot in oneselfG.3irstly# it is easy to see fanaticism in others and difficult to spot in oneself !ecause people lack tolerance. They produce hatred among people and distur! the peace of society. -econdly# people are egocentric.ews. They consider tolerance a weakness or surrender. They do not respect the ideas of others. It only means to !e !road7minded# li!ral# calm and patient. QUESTION NO. They consider their thinking# !eliefs and creeds correct# truthful and the highest of all. Thirdly# people are self7confirmig and findfaulters. They do not understand that putting up with people does not mean yielding to them. $!sense of tolerance and compromise makes people narrow7minded and fanatic. 3or example# the +nglishmen ususlly accuse the Nazis of !eing intolerant to the . These people are responsi!le for the colour uestions and racial prejudices.

orate.o y fitF =a> (anners are Infe"tious Infectious means lia!le to !e transmitted to people. 2ay !e that fellow has had a uarrel with his wife on !reakfast ta!le. $ !us conductor on *ondon routes was very nice and helpful to .e that all #fanati"al "ree s# are har%ful to %an6in F ="> 5ow o .ita%ins 6ee! hu%an . In his essay #On Sayin2 3lease# $lpha of the /lough has very aptlycommented on good and !ad manners as infectious. Thus due to one person)s discourtesy# a chain action started and so many people were infected with it. The second example is of good manners. The writer has propagated his view point with two examples. =. The wife might have !een annoyed !y the cook who might have !een irritated on the !ehaviour of the house7maid. so also are 2oo %anners#.ertran $ussel !ro.> 5ow oes . The first example is of !ad manners.=a> #If . Ela.a %anners are infe"tious. $ fellow did not say GpleaseG to a lift7operator and was thrown of the lift !y him.arious . If the !ad manners of one person influence others and make them rude and ill7tempered1 the good manners of one person also affect others and make them polite and kind.

. $s we live in a society so the ways and manners of people are !ound to affect others.ews are the salt of the earth as professed !y the .> 5ar%fulness of 'anati"al )ree s 8ertrand %ussell in his essay #S"ien"e an @alues# says that all fanatical creeds are harmful to mankind.ews !elong to the worst race on earthG as claimed !y the @erman Nazis while G$ll . *ike infections they travel from person to person leaving their !itter or sweet taste in the environment. 0e even gave the writer a ticket when the writer !oarded his !us without any money in his pockets.his passengers.ews. $s a result his passengers could not help !eing nice and polite. The desire for a fanatical creed is one of the greatest evils in human history. In short# the writer has rightly said that manners are infectious1 whether they are !ad or good. 0is civility radiated comfort# joy and peace. =. 0e treated the !lind# the old and the young ones carefully and lovingly. The examples of fanatical creeds areA G$ll 6atholics will go to 0ellG as said !y the /rotestants and G$ll /rotestants will go to 0ellG as asserted !y the 6atholics1 G$ll 2uslims are infidelsG as said !y the 6hristians and G$ll 6hristians are infidelsG as alleged !y the 2uslims1 G$ll . They uickly spread from one person to another like a contagious disease.

The supporters of Trotsky founded their fanatical creeds in the %ussian 8olshevik %evolution of '(': for the forci!le enforcement of communism. $ll these totally different fanatical creeds of 6hristians 6atholicism and %ussian 6ommunism have !een claiming heavenly salvation at the cost of earthly salvation.o y $ vitamin is an organic compound re uired !y an organism as a vital nutrient in limited amounts. The worshipers of 2ithra founded their fanatical creeds in a solar paradise. There are thirteen vitamins that a human !ody needs for health and fitness. 0owever# science on the other hand aims at the spread of earthly salvation on the condition of all kinds of tolerance for each other. ="> I%!ortan"e of @ita%ins for 5u%an . The early 6hristians even started persecuting each other for minor deviations of their fanatical creeds. This has happened in its worst shape in the late %oman +mpire whose climax turned into a permanent downfall in M:N $5. These include four fat7solu!le vitamins1 $#5#+ and . The fanatical creeds of /lotinus took their origin in /lato)s utopia of eternal world.-uch fanatical creeds have caused nothing !ut !loodshed and massacre. Next the same ugly situation arose in the %enaissance of the 'Nth century.

8eri7!eri and pellagra are caused !y the scarcity of 8 vitamins. The dearth of vitamin $ may lead to a curious condition of the eye called xerophthalmia. The writer also proscri!es us to take vitamins in the form of ta!lets. Thus vitamins play a significant role in keeping the human !ody healthy and fit. 5eficiency and excess of vitamins also affect human health. Bitamins $ plays a really !ig part in !ody growth# immune system and eye7 sight. Bitamin 4 is the clot7master. 4enneth . Bitamin 6 helps to heal cuts and wounds. "ne of major causes of human infertility is the lack of vitamin +. In his essay #The @ita%ins## 5r. .e must get them from fresh vegeta!les# fruits# cereals and meat to keep our !ody ro!ust. Bitamin 5 is necessay for strong !ones and + is indispensa!le for fertility. The lack of vitamin 5 can cause rickets. If the vitamins are missing from human diet# then the supply of mere car!ohydrates# proteins# fats and minerals fail to keep us in proper state of health. +ach vitamin has specific jo!s.4# and nine water solu!le vitamins1 E 8 vitamins and vitamin 6. 8 vitamins help human !ody to synthesize proteins and energy.alker has !eautifully descri!ed the role of various vitamins for human !ody. . -imilary high dose of some vitamins may make human !ody sick. In short# for the fitness of human !ody an ade uate uantity of vitamin is inevita!le.

e the /uarrel .een lo. SHORT STORIES QUESTION NO. 6 =a>What is the role of Ni"6 + a%s in #The :illers#F =.etween Usta (an2u an the 4ora Sol ier. =The New )onstitution> .e .eatri"e .2.efore yin2 in #$a!!a""ini-s 8au2hter#.> #I woul rather ha. ="> 8es"ri. not feare # says . Ela.e .orate.

oy#. 0e also offers him his help !y saying# #8on-t you want %e to 2o an see the !oli"e#F Thirdly# he is a peace7loving person. Thus when he comes !ack 0enry)s *unch7 %oom# he says to @eorge# #I-% 2oin2 to 2et out of this town#. 0is age !ecomes evident when $l and 2ax mock his masculinity !y calling him a #. 3irstly# he is a little dude of a!out eighteen or nineteen who works at 0enry)s *unch7%oom with @eorge and -am in -ummit. There he warns "le $nderson of the impending danger to "le)s life from $l and 2ax.=a> $ole of Ni"6 + a%s "le $nderson# $l# 2ax# @eorge# -am and Nick $dams are the main characters of the story# #The :illers#. 2oreover# when -am says# #&ittle .oys always 6now what to o## his teenage gets proved.ri2ht . 0owever# the protagonist is Nick $dams. 0e is a typical 0emingway hero who is learning #the "o e#. $fter the departure of $l and 2ax# he goes to 0irsch)s 8oarding 0ouse. -econdly# he is a responsi!le citizen. 0e is a teenage !oy# responsi!le citizen and peace7loving individual. . 0e recognizes the horror of evil and attempts to do something a!out it# !ut when he cannot# he decides to run away from the area of gangsters.

0e moved a!out in the city to see colour and light# !ut there was none. an nee s lo.o y . 0e thought that the new constitution was in force.etween Usta (an2u an the 4ora Sol ier It was the morning of 'st $pril# '(DF in -outh $sia. ="> Quarrel . 0er evil power is merely a superficial disguise. &stad 2angu# the hero of the story #The New )onstitution# !y -aadat 0asan 2anto# got up earlier than usual. /olice also appeared on the scene. 0istory and literature presents many examples of it.# Thirdly# her heart and mind is grief7stricken. 2angu was apprehended.eatri"e-s Wish to . 0er father does not love her the way she needs. . -econdly# her soul is pristine. To recover the amount spent on the new plume of his horse# 2angu demanded five rupees for the service.elie. 2angu drove towards him. 3irstly# she is a lonely maiden. The day when a new constitution was supposed to !e promulgated.e as its aily foo . -he has no mother and no !rother. @iovanni accuses her of his !eing poisonous and even calls her #terri. -o under the illusion of e ual rights# he hit a !low under the chin of the soldier. The @ora soldier wanted to !e carried to the dancing girls) !azaar. 8aglioni causes hatred in the heart of @iovanni for 8eatrice. 0e gave the soldier a sound !eating. In desperation# the soldier !egan to shout for help. %y s!irit is 4o -s "reature. 0e went to the cantonment. 0ence she says# G4io. $lthough her sinister father has impregnated her !ody with poison# her soul remains pure.e &o. 0e shouted GNew constitutionHG GNew . 0e was waiting for a conveyance. 2any !lows followed.> . %appaccini uses her as a 2uinea !i2. Thus# to keep her emotionally sound and psychologically !alanced# she wishes the love of society. 0e set up his tonga and came on the road. There he saw the @ora soldier who had a!used him the year !efore in the drunken state. -oon a crowd gathered there. $ll the three characters make her life misera!le. 0e flew into exasperation. 8eatrice is also a poisonous girl !ut she never wants to !ecome an o!ject of fear !ut of love.anni.e it.e /oisonous women have long !een the em!odiment of fear. 0er #sister!lant#cannot re uite her love.e fe with !oison. -he wishes to !e loved !ecause she is alone# her soul is pristine and her mind is depressed. The demand of five rupees caused a violent !ickering !etween the two. In this dilemma# she only needs love# love and love. 0er life is confined to her house and garden.=.le#. The @ora soldier hit 2angu with his stick. thou2h %y . 2angu)s thigh was injured.

7 (a) .constitutionHG 8ut he was told that there was no new constitution. QUESTION NO. Thus she says# GI had enough with sick menG. -he fears that the sick %osen will soon leave her in the lurch like that of her sick hus!and. -he has a . 3irstly# +va wants to lead an independent life. 0owever# +va rejects all his offers of help !ecause she likes self7dependence# possesses self7respect and loves her late hus!and very much. $t last# the common Indian was put !ehind the !ars and it got proved that the 8ritish were still in rule. -o +va is in a great predicament. @od takes pity and sends an angel of help named %osen. -he thinks that no!ody will marry a poor widow with two daughters. -econdly# she is a paragon of self7respect.a-s $efusal to $osen-s 5el! 0itler kills relatives# migration ruins !usiness# disease snatches hus!and and daughters !ecome !urden. +ven %osen is ready for marriage !ut she refuses.hy does +va turn down every offer of %osen in GTake /ityGJ (!) 0ow does the -wallow sacrifice his life for the love of the 0appy /rinceJ (c) 5escri!e the effect of romantic love on the adolescent mind of the -mall 8oy. ($ra!y) =a> E.

$t the start of the story# he is shown to !e a romantic !ird who !elieves in the physical love. "n the first night he stops to help a seamstress and his ill son with the ru!y from the statue)s sword7hilt. -he does not want to let his name down. "n the second night he delays . 0owever# on the re uest of the statue# he procrastinates his journey three times. The -wallow is migrating to +gypt where he is awaited !y his friends. -he prefers starvation and loneliness to disgrace of her self7 respect.ilde.firm !elief in her own integrity. 0owever# as the tale advances# he falls in true love with the statue of a prince. In the end it seems that she goes to %osen)s window to surrender. =. The love for which he postpones his seasonal migratory flight towards +gypt# !ecomes an agent of charity and even sacrifices his life. 8ut +va never !reaks down. 0ence she plainly says no to each and every offer of help !y %osen. %osen)s pity# charity# love and marriage proposal all hurt her self7respect. @radually his love is transformed into a2a!e. 8ut it is just the hallucination of %osen as he wants to see her !reaking down !efore him. -he still calls him G2y $lexG. Thirdly# she has a great love for her late hus!and.> The $ole of Swallow The -wallow is a very lovely character in the short story #The 5a!!y 3rin"e# !y "scar .

his trip to help a starving playwright with one of the sapphire eye of the statue. In his mori!undity# he flies to the statue)s shoulder# kisses him on the lips and falls down dead at his feet. 0e always keeps her with him in his imagination. ="> Effe"t of $o%anti" &o.y# !y . In the meantime# snow is followed !y frost. 0e flies over the city and narrates the sufferings and miseries of the people to the statue. 3irstly# love makes the !oy highly imaginative. This is the !oy)s first and unre uited love which makes him an imaginative dude# parasitical follower and sentimental fool. $t day in the class7room and at night in the !ed7room# he envisages . . 0e is always o!sessed in the sweet thoughts of his sweet7heart. #+ra.oyce !eautifully depicts the effect of romantic love on the adolescent mind of a small !oy who is infatuated with the sister of a play7mate. "n the third night he stays to succor a destitute match7girl with the other sapphire eye of the statue.hen the statue !ecomes !lind of !oth eyes# the -wallow decides to live with him forever. The -wallow grows colder and colder.ames .e $ccording to 'reu # a love which has a !locked sexual urge is called romantic love. "ne !y one he plucks the gold leaves that cover the !ody of the statue and distri!utes them among the indigent of the city.

0e wants to hang around his !eloved all the time.ith a little money in the almost closed !azaar# he confronts with e!i!hany and returns home empty handed.rown fi2ure# !etween him and the page of !ook he strives to read. 0owever# love compels him to visit G$ra!yG. 0e promises his darling to procure a souvenir for her from G$ra!yG. ="> 5ow oes the story #The 8u"hess an the Heweler# refle"t the %oral e"a en"e of the En2lish aristo"ra"yF . Thirdly# love makes him a sentimental fool. -econdly# love converts him into a parasitical follower. .her !eautiful #. 8eing late# his aunt advises him to postpone his trip.uil an at%os!here of horror in #Tell-Tale 5eart#F =.+.anity of wo%en.> #The Ne"6la"e# is a satire on the . 3oe . $s soon as she comes at her doorstep# he uickly takes his !ooks and follows her to that point where their ways diverge. 8is"uss. 0is uncle gives him a little money. +very morning# he lies on the floor of his front room and anxiously waits for his !eloved to come out of her house for school. QUESTION NO. 9 =a> 5ow oes E.

3or seven nights# the narrator goes to kill the old man. Thirdly# the corpse of the old man fills us with shuddering horror. 0owever# on the eighth night# the old man wakes at a certain noise.Tale 5eart# !y +dgar $llen /oe# horror plays a tremendously vital role in the execution of the tale. "ne of the eyes of the old man is a!normal. -econdly# the process of killing generates horror. The revulsion exceeds to such an extent that he decides to kill the old man# perhaps his master. $fter gloating over his victim)s fear an hour# the protagonist lets out a ray of light at the #e. The narrator wants to eliminate a harmless and offenceless old man simply !ecause of his physical deformity. The eye chills him to the !ack!one. 0e pounces upon the old man and smothers him under !ed. The reason of the murder# the procedure of killing# the dismem!ering of the corpse and the relentless heart7!eat of the dead man are the major elements of horror in the story.e feel near nausea when the merciless killer hacks the corpse into pieces to conceal it . . In #The Tell . The narrator la!els it a #. The sight infuriates him.=a> 5orror in #The Tell .ulture eye#. 3irstly# the motive of the murder creates horror. The eye !eing closed# he takes no action.il eye#.Tale 5eart# $ very strong feeling of fear# shock or disgust is called horror.

under the wooden planks of the floor. #The Ne"6la"e# !y @uy de 2aupassant is an excellent satire on the vanity of women. The writer manifests that vanity has a fall.eauty /ueen at a !all# she procures a costly frock and !orrows a diamond necklace which are sym!ols of her vanity. -econdly# women)s excessive pride in their physical !eauty has !een criticized. The writer condemns this vain and pessimistic attitude of life. =. The a!sence of expensive stuff in her life makes her feel worthless and futile.> Satire on @anity of Wo%en $ literary work in which human vice or folly is attacked through irony# derision or wit is called satire. 2atilda is not satisfied with her poor hus!and# hum!le house and other modest !elongings. To !ecome a . 2atilda is very proud of her physical !eauty. Through the characters of 2atilda and 3orestier# the writer has satirized three aspects of women)s vanity1 discontent with life# excessive pride in physical !eauty and egoism to hide truth. Banity is# in fact# the uality of !eing vain and valueless. The necklace is lost and 2atilda has to . The horror gets intensified manifold when the conscience of the killer !egins to hear the relentless thro!!ing of the dead man)s heart getting louder and louder each moment. 3irstly# women)s dissatisfaction with life has !een satirized.

0e is a very greedy man. @am!ling# stealing# cheating# greediness and insolence were the prevailing vices among the elite class. It is the egoism of 3orestier that she does not tell 2atilda that the necklace is fake. 0is character amply reveals the moral decadence of the contemporary upper class. Thus !oth women have fear of !eing original and this attitude is intimately connected to vanity or . Thirdly# women)s egoism to hide the truth has !een ridiculed. There are two main characters in the story 77 "liver 8acon and a 5uchess. These characters fully reflect the moral decadence of the +nglish aristocracy. The story GThe 8u"hess an the Heweller# written in '(DE !y Birginia . -imilarly# 2atilda does not tell 3orestier that the necklace has !een lost.oolf clearly reflects the decadence of moral values of the +nglish aristocracy after the Bictorian +ra.pay a heavy price for it. +ven though he has !ecome the richest jeweler in +ngland# yet he is not satisfied.ain2lory. Now he !uys fake pearls . "liver 8acon is a %epresentative of naoveau aristocracy. 2oreover# he is a philanderer. 0e has deceived 2ademoiselle who used to stick roses in his !utton hole. ="> (oral 8e"a en"e of the En2lish +risto"ra"y The act or process of falling into an inferior condition is called decadence.

QUESTION NO.ife in #The Sha ow in the $ose 4ar en# !y 5.etween the 'ren"h Sol ier an the 3anther.y ifferent fro% her el er sistersF =a> The Wife -.e . -he is a thief. 0er character also highlights the lax ethics of the no!ility of that time.+ Nostal2i" )hara"ter -ome memories fade away with the passage of time. -he has no respect for her hus!and. -he is so !ankrupt morally that she stakes the honour of her daughter for money.0.> 8es"ri.e the lo. *awrence still retrospects her first love passionately. -he calls him villain# sharper and !ad)un. ="> 5ow is &is. The . In order to get money for gam!ling# she steals the pearls of her hus!and. -he offers her daughter 5iana for amour to "liver 8acon in her own house. 1 =a> The Wife in #The Sha ow in the $ose 4ar en# "annot hel! i22in2 her !ast. 8is"uss. "n the other hand# the 5uchess represents inherited aristocracy. 0er issuelessness# choosing a familiar place for outing and . =.from the 5uchess in exchange of passing a weekend with her daughter 5iana# his new !eloved. 8ut the reminiscence of first love refuses to wither away.

-ince then she has !een living with him in 8ridlington under the same roof. Thirdly# her discharging of repressed emotions shows her love for past. -he visits this garden alone. 0owever# she has not given !irth to a !a!y.etween the 'ren"h Sol ier an the 3anther $n emotion of strong affection and personal attachment is called love. 0er mind is so full of the memories of past that it refuses to hide the present shock.ife is childless. It means she has not compromised with her present. In other words# she still loves her past.atching him alive !ut mad pertur!s her greatly.e .> &o. =. -he has not developed conjugality with her hus!and. -he married 3rank three years ago.ife deli!erately selects a sea7side village to revive her yore. 0ere there is her sweet memorial place# a rose garden. . #+ 3assion in the 8esert# !y 0onore 5e . In the garden# she encounters $rchie. -econdly# when the hus!and arranges for an outing# the . 3irstly# the . This lush# enchanted garden# filled with red# pink and white roses reminds her of the time spent there with +r"hie# her erstwhile lover. Thus after coming !ack the garden# she !lurts out a confession of her affair with $rchie to her hus!and.ejaculation of pent7up emotions prove that she cannot help digging her past.

The soldier says to the panther# #We-re . The soldier calls her with loving names. 0owever# !eing apprehensive of her ferocity# he once tries to flee !ut falls in a uicksand. -he seizes him !y the collar and pulls him up. . *ove takes a trial. The panther comes to his rescue. The male lover is an escaped 3rench soldier while the female lover is a panther. In her mori!undity# she looks at the wild soldier without any anger or enmity. -oon they !ecome friends. $fter this incident# the love !etween the two grows strong. Their encounter in a den of desert gradually develops into a love affair !etween the two. -o he sta!s her with his digger. "n the morning of second day of his escape# the soldier dares to caress the panther. "nce when the soldier shows interest in an eagle# she shows her jealously !y growling and hopping a!out. -he clutches his leg in her jaws to keep him !ack. *ove !egets love. 0e misunderstands that the panther is going to devour him. It descri!es a strange type of love !etween a human and a !east. "n the other hand# the panther !ecomes jealous in love.oun to2ether for life an eath#. The soldier again tries to desert the panther. -he dies there and then !ut wins in the trial of love. 3rom that time the desert seems inha!ited to him.8alzac is a wonderful love fantasy. The panther wags her tail voluptuously.

This shows her love and respect for her ancestors. $s for her sisters# they are playful and flirting girls. 0er !eauty# love and morality do not correspond with that of her sisters. -he only loves -imon 8yrne and remains constant in her love. They wear dresses of !right eye7catching colours. 6harlotte has a face like *a 8elle 3erroniere and 8renda has the flower7like delicacy of a /iero della 3rancesca. -he still likes Gthe pictureG that !elongs to her forefathers. "n the other hand# her sisters lack spiritual !eauty !ut outwardly they are -"har%ers-. Thirdly# *is!y is a moral girl. Their love is selfish and !usiness like. -he has two elder sister1 6harlotte and 8renda.y an 5er Sister *is!y $very is the heroine of the short story #The &ittle Willow# !y 3rances Towers. +ven the war has not pertur!ed her morality. .hen we have a comparative study of the characters of the three sisters# we find that *is!y is uite different from her si!lings. They pretend to !e in love with all the eligi!le army officers who visit the 6ourt 0ouse.e wo%an in any a2e#. 3irstly# *is!y is not physically attractive and glamorous !ut has a tremendous inner !eauty.="> 8ifferen"e .etween &is. 0owever# her sisters are . In short# they are #the ty!es of the se u"ti. -econdly# *is!y !elieves in true love.

/opova claims that she is inconsola!ly !ereaved !ut her powdered face and passionate em!race .etween Un"le Ha%es an his ne!hew. The exaggerative characters# ludicrous situations and impro!a!le plot are the major farcical elements in the play that produce !elly laughs# slapstick humour and rum!ustious entertainment. =. The deaths of their erstwhile lovers have no effect on them. They inflate themselves to !e more than they actually are.ear# as a far"e.elle 8a%e Sans (er"i#. -mirnov exposes himself a misogynist. Thus they remind us one of 4eats) #&a .ear# !y $nton 6hekhov is an outstanding archetype of this genre. 3irstly# the play has exaggerative characters.> What is the "onfli"t . 00 =a> 8is"uss the !lay #The .heartless# insensitive and immoral. 0owever# the way he exploits flattery to win /opova)s love makes us giggle. QUESTION NO. 3hili!F ="> Why has 3ri%rose e"i e to %arry an u2ly %anF =a> #The .ear# +s a 'ar"e 3arce is a kind of low comedy that raises roars of laughter rather than smile. They are alaEons. #The .

with -mirnov give us a hearty cachinnation..> )onfli"t . /opova)s refusal to pay !ack -mirnov the loan# /opova)s accepting -mirnov)s challenge to fight a duel with pistols and -mirnov)s teaching /opova how to fire a pistol are the most ludicrous and ridiculous situations in the play.ames is the soul of the play.H =. /hilip has just repatriated from a nerve7 shattering war. -econdly# the play is pregnant with ludicrous situations. These situations !reed a great hee7haw and guffaw.. -o he is in a mood of holiday. $lmost all the five characters are in conflict !ut the agon !etween /hilip and &ncle .. The first conflict starts at !reakfast on the issue of punctuality.. Thirdly# the plot of the play is impro!a!le. It mas uerades the expected tragedy into comedy.. 0e wakes . In #The .oy )o%es 5o%e# !y $.... Thus the end# o!viously makes the readers or the spectators laugh a great deal..$. 2ilne# the element of conflict is very prominent. It is full of suspense !ut the suspense# curiously enough# is titillating# rather than grim.. The major factors which esta!lish conflict !etween the two are1 punctuality# manners and /hilip)s career.. The twist at the end of the plot is uite humorous. 0aH 0aH 0aH .etween 3hili! an Un"le Ha%es The opposition !etween two things is called conflict.

ames exploits the power of money and /hilip uses the power of revolver. 0e lights it and starts puffing in front of his uncle without any permission. The 8eauty and the 8east make the most positive and supportive couple. .ohn# !ecause he is a very loving# . -he has decided to marry an ugly man# .hile waiting for /hilip in the morning room# &ncle .up late in the morning. $ showdown starts !etween the two. &ncle . The third conflict is seen in the dream on the concern of /hilip)s employment.ames naps in front of the fire. /rimrose# the heroine of the play #S%o6e-S"reens# !y 0erold 8righouse# has realized it. /hilip wants to !e an architect while his uncle tries to push him into his jam !usiness. 0owever# when . 0e demands his !reakfast at 'K o)clock. . ="> 3ri%rose-s 8e"ision to (arry an U2ly (an The ugly hus!and is a secret to successful marriage. /hilip wins.ames wakes up# /hilip is ready to join the jam !usiness. 0e has made a strict rule in his house to have !reakfast at E o)clock sharp. -he is !eautiful young girl of twenty. &ncle . 0e dreams that /hilip has a cigar in his hand. The second conflict takes place in a dream on the matter of decorums.ames does not like it at all.ames does not approve his unpunctuality.

0e makes her feel all funny inside.solvent and secure man. Thirdly# she wants to marry the hideous man !ecause he is very secure. 0is love has made her !lind to his physical ugliness. -ince he is ugly# he is not a lady7killer.an . -he will have no worries regarding his running after other women or other women running after him. $nd love !etween a man and a woman is an insanity that is only cured !y marriage. 0e hits her where she matters. -he will roll in money. In other words# he will remain a %ono2a%ous hus. -econdly# she has proposed to marry the unattractive man !ecause he is well7esta!lished financially. Thus she will have no financial pro!lems after marriage. 0e is an international player of a very earning game# the rug!y foot!all. 0e will not desert her the way her charming father has deserted her mother. 2oreover# he is one of the most successful advertising agents in *ondon. 3irstly# she has decided to marry the ugly man !ecause he is a very amorous and loving person at heart. .

00 =a> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i. The vast expenditure of money and human effort now !eing devoted to projects of putting man into space might well !e applied to ends more practically useful and more conducive to human happiness. -pace travel is !y far the most expensive type of exploration ever undertaken !y man.en at the en . COMPREHENSIONS QUESTION NO.3. It is a strange world in which tens of millions of pounds are spent to give one man a ride round the earth at thousands of miles an hour# while !eneath him in his or!it live millions for whom life is a daily struggle to win a few coins to !uy their !read and !utter. .hy should the richer countries of the world !e pouring their resources into space when poverty and disease on the earth are crying out for reliefJ "ne could give a cynical answer to this uestion and assert . The money and effort that go into the development and construction of a single type of space7rocket would more than suffice to rid several countries of such s"our2e as malaria or typhoid fever# to name only two of diseases that medical science has con uered !ut which still persist in the world simply !ecause not enough money and effort are devoted to their era i"ation.

=iii> Why is %an !ourin2 his resour"es into s!a"eF $ns.that man)s expensive adventures into space are merely the !y7products of the struggle !etween great powers for prestige and possi!le military advantage.> Era i"ation $ns.> E?!lain the %eanin2s of the followin2 wor sG =a> S"our2e =. It is a strange world !ecause it does not do what it should do. 2alaria and typhoid still exist in the world !ecause (a) -cientists put more efforts on space exploration than on these diseases. QUESTIONS =i> Why is it a stran2e worl F $ns. (!) The money needed to eradicate these diseases is wasted on space exploration. 2an is pouring his resources into space !ecause (a) 0e wants to gain prestige or good reputation in the world. (a) S"our2e means a source of widespread dreadful affliction and devastation such as that caused !y pestilence or war. . =i. =ii> Why o %alaria an ty!hoi still e?ist in the worl F $ns. (!) 0e hopes to get possi!le military and strategic advantages against others. It is wasting a lot of money and effort on space exploration while millions of people on the earth are starving due to lack of money and concern. (!) Era i"ation means the complete destruction or extermination of every trace of something.

en at the en . It is possi!le now# if the population of the world does not increase too fast# for one man)s la!our to produce much more than is needed to provide a !are su!sistence for himself and his family.le title for the !assa2e. It has !een so used to a limited extent# in 8ritain and $merica# and would have !een so used more effectively !ut for war. +xcept prestige and military advantage# there is no other !enefit of space exploration.i> (a6e a su%%ary of the !assa2e.(wordA ::) =. If these three things can !e extended to the rest of the world as it !ecomes industrialized# and if the danger of great . Su%%ary -pace travel is the most expensive type of exploration.le Title + .> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i. /overty and diseases still exist in the world !ecause the efforts and money needed to eradicate them is wasted on space exploration. It is wasting a lot of money and effort on space exploration while millions of people on the earth are starving due to lack of money and concern. Its use in raising the standard of life has depended mainly upon three things1 democracy# trade unionism# and !irth control.anta2es an 8isa . Suita. @iven an intelligent democracy not misled !y some dogmatic creed# this possi!ility will !e used to raise the standard of life. $ns. $ll three# of course# have incurred hostility from the rich. It is a strange world.anta2es of S!a"e E?!loration =.=. 3ortunately# however# the growth of industrialism has coincided in the west with the growth of democracy. $ns.> Su22est a suita.

If the population continues to increase at the present .etween in ustrialis% an e%o"ra"yF $ns. =ii> 5ow "an the stan ar of life .ithout democracy# industrialism will create a regime in which the /haraohs !uild the pyramids.e the i%!a"t of in"rease in !o!ulation at the !resent rateF $ns.> What will . In particular# if the world population continues to increase at the present rate# the a!olition if poverty and excessive work will !e totally impossi!le.erty .wars can !e eliminated# poverty can !e a!olished throughout the whole world# and excessive hours of la!our will no longer !e necessary anywhere. 8ut without these three things industrialism will create a regime like that in which the /haraohs !uild the pyramids.e a. /overty can !e a!olished !y adopting the following measures1 (a) +limination of war (!) 8irth control =i. The standard of life can !e raised with the help of following things1 (a) Intelligent democracy (!) Trade unionism (c) 8irth control =iii> 5ow "an !o. 3or example he says# (a) The growth of industrialism coincides with the growth of democracy.olishe F $ns. (!) . QUESTIONS =i> What "onne"tion oes the writer show .e raise F $ns. The writer shows a strong connection !etween industrialism and democracy.

> Su22est a suita. $ns. $n intelligent democracy can !e used to raise the standard of life.le Title In ustrialis% an 8e%o"ra"y =. Suita. 3re"is The western countries are making progress in the field of industry with the growth of democracy. (wordsA NK) QUESTION NO. 0B =a> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i.le title for the !assa2e. $ns.i> (a6e a !re"is of the !assa2e.rate then the following things will !ecome impossi!le1 (a) $!olition of poverty (!) +nd of excessive hours of la!our =. It encourages man)s reliance on his own faculties and realizes the dangers inherent in the $merican scheme.en at the en . "n the contrary# +urope su!ordinates the use of machines to human happiness and welfare.ith mass production# the amenities of life are availa!le to almost every citizen. . 0is individual li!erty and . +fficient organization if highly mechanized system has resulted in maximum productivity in $merica. It is spending lavishly on la!our7saving machines.ith the help of these three things# poverty and excessive hours of la!our can also !e a!olished. . 0owever# great the advantages of mechanization# it crushes the creative faculty of man and makes a machine out of him. The standard of life is dependent upon three things1 democracy# trade unionism and !irth control. @reat progress has !een made !y $merica in the field of mechanization.

These goods also lose their fascination !ecause mass production has given a set !ack to the individuality of the articles produced. The +uropeans# therefore# contend that it is !etter to sacrifice a few material comforts that crush the aesthetic and spiritual urge in the individual which large scale mechanization is doing in $merica. QUESTIONS =i> What is the result of !ro2ress in the fiel of %e"haniEation in +%eri"aF $ns. In other words# mass production or large scale production is the result of mechanization in $merica. +uropeans sacrifice a few material comforts . .> Why o Euro!eans sa"rifi"e a few %aterial "o%fortsF $ns. $pparently# it has positive effects on citizens of $merica. =i. =iii> What is the "ase in Euro!eF $ns. 3or example1 (a) They usually rely on their own faculties. +uropeans are uite opposite to $mericans. In his moments of leisure the worker finds it difficult to turn his hands to creative work !ecause the machine7made goods do not inspire him in the direction of refinement. =ii> 5ow has it affe"te +%eri"aF $ns.personality suffer an irretrieva!le loss.ith mass production# the amenities of life are availa!le to almost every citizens and they are enjoying luxurious lives. The progress in the field of mechanization in $merica has resulted in maximum productivity of goods. (!) They consider mechanization a danger to their creative faculty# individuality# aesthetic and spiritual urge.

> (a6e a suita.le title of the !assa2e. $ns. 8y a tutorial we mean a regular weekly meeting of a teacher and small group of students.i> (a6e a !re"is of the a. It is# in fact# an opportunity for a teacher to get to know his students. They are ready to sacrifice a few material comforts !ecause they do not want to crush the aesthetic and spiritual urge in the individual.le Title (e"haniEation in +%eri"a an Euro!e =.en at the en . $ns. $s a result of maximum productivity# it has succeeded in providing her people a luxurious life. 0owever# +uropeans think that machines cause to destroy the creative faculty and individuality of man.e !assa2e. (wordsA :') =. =. In universities in the . 3re"is $merica has made great progress in the field of mechanization !y spending a!undantly in this field. $ tutorial is not an occasion for a lecture !y a teacher nor it is an informal conversation piece.> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i.o.!ecause1 (a) They want to encourage man)s reliance on his own faculties.est# a large part of teacher)s time is spent on tutorial work. (!) They wish to keep alive the aesthetic and spiritual urge in the individual. It is further a means to discover their potential a!ilities# stimulate them !y discussion# test their response to what they have read# and to give them individual advice on . Suita.

QUESTIONS =i> What oes the writer %ean . The teacher of the . $ further advantage of the tutorial is that it ena!les the teacher to !ecome intimately ac uainted with his students# !oth as individual as a scholar.> Shoul we a o!t this syste% in our "ountryF If yes . It is# in fact# an opportunity for a teacher to get to know his students. =iii> What o the stu ents 2ain .estern &niversities spends his much time on tutorial work !ecause it helps him to know a!out the #whole "hil # and he can give the students individual advice on their studies. The usual form is that the students read original essays in turn and these are discussed# analyzed and evaluated !y the group as a whole under the guidance of the teacher. $ tutorial should help a student to clarify his mind !y the exchange of ideas# and should send him !ack to his !ooks with a new awareness and a new interest.ersities s!en his %u"h ti%e on tutorial wor6F $ns. =i.their studies. It is not an occasion for a lecture !y a teacher nor it is an informal conversation piece.y a tutorialF $ns. It should encourage him to think for himself and give him practice in formulating and expressing opinions.y tutorial wor6F $ns. =ii> Why o the tea"her of the Western Uni. $ tutorial helps a student to clarify his mind !y the exchange of ideas# and send him !ack to his !ooks with a new awareness and a new interest. It encourages him to think for himself and give him practice in formulating and expressing opinions. $ccording to the writer# a tutorial means a regular weekly meeting of a teacher and small group of students.

It is an opportunity for a teacher to get to know his students.le Title I%!ortan"e of Tutorial =. Bery few students have really any clear idea of what science mean. Ies# we should adopt this system in our country.hen pupils at school work for a pass in science su!ject# they regard it their main !usiness to learn a large num!er of facts and a smaller num!er of principles and theories. QUESTION NO. $ tutorial is a meeting of a teacher and small group of students. $ tutorial is a great help for the students to improve their ideas# thoughts and flourish in studies. Suita. It also ena!les the teacher to !ecome intimately ac uainted with his students. $ scientist must have a certain num!er of facts# principles and theories at his finger tips. 3re"is In western universities a lot of tutorial work is done.en at the en . It helps a student to clarify his mind !y the exchange of ideas# and sends him !ack to his !ooks with a new awareness and a new interest. Now all this is good in its way. =.whyF $ns.le title for the !assa2e.> Su22est a suita.i> (a6e a !re"is of the !assa2e. . It encourages him to think for himself and give him practice in formulating and expressing opinions. 03 =a> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i. The teaching of science in schools tend to o!scure the meaning of science. 8ut science .

would cease to !e science if scientists merely worked from fixed sets of facts and theories. . *et them realize that science is essentially a creative activity. *et them not think that any !ranch of science is a su!ject that one can sit down and learn. It is# therefore# most important to give our young students of science an awareness of skepticism and open7mindedness that is part of the very soul of science. (!) They have !een so ready to dis!elieve in text !ooks of their youth. -cience has advanced rapidly in recent history !ecause scientists have !een greedy for new knowledge# and !ecause they have !een so ready to dis!elieve in text !ooks of their youth.an"e%ent of s"ien"eF $ns.> What shoul we tea"h to our stu ents of s"ien"eF $ns.e should teach two major things to our students of .e s"ien"eF $ns. =iii> What are the two "auses of the a . The two major causes of the advancement of science are1 (a) -cientists have !een greedy for new knowledge. The essence of science is the gathering of new facts and the esta!lishment of new theories. =i. -cience ceases to !e science when (a) /upils work for a pass in a science su!ject (!) They learn a large num!er of facts and smaller num!er of principles and theories. The essence of science is (a) @athering of new facts (!) +sta!lishment of new theories =ii> When oes s"ien"e "ease to . QUESTIONS =i> What is the essen"e of s"ien"eF $ns.

science. (a) $wareness of skepticism (!) "pen7mindedness =.> Su22est a suita,le title for the !assa2e. +ns. Suita,le Title Tea"hin2 of S"ien"e as + )reati.e +"ti.ity =.i> (a6e a !re"is of the !assa2e. 3re"is The essence of science is gathering of new facts and esta!lishment of new theories. /upils work for a pass in a science su!ject. They learn a large num!er of facts and smaller num!er of principles and theories. The two major causes of the advancement of science are that scientists have !een greedy for new knowledge and have !een so ready to dis!elieve in text !ooks of their youth. ,e should teach our students an awareness of skepticism and open7 mindedness. (,ordsA :() =,> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i.en at the en . ,hether the su!ject should !e taught in +nglish in our educational institutions or through the medium of our other tongue is one of the most important pro!lems of the present day. There are uite a few points to !e considered in this connection. Those who oppose the introduction of +nglish as a medium of instruction think that the su!jects taught in +nglish are not properly understood !y the students. ,hen they are not a!le to understand a point properly# they are evidently una!le to express it properly. ,hen they are compelled to write the answers in +nglish# they feel pained. 0ence they develop

a sort of inferiority complex. This thing mars the growth of intellectual power and as a result their personality remains undeveloped. Thus they prove a complete failure in their lives. 8ut that is not a sensi!le way of thinking. $s a matter of fact# it is not simply the medium of instruction that counts in the educational affairs. There are some other factors as well to !e taken into consideration of mind etc. 2oreover# &rdu is still in a stage of infancy. It is impossi!le for it to compete with +nglish and !ecome mature enough to a!sor! suita!le e uivalents of technical terms !efore it is introduced as a medium of instruction. The change# of course# must !e there# !ut it must !e very gradual one. QUESTIONS =i> What o the !eo!le a2ainst En2lish sayF $ns. The people who oppose +nglish say that the su!jects taught in +nglish are not properly understood !y the students. This thing mars the growth of intellectual power and as a result their personality remains undeveloped. =ii> What is the 2reatest iffi"ulty in "han2in2 o.er to Ur uF $ns. &rdu is still in a stage of infancy. It is impossi!le for it to compete with +nglish and !ecome mature enough to a!sor! suita!le e uivalents of technical terms !efore it is introduced as a medium of instruction. =iii> Till when shoul we wait for this "han2e-o.erF $ns. ,e should wait for this change till &rdu !ecome mature enough to a!sor! suita!le e uivalents of technical terms. =i.> What sort of "han2e oes the writer su22estF

$ns. The writer suggests a gradual change. ,e should !e patient and develop &rdu gradually to compete with +nglish voca!ulary. =.> Su22est a suita,le title for the !assa2e. Suita,le Title U ru an En2lish +s (e iu% of Instru"tion =.i> (a6e a !re"is of the !assa2e. 3re"is ,hether &rdu or +nglish should !e a medium of instruction is a jigsaw puzzle. -ome people favour it while the others oppose. The opponents think that the su!jects taught in +nglish are not properly understood !y the students. This thing mars the growth of intellectual power of students. 0owever# medium of cannot !e !lamed solely. &rdu cannot !e applied as a medium of instruction !ecause it has not su!stitutes for scientific and !usiness terms of +nglish. ,e would have to wait till &rdu matures enough to compete with +nglish.

QUESTION NO. 0C
=a> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i.en at the en . 2ankind has undou!tedly progressed since medieval time. The earliest men lived like !rutes. Individuals fought among themselves and strong destroyed the weak# for that is the law of jungle 777 the law of irrational life. 8ut man was not an animal. 0e possessed rational faculties. These faculties gradually developed and appeared in his actions# and man gave up the laws of jungle and evolved his own rational law. 2en saw that the law of physical strength was not applica!le to their lives. They realized that they have

souls and the strength of a !eing with a soul can consist in a variety of capa!ilities other than the power to hack and hew and tear and !ite. 3or instance# a man can !e strong in reasoning tools# or in controlling the actions of other rational !eings !y the power of song and speech. Thus men realized that they should not !e fighting among themselves !ut should !e working together and giving one another opportunities to develop their respective strength. This was the first step in man)s progress. 8y this means men gained such control over the force of nature and made each other so much wiser and more comforta!le that they were convinced that they were the !est creation of @od. QUESTIONS =i> 5ow i the earliest %en li.eF $ns. The earliest men lived like !rutes. They followed the law of jungle. Individuals fought among themselves and strong destroyed the weak. =ii> What is the law of Aun2leF $ns. The law of jungle means )might is right). The strong destroyed the weak. The man who can dominate and esta!lish his power over his fellow !eings may !e the king of that society. $ccording to this law the strong is the sole powerful. =iii> What i %en learn to o when his reason e.elo!e F $ns. ,hen reason developed# the mind of man got illuminated. 0e came to know that he should make good relations with other fellow !eings of the society. =i.> 5ow were %en "on.in"e that they were the ,est "reation of 4o F

$ns. ,hen reason developed# man realized that he has soul and the strength of a !eing. 0e gained such control over the force of nature and made each other so much wiser and more comforta!le that they were convinced that they were the !est creation of @od. =.> Su22est a suita,le title for the !assa2e. Suita,le Title E.olution of 5u%an 'a"ulties =.i> (a6e a !re"is of the !assa2e. 3re"is "n the !asis of his rational faculties# mankind developed from irrational !rutal life of medieval times to a cultured man. ,hen his reason developed# it illuminated his mind which made him to realize the value of friendship against enmity. In this way he proved himself to !e the !est creation of @od. =,> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i.en at the en . -uccess in the next electoral contest will come only to those political parties that are a!le to win the support of the people not happy with their current economic situation. $ vast majority 77 more than (F per cent 77 will vote with no assurance that their welfare is the main concern of the parties seeking their support. This is what makes politics so volatile in the country as it marches towards yet another election. There is a lot at stake in the coming election for the political parties preparing to contest and the leaders who manage them. To win the support of the discontented# the parties and their leaders will need to offer their well7developed programmes aimed at improving

the welfare of the citizens. It is my !elief that only those parties will succeed in 2arch who have developed programmes to redress some of the pro!lems created !y the model pursued over the last five years. That model was focused on developing the principal cities of the country !y promoting the sectors that provided a limited amount of employment and yielded in comes to a very small proportion of the population. This model will need to !e changed significantly to win the political !acking of the deprived and disadvantaged. 8ut that can only happen if the people are presented with programmes in which they can place some trust. QUESTIONS =i> Who will win the ne?t ele"tionsF $ns. The political party who wins the support of those people who are not satisfied with their present economic condition# will win in the next elections. =ii> What oes it %a6e !oliti"s so .olatile in the "ountryF $ns. /eople are not sure whether the party seeking their support concerns their welfare as main issue or not. This makes politics so volatile in the country. =iii> 5ow "an the su!!ort of the is"ontente ,e wonF $ns. The support of the discontented can !e won !y offering such programmes as aim at the improvement of citizens) welfare. This factor renders the situation to an unpredicta!le metamorphosis. =i.> 5ow "an the trust of the !eo!le ,e wonF $ns. The trust of the people can !e won !y launching practical programmes.

=.> Su22est a suita,le title for the !assa2e. Suita,le Title Ele"tions an Welfare of 3eo!le =.i> (a6e a !re"is of the !assa2e. 3re"is "nly those political parties will win in the coming elections who win the support of people dissatisfied with their present economic condition. 2ost people cast their votes without !eing sure that the party will !e fit for them. -upport of masses can !e won !y offering programmes of social development. Those parties will win the elections that have a sound plan to eradicate pro!lems created !y the set7up used for the last five years. This set7up needs to !e changed !e !enefit the disappointed people. QUESTION NO. 05 =a> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i.en at the en . +ducation# in general is enigmatic in /akistan. It is plagued with falling standards# loss of direction# and insensitivity on the part of governments. 2isguided and chaotic as it is# education in /akistan is misunderstood as restricted to passing examinations or o!taining degrees. It is totally deprived of career planning and skill development. $nd a!ove all it fails to im!i!e in our students# human values which are !asic to our Islamic society. The "xford dictionary defines education as awakening and development of one)s character and mental powers. The computerized 65# The ,orld 8ook# states that education is the process !y which people ac uire knowledge# skills# ha!its# values and attitudes.

The word education is also used to descri!e the results of the educational process. +ducation should help people !ecome useful mem!ers of society. It should also help them develop an appreciation of the cultural heritage and teach them to live more satisfying lives. The most common way to get education is to attend school# !ut much education also takes place outside the classroom. Throughout history of eduction is not as old as humanity# its demands for the present world are enormous and pressurizing. The world has expanded itself to an era of phenomenal growth and development with multiplying technology. The world today clearly demands specialization and realization of uality education. -imply speaking# teaching two plus two makes four is education# !ut application of four is all spheres of life is its uality. QUESTIONS =i> 'ro% whi"h efe"ts oes e u"ation in 3a6istan sufferF $ns. +ducation in /akistan suffers from defects like falling academic standards# loss of direction# and insensitivity on the part of government. =ii> 5ow "an o 3a6istanis thin6 e u"ation isF $ns. /akistanis generally think that education is misguided and chaotic. It is totally deprived of career planning and skill development. It fails to im!i!e in our students human values which are !asic to our Islamic society. =iii> 5ow is 2eneral e u"ation ifferent fro% /uality e u"ationF $ns. @eneral education is different from uality education in the sense that teaching two plus two makes four means general education. 0owever# application of four in all

e in your own wor s the efinition of e u"ation. @eneral education is different from uality education in the sense that teaching two plus two makes four means general education. Luality education helps people !ecome useful mem!ers of society. 3re"is +ducation in /akistan suffers from defects like falling academic standards# loss of direction# and insensitivity on the part of government. It fails to im!i!e in our students human values which are !asic to our Islamic society. /akistanis generally think that education is misguided and chaotic. The process by which society transmits its accumulated knowledge.> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i. 0e knows that he is a mem!er of a group with which he is associated !y a thousand and one ties.i> (a6e a !re"is of the !assa2e. $ person who is aware of his duties and rights in his society is a good citizen. =. 0e realizes that he should live in harmony with .en at the en .> 4i. Luality education helps people !ecome useful mem!ers of society. Suita. =i. =.le title for the !assa2e.spheres of life means uality eduction.le Title E u"ation in 3a6istan =. 0owever# application of four in all spheres of life means uality eduction.> Su22est a suita. skills and values from one generation to another is called education. $ns. It is totally deprived of career planning and skill development.

0e pays his taxes.other mem!ers of society. 0e keeps away from such activities that may harm the interests of his fellow citizens. $ good citizen does his !est to do his duty to the society. 0e has received much in material and spiritual !enefits from others. 0e cannot live alone. 2an cannot live without a society. 0e lives a clean and honest life. 0e always keeps in vies the interests of his society and state. 0e is not selfish. 8ut living in a society means co7operaion with other mem!ers of that society. Iou have to accept the conditions and traditions that a society prescri!es for its mem!ers. 0e must live with his fellow human !eings.hen you live in society# you have to live as others live. $ person who is aware of his duties and rights in his . . 0e knows that the la!our and work of countless persons have enriched his life. QUESTIONS =i> Who is a 2oo "itiEenF $ns. $ good citizen is aware of the fact that he is inde!ted to his society in many ways. These conditions and standards of !ehaviour are for the common good and welfare of the society and individuals. 0e takes keen interest in the affairs of his state. -ociety gives you some rights and some duties. 0ow does a good citizen pay his de!ts to the societyJ 8y living useful and fruitful life# he lives not for himself alone !ut he lives for others. It is only just and right that he should pay his de!ts. 0e is tolerant and kind and virtuous. 0e does not live in isolation. 0e life# to a very great extent# depends on others.

(a) 5ar%ony means an agreement in feeling or opinion. =iii> What are the uties of a 2oo "itiEenF $ns. (!) 0e should not live for himself !ut also for other. =. 0e cannot live alone. (!) 3res"ri. (d) Isolation means a state of separation !etween persons or groups.> 4i.> Su22est a suita. $ good citizen live in harmony with other mem!ers of his society. There are many duties of a good citizen. =i.> 3res"ri.e means to set down as a rule or guide. (c) 0e should pay his taxes and take keen interest in the affairs of his state. 0e has to live with his fellow human !eings.le title for the !assa2e.te = > Isolation $ns. 3re"is $ good citizen is aware of his duties and rights in his society. 2an is a social animal.e other wor s for< =a> 5ar%ony =.e ="> In e.hen men live together and co7operate with one another# a society is formed.i> (a6e a !re"is of the !assa2e. (c) In e. 0e lives in harmony with other mem!ers of the .te means morally# socially# or legally o!ligated to another. Suita. =ii> Why is so"iety for%e F $ns.society is a good citizen.le Title Qualities an 8uties of a 4oo )itiEen =. 3or example (a) $ good citizen should pay his de!ts to the society. .

0e pays his taxes and takes interest in state affairs. CORRECTION. 4. I took pains in my work. IDIOMS. 0e has ten head of cattle.i> 5e 2a.> I too6 !ain in %y wor6. 06 =a> )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. . =Noun> =i> I nee a ten ru!ees note. $ good citizen not only lives for himself !ut also for others. I need a ten rupee note.society.e or er to release hi%. =i. =. 0e has given up his studies. 0e respects others !ecause he knows the importance of other people in the society. 0e ran three hundred meter race. =ii> 5e ran three hun re %eters ra"e. 0e gave orders to release him. 0e follows the rules and traditions of the society.> 5e has 2i. PHRASAL VERBS QUESTION NO. 0e is not selfish !ut tolerant# kind and virtuous.en u! his stu y. =. (iii> 5e has ten hea s of "attle.

es !raise. =. =iii> E. he was %y .oy who was !ro%ote .ii> 5e 2a. "ne should take care of one)s health.> Salee%a is the wo%an whi"h 2a.aile of the o!!ortunity.iha an I 2o there.ro6en. =ii> One shoul ta6e "are of his health.e enjoyed ourselves at the concert. The !oy who was promoted was my !rother. =.=. I have many pieces of work to do. =i?> The "hair-s le2 is .e %e "oura2e to wor6. 0e gave me many pieces of advice.iii> I ha. =i?> These two . =.> 5e is the stu ent who I thin6 eser. +veryone raised his hands.e %any wor6s to o. =.rother.ii> 5e a. -aleema is the woman who gave me courage to work.oys hate one another.oo6-s !ri"eF .i"es.e %e %any a . 0e availed himself of the opportunity. =i.eryone raise their han s.iii> We enAoye at the "on"ert.hat is the price of this !ookJ =. =3ronoun> =i> &et Sa.i> The . =. . =?> What is this .> )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. The leg of chair is !roken. . *et -a!iha and me go there. 0e is the student whom I think deserves praise.

=?> Why he wrote that foolish letterF . =.> =i> The wa2es of sin are hell.> 5is frien an . *ittle children love one another. 0e came yesterday. while his friend is a 8. 0is friend and !enefactor has left the room.$.i> I re/uest you not to "ut Ao6es in the "lass.+.e ea"h other.$.+.rother-s only hel! were his frien s. 2y !rother)s only help was his friends. =ii> Ten %iles are a lon2 istan"e.. . They found that the ship was leaking. 0e scored three goals in the last match. 0e is an 2. 0e is studying in the medical college.> They foun that the shi! is lea6in2.e left the roo%. while his frien is . =.These two !oys hate each other. =iii> (y . =?> &ittle "hil ren lo.hy did he write that foolish letterJ = > )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. The wages of sin is hell. Ten miles is a long distance. ="> )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. I re uest you not to make jokes in the class. =@er.ii> 5e %a e three 2oals in the last %at"h. =+rti"le> =i> 5e is (.iii> 5e is rea in2 in the %e i"al "olle2e. =. =i?> 5e has "o%e yester ay.enefa"tor ha. =. =i.

"ooler it is.ler. =ii> We %et at the house of a %utual frien to %a6e !ea"e.e> =i> 5e is a fa%ous 2a%. I have a headache.y nature.e met at the house of a common friend to make peace. =. 2an is selfish !y nature. I am the stronger of the two. =i. =. .iii> I a% stron2er of the two. In *ahore we stayed at a hotel. @old is more costly than silver. The higher we go# the cooler it is.oo6. 3aisala!ad is the 2anchester of /akistan. . =iii> 'aisala.est .i> The %an is selfish . =.er. The rose is the sweetest of all flowers. =?> This is a . =i?> 5i2her we 2o. QUESTION NO.a is (an"hester of 3a6istan. This is the !est !ook. =iii> 5e is a "owar !erson.ii> I ha. =.=ii> In &ahore we staye at hotel.e hea a"he.> The 2ol is %ore "ostly than the sil. 07 =a> )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. 0e is a notorious gam!ler. =+ Ae"ti.> $ose is the sweetest of all flowers.

0e seldom comes here. =. "f the two routes# this is shorter. 0e died two months ago. =ii> 5e "o%es here sel o%.> We . this is the shortest.i> &ahore is lar2er than any "ity in the 3unAa. It is very hot today.ii> Of the two routes.efore. 0e !ravely faced the enemy.ra.> She is %ore "le. 0e never goes there. *ahore is larger than any other city in the /unja!.ely the ene%y. =iii> 5e fa"e ..er. 2umtaz is a uni ue teacher.> )orre"t the followin2 senten"es.er than he. 0e enjoys worldwide reputation.iii> (u%taE is the %ost uni/ue tea"her.e visited many places worth7seeing. =. =. =. -he is clever than he. $tif sings well. =+ .0e is a cowardly person.> +tif sin2s 2oo . =i?> 5e enAoys the %ost worl wi e re!utation. =i.erry short"a6e tastes eli"iously.i> The straw. =i.> =i> 5e 2oes there ne. =. =. =. .er. .> 5e ie two %onths .isite %any worth-seein2 !la"es. =?> It is %u"h hot to ay.

=i?> 5e wrote with re in6. =. =. It is very interesting !ook.oo6. =?> It is %u"h interestin2 .i> I "annot !ull on %y wor6. The rotten eggs smell !ad.ii> It is half !ast fi.an6-s failure. =ii> We rea"he at the !latfor% soon after the train left. =i. The patient has !een operated upon.een o!erate . *ook up this word in the dictionary. =. -he is angry with me.The straw!erry shortcake tastes delicious. It is half past five !y my watch. =3re!osition> =i> The lion atta"6e at hi%.e reached the platform soon after the train left. I shot at the !ear !ut missed. =iii> The !atient has . .iii> 5e is har ly hit . The lion attacked him. ="> )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. =.ear . .iii> She is an2ry on %e.e in %y wat"h. I never take medicine. =i?> I sel o% or e. I cannot pull on with my work.ut %isse . 0e is hard hit !y the !ank)s failure.er ta6e %e i"ine. =.y the .a ly.ii> The rotten e22s s%ell .> &oo6 this wor in the i"tionary.> I shot the . =.

-carcely had he gone when a policeman knocked at the door. 0ardly had we set out when the !ad weather !egan. If he is poor# I will help him.i> No sooner he left than the stor% . =i?> 5e wears li6e his frien oes. =)onAun"tion> =i> If you o not "o%e. 0e cried as if he were mad. No sooner he left when the storm !roke. .e2an. =. &nless you work hard# you cannot secure good marks.ut he is stron2.0e wrote in red ink.> S"ar"ely ha he 2one than a !oli"e%an 6no"6e at the oor. = > )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. Neither he comes# nor writes. . I have not seen you for a long time. 0e wears as his friend does. =.> 5ar ly ha we set out than the .e not seen you sin"e a lon2 ti%e. =iii> +lthou2h he is ol . =. nor he writes. =i. =?> I ha. $lthough he is old# yet he is strong. If you do not come# I shall not help you.ro6e. you "annot se"ure 2oo %ar6s. =ii> If he is !oor.iii> Neither he "o%es. then I will hel! hi%. =?> 5e "rie as if he was %a . =. then I shall not hel! you.a weather .ii> Unless you on-t wor6 har .

Now they are !oth head cashiers. =ii> )arry wei2ht Iour arguments do not carry weight in this matter. =. 09 =a> Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es. =iii> )o%!are notes .o" The rain played havoc with our garden party arrangements.e met after the examination to compare notes how well we had done.ii> 5ush %oney The crooks paid police hush money to keep their wherea!outs secrets. =.> 'ollow suit $li went to word for an !ank# and $slam followed suit. =.e22ar es"ri!tion The !eauty of Taj 2ahal !eggars description.iii> (a6e a%en s I have come to you to make amends for my misconduct. =i. =. =.> 'all flat 2y attempt at humor fell flat and now the girl does not like me.QUESTION NO.i> 5ol water Iour arguments do not hold water in this matter. =i?> 3lay ha.i> Wor6 won ers . =i> .

> 'lo2 a ea horse . =?> Ta6e a fan"y The artist took a fancy to that !eautiful painting. =. /lease do not flog the dead horse. =.This new medicine works wonders with my headaches. =ii> )ut a sorry fi2ure -he cut a sorry figure in the presence of her ugly hus!and.le !ie $t last the proud Indian $rmy had to eat a hum!le pie in the '(NF . =. =. =i?> S%ell a rat I smell a rat in your plan. . =i> . =.reast 0e made a clean !reast of his guilt !efore the judge.ar.> Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es.e have already discussed this pro!lem thrice.> (a6e a "lean .ii> 3o"6et an insult 0e a!used me in the presence of my teacher and I had to pocket an insult.iii> 3ull a lon2 fa"e 0e pulled a long face at his insult in the meeting.i> (a6e a fa"e 0e made a face at me to hum!le me !efore the teacher.e"o%e a .ywor 0is name has !ecome a !yword for honesty in the community. =i. =iii> Eat a hu%.

D million mark. =. =?> Steal the show $ll the singers were good# !ut $tif $slam stole the show.iii> 5it the %ar6 0is de!ts have hit the %s. =ii> .="> Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es. =.u"6et The patient kicked the !ucket last night. =.ury the hat"het *et us !ury the hatchet and !e friends again.> )arry the ay "ur team didn)t play well at first# !ut we carried the day in the end.rea6 the i"e $ll were sitting silent in the meeting. $t last# I !roke the ice. =i. = > Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es. =iii> .ell the "at +veryone was unhappy with the officer !ut no one was ready to !ell the cat.> . .ii> 4rease the !al%s 0e greased the palms of the policeman and got his work done.i> 'a"e the %usi" The politicians have to face the music.rea6 the news The doctor had to !reak the news to Najma a!out her hus!and)s cancer. =. =i?> :i"6 the . =i> .

It would !e like casting pearls !efore swine. =. =ii> .hen my father was out of work# we had to live from hand to mouth. =iii> .ush 5o not !eat a!out the !ush and come to the point. QUESTION NO.=i> + insult to inAury 0e insulted me at first and then a!used me. 01 .efore swine 5on)t !other explaining -hakespeare to children. In this way# he added insult to injury.urst into tears The child !urst into tears at the loss of his toy.e in the lur"h The hus!and left her in the lurch and now she is leading a misera!le life.iii> 'all in lo.urn the "an le at .ii> En in s%o6e $ll his effort to start a new !usiness ended in smoke. =?> &i.hen exams are drawn near# students try to !urn the candle at !oth ends. =.> )ast !earls .i> 8ie in harness Luaid7e7$zam died in harness on ''th -eptem!er# '(ME. =.out the . =. =i.> .oth en s .eat a.e with I fell in love with the red car and !ought it at once. =i?> &ea.e fro% han to %outh .

e 0e got tired with his jo!# so he took 3rench leave.=a> Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es. =.> )ro"o ile tears The step7mother shed crocodile tears at her son)s death. =. =. =i> + fishy eal Their treaty proved a fishy deal. =?> Thu%.i> 8ut"h "oura2e It was a 5utch courage that made him attack the policeman.o? The pu!lication of this !ook opened up a /andora)s !ox in politics.nail s6et"h The manager gave a thum!nail sketch of his plans. =iii> + %ai en s!ee"h 0is maiden speech in the $ssem!ly was successful.> 8a%o"les.iii> 3an ora-s . =ii> + 'reu ian sli! -he spoke !y chance that she liked 2r. =i> +ll an sun ry .> Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es. =i?> The un er o2 The underdog in a 2uslim society must !e treated well. =i. $slam# which was a 3reudian slip.swor The *atin $merican de!t is overhanging $merican !anks like the 5amocles) sword. =.ii> 'ren"h lea. =.

ran"h The company has !een transformed root and !ranch !y the new management. =i?> $oot an .$ll and sundry went to see the village fair.etween -chools in villages are few and far !etween.loo 3lesh and !lood cannot tolerate this act of cruelty.iii> $an6 an file The rank and file of the country stood up against the king. =iii> + ar6 horse . =. =. =.oi The contract was declared null and void.> 'irst an fore%ost 3irst and foremost# we should take care of our health. =i. =ii> . =ii> + . =?> To an fro The flowers were swinging to and fro in the cold wind.ii> 3art an !ar"el 0ard work is a part and parcel of success.lue sto"6in2 -he is not well educated !ut she is a !lue stocking.a2 an . =iii> 'ew an far .ro6en ree 5o not tell your secrets to him !ecause he is a !roke reed.i> Null an . =i> + .a22a2e 0e has left *ahore !ag and !aggage.> 'lesh an . =. ="> Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es.

ii> + s"a!e 2oat $ll of them were guilty !ut $slam was made a scape goat.> + lau2hin2 sto"6 If I wear that hat# I shall !e the laughing stock of the village.iii> + su2ar a y The woman went off on a nice winter holiday with her sugar daddy.e wire "ur new principal is a man of action.0e proved a dark horse and stood first in the annual examination. =ii> +t a stret"h -he works at computer for hours at a stretch.i> + rollin2 stone $ rolling stone gathers no moss. =. =i. =i> +t a loss . =i?> + turn "oat $ politician in /akistan is often a turn coat. 0e is a live wire. =. =. =.lan6et $slam is fun at parties# !ut his !rother is a wet !lanket.> + li.e were at a loss a!out what to do with a !roken computer. =iii> +t a22ers rawn $ll the religious parties in /akistan are at daggers drawn with one another. = > Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es. . =?> + wet .

er.e are at logger heads with the company over their plans to !uild a new factory.> 'or 2oo 0e is leaving this place for good.> +t lo22er hea s .a"6 out 0e !acked out of the contract at the last moment. =i> .a"6 away Iou should !ack away from the fire.ear with I could not !ear with this angry mood. QUESTION NO. B0 =a> Use the followin2 !hrasal .ear u! . =i. =. =i?> Out at el.i> In "ol .ii> In the !i!eline The new education policy is in the pipeline. =. =.=i. =.> .ows 0e always wears that old jacket although it is out at el!ows. =iii> .il The new education policy is on the anvil.iii> On the an. =?> Un er a "lou 0e left his jo! under a cloud.loo 0e was murdered in cold !lood. =ii> .s in your own senten"es.

s in your own senten"es. =.> 8ro! in I hate to drop in on people when they aren)t expecting me.iii> . . =.> 8o away with This chemical will do away with the stain in your sink. =.> Use the followin2 !hrasal .a"6 The /akistan $rmy !eat !ack the Indian $rmy in '(NF. =. =i. =?> .out 0ow did this damage come a!outJ =ii> )o%e off .rea6 out 6holera has !roken out in the city now7a7days.low out I !lew out the candles one !y one.ii> . =i?> .uy off The mo!ster tried to !uy off the jury.Iou should !ear up the hardships of life !ravely.i> 'all out The hus!and fell out with his wife over a trifle.eat .i> .er.rea6 into $ thief !roke into his house last night.hat time does this party come offJ =iii> )arry off The kidnappers carried the child off. =.rea6 own The car !roke down on the way. =. =.> . =i> )o%e a.

> 3ull own They are going to pull down the old !uilding today.e u! 0e has given up smoking for ever.=.e must make up for the lost time. =.out There is a lot of this flu going a!out these days. =ii> (a6e u! for .ii> 'all in with I fell in with an old friend on my way.e should not look down upon the poor.ii> 3ut u! with I cannot put up with my insult. =. =.iii> 4i.er . =. =iii> 3ass away The patient passed away in the morning. =i?> 4o a. =i?> $un o.er. ="> Use the followin2 !hrasal .iii> $un own 5ue to illness# his health has run down.s in your own senten"es. =i> (a6e off with The ro!!er made away with the jewelry.> 3ull u! 0e pulled up the dog out of the pond.i> 3ut off 5o not put off your meeting. =?> &oo6 own u!on . =. =i.

=. =?> $un u! a2ainst 2y motor !ike ran up against a car last night. .y 0e stood !y me in poverty. =. =ii> Stan .er. =?> Wear out I wore out my shoes in less than a month.ii> Turn away The police officer turned the pedestrians away from the scene of the accident.iii> Turn own -he has turned down my proposal. =. =.s in your own senten"es.> Sti"6 to /lease stick to the traditions of Islam at every cost.$ child was run over !y a car.> Ta6e own Take down what I dictate you.G =i. =i> Set u! for 0e sets himself up for an experienced driver. =iii> Stan for In a traffic signal# the red light stands for Gstop.i> Ta6e in I was taken in !y his friendly manners. = > Use the followin2 !hrasal . =i?> Wal6 away with 0is servant walked away with his money.

0o sakta hai k paper checker aap ko marks day day.a! ap ko kisi idiom ya phrasal ver! ka meaning na ata ho to uss ko paper mein chor ker mat aaiN. TRANSLATION QUESTION NO. -omething is !etter than nothing. B =ii> KKKKKKKKKKKKK ????????????? is a famous idiom>phrasal ver! used in everyday conversation. B0 =a> Write an a!!li"ation for Ao. LETTERS. Senten"e No. DIALOGUES. APPLICATIONS. 5. Senten"e No.e22ar es"ri!tion> I asked my teacher the meaning of ????????????(!eggar description). +xamination 0all# . 8ulkay darj zayl general sentences likh aaiN. 0 =i> KKKKKKKKKKKKKK =for e?a%!le .S 'O$ WE+: STU8ENTS . 4eneral Senten"es Senten"e No.. 3 =iii> KKKKKKKKKKKK I searched the meaning of ?????????? in the dictionary.TI3 'O$ I8IO(S +N8 35$+S+& @E$.

Ae"tG +!!oint%ent as a -----------------------------------ir# I have come to know through a relia!le source that some posts of ?????????? lie vacant at you firm>institution under your kind control.6. 8ate of .>2. Na%eG $.$.-c.8.8. I am giving !elow a resume of my ualification and other particulars. I will !e availa!le to take up my duties any time and would !e glad to work under your kind supremacy.6. ?????????? E?!erien"eG ????? years . It will show that I am the person you need in your office>firm>institution.$. (city) $pril CC# CK'D 777777777777777 777777777777777 777777777777777 Su. I offer myself as a candidate for one of them.irthA 55>22>II E u"ationG 2.

6 )onta"tA OOOOOOOOOO OthersA I am an amateur cricketer# competent de!ater and have an excellent command on +nglish *anguage. Iours o!ediently# P. +xamination 0all# $.> Write an a!!li"ation to !ro.+ ressA +xamination 0all# 6ity $. =. Thanking you in anticipation.8.I. (city) $pril CC# CK'D . (/hotocopies of necessary certificates are attached herewith) I would appreciate your considering me as a candidate for this post and if appointed I would work to the entire satisfaction of my superiors. I will leave no stone unturned.i e infor%ation.6.Q.8.

6.out #KKKKKKKKKKKKKK#. (city) $pril CC# CK'D The +ditor# The Nation# *ahore. +xamination 0all# $. .777777777777777 777777777777777 777777777777777 -u!jectA -ir# QUESTION NO.iews a.8. BB =a> Write a letter to the e itor of a news!a!er e?!ressin2 your .

-ometime ago there were complaints in the newspaper a!out ?????????????????????????????????????????????? ??????????????????????????????????? ?????????????????????????????????????????????? ??????????????????????????????????? ?????????????????????????????????????????????? ??????????????????????????????????? It was claimed that this type of negligence would not !e tolerated. I hope that your highly reputed newspaper can !e very useful to pave the way for the solution of this pro!lem.-u!jectA ?????????????????????????????????????????????? ?????????????? -ir# I re uest you to pu!lish this letter in the esteemed and widely read columns of your paper. In this respect# to remove this undesira!le situation# I re uest the following stepsA . It will definitely !e helpful for the pu!lic and government to get information a!out the gravity of the pro!lem# which will certainly cause its solution. 8ut the situation is still the same and complaints are persistent.

=.in2#.I. I hope that something will !e done immediately to remove the fears and misgivings from the pu!lic mind.(i) The government herself should take suita!le steps to get rid of the em!arrassment.iews a.6.Q. (city) $pril CC# CK'D The +ditor# . Iours truly# P. The case is of vital importance !ecause it concerns the general !etterment. (ii) The pu!lic should also !e warned to !e careful and wise in future.8.out #$e"6less 8ri. (iii) 6oncerned staff should !e made more alert and active. +xamination 0all# $.> Write a letter to the e itor of a news!a!er e?!ressin2 your .

(ii) The police should take a constant watch over the speed of the vehicles.The Nation# *ahore. . %eckless driving is# in fact# a mental state in which the driver displays a wanton disregard for the rules of the road1 the driver often misjudges common driving procedures# often causing accidents and other damages.It is a great threat to life and property.Ae"tG %eckless 5riving Sir. It is usually a more serious offense than careless driving# improper driving# or driving without care and attention. Su. Thus @overnment# traffic police and masses should adopt the following measures to check this pro!lem. %eckless driving is a major cause of road accidents. (i) @overnment should esta!lish maximum check posts on the roads. %eckless driving is a major moving traffic violation. Through your esteemed paper I want to draw the attention of people# traffic police and government towards the issue of reckless driving.

(v) The licenses of the drivers exceeding the speed limit should !e cancelled forthwith. Iours truly# P. . B3 =a> Write a ialo2ue . (iv) -evere action should !e taken against the defaulters. (vii) The passengers should refuse to continue their journey in a vehicle not o!serving the traffic rules.I. QUESTION NO. If warning proves ineffective# its route7 permit should !e cancelled. (vi) The company whose drivers too often neglect the laws should !e warned.Q.etween two frien s a. 0ope to get pu!lished my thoughts a!out reckless driving.(iii) The police should conduct surprise raids fre uently.out the waywar ness a%on2 the youth.

$aEaG Ies. I do not see any check and !alance !y elders# parents and teachers. .out the Waywar ness a%on2 *outh )hara"tersG $sif and %aza (two friends) Ti%eG Noon S"eneG $sif and %aza are coming !ack from college on a van. $aEaG I agree with you.8ialo2ue . +sifG The waywardness in the society is on the rise# mainly due to the ill effects of electronic and print media. This induces them to discuss a!out the waywardness among youth. Indian movies# misuse of mo!ile phones and internet are the major causes of waywardness among youth.etween Two 'rien s a. It is following its own capricious# wanton and depraved inclination. 8I+&O4UE +sifG $lasH "ur young generation has fallen a victim of waywardness. They happen to see some students smoking openly on the roadside.

0e shakes hand with %aza and alights form the van) =. (The van applies !rakes. $aEaG /arents should keep an eye on their children. $sif)s stop approaches.+sifG 2oreover# . +sifG Ieh. The reha!ilitation of these unfortunate youngsters is the need of hour. $aEaG In my opinion# well7timed Nikkah is indispensa!le to prevent youth from waywardness.> 4eneral 8ialo2ue )hara"tersG $(junior) and 8(senior) Ti%eG $fternoon S"eneG 0ouse>8azaar>6lass7room>%esturant 8I+&O4UE .estern culture is leading to the increasing tendency of excessive smoking# alcoholism and drug culture among the youth. $aEaG The spreading trend of waywardness in the youth is eroding the vitals of our society. +sifG @overnment and police should take some strick measures to check this pro!lem.

8A I)m doing a jo! at ????????? $A ?????????????????????????????????????????????? ??? 8A ?????????????????????????????????????????????? ??? . 8A 0ow is your life goingJ $A It)s fine.hat are your engagements now7a7days.$A $ssalam7o7$laikumH 0ow are youJ 8A . /ro!lems are the part and parcel of life.> I)m doing a jo! at ????????.hat are you doing now7a7 daysJ $A I)m doing my 8. $A .$. . 8A . 8A I agree with you. It)s all due to the negligence and carelessness of government.hat)s your pro!lemsJ $A *oad shedding>inflation>rising prices>7777777 is the major pro!lem confronted to every citizen of /akistan.a $laikum -alamH I)m fine.

$A ?????????????????????????????????????????????? ??? 8A ?????????????????????????????????????????????? ??? $A ?????????????????????????????????????????????? ??? 8A ?????????????????????????????????????????????? ??? $A -orry for interruption. 2y cell phone is ringing. 8A Is it an emergencyJ $A $ little !it. 8A "kH Iou can go. . 8A -urelyH $A 2y father>mother>wife is calling me at home. 2ay I attend the call. $A Nice to meet you.

(They shake hands and depart) L&+-TI"N N". The . QUESTION NO.ish you good luck. (!) . CM (a) .rite a dialogue !etween a student and a teacher on the importance of !ook reading. The 2uslims !eacon such people who worshiped natural phenomena and when man was deprived of every kind of faith# he was not in the ha!it to understand life.8A . -ee you again. B5 =a> Translate the followin2 !ara2ra!h into En2lish. In history# there is no trace of such a nation which gained a repute without contemplations. 2ay $llah help to solve your pro!lems and reduce your cares# worries# tensions and frustrations.rite a dialogue !etween two men a!out dearness. T$+NS&+TION Nations get progress in the world on the !asis of their contemplations.

> Translate the followin2 !ara2ra!h into En2lish. That is why they are second fiddle in the whole world. 2ost people are unhappy and dissatisfied with their present lot.e know that there is wide social unrest in our country. T$+NS&+TION . 3or instance unemployment incline them to think that their education will not !e a!le to help them in getting a jo!. ="> Translate the followin2 !ara2ra!h into En2lish. +vils such as fraud# lie# injustice and lack of e uality are also a source of worries among students. /eople are conceived a!out the dangers of war# dearness and the increase in the crimes. T$+NS&+TION . /oor social and economic conditions are a cause of unrest among students. 8ut# alas# the 2uslims have a!andoned the search for knowledge now. =.2uslims gave this man a new resolution and inculcated the mysteries of the universe.

No change can !e made in these laws. In it# the real power has the people who are elected !y pu!lic. EXPLANATION WITH RTC . Instead of it# the parents should ponder whether the girl and !oy like each other# and are they fully ready to live with each other for good in futureJ 1. The purpose of this expenditure is to impress others. T$+NS&+TION It is the need of hour that we should spend as little as possi!le on weddings.est# democracy is such type of government where there exist freedom# e uality and !rotherhood. The representatives of pu!lic only implement those laws which are made in the light of Luran and -unnah. It has often !een o!served that !oth the girl)s and !oy)s parents try to spend as much as possi!le on the wedding. = > Translate the followin2 !ara2ra!h into En2lish. In it the real sovereign is $llah and the !asic laws have !een explained in the 0oly Luran. The concept of Islamic democracy is much higher that it.In .

0 (a) No time to see# in !road -treams full of stars# like skies at night. (c) 2ountains# oceans# leaf -tar shine# moon Iou)re all that I can call =a> No ti%e to see. in . 0e concludes that such a sorrowful life is a poor life. .ill lie In the "f %eality and !e comforted.illiam 0enry 5avies )ONTEDT =i> O""urren"eG *ines :7E>'M =ii> )ontentG In this poem the poet laments that modern man has drowned so much in the ocean of temporal charms that he has no time to see and enjoy the Nature like trees# animals# streams and 8eauty. o) !ony and my daylight# nights arms stone glow own. $E'E$EN)E =i> *eisure 3oe%G =ii> 3oetG . Strea%s full of stars. li6e s6ies at ni2ht. (!) .roa ayli2ht.QUESTION NO.

(*ord 8yron) =.ony ar%s Of $eality an .> Will lie o. $E'E$EN)E =i> 3oe%G New Iear %esolutions =ii> 3oetessG +liza!eth -ewell . li6e the ni2ht Of "lou less "li%es an starry s6ies. In short# he cannot notice that these gushing streams are the #2ala?ies of earth#.eauty. 0e cannot understand how does the natural light of sun fall on the running water of the hilly streams.e "o%forte .ED3&+N+TION In these lines the poet says that modern man has ceased to !e imaginative and the reason is #la"6 of ti%e#. 0e cannot perceive how does this uickly flowing water strike against the pe!!les and thus reflect a twinkling light like that of the stars shinning at night in the sky. She wal6s in . 0e is so !usy in his worldly pursuits that he has no time to o!serve the !eauty of streams.ni2hts In the .

ED3&+N+TION In these lines the poetess has personified $eality. Thus she is comforted in the !ony arms !ecause these give her self7satisfaction# !lessed relief and spiritual exultation. %oon 2low *ou-re all that I "an "all %y own.ith the passage of time# she has !ecome ha!itual to it. leaf an stone Star shine.eauty#. 8ut the poetess is not an escapist.)ONTEDT =i> O""urren"eG *ines :7(>( =ii> )ontentG In this poem the poetess expresses her three revolutionary resolutions !efore the dawn of the new year. In the !eginning it was a very !itter and unpleasant practice !ecause !ony arms can give no joy or satisfaction to his wife. %eality. o"eans. $E'E$EN)E . -he has decided to spend her nights in the !ony arms of 2r. -he resolves to remain most of the time silent# think a!out what she is and face the realities with contention. . -he has given it the ualities of a hus!and. ="> (ountains. Now she has understood and comprehended the fact that #truth is .

-he cannot call her hus!and own !ecause she has always found him full of threats of separation or divorce.ork =ii> 3oetessG 2aya $ngelou )ONTEDT =i> O""urren"eG *ines CN7CE>CE =ii> )ontentG In this poem the poetess descri!es her disgust for domestic chores and love for Nature. Thus she has got tired of human !eings. =Willia% Wor sworth> . 0owever# she can call o!jects and phenomena of Nature like mountains# oceans# leaves# stones# star shine and moon glow etc her own !ecause #Nature i ne.er . -o she longs for the !lessings of Nature to give her power to !ear this dull life. -he is fed up !y looking after the children# !uying and cooking food# and maintaining her house. -he cannot call her children own !ecause they either do no o!ey her fully or show their inclination towards their father.e her#.oman .etray the heart that lo.=i> 3oe%G . ED3&+N+TION In these lines the poetess expresses her ina!ility to find any human !eing whom she can trust and call her own except Nature.

e one.oseph +nright )ONTEDT =i> O""urren"eG C(7DK>DK =ii> )ontentG In this poem the poet discusses the wavering !ehaviour of people. These people do what the common people do not do# and do not do what the common lot do.B =a> It is .ery 2oo to . ED3&+N+TION . =a> It is .ery 2oo that we ha.ore.els *ou %ay not fin it . heart I I re.e one.e *ou %ay not fin it . ="> The %usi" in %y &on2 after it was hear no %ore.QUESTION NO. an thus In triu%!hs !eo!le ha.els 2o .ery 2oo that we ha.> Thus I entere .e re. =.ery 2oo to . The poet calls them Gre!elsG.e ro!!e own ea . 0e also thinks that their presence is good for society. $E'E$EN)E =i> 3oe%G The %e!el =ii> 3oetG 5ennis .

In other words# they !ring happiness in life and increase the cultural wealth of the society. Therefore# these people do not like to !ecome Gre!elsG. There is not dou!t that education and age have made most of the people civilized# sophisticated and ur!ane.e ro!!e $E'E$EN)E =i> 3oe%G /atriot into Traitor =ii> 3oetG %o!ert 8rowning )ONTEDT =i> O""urren"eG *ines CN7C:>DK =ii> )ontentG In this poem the poet narrates the story of the rise and fall of a political leader.> Thus I entere . Their outwardly re!ellious attitude creates fun and promotes variety in the society. 8ut these people should tolerate Gre!elsG in the society for their own !enefit. . an thus I 2o In triu%!hs !eo!le ha. =.In these lines the poet says that the presence of Gre!elsG in a society is very good and !eneficial. These Gre!elsG are# in fact# unconventional persons who act against social values and traditions. $ year ago# people considered him a great patriot !ut now he is going to !e own ea .

8ut after a year# he had to go to the scaffold in thorough disgrace !ecause his erstwhile devotees had stigmatized him as a traitor.hile going to the scaffold# the leader wished if he would have died at the moment of his great triumph like some of the heroes in history# for example Quai -e-+Ea%# it would have !een !etter for him. 0e wanted to receive full reward of his struggle in this very world !ut his wish remained unfulfilled.hanged !y the same people.ore.ordsworth )ONTEDT =i> O""urren"eG *ines D'7DC>DC .illiam . Thus he waits for the judgment of @od to redeem him. This leader# one year earlier# had entered the city as an acclaimed hero and patriot. $E'E$EN)E =i> 3oe%G The -olitary %eaper =ii> 3oetG . &on2 after it was hear no %ore. ED3&+N+TION In these lines the poet sums up the political career and hum!le wish of a leader. . ="> The %usi" in %y heart I . 0e served his masses whole7heatedly for a whole year.

Though the poet does not listen the sweet voice of this soprano again in reality yet he has saved it in his mind as a retrieva!le memory. This memory has !ecome a permanent source of spiritual pleasure and tran uility for the poet ever7afterwards. Sweet (e%oryL wafte . stage . 0e thinks her voice more melodious than that of the nightingale and the cuckoo. The melodious voice of the song of GThe -olitary %eaperG just like the charming !eauty of the scene of #8affo ils## left an everlasting impact on the heart and mind of the poet. 3 (a) $ll the world)s a $nd all the men and women merely players. ED3&+N+TION In these lines the poet says that a thing of !eauty is a joy forever. Oft u! the strea% of Ti%e I turn %y sail.y thy 2entle 2ale. =Sa%uel $o2er> QUESTION NO. Thus he saves her song in his memories to enjoy it ever7afterwards.=ii> )ontentG In this poem the poet praises the song of a highland girl# singing and reaping in a valley of -cottish mountains.

=a> +ll the worl -s a sta2e +n all the %en an wo%en %erely !layers. ED3&+N+TION In these prover!ial lines the poet has used two !eautiful metaphors.orld)s a -tage =ii> 3oetG . $E'E$EN)E =i> 3oe%G $ll the . 3irstly he says that the planet earth is a huge platform where the performance of the drama . 0e starts his performance as an infant# then a school !oy# a lover# a soldier# a justice# a retired person and finally an old man.(!) $ legacy of !enefits 77 may we In the future years !e found with those who try To la!our for the good until they die.illiam -hakespeare )ONTEDT =i> O""urren"eG *ine '7C>CE =ii> )ontentG In this poem the poet says that the world is a stage and man is an actor. 0e performs seven roles in his life on this stage. (c) In the morning glad I see 2y foe outstretched !eneath the tree.

Thus they do not lead an independent life !ut are merely puppets or actors.enefits -.orld)s a -tageG is# in fact# a phrase that !egins a monologue spoken !y . I hol the worl .%ay we In the future years . 4ratiano.ac ues in #+s *ou &i6e It# $ct C# scene :# line 'D(.> + le2a"y of .our for the 2oo until they ie.ut as the worl . -econdly he says that all human !eings are merely stage actors. They !ehave well to make others impressed. $E'E$EN)E =i> 3oe%G 5eparture and $rrival =ii> 3oetG Thomas -tearns +liot )ONTEDT =i> O""urren"eG *ines CF7C:>DN . They keep an appearance most of the time like that of actors. *ike actors# they also entertain others. + sta2e where e.named #life# keeps on taking place.e foun with those who try To la.ery %an %ust !lay a !art. (The 2erchant of Benice 7 -hakespeare) =. They dress well to make others happy. G$ll the .

illiam 8lake . 0e advises them to work harder than their ancestors to make the world a !etter place for the coming generations.eneath the tree. $E'E$EN)E =i> 3oe%G $ /oison Tree =ii> 3oetG . These do not die with the death of people.=ii> )ontentG In this poem the poet expressed an a!iding idealism and optimism. 0e asks the people to greet the new century which is coming with new gifts and capa!ilities. These survive with the coming generations as a legacy.e. These are the writers# scientists and teachers etc who worked hard all their lives for the welfare and good of their generation and the coming ones. ED3&+N+TION In these lines the poet says that actions and deeds of people are immortal. 0istory is replete with the people who performed great actions and deeds. ="> In the %ornin2 2la I see (y foe outstret"he . The poet wishes that GweG# i.# the inha!itants of the twentieth century should also la!our hard continuously till our death so that the coming generations may remem!er us a #heroes# for our su!lime actions and deeds.

0is enemy was tempted to eat it like E. QUESTION NO. 0is enemy eats this apple and dies there and then. 5eath is an occasion for grief !ut for the poet it turns out to !e an occasion for joy !ecause his hatred has won at the cost of his enemy)s death.)ONTEDT =i> O""urren"eG *ines 'F7'N>'N =ii> )ontentG In this poem the poet descri!es the development and effects of anger. The poet had# in fact# planted a tree of hatred for his enemy. . $t last his enemy ate it stealthily at night and died there and then. This tree !ore a !right !ut poisonous apple. "nce the poet !ecomes angry with his foe and !ottles up his wrath. C (a) $nd on her -inging of 2ount $!ora. This hatred !ecomes a tree which !ears a poisonous apple. dulcimer she played . ED3&+N+TION In these lines the poet says that triumph always gives happiness and satisfaction.hen the poet went to his garden in the morning# his joy knew no !ounds !ecause his enemy was no more than a rigor mortis# lying on the ground !eneath the tree.e was tempted to eat the apple in /aradise.

In her hands# she was holding two light7weight hammers. $E'E$EN)E =i> 3oe%G 4u!la 4han =ii> 3oetG -amuel Taylor 6oleridge )ONTEDT =i> O""urren"eG *ines MK7M'>FM =ii> )ontentG In this poem the poet gives an imaginagy description of a wanderland# Panadu. (c) $nd yet those If you were not afraid# you would kill himH =a> +n on her ul"i%er she !laye Sin2in2 of (ount +. It has a pleasure7 doom# a sacred river# ancient forests# a wailing woman# a mighty mountain# caves of ice and a damsel singing of mount $!ora. The poet dreamt that a young !lack woman was standing in this wanderland.ora.(!) . -he was# in fact# an $!yssinian maid.alked through a wood# saw the !irds in the trees. ED3&+N+TION In these lines the poet depicts a very romantic scence at 4u!la 4han)s wanderland# Dana u.ith voicesA . They have no politicians and sang at their ease. .

e no !oliti"ians an san2 at their ease. They ha.> Wal6e throu2h a woo . 2oreover# she was singing a melodious song in praise of sacred mountain called $!ora.ir s in the trees. The hills are ali.ews fled to $merica to take refuge.e with the soun of %usi" With the son2s they ha. Thus the presence of the young woman# the playing of the musical instrument and the singing of the praise song all add to the !eauty and charms of this land.e sun2 ("scar 0ammertein II) =. $E'E$EN)E =i> 3oe%G -ay This 6ity 0as Ten 2illion -oul =ii> 3oetG . The music of this zither was creating a pleasing effect. To get rid of 0itler)s cruelties in @ermany# the .yston 0ughes $uden )ONTEDT =i> O""urren"eG *ines D:7DE>ME =ii> )ontentG In this poem the poet descri!es the misera!le condition of @erman . 8ut the immigrants had to face estrangement# alienation and maltreatment in $merica.ews. .these hammers she was palying a musical instrument called dulcimer. saw the .

The immigrants perceived that the cause of their happiness and freedom was the a!sence of politicians among !irds. These !irds were chirping and singing without any social ta!oos or trou!les. There they happened to o!serve the !irds in the trees.ews# they went to a small forest.oi"esG If you were not afrai . . In other words# they were enjoying the freedom and li!erty in their lives. ="> +n yet those . you woul 6ill hi%L $E'E$EN)E =i> 3oe%G -nake =ii> 3oetG 5avid 0er!ert *awrence )ONTEDT =i> O""urren"eG *ines DN7D:>:F . $lasH politicians among humans have divided mankind into groups# races# nations and countries.hen the authorities of New *or6 did not give any shelter to the immigrant .ED3&+N+TION In these lines the poet regrets that human life has fallen !eneath the animal level and the major reason is the presence of politicians among humans.

la hear fro% far +n"estral .=ii> )ontentG In this poem the poet descri!es his encounter with a snake that comes to drink water at his water7trough. The poet has liked the presence of this !eautiful snake in his house. +n . 0owever# the voices of his education compel him to attack it.%i this tu%ult :u. It is a greater enemy of man.oi"es !ro!hesyin2 warL (-. $fter his departure# he feels sorry for his mean action. 0owever# on the other hand# he is again hearing the inner voices of his conscience and social education. 6oleridge) QUESTION NO. 5 . Thus the rational voices are urging him that if he is not a coward or pavid and if he does not feel afraid of it# he must kill the venomous snake to save himself and others from its !ite.T. ED3&+N+TION In these lines the poet expresses the conflict in his mind a!out how to treat the snake which has come to his water7trough to uench its thirst. 0e is much impressed !y its physical !eauty. These voices are alarming him that snake is a dangerous and poisonous reptile.

I propose to use itG.y isn-t to ha.les that To. 8ut later# they are engaged in love7making. $E'E$EN)E =i> 3layG The 8ear =ii> 3laywri2htG $nton 6hekhov )ONTEDT =i> O""urren"eG *ast line of the play =ii> )ontentG /opova# a dowager# is visited !y -mirnov# a creditor of her late hus!and.(a) G*uka# tell them in the sta!les that To!y isn)t to have any oats all to7dayG. ED3&+N+TION . The power of the purse goes a long way in this world. -he is not in a position to repay the loan. The situation advances in such a manner that they are ready to fight with pistols.G =a> #&u6a.ay#. (!) G3ortunately# I have other means of impressing you. The rogues and the rulers may !oth come from the gutter# or the /alace. tell the% in the sta. (c) There ain)t no criminal classes# any more than virtuous classes.e any oats all to.

e other %eans of i%!ressin2 you. The !ower of the !urse 2oes a lon2 way in this worl . thy na%e is wo%anL (. In the !eginning of the play she says to *uka# #Tell the% to 2i. 8ut now /opova has !ecome very cruel to To!y.illiam -hakespeare) =. G+xtra feed of oatsG has reduced to Gno feed of oatsG.> #'ortunately. $E'E$EN)E =i> 3layG The 8oy 6omes 0ome =ii> 3laywri2htG $lan $lexander 2ilne )ONTEDT . Thus she proves1 'railty. I ha.This sentence is spoken !y the heroine of the play# /opova. It shows that she has !egun to like -mirnov and despise 2ihailovitvh# her late hus!and. I !ro!ose to use it#. Thus To!y was not only the favourite horse of 2ihailovitch !ut also of /opova.e hi%=To. It means her love for 2ihailovitch has evaporated and the cloud of vapours is raining on -mirnov.hen /opova loved her late hus!and# she also loved his favourites.y> an e?tra fee of oats#. . -he utters it when *uka and other servants come to !eat -mirnov with different tools.

or the 3ala"e. 0owever# when he wakes up /hilip accepts his proposal.ames fails to influence /hilip with his anger# he threatens him to use Gthe power of the purseG.ames holds the purse7strings. /hilip)s father has died.ames permission. 8efore that he cannot withdraw his money without &ncle .# $E'E$EN)E .ames.=i> O""urren"eG $lmost middle of the play =ii> )ontentG /hilip# a soldier# comes !ack after the war to the house of &ncle . -o when &ncle . ED3&+N+TION These lines are spoken !y a main character of the play# Un"le Ha%es. ="> There ain-t no "ri%inal "lasses.ames wants to !ring him into his jam !usiness. any %ore than . 0owever# /hilip cannot get his money until he is twenty7five.irtuous "lasses. 0e thinks that money has a great power in this world. .oth "o%e fro% the 2utter. 0e utters these lines when /hilip says to him that his anger is not so impressive as that of his 8rigadier. -o he plans to use Gthe power of purseG to impress /hilip. &ncle . 0e has left a tidy sum of money for /hilip. The ro2ues an the rulers %ay . In his nap he dreams that /hilip does not agree with him.

In his opinion# people are not !ad or good !ecause of their origins. -o they cunningly send him to their neigh!our)s house.olf.olf# a !urglar# !reaks into the house of -ydneys. These are circumstances that influence a person to !ecome ethical or virtuous. $ criminal may !e a poor or an aristocrat. ED3&+N+TION These lines are spoken !y the central character of the play# the . 0e utters these lines to contradict *ady %edchester when she uses the words Gcriminal classesG. "ne !y one# all the family mem!ers come into the room where the . $ good person may !e the inha!itant of a slum or a /alace. 6lass or caste plays no role in it. These are circumstances that force a person to !ecome a rascal or scoundrel. 0e says that there in no societal group of criminals. . 3amily !ackground plays no role in it.olf is trying to ro! their 6hristmas gifts.=i> 3layG -omething to Talk $!out =ii> 3laywri2htG +den /hillpotts )ONTEDT =i> O""urren"eG $lmost middle of the play =ii> )ontentG The . -imilarly there is no hierachy of good people. They appreciate him !ut do not want to lose their gifts.

WO(+N WO$: . &EISU$E . NEW *E+$ $ESO&UTIONS .* WI&&+I( 8+@IES (i) (ii) (iii) B.* (+*+ +N4E&OU (i) (ii) (iii) 5. T5E $E.ET5 SEWE&& (i) (ii) (iii) C.* W+&TE$ 8E &+ (+$E (i) (ii) (iii) 3.H EN$I45T (i) (ii) . T+$T+$* .* E&IM+.* 8.LESSON WISE PAPER A 3OET$* =+>ED3+N+TION WIT5 $T) 0.E& .

$OWNIN4 (i) (ii) (iii) 7. ONE +$T .IS5O3 (i) (ii) (iii) 1.E$T .(iii) 6.U$* (i) (ii) (iii) 9.* WI&&I+( WO$8SWO$T5 (i) (ii) (iii) 00.* T. 3+T$IOT INTO T$+ITO$ .* E8W+$8 &OW. E&IOT (i) (ii) . +&& T5E WO$&8-S + ST+4E .* $O. 8E3+$TU$E +N8 +$$I@+& .S. T5E 5UNTS(+N .* WI&&I+( S5+:ES3E+$E (i) (ii) (iii) 00.* E&IM+. T5E SO&IT+$* $E+3E$ .ET5 .

* HO5N :E+TS (i) (ii) .E$T '$OST (i) (ii) (iii) 06.(iii) 0B.S. T5E @+NIS5IN4 @I&&+4E .* $. +'TE$ +33&E 3I):IN4 . &I45TS OUT .&+:E (i) (ii) (iii) 03. W5EN I 5+@E 'E+$S . .E)+USE I )OU&8 NOT STO3 'O$ 8E+T5 E(I&* 8I):INSON (i) (ii) (iii) 0C. T5O(+S (i) (ii) (iii) 07.* WI&&I+( . + 3OISON T$EE .* E8W+$8 T5O(+S (i) (ii) (iii) 05.* $O.

3O&ITI)S . 5U&(E (i) (ii) .* S. *E+TS (i) (ii) (iii) BB. :U..E.* W. S+* T5IS )IT* 5+S TEN (I&&ION SOU&S . SN+:E .. +U8EN (i) (ii) (iii) B0.* W.T.5.&+ :5+N . )O&E$I8E (i) (ii) (iii) 01.(iii) 09.5. 5+W:-S (ONO&O4UE . &+W$EN)E (i) (ii) (iii) B3.* T.* TE8 5U45ES (i) (ii) (iii) B0. +UTU(N .* 8.

* W+&TE$ 8E &+ (+$E (i) +xplain GTartaryG !y .* EM$+ 3OUN8 (i) (ii) (iii) =. (CKKM @roup I) (ii) .ET5 SEWE&& (i) +xplain the following lines I will *ong draughts $s a purgation (CKKF II) !y of +liza!eth -ewellA drain uiet .U$4 (i) (ii) (iii) B5.illiam 5avies in his poem G*eisureG emphatically points our that in this rush of life we do not have time to appreciate the !eauty of life and nature.* WI&&+I( 8+@IES (i) .> QUESTIONS 0.hat are some of the simple delights we miss !ecause of our !usy lifeJ +la!orate. &EISU$E . 'O4 . (CKKF @roup I) (iii) B.alter 5e *a 2are as a romantic poem. T+$T+$* . (ET$OG3+$IS . 5iscuss. (CKKM @roup II) (ii) (iii) 3.(iii) BC.* E&IM+. NEW *E+$ $ESO&UTIONS .* )+$& S+N8.

* 8. (CKKM @roup I) .$OWNIN4 (i) (ii) (iii) 7.ET5 . WO(+N WO$: .H EN$I45T (i) +xplain all what the others do and re!el does not doJ (CKKM @roup II) (ii) (iii) 6.orkGJ +xplain.hat kind of disgusting picture of woman)s life 2aya $ngelou has drawn in her poem# G.IS5O3 (i) 0ow can we master the art of losingJ 5iscuss. (CKKF @roup I) (ii) (iii) 9.(ii) (iii) C. (CKKF @roup I) (ii) (iii) 5.E& . T5E $E.* (+*+ +N4E&OU (i) .* E8W+$8 &OW.* E&IM+.U$* (i) GThus I entered and thus I go In triumphs# people have dropped down deadG.E$T . ONE +$T .oman . 3+T$IOT INTO T$+ITO$ . T5E 5UNTS(+N . +xplain these lines from 8rowning)s poem G/atriot into TraitorG.* $O.

* WI&&I+( . +&& T5E WO$&8-S + ST+4E .orld)s $ -tageG !y -hakespeare. .&+:E (i) (ii) (iii) 03. (CKKF @roup II) (ii) . T5E SO&IT+$* $E+3E$ . 8E3+$TU$E +N8 +$$I@+& .orld)s $ -tageG !y -hakespeare. (CKKF @roup II) (iii) 1.hat kind of picture of death +mily 5ickinson draws in her poem# G8ecause I 6ould Not -top for 5eathG.orld)s $ -tageG.(ii) G"ne $rtG is the art of losing. (CKKF @roup II) 00. + 3OISON T$EE .* WI&&I+( S5+:ES3E+$E (i) 6omment upon the seventh stage of man)s life in G$ll the .S.* T. 0ow can we master this artJ +xplain.E)+USE I )OU&8 NOT STO3 'O$ 8E+T5 E(I&* 8I):INSON (i) .* WI&&I+( WO$8SWO$T5 (i) (ii) (iii) 00. (CKKM @roup II) (iii) +xplain the fourth and fifth stages of life as depicted in G$ll the . (CKKM @roup I) (ii) 5escri!e the seventh stage of life in -hakespeare)s G$ll the . E&IOT (i) (ii) (iii) 0B.

&+ :5+N .S. T5O(+S (i) (ii) (iii) 07. (CKKF @roup II) (iii) 05. (CKKM @roup I) (ii) G*ights "utG !y +dward Thomas dwells on the power of sleep. .* E8W+$8 T5O(+S (i) G*ights "utG !y +dward Thomas dwells on the power of sleep.(iii) 0C. :U. T5E @+NIS5IN4 @I&&+4E . &I45TS OUT .T. +xplain. +la!orate.* S.E$T '$OST (i) (ii) (iii) 06.hat does 6oleridge descri!e in the poemJ (CKKM @roup II) (ii) (iii) . W5EN I 5+@E 'E+$S .* HO5N :E+TS (i) (ii) (iii) 09. )O&E$I8E (i) GIn Panadu did 4u!la 4han $ stately pleasure7dome decreedG# and then follows the most imaginative poem. +'TE$ +33&E 3I):IN4 .* $O.* $.

* TE8 5U45ES (i) (ii) (iii) B0. *E+TS (i) GIn our times the destiny of man presents its meaning in political termsG.U$4 (i) +xplain the poetic !eauty of G3ogG !y 6arl -and!urgA . S+* T5IS )IT* 5+S TEN (I&&ION SOU&S .. (CKKM @roup I) (ii) (iii) BB. +UTU(N . 5U&(E (i) (ii) (iii) BC.. +U8EN (i) (ii) (iii) B0. Ieats in the light of 2ann)s given comment.* )+$& S+N8.5. 'O4 .* W. SN+:E .* T.* W.* 8. 5+W:-S (ONO&O4UE . &+W$EN)E (i) (ii) (iii) B3.8.01.5..E. +xplain G/oliticsG !y . 3O&ITI)S . Thomas 2ann.

* E$NEST 5E(IN4W+* (i) (ii) (iii) B. (CKKM @roup II) (ii) (iii) B5. (ET$OG3+$IS . T5E NEW )ONSTITUTION . $+33+))INI-S 8+U45TE$ N+T5+NIE& 5+WT5O$NE (i) (ii) (iii) 3.* EM$+ 3OUN8 (i) (ii) (iii) S5O$T STO$IES 0.The fog come "n little cat feet It sits looking "ver the har!our and city "n silent haunches $nd then moves on.* S++8+T 5+SS+N (+NTO (i) . T5E :I&&E$S .

* H+(ES HO*)E (i) (ii) (iii) 9. T5E TE&&-T+&E 5E+$T .$E+:'+ST .* HO5N STEIN.* .+. .* E. T5E NE):&+)E .E$N+$8 (+&+(U8 (i) (ii) (iii) 6. +$+.* 4U* 8E (+U3+SS+NT (i) .* OS)+$ WI&8E (i) (ii) (iii) 7.(ii) (iii) C. T+:E 3IT* .E): (i) (ii) (iii) 5. 3OE (i) (ii) (iii) 1. T5E 5+33* 3$IN)E .* .

T5E '&* .* '$+N)IS TOWE$ (i) .+&M+) (i) (ii) (iii) 05. T5E S5+8OW IN T5E $OSE 4+$8EN . T5E &ITT&E WI&&OW .(ii) (iii) 00. T5E 8U)5ESS +N8 T5E HEWE&&E$ .* 4$+)E 3+&E* (i) (ii) (iii) 03.* 5ONO$E 8E .* @I$4INI+ WOO&' (i) (ii) (iii) 00.* :+T5E$INE (+NS'IE&8 (i) (ii) (iii) 0C. + )ON@E$S+TION WIT5 (* '+T5E$ . + 3+SSION IN T5E 8ESE$T .* 8.5. &+W$EN)E (i) (ii) (iii) 0B.

* E8EN 35I&&3OTTS (i) (ii) (iii) C. T5E .(ii) (iii) ONE-+)T 3&+*S =+>ED3+N+TION WIT5 $T) 0.* +NTON )5E:5O@ (i) (ii) (iii) B.E+$ .* +NTON )5E:5O@ (i) . S(O:E S)$EENS .* 5+$O&8 .+. T5E .O* )O(ES 5O(E .OUT .$I45OUSE (i) (ii) (iii) =. T5E .> QUESTIONS 0.E+$ .* +. (I&NE (i) (ii) (iii) 3. SO(ET5IN4 TO T+&: +.

$I45OUSE (i) (ii) (iii) (O8E$N ESS+* 0.+.* E8EN 35I&&3OTTS (i) (ii) (iii) C. 5escri!e the difficulties faced !y the people at the time of independence. (CK'' @roup I) M. T5E . .OUT . +xplain. *ia at $li 4han expect of the $mericans for the development and sta!ility of /akistan.(ii) (iii) B. 3+:IST+N +N8 T5E (O8E$N WO$&8 .* 5+$O&8 . . (CK'C @roup I) . (I&NE (i) (ii) (iii) 3.orldG.O* )O(ES 5O(E .hat did 2r. To *ia at $li 4han# demand for /akistan was the most reasona!le and entirely practica!le. (CKKN @roup I) D. (CKKF @roup I) C.* +.hy did the 2uslims of India ask for a country of their ownJ (CK'' @roup II) F.* &I+QU+T +&I :5+N '. S(O:E S)$EENS . SO(ET5IN4 TO T+&: +. +xplain the rationale of /akistan as it is explained in *ia uat $li 4han)s G/akistan and the 2odern .

N+4+S+:I. (CKKM @roup I) 'K. *awrence in G. (CK'K @roup II) 'D. (CKKN @roup II) 'C. +U4UST 1. (CKKF @roup I) . 01C5 . 5. @loria +merson)s GTake the /lungeG is a candid account of writer)s hopes and fears. 0ow specific is the writer a!out what she expected to seeJ 5oes she suggest these expectation without stating themJ (CK'C @roup II) 3. 5iscuss. . @ive description of spring presented in G. 5iscuss. (CK'' @roup I) C. 0ow does @loria +merson maintain the focus on her feelings throughout the essayJ 5o these feelings changeJ (CK'C @roup II) 5.histling of 8irdsG.0. 5escri!e the writer)s experience of taking the plunge. 5iscuss .* @I$4INI+ WOO&' :. T5E E)&I3SE . +xplain (CKKF @roup II) ''.histling of 8irdsG. G.5. +la!orate.N. 5escri!e @loria +merson)s experience of parachute jumping.* 4&O$I+ E(E$SON 'M. (CKKN @roup II) 'F. W5IST&IN4 O' . &+W$EN)E (. 0ow were we# according to *ia uat $li 4han# justified in our demand for /akistanJ (CK'D @roup II) B.* 8. @ive an account of the disaster occurred on $ugust (# '(MF at Nagasaki.I$8S .hy did the writer want to jump from the aeroplane with a parachuteJ (CKK( @roup II) ':.inter as a general who has !een !eaten and retreating.histlingG is a sound sym!ol which stands for the life and movements of !irds and of all living creatures. (CK'K @roup II) 'E. (CKK( @roup I) 'N. T+:E T5E 3&UN4E .* (I)5+ITO I)5I(+$U '(. 5escri!e the experience and feelings of the people !efore and during the solar eclipse. (CKK( @roup I) E. There is depiction of Nature in G.histling of 8irdsG shows his fascination for sound and colour.

hy didn)t the writer and his uncles think it wrong to outwit the grandfather)s violence and rigourJ (CKK: @roup I) CE. . W+&:IN4 ON T5E (OON . .hat was the condition of the survivors of the nuclear explosionJ (CK'K @roup I) 6.. There is something essentially sad a!out the portrayal of the Tailor in G2y TailorG. 0ow does Ieats remem!er different relations especially that of grandfather in his essay G2y @randfatherGJ (CKKF @roup II) C:. *E+STS CM.* STE35EN &E+)O): D'. +la!orate.E+UT* IN8UST$* .* W.* 8+@I8 $.hat wonders does 5avid %. . .. (CK'D @roup II) 9. (CKKM @roup II) CF. (CK'D @roup I) 1.* +&8OUS 5UD&E* . . . 2ake a comparison !etween Ieats) grandfather and grandmother. .rite down a character sketch of Ieats) @randfather. (CK'C @roup I) DK. 0ow was it easy to deceive the grandfather in G2y @randfatherGJ (CKKN @roup I) CN. -cott experience on the moonJ (CKKE @roup I) CC. G-ometimes I scarcely !elieve that I have actually walked on the moonG.hat kind of character -tephen *eacock draws of the tailor in his essay G2y TailorGJ (CKKF @roup I) DC. S)OTT C'.hat has the tailor in G2y TailorG to hideJ (CKKN @roup II) DD. (* T+I&O$ . (* 4$+N8'+T5E$ .CK. (CK'' @roup I) 7.hat are Ieats) impressions of his grandfatherJ (CK'K @roup II) C(. . T5E .hat were the feelings of -cot and Irwin on landing on the moonJ (CK'K @roup I) CD. .rite a note on the character sketch of grandmother in G2y @randfatherG.

hat does 0uxley refer to as )%epellant) in the make7up of some modern womenJ (CKK: @roup I) DE. T5E . There is irony and humour in GThe 8eauty IndustryG !y 0uxley. (CKKF @roup II) MD. 0ow does 2ax 8eer!ohm differentiate !etween 0osts and @uestsJ (CK'D @roup II) 0B. 5OSTS +N8 4UEST .DM.arJ (CKKE @roup I) MK. $re 5octors men of scienceJ 5iscuss. . (CKKM @roup I) ME.hat according to 2ax 8eer!ohm is good guestshipJ (CKKN @roup I) MM. .* 5E$. .+)5E&O$-S 8I&E((+ . +xplain.4.hat kind of a dilemma does a !achelor face in his lifeJ (CK'C @roup I) . (CKKN @roup I) DN. 5iscuss. +xplain with reference to GThe 8eauty IndustryG. (CK'D @roup I) 00. +$E 8O)TO$S (EN O' S)IEN)EF . 0ow does the writer differentiate !etween hosts and guestsJ (CK'' @roup II) MN.* (+D .hat kind of hosts were 2ac!eth and *ady 2ac!eth as mentioned in G0osts and @uestsGJ +xplain.hyJ (CKK: @roup II) D(.. $ldous 0uxley in G8eauty IndustryG calls annual expenses of one hundred and fifty six million pounds on make up )$ tidy sum).O5( MC. 0ow does human !ody compare with a 6hina . . S5+W M'. +ven great depression could not !eat down $merican women)s ha!it of make7up. (CKKM @roup I) DF.hat is the dilemma of a !achelor as depicted in 0er!ert @old)s GThe 8achelor)s 5ilemmaGJ (CKKF @roup II) M(. G"ur deepest instincts# !ad or good# are those which we share with the rest of the animal creationG. . 0ow has it !ecome possi!le for a grandmother to look as young as her granddaughterJ (CKKE @roup II) 00. 5iscuss the real pro!lems of a !achelor. .EE$. (CKK( @roup II) MF. 0ow does the !achelor fare in $merican societyJ (CKKN @roup I) FK.hy and how does 0uxley compare human !ody with a /orcelain .* . .E$T 4O&8 M:.arJ (CKKN @roup II) D:.

(CKKE @roup I) NM. TO&E$+N)E . (CKKM @roup I) FC. (CKK( @roup II) F(.* +&35+ O' T5E 3&OU45 N'.rite an essay on tolerance. 0ow did the writer feel and !ehave when he discovered while in the !us that he had no money on himJ (CKKN @roup II) NC.2.2.. 3orster. . . (CKKF @roup I) FD. )*ord must !uild if the work is to stand . 'O$STE$ F'. .(. (CKK( @roup I) FE. 3orester in his essay GToleranceG does not favour love re!uilding civilization.hat is )N$QI) solution of dealing with the people one does not likeJ (CKK: @roup I) FM. (CK'' @roup I) N:. ON S+*IN4 -3&E+SE. +la!orate. "ur good manners prove that we respect others regardless of their station or status. Tolerance lies in putting up with the people unlike us# not in loving them. (CKKE @roup II) NF. .. (CKKE @roup I) FN. (CK'C @roup II) 0C.* &EWIS T5O(+S . (CK'K @roup II) NN.hy are !ad manners infectiousJ (CK'C @roup I) 05. +. 6ritically examine 3orester)s views on tolerance. (CK'' @roup II) NK. +la!orate. 0e who tolerates people different from him is )Truly 8rave).. . TO E$$ IS 5U(+N . . )It is easy to see fanaticism in other people !ut difficult to spot in oneself).03.)J 6omment. 5iscuss. GIf !ad manners are infectious# so also are good mannersG. *aw does not do so much to make social interaction sweet and smooth as do the good manners..rite a note on Tolerance. 6omment. (CKK: @roup II) FF. +xplain. +la!orate. (CKKE @roup II) F:. +la!orate.hy does the writer recommend the story of 6hesterfield to the lift7man in G"n -aying /leaseGJ (CKK: @roup II) ND.rite a note on the good manners of the conductor on the !us. )Tolerance is not the same as weakness)# says +.* E.

(CK'' @roup II) ED. $ll Gfanatical creedsG are harmful to mankind. S)IEN)E +N8 @+&UES . (CK'' @roup II) 06.hat *ewis Thomas in his essay# GTo +rr is 0umanG says a!out the lower animals and computersJ +xplain. 5iscuss. 0ow does 3rancine /rose distinguish gossip from rumour mongeringJ (CKK( @roup I) :M. $ll exploration is !ased on human falli!ility.* +NON*(OUS .* '$+N)INE 3$OSE :C.(CKKE @roup II) EK. .hat harm can )pleasant illusions) doJ (CKK: @roup I) ::. #SU3E$# . (CKKM @roup II) :N. 4OSSI3 . +la!orate. (CKKF @roup II) N(. In what different ways people gossip and to what effectJ (CKKM @roup II) :D. 0ow does 8ertrand %ussell prove that all Gfanatical creedsG are harmful to mankindJ (CKK( @roup II) EC. Thomas in his essay GTo +rr is 0umanG# states that non7human !eings or things cannot possess the faculty of reasoning. 5o you agree with %ussel)s view that the esta!lishment of a single authority in the world will a!olish warJ (CKK( @roup I) E'. +volution from agriculture to industry was positive and progressive.NE. .* . 8ertrand %ussel argues that !y eliminating great wars we can a!olish poverty.hat is the relation !etween committing mistakes and free willJ (CK'K @roup II) :'. (CK'K @roup I) 07. 5iscuss rumour# slander and gossip and differentiate !etween them. GThere are certain things that our age need# and certain things that it should avoidG. 0owJ (CKK: @roup II) :E. 6omment. +volution from agriculture to industry was not only economic !ut also cultural and political. +la!orate. 5iscuss. (CKKE @roup I) :(. . Q. (CK'K @roup I) :K. .hat are %ussell)s views a!out science and valuesJ (CK'C @roup II) 09. 5iscuss.E$T$+N8 $USSE& :F.

(CK'' @roup I) 01. G-ince now we live in a world of super7things# we might expect them to !e made !y a race of supermenG. $0 3##-35# -$"1+ $* ONE $0 ). T5E @IT+(INS . '$O( SO(E 3O&I)E(EN +N8 + (O$+& . -(). !* $%)/(* .4.:. (CKK( @roup II) EF.alker)s essay# GThe BitaminsG. (CKKF @roup I) E(. (CK'D @roup I) B0.EM. .G"$%& I' 1. W"() !* ++!. +xplain the utility of vitamins on human !ody. (CK'K @roup I) T5E O&8 (+N +N8 T5E SE+ YEAR WISE PAPER B PAPER NO.* 8$. G/olicemen in 6hesterton)s essay !ehave exactly like our own policemenG. :ENNET5 W+&:E$ EE. 6hesterton in his G-ome /olicemen $nd a 2oralG call the target of his knife7throwing )2angled tree)J (CKK: @roup II) E:.hy does @. . +lucidate.rite down the different nourishing ualities of different vitamins as mentioned in 5r. 5iscuss.hich are the water solu!le vitamins and what are their !enefitsJ (CKKE @roup II) ('. 1 (Y !" 2##4 . 4enneth . . 0ow do various vitamins keep human !ody fitJ (CKK: @roup I) (K.. 5escri!e the origin of the word GsuperG. 0$//$-(*2 )$&(3+4 (i) Muslim Unity (ii) Social vils in !akistan . )5ESTE$TON EN.* 4.

and would have been so used more effectively but for war.ed. and if the danger of great wars can be eliminated." ). &t has been so used to a limited e)tent. poverty can be abolished throughout the whole world. . if the population of the world does not increase too fast. however. *ut without these three things industrialism will create a regime like that in which the !haraohs build the pyramids. R !1 ). and birth control. &ts use in raising the standard of life has depended mainly upon three things+ democracy. for one man's labour to produce much more than is needed to provide a bare subsistence for himself and his family. have incurred hostility from the rich. the growth of industrialism has coincided in the west with the growth of democracy. 5% +)($*+ 2(6 * !) ). &f these three things can be e)tended to the rest of the world as it becomes industriali. %ortunately. of course. 0$//$-(*2 &!++!2 !*1 !*+. trade unionism. this possibility will be used to raise the standard of life. &n particular. *1.(iii) Music "ddiction (iv) lementary ducation (v) "fter#effects of Modern $ar 2. "ll three. and e)cessive hours of labour will no longer be necessary anywhere. &t is possible now. in *ritain and "merica. (iven an intelligent democracy not misled by some dogmatic creed. if the world population continues to increase at the present rate.

2. 3. $"/T 0 "ccounts 1lerks in a well established Multi /ational %irm. !. "$!1+. 0$//$-(*2 .the abolition if poverty and e)cessive work will be totally impossible. (vi) Make a precis of the passage. OR W"() !* !&&/(3!)($* (* " +&$*+ !16 ")(+ 9 *). W"() ! / )) " )$ ). *o) /o. &slamabad )$ ).ow can the standard of life be raised(iii) . E1()$" $0 ! * -+&!& " !8$%) ). !3%) )"!00(3 &"$8/ 9 $* 3(). 345. 7% +)($*+4 (i) $hat connection does the writer show between industrialism and democracy(ii) .ow can poverty be abolished(iv) $hat will be the impact of increase in population at the present rate(v) Suggest a suitable title for the passage.

&" ++($*+ (* + *) *3 + $0 . .$%" $-*4 (i) *ear up (ii) 0ie (iii) 1ome to (iv) 6est (v) 0amocles' sword (vi) %eather in one's cap (vii) (ift of the gab (viii) " fishy (i)) Stand of ceremony ()) Make a bee line for out in story 5. 0$//$-(*2 (1($9!)(3 . :IVE $0 ). U+ !*. 0$//$-(*2 + *) *3 +4 (i) 1limbing down the stairs. (v) The 7ury were unanimous in their verdict. (viii) & went there with a view to get first hand information.e denied to accept the invitation. (iv) . (iii) They decided for starting on their 7ourney.4. :IVE $0 ). (ii) Tell me the last news of war. C$"" 3) !*. (vi) $hom was she talking(vii) The population of 8arachi is greater than any other town in !akistan. he fell head long.

<. T"!*+/!) ).en at the en .4rou! II> 0. ()) & don't know the reason why he dislike me. B =*ear B00C .4 OR W"() ! 1(!/$2% 8 ). .(i)) Though he has enough money. $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) $n Ideal 6ollege (ii) -cience and $rts (iii) 2uslims) 8ackwardness (iv) 0ealth 6are in /akistan (v) %ole of +lectronic 2edia B. 0$//$-(*2 (*)$ E*2/(+. /(*2. Write an essay.* ! +)%1 *) !*1 ! &$/(3 + "2 !*) $* $* -. with an outline. but he will not purchase a house. 3+3E$ NO.

(iv) /oint out some forms of psychological ugliness. $nd yet they were not !eautiful. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 i io%ati" e?!ressions in senten"es of your own. $nd conversely# there is an interior light that can transfigure forms that the pure aesthetician would regard as imperfect or downright ugly. The jar may !e empty or tenanted !y spiders# full of honey or stinking slime 7 it makes no difference to its !eauty or ugliness. "n the pretty faces of those especially who are trying to have a continuous good time# one sees very often a kind of !ored sullenness that ruins all their charm. -piritual emptiness or ugliness shows through. (i) 5o up . 3.out the !ro. 8ut a woman is live# and her !eauty is therefore not skin deep.out the la"6 of %e i"al fa"ilities in 4o. 3or the lovely vase was either empty or filled with some corruption. Their shape# their colour# their surface texture were perfect. O$ Write a letter to the e itor of a news!a!er a. $n ugliness also of greed# of lasciviousness# of avarice. The surface of the human vessel is affected !y the nature of its spiritual contents. I have seen women who# !y the standards of a connoisseur of porcelain# were ravishingly lovely. $ll the deadly sins# indeed# have their own peculiar negation of !eauty.ern%ent 5os!italsN8is!ensaries.le%s fa"e "o%%uters in the "ity.hat does real !eauty signifyJ (ii) .here does the !eauty of a porcelain jar lieJ (iii) 5ifferentiate !etween inner !eauty and outer !eauty.%eal !eauty is as much an affair of the inner as of the outer self. The !eauty of a porcelain jar is a matter of shape# of colour# of surface texture. QuestionsG (i) . Write a letter to the 5ealth (inister a. .y C. (v) 2ake a precis of the passage. There is an ugliness of stupidity# for example# of unawareness (distressingly common among pretty women). There are numerous forms of psychological ugliness.

(v) -end this letter on my home address. (ii) 0e does not care for his money.hat to speak of 3rench# he does not know even +nglish. ialo2ue . (iii) 0e !ehaved cowardly.(ii) @et away with (iii) *ive !y (iv) $t loggerheads (v) "ut of !ounds (vi) /lay upon (vii) $s the crow flies (viii) The under dog (ix) The school master is a!road (x) $ !lue stocking 5.itual late 3+3E$ NO. (vii) 2y friend told me that he is not to !lame. (vi) There is nothing such as chance.4rou! I> . (viii) The judge disposed the case at once.etween a tea"her an a stu ent who is a ha. Translate the followin2 into En2lish. (x) . 3 =*ear B005 . 6. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. (iv) I am ill since three months. (i) "pen this knot. (ix) No sooner I had fallen than they ran away. O$ Write a "o%er.

-ociety gives you some rights and some duties. $ good citizen is aware of the fact that his is inde!ted to his society in many ways. 0e keeps away from such activities that may harm the interests of his fellow citizens. These conditions and standards of !ehaviour are for the common good and welfare of the society and individuals. It is only just and right that he should pay his de!ts. 0e realizes that he should live in harmony with other mem!ers of society. 2an cannot live without a society. 0e lives not for himself alone. 0e does not live in isolation. 0e is tolerant# kind and virtuous. 0e lives for others. 0e pays his taxes. Write an essay.en at the en . $ person who is aware of his duties and rights in his society in a good citizens. QuestionsG (i) @ive a suita!le title to passage. . 0e cannot live alone. 0e has received much in material and spiritual !enefits from others.0. 0e lives a clean and honest life. 8ut living in a society means cooperation with other mem!ers of that society. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) %eading for /leasure (ii) Ills of -moking (iii) *iteracy 6ampaign (iv) $n Ideal -tudent (v) 0ow to 2ake /akistan -trong and -ta!le B. 0e knows that the la!our and work of countless persons have enriched his life. 0e always keeps in view the interests of his society and state. with an outline. 0e knows that he is a mem!er of a group with which he is associated !y a thousand and one ties. $ good citizen does his !est to do his duty to the society. . 0e is not selfish. 0e takes keen interest in the affairs of his state.hen you live in a society# you have to live as others live. Iou have to accept the conditions and traditions that a society prescri!es for its mem!ers. 0is life# to a very great extent# depends on others. $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. 0e must live with his fellow human !eings. 0ow does a good citizen pay his de!ts to the societyJ 8y living a useful and fruitful life.

out s%o6in2 a%on2 stu ents. (ix) 0e walks as if he is lame. (vi) -lower you move# greater the time you take. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. (i) 8ring forth (ii) 5ie down (iii) @o against (iv) 4nock a!out (v) 0ouse of cards (vi) *aughing stock (vii) Nip in the !ud (viii) /lay truant (ix) 4eep one)s fingers crossed (x) 0ave a !ee in one)s !onnet 5. (v) I would sooner uit than to do it. 6. 3. (ii) 6ertificates are attached herewith. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 i io%ati" e?!ressions in senten"es. C.hat are the duties of a good citizenJ (v) @ive other words forA (a) 0armony (!) /rescri!e (c) Inde!ted (d) Isolation (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage in a!out 'KK words.(ii) . (x) "ne can learn his lesson if he applies his mind to it. Translate the followin2 into En2lish.ho is a good citizenJ (iii) . O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the se"retary of hi2her e u"ation for 2ran of s"holarshi! for hi2her stu ies a. (viii) -he was too pleased to hear the news.hy is society formedJ (iv) . Write a letter to the e itor of a news!a!er a.roa . (iii) -he died from cancer. . (iv) No sooner he left than the storm !roke. (vii) They considered him as a great fool. (i) 0e or she is a thief.

$ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.4rou! II> 0. 3+3E$ NO. with an outline. Thousands of years ago# when men lived in caves and hunted animals for food# strength of !ody was the most important thing1 !ut now# in the Twentieth 6entury# !rains are more important. -trength of !ody is still needed for . of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) 2o!ile /hone (ii) 5rug $ddiction (iii) $n Ideal 6ollege (iv) -ocial +vils in /akistan (v) 6haracter is 5estiny B. "ught women to have the same rights as menJ $ hundred year ago# the answer in every country in the world would have !een# GNoG. +ven now# in the Twentieth 6entury# there are many countries where women are still treated almost like servants# or even slaves. Write an essay.en at the en .hy notJG you would have !een told# scornfully and pityingly# that women were weaker and less clever than men# and had worse characters. C =*ear B005 . If you had asked# G.etween a stu ent an a tea"her on the i%!ortan"e of is"i!line.O$ Write a ialo2ue . It is certainly true that the average woman has weaker muscles that the average man.

8ecause they# and not men# do this# they usually love their children more# and are !etter a!le to look after them# since they are more patient and understanding with small children. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 i io%ati" !hrases in senten"es of your own.hy would you have !een told a hundred years ago that women ought not to have the same rights as menJ (ii) . There have !een women judges in Turkey# women am!assadors in $merica# women ministers in the 8ritish government and women &niversity professors in many countries.hat work does the writer mention that women have done as well as menJ (v) .hy was strength of !ody important thousands of years agoJ (iii) 0ow can we see that it is no longer so importantJ (iv) . 8ut in countries where there is the same education for !oth# it has !een clearly shown that there is no difference at all !etween the !rain of the average woman and that of the average man.hat is particular a!out women that men can)t doJ (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage in not more than 'CK words. Write a letter to the e itor of a news!a!er a. $nd among the greatest and strongest rulers of +ngland were Lueen +liza!eth and Lueen Bictoria. 3.a few kinds of work# !ut the fact that such kinds of work are not well paid shows that the Twentieth 6entury does not think that muscles are of very great importance. C. 3or this reason# many women are happier if they stay at home and look after their house and family than if they go out and do the same work as men do. (i) -tick to (ii) -tand out (iii) %un out . O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the ire"tor of e u"ation for the !ost of an En2lish tea"her.hat a!out women)s !rainsJ "f course# in countries where girls are not given so good an education as !oys they know less. 8ut women can do one thing that men cannotA they can produce children. It is their own choice# and not the result of !eing less clever than men.out traffi" %ess on "ity roa s. . QuestionsG (i) .

(iv) 6arry weight (v) 6ut a sorry figure (vi) 8ury the hatchet (vii) 5o up (viii) Turn coat (ix) $ dark horse (x) 8y and large 5. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. (i) 3or goodness)s sake leave my alone. (ii) -he is more intelligent of the two. (iii) ,ho do you want to seeJ (iv) *et -a!iha and I go there. (v) ,e saw much less films than last years. (vi) 8etween you and I# he is a cheat. (vii) The climate of 2ultan is !etter than *ahore. (viii) I only did two sums. (ix) *atest part of the !ook is very difficult. (x) There is a little truth in your statement. 6. Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween two frien s on so%e T@ !ro2ra%%e.

3+3E$ NO. 5
=*ear B006 - 4rou! I>

0. Write an essay, with an outline, of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) /unja!A The *and of 3ive %ivers (ii) 5reams of a 6ollege -tudent

(iii) Information Technology (iv) Terrorism and Image of /akistan $!road (v) %ole of ,omen in -ociety B. $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.en at the en . ,hen the time for a general election approaches# candidates who wish to !e elected travel around with loudspeakers and hold meetings. They hold meetings !efore the elections !ecause they wish to appeal the electorate. They wish to present to the pu!lic what they consider to !e suita!le programme for legislation when and if they are elected# and they seek to show why their programme should !e chosen in preference to that their opponents. The candidates are in this way seeking to influence pu!lic opinion. 0olding a meeting is pro!a!ly the simplest form in influencing pu!lic opinion# !ut it is still a very important method. The speaker faces his audience# which is then a!le to gauge his honesty and sincerity. In these days of political parties# it is more the political party that wields the greater influence# rather than the individual speaker and what he has to say. Nevertheless if# as a speaker# he is unimpressive he may do a lot to reduce his party)s chances in the election. 8ut pu!lic meetings are not the only means of influencing pu!lic opinion. +very time people assem!le in a group and discuss some matters# they are employing a method of forming and persuading opinion. In a democracy it is important that there should always !e this attempt to get some expression of opinion even among the hum!lest people. ,hen people meet and formulate opinion they are really helping to govern themselves. -o this method of assessing and gauging pu!lic opinion and there!y arriving at an agreement is of the greatest importance. QuestionsG (i) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. (ii) ,hat is the importance of holding pu!lic meetingsJ (iii) ,hat is meant !y GelectorateGJ (iv) ,hy does an unimpressive speaker reduce his party)s chancesJ (v) ,hat are the means of influencing pu!lic opinionJ (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage in a!out '>D of the whole.

3. Write a letter to the E itor of a News!a!er a,out the "orru!tion ,y the W+38+ %eter rea ers. O$ Write an a!!li"ation in res!onse to the followin2 a .ertise%ent. ,anted active and smart young graduate lady to work as Telephone "perator in a 2ulti National 6ompany /.". 8ox MF# *ahore. C. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. (i) They found that the ship is leaking. (ii) 0e was arrested under the charge of stealing. (iii) 0e is sitting !esides his mother. (iv) -o nice a man I have never seen. (v) 3aisala!ad is 2anchester of /akistan. (vi) The gold is more costly than the silver. (vii) 0e is a man of words. (viii) ,hat is this !ook)s priceJ (ix) 0is hairs have turned white. (x) +ither he or I are right. 5. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 i io%ati" !hrases in senten"es. (i) 8ear away (ii) $ccede to (iii) $ct for (iv) 2ake at (v) $ dog in the manger (vi) $ la!our of love (vii) The "ld $dam (viii) 8oil over (ix) 5o away with (x) 3all in with 6. Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween two frien s a,out ;la"6-%ar6etin2 of foo ite%s.

3+3E$ NO. 6
=*ear B006 - 4rou! II> 0. Write an essay, with an outline, of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) Importance of Newspapers (ii) 3emale +ducation (iii) 5emocracy in Theory and /ractice (iv) 2y 6hildhood (v) -ome /ro!lems 3acing /akistan Today B. $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.en at the en in your own wor s. @reat progress has !een made !y $merica in the field of mechanization. It is spending lavishly on la!our7saving machines. +fficient organization of highly mechanized system has resulted in maximum productivity in $merica. ,ith mass production# the amenities of life are availa!le to almost every citizen. "n the contrary +urope su!ordinates the use of machines to human happiness and welfare. It encourages man)s reliance on his own faculties and realizes the dangers inherent in the $merican scheme. 0owever great the advantages of mechanization# it crushes the creative faculty of man and makes a machine out

of him. 0is individual li!erty and personality suffer on irretrieva!le loss. In his moments of leisure the worker finds it difficult to turn his hands to creative work# !ecause the machine7made goods do not inspire him in the direction of refinement. These goods also lose their fascination !ecause mass production has given a set!ack to the individuality of the articles produced. The +uropeans# therefore# contend that it is !etter to sacrifice a few material comforts than crush the aesthetic and spiritual urge in the individual which large7scale mechanization is doing in $merica. QuestionsG (i) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. (ii) ,hat is the result of progress in the field of mechanization in $mericaJ (iii) 0ow has it affected the citizensJ (iv) ,hat is the case in +uropeJ (v) ,hy do +uropeans sacrifice a few material comfortsJ (vi) 2ake a summary of the passage. 3. Write a letter to the E itor of a News!a!er a,out o.er-loa in2 of !assen2ers an o.er-"har2in2 of fares in the !u,li" trans!ort. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the ire"tor of a theatre to "ase to in his sta2e ra%a as a heroNheroine. C. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. (i) I met him prior than his departure for 4arachi. (ii) 0e is the a!lest and efficient teacher. (iii) They did their duty should !e rewarded. (iv) It is no dou!t that the man is dead. (v) I dou!t that he will come. (vi) No sooner he left than the storm !roke. (vii) 0e likes me reading the novel. (viii) I asked him what he ate. (ix) 0e ran as fast as he could run. (x) I said it in his face. 5. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 i io%ati" !hrases in senten"es. (i) $ !ull in a china shop (ii) 8revity is the soul of wit (iii) @et at the !ottom of (iv) $ cat and dog life

(v) -peak (vi) 6ut (vii) 6ry (viii) 8ear (ix) 6all @od (x) 3all 6. Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

to

daggers off out up witness across

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween a traffi" ser2eant an a stu ent a,out .iolation of traffi" rules whi"h the latter has "o%%itte .

3+3E$ NO. 7
=*ear B007 - 4rou! I> 0. Write an essay, with an outline, of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) *ife of a 5octor)s ,ife (ii) "ur +ducational /ro!lems (iii) -ports as a /astime (iv) -cience without 6onscience is a %uin of Nature (v) /lace of %eligion in the 2odern ,orld B. $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.en at the en . The answers %ust ,e in your own wor s.

/akistanis are sometimes treated as suspects as they enter -audi $ra!ia. They procedures for search and investigation are aggressive# and naturally# time7 consuming may !e a humiliating experience for a self7respecting /akistani. *ately# another trend is developing which can hurt as still more as injury is !eing added to insult. Luite a few -audis are now unwilling to employ /akistanis as they used to do in the -eventies. "ne main reason cited is the incidence of drug7 trafficking (!usiness) through expatriate /akistanis who# at times# colla!orate with drug7traffickers. Thus# the channel of employment of our la!our in -audi $ra!ia is drying up# partly owing to our failing as a people. /akistan is a victim as drugs produced in $fghanistan pass through our territory. It cannot !e denied that drugs are produced in /akistan# !ut the @overnment is trying to curtail their production. 0owever# with an estimated indigenous (native) population of just over three million addicts the local production of drugs does not appear enough to meet the home demand. Thus# having started as a producer of heroine in '(:(# thanks to the transfer of such technology !y a western adventurer# it is now the major consumer. 0owever# in the western countries# the treatment meted out to /akistani nationals is humiliating. QuestionsG (i) ,hy is the treatment humiliating for /akistanis on entering -audi $ra!iaJ (ii) ,hat is the main reason for the reduction of employment opportunities in -audi $ra!iaJ (iii) 0ow much is /akistan responsi!le for drug7traffickingJ (iv) ,ho is technologically responsi!le for the production of heroinJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title to the passage. (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage. 3. Write a letter to the Ins!e"tor 4eneral 3oli"e a,out the is"ri%inatin2 attitu e of the 3oli"e towar s the "i.ilians. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to a lan lor to hire you as a %ana2er of his far% ser.ants. C. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!t will ,e %ar6e > (i) 0e made three goals in the last match. (ii) ,hen $mjad or his !rother visits us we are delighted. (iii) 0e asked me where I came from.

(iv) There is little to do in such a hopeless case as this. (v) 0e always had hatred against inefficiency. (vi) Iou ought to have treated him you e ual. (vii) 0e enjoys the most worldwide reputation. (viii) The !oy who was promoted# he was my !rother. (ix) 0e availed of the opportunity. (x) I would sooner uit than to do it. 5. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will ,e %ar6e > (i) *ook !ack (ii) 3reudian slip (iii) @et at (iv) 5rop a line (v) 5eliver the goods (vi) 6ut in (vii) 6ry down (viii) 8olt from the !lue (ix) $round the corner (x) $t a stretch 6. Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween a tren s in ressin2. au2hter an a %other a,out the %o ern

3+3E$ NO. 9
=*ear B007 - 4rou! II> 0. Write an essay, with an outline, of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG

The great leader demanded the common people)s presence# through their representatives# at important meetings and participation in his decision7making. (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage. 0e addressed them directly# had a silent dialogue of the heart with them even when he could not meet them personally. The Islamic %epu!lic of Iran took a !old stand on the !asis of this o!jective. (v) -uggest a suita!le title to the passage. In this way he wanted to ensure the achievement of the aims of the Islamic %evolution. This policy was instantly successful in winning the support of the 2uslim masses even in the countries that were !eing ruled !y the so called representatives.hat was his mode of achievement towards his goalJ (iii) 0ow can you call The Iranian %evolution a Gpeople)s revolutionGJ (iv) 6omment on the success of The Iranian %evolution. QuestionsG (i) +xplain the main o!jective of Imam 4homeini. "ne of the main o!jectives of Imam 4homeini)s foreign and domestic policy was the propagation of the humanitarian principles of Islam. $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions at the en . The answers %ust . The people in almost all the 2uslim countries# and even in others whether they were inha!ited !y 2uslims or followers of other faiths# listened to his speeches and talks attentively and devotedly. .omen (iv) The %ole of 3ilms in "ur -ociety (v) The New 5istrict -ystem in /akistan B. Thus# instead of appealing to the unpopular and reactionary governments of the day# he esta!lished dura!le and lasting contacts with the common people and their true representatives. The revered Imam tried to associate the masses in his own and other 2uslim countries with his o!jective. Iran explained this stand at every international forum.orking . The divine commands that have shaped the Iranian policies are perhaps common to every major religion. (ii) .(i) @rowing Trends of 5rug7$ddiction among the -tudents (ii) 6ell /hones 7 $ -ocial 8ane (iii) /ro!lems 3aced !y .e in your own wor s.

out the !ro.e22ars in the . (ix) 0e has lit up the fire of reform. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es.e %ar6e > (i) @o !ack upon (ii) @et into a scrape (iii) 8reak away (iv) 8uy off (v) 6onfide to (vi) 0old off (vii) Throw cold water upon (viii) 3all out with (ix) 6ast a!out (x) 0old water 6.usy streets an %ar6ets of your "ity. (iv) This is another side of the uestion. (iii) 0e is hardly hit !y the !ank)s failure. (i) 0e is 2. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . (vii) 2y tooth is paining very !adly. (x) I did not know that honesty was the !est policy.$.e %ar6e >.y the . . Write a letter to the e itor of a news!a!er a. (viii) Najma eats like -alma does. (ii) 0e has !een died today. (v) The de!ate was now coming to a close. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 4eneral (ana2er of a )e%ent 'a"tory for a Ao. while his friend is 8. of a (e"hani"al En2ineer. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. C. 5. (vi) 0e ran three hundred meters race.le%s "reate .$. Translate the followin2 into En2lish.3.

with an outline. The wise man will !e as happy as circumstances permit and if he finds the contemplation of the universe painful !eyond a point# he will contemplate something instead.O$ Write a ialo2ue .etween a %other an her an isa .anta2es of an arran2e %arria2e.anta2es 3+3E$ NO. 1 =*ear B009 . Their pride on their unhappiness makes people suspicious of its genuinenessA they think that man who enjoys !eing misera!le is not misera!le. I do not myself think that there is any superiority rationality in !eing unhappy. This view is too simple1 undou!tedly there is some slight compensation in the feeling of superiority and insight which these sufferers have# !ut it is not sufficient to make up for the loss of simple pleasure. The answers %ust . The men who hold this view are genuinely unhappy !ut they are proud of their unhappiness which they attri!ute to the nature of the universe and consider to the only rational attitude for an enlightened man. I am persuaded that those who uite sincerely attri!ute their sorrows to their views a!out the universe are putting the cart !efore the horseA the truth is that they are unhappy for some reasons of which they are . of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) $ 2odel 6itizen (ii) The $ge of 2achines (iii) Importance of $dvertising (iv) "ur +conomic /lanners (v) -cope of Tourism in /akistan B. $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions at the en .e in your own wor s. au2hter on the a . Write an essay.4rou! I> 0. It is common in our day# as it has !een in many other periods of the world)s history to suppose that those among us who are wise have seen through all the enthusiasms of earlier times and have !ecome aware that there is nothing left to live for.

er eterioratin2 "on ition of law an or er in the "ity. Write a letter to the E itor of a News!a!er su22estin2 hi% "ertain "on itions un er whi"h a !erson "an ta6e !art in 4eneral Ele"tions. (ix) -carcely had he gone than a policeman knocked at the door. 5. =No e?tra atte%!ts will .e %ar6e > (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) Take Take Throw -tand -trike down in up for down . QuestionsG (i) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will .e met at the house of a mutual friend to make peace. (viii) If you do not come# then I shall not help you. (ii) I do not know where was he at that time. (x) 0ave you seen her latest photograph. (v) .e %ar6e > (i) "ur parents may !e resem!led to a tree which gives us cool shade. C. (iv) If I fail in this examination I will give the next.not aware.hat is common with the wise today to supposeJ (iii) . (iii) I re uest you not to cut jokes in class. 3.hat is the result of pride on unhappinessJ (iv) 0ow can a wise man !e happyJ (v) +xplain the meanings of the following wordsA (a) +nthusiasms (!) 6ontemplation (vi) 2ake a summary of the passage. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. (vi) 0ave you heard of your son)s ro!!eryJ (vii) The downfall of the king is to !e attri!uted to nothing else than pride. (ii) . O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the Ins!e"tor 4eneral of 3oli"e "o%!lainin2 a2ainst the e.

a foo ite%s an their hi2h !ri"es in the "anteen.etween a stu ent an a "anteen %ana2er a. =The answer %ust . .(vi) (vii) (viii) 8ecome (ix) 3all (x) 0ave no touch with -tand %ing a foul for out !yword of 6. Write an essay. 3+3E$ NO.edding B.e in your own wor s. 00 =*ear B009 . of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) /leasures of 6hildhood (ii) Interest 3ree 8anking -ystem (iii) Iran)s Nuclear /rogramme (iv) Billage &plift (v) 3eatures of a /akistani . O$ Write a ialo2ue . $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. Translate the followin2 into En2lish.en at the en .4rou! II> 0. with an outline.out the .

e will .sen"e as well as the %altreat%ent of o"tors of the rural areas with the !atients. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es.hy should the richer countries of the world !e pouring their resources into space when poverty and disease on the earth are crying out of reliefJ "ne could give a cynical answer to this uestion and assert that man)s expensive adventures into space are merely the !y7 products of the struggle !etween great powers for prestige and possi!le military advantage. The vast expenditure of money and human effort now !eing devoted to projects for putting man into space might well !e applied to ends more practically useful and more conducive to human happiness. 3. The money and effort that go into the development and construction of a single type of space7 rocket would more than suffice to rid several countries of such scourge as malaria or typhoid fever# to name only two of the diseases that medical science has con uered !ut still persist in the world simply !ecause not enough money and effort are devoted to their eradication. QuestionsG (i) .> (i) (ii) /oetries This have their poultry appeal !elongs to the to heart.. It is a strange world in which tens of millions of pounds are spent to give one man a ride round the earth at thousands of miles an hour# while !eneath him in his or!it live millions for whom life is a daily struggle to win a few coins to !uy their daily !read.hy is man pouring his resources into spaceJ (iv) +xplain the meanings of the following wordsA (a) -courge (!) +radication (v) -uggest a suita!le title of the passage. him.-pace travel is !y far the most expensive type of exploration ever undertaken !y man.hy do malaria and typhoid still exist in the worldJ (iii) .e %ar6e . Write an a!!li"ation to the 8istri"t 5ealth Offi"er a. .hy is it a strange worldJ (ii) . O$ Write a letter to the NaEi% of your "ity re2ar in2 the !oor sanitary "on itions an .ro6en sewera2e line of your area. =In "ase of o.out the a. (vi) 2ake a summary of the passage.er atte%!t only the 'irst 'i. C.

etween two frien s a. (ix) /lease# do the needful. (iv) I hate those sorts of men.> (i) -tick (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) 3ace (x) 3log a dead horse to 0ush 8ring 8eat 5ie @o %un 8roken the the point up through !ack away a!out down reed music 6. 00 .out the waywar ness a%on2 the 3+3E$ NO.(iii) &nless you don)t work hard# you cannot secure good marks. (viii) The rotten mangoes smell !adly. O$ Write a youth. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . (vii) 0e said to them if can you help me. ialo2ue . (vi) 0e is such a man who is linked !y everyone. (v) 0e has !een operated.e %ar6e . 5. Translate the followin2 into En2lish. (x) *eave was availed at once. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es.

with an outline. There is always a message in these colours# such as1 Gkeep away# Gmind your stepG# Gdarling won)t you care for a danceJG . QuestionsG (i) . (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. It was the prototype of our Glost and foundG classified ad that was painted on a wall.4rou! I> 0.e in your own wor s. $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. $n advertisement offering a gold coin as a reward to anyone tracing out a runaway slave was unearthed in the ruins of The!es and is computed to !e as old as the third millennium 8. In human life# advertising through the mouth must have !egun with the !eginning of commerce.hat is the difference !etween camouflage and advertisingJ (iv) . . Write an essay. $s regards advertising through the written word there is archaeological evidence that it was !eing practiced at least D#KKK years ago.hile camouflage is tricky and timed# GadvertisingG is honest# confidant# and forthright# as far as the world of nature goes. $s such# its origin can !e traced right !ack to the origin of the species. G$dvertising colourationG is a familiar !iological phrase denoting the colours developed !y certain animals to make them stand out against their natural !ackground.> $dvertising is essentially the art of communication.hat does the phrase Gadvertising colourationG meanJ (iii) .en at the en .hy I *ove /akistanJ (ii) $n +xcursion Trip (iii) *ife is -truggle (iv) Importance of %eading (v) *ife in a 8ig 6ity B.6.hen did ver!al and written advertising !egin in human lifeJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. =The answers %ust .hat was advertisingJ (ii) .=*ear B001 . The tradition is still kept alive !y hawkers and street vendors in our towns and villages. It is the direct opposite of camouflage. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) .

ils of street . O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 8ire"tor of E u"ation for the !ost of an En2lish Tea"her.e22in2. (vii) .e %ar6e . )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. (viii) I do not care for these sorts of things. (iv) I have not seen you since a long time. =No e?tra atte%!ts will .rite with ink. Translate the followin2 into En2lish. (v) The time passed off uickly. (ix) -he is not clever to do it. 5. C. . (ii) 0e has often !eat me at tennis. (iii) 0e was !orn in nineteen hundred eighteen. (x) 0e is a coward !oy. (vi) I cannot pull on my work.e %ar6e .> (i) -aleem and I am enemies.> (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) /ull up 6ome 3ix *ook Turn %un %oot 0ang 4ick "n the the up and a!out up up up against !ranch fire !ucket cards 6. Write a letter to the E itor of a News!a!er on the e.3.

$ll three# of course# have incurred hostility from the rich.a6ery. @iven an intelligent democracy not misled !y some dogmatic creed# this possi!ility will !e used to raise the standard of life. It is possi!le now# if the population of the world does not increase too fast# for one man)s la!our to produce much more than is needed to provide a !are su!sistence for himself and his family. 0B =*ear B001 .en at the en .4rou! II> 0.est with the growth of democracy.O$ Write a ialo2ue .> 3ortunately# however# the growth of industrialism has coincided in the . the "usto%er a. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) $n Ideal -tudent (ii) -ecurity 2easures at /u!lic /laces (iii) 5rug $ddiction (iv) Inflation 7 %ising /rices (v) The /ower of +lectronic 2edia B.out the stale 3+3E$ NO. $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.etween the (ana2er an foo ite%s of the . Its use in raising the standard of life has depended mainly upon three thingsA democracy# trade unionism# and !irth control. with an outline.e in your own wor s. =The answers %ust . Write an essay. If these three things can !e extended to the rest of the . It has !een so used to a limited extent# in 8ritain and $merica# and would have so used more effectively !ut for war.

another. friends. 8ut without these three things industrialism will create a regime like that in which the /haraohs !uilt the pyramids.> . Write a letter to the E itor of a News!a!er a.world as it !ecomes industrialized# poverty can !e a!olished throughout the whole world# and excessive hours of la!our will no longer !e necessary anywhere. morning. In particular# if world population continues to increase at the present rate# the a!olition of poverty and excessive work will !e totally impossi!le. leave.> (i) 2y !rother)s only help were his (ii) These two !oys hate one (iii) .e %ar6e .e %ar6e .e should pray @od every (iv) It is half past five in my (v) 0e availed of the (vi) 0e visited many worth7seeing (vii) Neither he comes# nor he (viii) . watch. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es.ern%ent 5os!itals. letterJ days.hat connection does the writer show !etween industrialism and democracyJ (ii) 0ow can the standard of life !e raisedJ (iii) 0ow can poverty !e a!olishedJ (iv) . =No e?tra atte%!ts will . =No e?tra atte%!ts will . (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. places. QuestionsG (i) . C.hy he wrote that foolish (ix) I shall stay at 2urree for few (x) 0e only is responsi!le for this act. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. 5.hat will !e the impact of increase in population at the present rateJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 'inan"e (ana2er of a (ultinational 'ir% for the a!!oint%ent of an +""ount )ler6. 3.out the la"6 of %e i"al fa"ilities in 4o. writes.

4rou! I> 0. with an outline. 03 =*ear B000 . of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) 5ifficulties of a 8.$.(i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) -it !ack 8ear 3all 2ake -et %ound Thum!nail 3ishy In %ule the off up out out with for up sketch deal pipeline out 6.etween two "lose frien s on the ill effe"ts of s%o6in2. 3+3E$ NO. -tudent (ii) 0ow to -pend Iour -pare Time (iii) Noise /ollution (iv) 0uman %ights in /akistan (v) "ld /arents . O$ Write a ialo2ue . Translate the followin2 into En2lish. Write an essay.

(iv) Is there a radical change in the presentation of the art of healing !y the mass mediaJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =The answers %ust .B.ails in the offi"es. QuestionsG (i) .e in your own wor s> %ecently the mass media# formerly su!servient to the medical profession# have !ecome increasingly restive and occasionally hostile. In 8ritain on 886 radio and television# the medical practices have come under sharp and aggressive criticism.hat is a lethal diseaseJ +xplain. 3. That goes for me too.hat is re uired in the relationship !etween the doctor and the patientJ The trust and unshaka!le trust# I would say. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 'inan"e (ana2e of a (ultinational 'ir% for the a!!oint%ent of an +u it Offi"er. $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.e %ar6e . =No e?tra atte%!ts will . 2ontaigne said1 GI honour physicians not for their services !ut for themselvesG.en at the en . If what emerges is an indictment of the profession# then I would re!ut the charge that I am anti7doctor.hat is the writer)s stance towards the medical professionJ (iii) . C.hat do you understand !y the mass mediaJ (ii) . In @ermany# in particular the newspaper and television have given a great deal of time and space to the complaints against the medical profession. (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. Is this antagonism to the profession justifiedJ $nd if so# whyJ I have tried to answer that uestion !y looking at the way it deals with some of the diseases of our civilization# including the most lethal# heart7attacks and cancer. . Write a letter to the E itor of a News!a!er !rotestin2 a2ainst the "orru!tion that !re.> .

etween two frien s a. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es.out the waywar ness a%on2 the . (viii) Not a line of the lectures were written. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . (x) It is much hot today. (vi) I seldom or ever take medicine. O$ Write a youth.(i) There is a !est teacher in that class. 5. (v) The man is selfish !y nature. Translate the followin2 into En2lish.> (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) In a mess 8low 8ear 8ear 8ack 5rop 6ompare 6rocodile 3ollow in out up with out in notes tears suit cap 3eather one)s 6. (vii) The child died at three year old. (ix) 0e is !ent to do it.e %ar6e . ialo2ue . (iii) 0e is reading at the medical college. (iv) 3ew people attended the meeting. (ii) These all pears are ripe.

&nderstanding of human nature must !e the !asis of any real improvement in human life.3+3E$ NO. -ince spontaneity is what is most thwarted !y machine# the only thing that can !e provided is opportunity# the use made of opportunity must !e left to the initiative of the individual.hat should !e the !asis of any real improvement in human lifeJ .e in your own wor s. No dou!t# considera!le expense would !e involved !ut it would not !e compara!le to the expense of war. The reason they are inade uate is that these instincts are capa!le of many disguises as the 5evil in medieval legend# and some of these disguises deceive even the elect. QuestionsG (i) . Write an essay.en at the en . with an outline.hat is the ade uate method of anarchic instinctsJ (iii) . .4rou! II> 0.> 2oral self7control# and external prohi!ition of harmful acts# are not ade uate methods of dealing with our anarchic instincts.hy are moral self7control# and external prohi!ition inade uate to deal with our anarchic instinctsJ (ii) .hen science learns to understand human nature# it will !e a!le to !ring happiness into our lives which machines and the physical science have failed to create. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) @ood 2anners (ii) +nergy 6risis (iii) 2o!ile /hone 7 $ 6urse (iv) 6ulture of Tolerance (v) $ %escue "peration B. The only ade uate method is to discover what are the needs of our instinctive nature# and then to search for the least harmful way of satisfying them. -cience has done wonders in mastering the laws of the physical world# !ut our own nature is much less understood# as yet than the nature of stars and electrons. 0C =*ear B000 . $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. =The answers %ust .

e %ar6e . (viii) /lease tell me where is your !rotherJ (ix) No less than twenty people died in the accident. (ii) I shot the !ear !ut missed. . (iii) They pay no attention to their old father. (iv) 0e is the student whom I think deserves praise. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 4eneral (ana2er of a (ultinational 'ir% for the a!!oint%ent of a (e i"al $e!resentati. for 3.(iv) 0ow can science help humanity (v) -uggest a suita!le title (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. Write a letter to the E itor of a news!a!er e?!ressin2 the nee o!enin2 a 2irls.> (i) (ii) (iii) 8e (iv) (v) @o (vi) 3all (vii) (viii) (ix) Through (x) The under dog 8lind 8ack up @ive !ack short +very 3or thick in away to up on of inch good thin and 6. (x) 0imalayas lie in the North of India. (vii) $slam has !een ill from five days. C. =No e?tra atte%!ts will .e %ar6e . (v) Is not he your !rotherJ (vi) $ darkest cloud has a silver lining. to achieve for the happinessJ passage.e.> (i) 0e made a goal against our college."olle2e in your "ity. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . 5. Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

+xcept for a small num!er of wealthy traders# nomadic tri!al leaders# and the %oyal family and its retainers# few $fghans have lived far from the !asic level of su!sistence.e in your own wor s. $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. Write an essay.O$ Write a ialo2ue . a tea"her on the i%!ortan"e of 3+3E$ NO. =The answers %ust .etween a stu ent an is"i!line. 05 =*ear B000 .> /overty is almost as widely shared as Islam in $fghanistan. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) /leasures of 6hildhood (ii) Billage &plift (iii) *iteracy 6ampaign (iv) 2oney is Not +verything (v) 3eatures of a /akistani . Throughout the century their diet consists of coarse !read# tea# and dairy products# supplemented !y fruits and vegeta!les in season and an occasional serving of mutton or chicken.4rou! I> 0.en at the en . with an outline. Though the food is never plentiful# the $fghan diet during good crop years appears to !e sufficient to support a vigorous population# !ut the precariousness of the food supply is o!vious from the drastic and .eeding B.

Write a letter to the E itor of a news!a!er. "riti"iEin2 the ress an ha. (x) I am much glad that you are here. (iii) I !elieve your are !etter now. 5. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage. (v) 0e aims to please every!ody. (ii) +ight miles are a long distance.continuing erosion of the soil and the creeping desertization of its landscape. The conflict !etween these competing values is a major feature of $fghan life# !ut in7group loyalty has necessarily played the paramount role in the shaping of the attitudes toward fellow $fghans and outsiders.e %ar6e . QuestionsG (i) . O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 8ire"tor of E u"ation for the !ost of an En2lish Tea"her. 3.its of stu ents at "olle2e. =No e?tra atte%!ts will .hy is the food supply !ecoming so precariousJ (iv) . C. (iv) I am studying the newspaper.hat is the major feature of $fghan lifeJ (v) 2ake a suita!le title of the passage. Balues are oriented toward social survival.hat does the diet of $fghan people consist ofJ (iii) . *oyalty to the primary group ultimately takes precedence over self7assertion# despite the great importance given to personal independence. (vi) -he came here for singing. (viii) $larmed at the news# the police was informed. (ix) %ose is the sweetest of all flowers. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. The poverty of most $fghan farmers and herders has imposed an elemental uality on their culture.@.hat is the economic condition of the people of $fghanistanJ (ii) . =No e?tra atte%!ts will .i e your ). +lso !ro.> (i) The wages of sin are death. (vii) I felt the cold air to strike my face.> .e %ar6e .

omen .4rou! II> 0.(i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) *ame duck @et $t 8uy 8reak Turn 0old 8ear into 6onfide a 5utch a off away away on out scrape to stretch courage 6.etween two frien s a. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) 5rug $ddiction $mong -tudents (ii) Importance of $dvertising (iii) Noise /ollution (iv) /ro!lems of . O$ Write a youth. ialo2ue . Write an essay. with an outline.orking .out the waywar ness a%on2 the 3+3E$ NO. Translate the followin2 into En2lish. 06 =*ear B000 .

hy do +uropeans sacrifice a few material comfortsJ (v) 2ake a suita!le title of the passage.e in your own wor s.en at the en .ith mass production# the amenities of life are availa!le to almost every citizen. 0is individual li!erty and personality suffer on irretrieva!le loss.hat is the result of progress in the field of mechanization in $mericaJ (ii) 0ow has it affected the citizensJ (iii) . "n the contrary +urope su!ordinates the use of machines to human happiness and welfare. =The answers %ust . $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.(v) "ld /arents B. In his moments of leisure the worker finds it difficult to turn his hands to creative work# !ecause the machine7made goods do not inspire him in the direction of refinement.> @reat progress has !een made !y $merica in the field of mechanization. It encourages man)s reliance on his own faculties and realizes the dangers inherent in the $merican scheme. It is spending lavishly on la!our7saving machines. Write a letter to the E itor of a news!a!er !rotestin2 a2ainst the "orru!tion of W+38+ lower staff. QuestionsG (i) . The +uropeans# therefore# contend that it is !etter to sacrifice a few material comforts than crush the aesthetic and spiritual urge in the individual which large7scale mechanization is doing in $merica. 0owever great the advantages of mechanization# it crushes the creative faculty of man and makes a machine out of him. These goods also lose their fascination !ecause mass production has given a set!ack to the individuality of the articles produced. (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage. 3. . +fficient organization of highly mechanized system has resulted in maximum productivity in $merica. O$ .hat is the case in +uropeJ (iv) .

(ix) I !ade him to do it. =No e?tra atte%!ts will .e %ar6e . 5. (vi) The teacher took a test of the students. (v) +ither of these two houses are to let. (x) It is much hot today.> (i) 0is friend and !enefactor have left the room.Write an a!!li"ation to the 'inan"e (ana2er of a (ultinational 'ir% for the a!!oint%ent of an +u it Offi"er. (viii) 0e has no money for giving you. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. (ii) +very one of them want to go to sea. (vii) 0e insisted to do it.> (i) -tick to (ii) -tand out (iii) 8ear with (iv) 8ack out (v) %un out (vi) 6ompare notes (vii) 6arry weight (viii) 3ollow suit (ix) In cold !lood . (iii) 0e is reading at the medical college. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . (iv) 3ew people attended the meeting. C.e %ar6e .

with an outline.en at the en . 3+3E$ NO.of the + uator)# where the sun comes out every day# keeping its radiant energy undiminished. .> The rich nations have made adjustments after the '(:D oil crisis# !ut the poor nations# who cannot afford the continue using oil# have to look for alternatives in order to keep up the pace of their development.etween father an son on the "hoi"e of !rofession. =*our own "onstru"te answers will fet"h you . Write an essay.ork (iv) 6hallenges for /akistan (v) $dverse +ffects of /olitics in 6olleges B.etter %ar6s. O$ Write a ialo2ue .(x) $ !lock head 6.4rou! I> 0. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) 2edia and -ociety (ii) Internet 7 $ Tool of 2odern $ge (iii) 5ignity of . $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. The solar . The sun# therefore# offers a free supply of thermo7dynamically high7 uality fuel 77 sunshine 77 to countries that are located in the earth)s solar !elt (DFN# DF. 07 =*ear B00B .hat# however# stand in the way# are a series of institutional and economic !arriers which must !e overcome if solar energy is to have an impact on the energy scene. Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. C. angry on me. It calls for a shift from centralized energy supply systems to on7site decentralized distri!ution of energy. It rests its emphasis on the social !enefits rather than the cost !enefits of a system. 5. Write a letter to the E itor of a news!a!er.e %ar6e .hat are the o!stacles in the way of ac uiring solar energyJ (iii) .energy plan re uires new ways of thinking. meal for DK minutes. QuestionsG (i) . "o%!lainin2 a. 3. plays good. don)t work hard fail.hat system of distri!ution does the author recommend for solar energyJ (iv) .> (i) 0e had (ii) $hmad (iii) -he is (iv) Neither of these (v) . ten !oys has failed. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es.> (i) (ii) 3all 8reak out out . (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage. The term )on7site) derives from the limited areas within which the energy produced !y a system is consumed.hat does the term Gon7siteG meanJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . prior than him.e %ar6e . come yesterday. to say little more.e enjoyed (vi) I reached (vii) -uch students who (viii) 0e re uested me (ix) -he is cooking the (x) 0e goes there never.out uns"he ule loa -she in2. at the concert. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 8ire"tor E u"ation =S"hools> for the a!!oint%ent of a tea"her.hat is the effect of '(:D oil crisis on poor nationsJ (ii) .

09 =*ear B00B .4rou! II> 0. Translate the followin2 into En2lish. a tea"her on the i%!ortan"e of 3+3E$ NO.(iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) .etween a stu ent an .> .omen +ducation (ii) 3estivals in /akistan (iii) Billage *ife (iv) 6omputer %evolution (v) 6harm in T 7 CK 6ricket B.oo6 $ea in2.etter %ar6s.ork wonders @et @et 2ake $pple $t 3ace -mall pie a the through over for order loss music talk 6. Write an essay. $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.en at the en . with an outline. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) Importance of . =*our own "onstru"te answers will fet"h you . O$ Write a ialo2ue .

0e had tentatively proposed it in a letter# dated CC $pril 'E:K# to 2ehdi $li as the organ of an association which he wanted organized !efore his return to India for Gthe uplift and reform of the 2uslimG# !ut with which his connection was not to !e divulged.hat was the strategy against 2uslim !ackwardnessJ (ii) . C. The two projects in his mind were closely interlinked1 for without an enlightened pu!lic opinion ade uate support for the educational institution could not !e ensured and# o!versely# without modern education the new generation would never outgrow its elders) prejudices and misconceptions. a!!li"ation to the 8istri"t )oor inatin2 Offi"er for the !ost of a )o%!uter O!erator.hen did he propose the esta!lishment of the periodicalJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. 3. O$ Write a Ao. naughty.out the %issin2 5ealth 'a"ilities in the 5os!ital of your area. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . )orre"t an 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. QuestionsG (i) .> (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) The "ne of players is I am senior than him in I read the same !ook which you *ahore is a worth7seeing 0e has any None of the !oys were poor the is neglected. (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage. -yed $hmad addressed himself to the periodical first. purchased.e %ar6e . 0e had a !lock prepared in +ngland for the title page of the periodical# which was to !e called the Tahzib-ul-Akhlaq in &rdu and the Mohammedan Social eformer in !n"lish.hat was -yed $hmed)s proposal a!out the periodicalJ (iv) . !ooks.The grand strategy for his campaign against 2uslim !ackwardness envisaged two main activities# namely1 a weekly periodical to propagate progressive social and religious ideas among the intelligentsia and an institution of higher learning to impart modern education to the new generation.hy were the two projects interlinked in his mindJ (iii) . injured. city. service. Write a letter to the E itor of a news!a!er a. .

=No e?tra atte%!ts will . 5. 3+3E$ NO.(viii) 0is (ix) The lion (x) -he is more cleverer than he. Translate the followin2 into En2lish. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) 6ollege 2emories . O$ Write a ialo2ue . 01 =*ear B003 .etween two %en on earness.e %ar6e . Write an essay.4rou! I> 0. him. hairs attacked are at !rown. with an outline. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es.> (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) "ut of el!ows 8reak 8ring /ass 2ake *ook "ily 3rench 6arry 6at)s the up down down up away for upon tongue leave day paw 6.

hat were the teachers supposed to !e in golden daysJ (iii) .en at the en .etter %ar6s.rite a note on the rewards that a teacher gets nowadays. .hat is the function of a teacher nowadaysJ (iv) . -ocrates was put to death and /lato is said to have !een thrown into prison# !ut such incidents did not interfere with the spread of their doctrines. =*our own "onstru"te answers will fet"h you . (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage. In anti uity# teachers were not an organized profession and no control was exercised over what they taught.> Teaching more even than most other professions# has !een transformed during the last hundred years from a small# highly skilled profession concerned with a minority of the population# to a large and important !ranch of the pu!lic service. It is true they were often punished afterwards for their su!versive doctrines.hat changes have occured in the profession of teaching during the last hundred yearsJ (ii) . $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.(ii) Iour 3avourite +nglish 5rama (iii) 6orruption in -ociety (iv) %ole of *aptop in +ducation (v) 3reedom of 2edia B. In former days# a teacher was expected to !e a man of exceptional knowledge or wisdom to whose words men would do well to attend. QuestionsG (i) . The profession has a great and honora!le tradition extending from the dawn of history until recent times# !ut any teacher in the modern world who allows himself to !e inspired !y the ideals of his predecessors is likely to !e made sharply aware that it is not his function to teach what he thinks# !ut instill such !eliefs and prejudices as are thought useful !y his employers. (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage.

(ix) If you will come to me# I will help you. Write a letter to the (ana2in2 8ire"tor.e should avail of this chance. a!!li"ation to the +""ountant 4eneral for the 3ost of an +ssistant.> (i) 2r. (ii) $ num!er of !oys is a!sent. "o%!lainin2 a. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . (iii) . 3a6istan $ailways.al of trains.e %ar6e .> (i) @ive up the ghost (ii) 5ie in harness (iii) 6old comfort (iv) 6ock and !ull story (v) 6ut to the uick (vi) 6ome of age . (v) The murdered was hung.out the late arri. (vii) Iou need not to go there.e %ar6e . (x) 0e swore of @od. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. Qahis with his wife and children live here. 5. O$ Write a Ao. (viii) 0e has visited *ahore yesterday. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. C.3. (vi) Iou are very kind on me. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . (iv) They went to the fair and enjoyed.

etter %ar6s. B0 =*ear B003 .4rou! II> 0. Write an essay.en at the en . $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.(vii) @et over (viii) 3all in with (ix) 2ake out (x) /ut up with 6. 5emocracy is not a 8eloved %epu!lic really and never will !e. 8ut it is less hateful than other contemporary forms of @overnment and to . of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) -pring -eason (ii) National &nity (iii) 6hildhood (iv) +lections (v) /ro!lems of /akistan B. with an outline. 3+3E$ NO. =*our own "onstru"te answers will fet"h you . Tranlsate the followin2 into En2lish.etween two frien on u!"o%in2 ele"tions.> This !rings me along to democracy# even love the !eloved %epu!lic which feed upon freedom. O$ Write a ialo2ue .

3. QuestionsG (i) .hat type of people does the writer likeJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. They find religions great or small or they produce literature and art or they do disinterested scientific research or they may !e what is called ordinary people who are creative in their private lives# !ring up their children decently for instance or help their neigh!ours. The people I admire most are those who are sensitive and want to create something or discover something and do not see life in terms of power and such people get more of a chance under a democracy than elsewhere. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. (iii) . C. $ll those people need to express themselves1 they cannot do so unless society allows them li!erty to do so and the society which allows them most li!erty is democracy. (v) 0e did nothing !ut played.e %ar6e . It does start from the assumption that the individual is important and that all types are needed to make a civilization is does not divide its citizens into !ossers and !ossed as an efficiency regime tends to do. (ii) 0e comes often late.out the in"reasin2 street "ri%es.that extent it deserves our support. O$ Write a Ao.hy does the writer call democracy a less hateful form of @overnmentJ (iv) . a!!li"ation to the 8ire"tor of a 3ri. (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage.> (i) -he sings good. .hat other advantages of democracy can you think of in addition to the fact that it allows most li!ertyJ (ii) -ummarize the writer)s definition of creative persons.ate 'ir% for the !ost of an +""ountant. Write a letter to the 8istri"t 3oli"e Offi"er a. (iii) 5o you know to cookJ (iv) I had not written any letter last night.

(ix) $lthough he is old !ut active. (vii) 0e said that he can help me. O$ Write a ialo2ue .out "han2e in weather. (viii) -he was married with her cousin. 5.> (i) /ut in (ii) 2ake over (iii) *ook into (iv) @o over (v) 4eep down (vi) 6at)s paw (vii) 3or good (viii) 0ard nut to crack (ix) @ive the devil his due (x) In !lack and white. Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es.etween two !ersons a. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . Translate the followin2 into En2lish. 6.e %ar6e .(vi) 0e is suffering from fever for ten days. (x) Tari as well as $sad are my friends. .

0e is in his grave.rite a character sketch of . (iv) -un# rain# curving sky 2ountain# oceans# leaf and stone# Iou)re all that I can call my own. =B0> (i) 3o!o.hat kind of story is thisA of love# of hatred# or of something elseJ (v) . =B0> (i) . E?!lain any T5$EE of the followin2 e?tra"ts with referen"e to the "onte?t. 0 =*E+$ B00C .4$OU3 I> 0. $nd I have !uried myself !etween four walls. They were only GshockedG.aG I shall never go out# why should IJ 2y life is already at an end.olf.hat land of change &stad 2angu was expecting from the new $ct of '(DFJ +xplain. . (iii) I was angry with my friend1 I told my wrath# my wrath did end# I was angry with my foe1 I told it not# my wrath did grow. (iii) GThe 5uchess and the . $nd I have something to expiate1 $ pettiness. 5iscuss.ewelerG is a story a!out the moral decadence of the +nglish elite class of those days. (ii) . (iv) In GThe -hadow in the %ose @ardenG# it is written# Gthere was a long silence of hate and sufferingG !ut at the end it says that they Gno longer hated each otherG. Iou really aught to turn over a new leaf tonight. (v) $nd so I missed my chance with one of the lords of life. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. (GThe New 6onstitutionG !y -aadat 0asan 2anto) (ii) In GTake /ityG !y 8ernard 2alamud# we read an undaunted struggle of a woman against the exploitation of a man. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.isho!G 6ome to the cathedral when you are at leisure. =B0> . B. (G-omething to Talk $!outG !y +den /hillpotts) 3.YEAR WISE PAPER A 3+3E$ NO. +la!orate.

(GThe 8achelor)s 5ilemmaG !y 0er!ert @old) (iv) . *awrence in G.orld)s $ -tageG !y -hakespeare. (ii) There is irony and humour in GThe 8eauty IndustryG !y 0uxley. 5iscuss. +la!orate.hat are some of the simple delights we miss !ecause of our !usy lifeJ +la!orate. =B0> (i) . +la!orate.illiam 5avies) (ii) 0ow can we master the art of losingJ 5iscuss. 6all him# @uy. (iv) . 5.2. 0e may . +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. +xplain G/oliticsG !y . B =*E+$ B00C . (v) 6omment upon the seventh stage of man)s life in G$ll the . +la!orate.4$OU3 II> 0.rite a note on "ld 2an)s struggle against the fish. E?!lain any T5$EE of the followin2 e?tra"ts with referen"e to the "onte?t. +la!orate.histling of 8irdsG shows his fascination for sound and colour. 3+3E$ NO. (G"ne $rtG !y +liza!eth 8ishop) (iii) GIn our times the destiny of man presents its meaning in political termsG. =B0> (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) The !iggest fish is the !iggest challenge. Ieats in the light of 2ann)s given comment.rite an essay on tolerance.0. (iii) $t the end of the novel only a skeleton of the gold fish is left. (ii) The sea is a living !eing. +la!orate. (iii) 5iscuss the real pro!lems of a !achelor. Thomas 2ann. (iv) G*ights "utG !y +dward Thomas dwells on the power of sleep. 3orster) C. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.. +la!orate. (GToleranceG !y +. (i) Ha%esG I suppose you think it)s !rave to come !ack from the front and threaten a defenseless man with a revolverJ Is that the sort of fair play they teach you in the $rmyJ (ii) &etti"eG Iou)ll love uncle 6harles 77 every!ody does. (G*eisureG !y .8.hat are the ualities of 5i2aggio that the old man eulogizesJ (v) .(i) 5.

0e never criticizes any !ody. (ii) . . B.hat does "le $nderson read on the wallJ +la!orate. 3. GTanks for coming to tell me a!out itG..> G%$//$66INI).hat is @iovanni)s role in the storyJ (iii) G$t leastG thought he# Gher poison in not yet entered into my system. (iv) 8ut if this century is to !e made great than those !efore# her sons must make her so. (i) Is the daughter more dear to the professor than his artJ 5iscuss.alter 5e *a 2are as a romantic poem. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.=a> GT0+ 4I**+%-G !y 0emingway +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. (G-cience and BaluesG !y 8ertrand %ussell) (ii) 2ake a comparison !etween Ieats) grandfather and grandmother.5$&@0T+%G !y Nathaniel 0awthorne +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. +nright) (iii) 5escri!e the seventh stage of life in -hakespeare)s G$ll the . +nswer any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. (iii) I will drain *ong draughts of uiet $s a purgation. +la!orate. =.not approve !ut he won)t criticizes.8. Ieats) (iii) In what different ways people gossip and to what effectJ (G@ossipG !y 3rancine /rose) C. (ii) 5escri!e 0enry)s *unch %oom and what happened thereJ (iii) 5escri!e 0emingway)s typical style of narrating a story. (v) The apparition of these faces in the crowd1 /etals on a wet !lack !ough. (iv) GIn Panadu did 4u!la 4han $ stately pleasure7dome decreedG# and then follows the most imaginative poem. I am no flower to die in her lapG. (G2y @randfatherG !y .. (i) GThere is not anything I can do a!out itG "le $nderson said. (i) +xplain GTartaryG !y . 0e looked at the wall.orld)s $ -tageG.hat does 6oleridge descri!e in the poemJ . (ii) +xplain all what the others do and re!el does not doJ (GThe %e!elG !y 5.. (i) GThere are certain things that our age need# and certain things that it should avoidG. +xplain. .

+nswer any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.e passed !efore a 0ouse that seemed $ -welling of the @round77 The roof was scarcely visi!le77 The 6ornice77in the @round77 (iii) $ touch of cold in the autumn night I walked a!road $nd saw the ruddy moon lean over hedge. Iou were a !a!y and I lost my !a!y. (iv) +xplainA G3ishG# he said softly# aloud# GI)ll stay with you until I am deadG. 3 =*E+$ B005 . 3+3E$ NO.(v) +xplain the poetic !eauty of G3ogG !y 6arl -and!urgA The fog come "n little cat feet It sits looking "ver the har!our and city "n silent haunches $nd then moves on. (ii) .hy among all the -panish people the hero is an $merican. Then you were a helpless child and I lost her too# and gained a school girl# . 5iscuss. (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) 0ow do you descri!e -antiago)s relationship with the !oyJ (ii) . (iv) It is always a losing game to !e a mother. E?!lain any T5$EE of the followin2 e?tra"ts with referen"e to the "onte?t. (iii) 5escri!e old man)s struggle against the sharks.4$OU3 I> 0. (v) 4illing sharks ultimately would mean defeating death. 5. 5iscuss. (i) In the company of dog lovers# The %e!el expresses a preference for cats.

alker)s essay# GThe BitaminsG. 0ow was %osen in GTake /ityG provoked to make such remarks a!out +vaJ (iv) G@azing up into the darkness# I saw myself as a creature driven and derided !y vanityG. +nswer any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. (v) . (i) . +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. 5iscuss.amesA $t the point of the revolverJ Iou settle your arguments !y forceJ @ood heaven# sirH This is just the very thing that we were fighting to put down.hat kind of character -tephen *eacock draws of the tailor in his essay G2y TailorGJ (iv) . 3. (i) +xplain the rationale of /akistan as it is explained in *ia uat $li 4han)s G/akistan and the 2odern . @o home to your childrenG.hat is on his mindJ (iii) G. G@o away from here.hore# !astard# !itchG# he shouted at her. This is the last remark of the main character in G$ra!yG.orldG. (v) There is always suspicious hope of 2atilda *oisel in GThe NecklaceG 5iscuss. +tte%!t any 'OU$ of the followin2 /uestions. (iii) .hy 2angu# the Tangawala# in GThe New 6onstitutionG# is always uarrelling with the "oras# the white menJ . C. . 5iscuss. B.half of you as dependent as ever you were# the other half a strange new creature with interests that I could not watch or share.rite a note on Tolerance.rite down the different nourishing ualities of different vitamins as mentioned in 5r.hat is the role of -am# the niggard# in GThe 4illersGJ (ii) . (ii) @ive an account of the disaster occurred on $ugust (# '(MF at Nagasaki. (v) . 4enneth . (vii) The modes# manners# and speech of G-moke -creensG are !right !ut harsh to some people. (vi) G$ 6onversation with 2y 3atherG is a story demanding a sense of character in a human !eing. +xplain.

(iii) 5iscuss 0emingway)s knowledge of fishing. 5. 5iscuss. +nswer any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. (iii) No time to turn at 8eauty)s glance# $nd watch her feet# how they can dance. 5iscuss. (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) . 5iscuss. +xplain these lines from 8rowning)s poem G/atriot into TraitorG.illiam 5avies in his poem G*eisureG emphatically points our that in this rush of life we do not have time to appreciate the !eauty of life and nature.hat kind of disgusting picture of woman)s life 2aya $ngelou has drawn in her poem# G. (v) The fish is a sym!ol of an ideal life for the old man.4$OU3 II> 0. (ii) .(i) . (iv) Thus I entered and thus I go .hat are -antiago)s pillars of successJ 5iscuss those ualities of the old man which help hem succeed in his mission. (iii) GThus I entered and thus I go In triumphs# people have dropped down deadG. 3+3E$ NO.orkGJ +xplain. (i) S%irno. 5iscuss. E?!lain any T5$EE of the followin2 e?tra"ts with referen"e to the "onte?t. (ii) 0emingway)s knowledge of the ocean is sound.G -illy and rudeH I don)t know how to !ehave !efore womenH 2adam# in my time I)ve seen more women than you have seen sparrows. (iv) The fish is a living character with intention and contention. (ii) WolfG -tow itH RTo *etticeS 5)you want me to a!andon my craft and start keeping ra!!its.oman . C =*E+$ B005 .

+nswer any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. (ii) . (i) . 5iscuss in view of his story GTell Tale 0eartG. (i) There is depiction of Nature in G. (v) +xplain GThe -hadow in the %ose @ardenG as a love story.histling of 8irdsG. +xplain. /oe haunts us and puts us into a situation where we can expect anything may happen any time.hat is the dilemma of a !achelor as depicted in 0er!ert @old)s GThe 8achelor)s 5ilemmaGJ (v) . (v) -o little happens# the !lack dog 6racking his fleas# in the hot sun Is history B. (ii) 0ow does Ieats remem!er different relations especially that of grandfather in his essay G2y @randfatherGJ (iii) . (iv) +. +tte%!t any 'OU$ of the followin2 /uestions. +nswer any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. +xplain.rite a note on @iovanni)s sentiments for 8eatrice and her father in G%appaccinni)s 5aughterG. (iii) The role of the main character in G$ra!yG is to run after the shadows. 5iscuss.In triumphs# people have dropped down dead.rite a note on hypocrisy of %osen in GTake /ityG. (iv) . . (i) +xplain the following lines !y +liza!eth -ewellA I will drain *ong draughts of uiet $s a purgation (ii) G"ne $rtG is the art of losing. 0ow can we master this artJ +xplain.hat *ewis Thomas in his essay# GTo +rr is 0umanG says a!out the lower animals and computersJ +xplain. (vi) G/assion in the 5esertG is a fantasy.$. 3. C.hat kind of hosts were 2ac!eth and *ady 2ac!eth as mentioned in G0osts and @uestsGJ +xplain. (vii) +xplain G-omething to Talk $!outG as a pleasant one7act play.

I mean marriage with .e passed the 3ield of @azing grain . 5iscuss.orld)s $ -tageG !y -hakespeare. (v) G*ights "utG !y +dward Thomas dwells on the power of sleep. (iv) 5on)t spoil it ????? don)t !e rude and violentH /ut that thing down. (v) The fight the old man was fighting with the fish must !e won. B. (i) $nd the dead man answered# )Talking !rought me here). (v) 3ri%roseG "f course# I don)t mean marriage in general. . +xplain.(iii) +xplain the fourth and fifth stages of life as depicted in G$ll the . (iii) The sea is presented as a living character in the novel. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. (ii) +xplain the relationship of the old man and the !oy. %emem!er the dayH The password is )-"/0I). (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) The theme of victory and defeat is em!edded in the story. 0is life and honour depend upon it. 0e makes me feel all funny inside. +xplain. 5 =*E+$ B006 . E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2. (iv) . (iv) 0emingway)s mysticism is that he feels one with the fish as part of the grand scheme of Nature. I)d always intended to give you the password if you failed. 3+3E$ NO. 8e !right# !e sensi!le. 5.e passed the setting -un ???? (iii) The fog comes "n little cat feet.hat kind of picture of death +mily 5ickinson draws in her poem# G8ecause I 6ould Not -top for 5eathG.ohn. 5iscuss.4$OU3 I> 0. (ii) .

(GTartaryG) (iii) The protagonist in GThe %e!elG is fake not real# yet important. (iv) +la!orate visual effects in GThe -olitary %eaperG. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. (i) The hero)s dreams are pure# innocent and unharmful.hat according to 2ax 8eer!ohm is good guestshipJ (v) 0ow does the !achelor fare in $merican societyJ C.orld)s a -tageG. (iii) 0appy /rince sees !est when he has no eyes to see. +xplain.rite a note on the state of law and order in &-$ after your study of GThe 4illersG. 3. +xplain. . +la!orate. (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) +la!orate -antiago)s hand game with the Negro.(i) . (v) .hat is the real nature of 4eats)s fears in G. (iv) +la!orate the final stage of -antiago)s struggle with the fish. (i) To *ia at $li 4han# demand for /akistan was the most reasona!le and entirely practica!le. says -antiago. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. +xplain. (iv) The wife in GThe -hadow in the %ose @ardenG cannot help digging her past. +la!orate. (v) &ncle . (ii) 0ow was it easy to deceive the grandfather in G2y @randfatherGJ (iii) +ven great depression could not !eat down $merican women)s ha!it of make7up. +xplain. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. (iv) . (iv) . (ii) In GThe New 6onstitutionG# &stad 2angu is at !est a half7wit. +la!orate. (ii) )+very day is a new day). +xplain with reference to GThe 8eauty IndustryG. (v) -antiago is more philosophic than formal philosophers. (iii) 5escri!e -antiago)s search for fish.hen I 0ave 3earsGJ 5.rite a note on -hakespeare)s accurate o!servation of life in G$ll the . 5iscuss.ames in GThe 8oy 6omes 0omeG is not a lion !ut a jackal in the gar! of a lion. 6omment.

(ii) Then practice losing farther# losing faster1 /laces and names and where it was you went. 3.4$OU3 II> 0.ewellerG. (v) 5iscuss 6hekhov)s GThe 8earG as a farce. . +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. (iii) . (v) Tell him the password# %edchester.e don)t want to ruin his 6hristmas. (iv) 0ow does the swallow in "scar . 6 =*E+$ B006 . (iii) 3eudalism has fallen on evil days. E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2G (i) I came down the steps with my picture $nd must wait# must stand and wait# 3or there he was at the trough !efore me.ill lie ") nights In the !ony arms "f %eality and !e comforted. B.ild)s GThe 0appy /rinceG fare as a friend. .3+3E$ NO. (i) 5iscuss &stad 2angu in GThe New 6onstitutionG as a representative of 6ommon Indians. 5iscuss with reference to G5uchess and the . 0e is done his !est. (iv) If you)re satisfied with /rimrose# that is the way to treat me ?????? as a meddling !usy!ody. (ii) Is %osen# in GTake /ityG# secretly in love with +va !ut does not have the courage to express his feelings.

5. (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) . +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. 7 =*E+$ B007 .4$OU3 I> .oman .hat is 5i2aggio)s importance in the novelJ (ii) . (i) Is the woman of G.inter as a general who has !een !eaten and retreating. (iv) .orkG fed up with her workJ .hat does she really wantJ (ii) 5eath is a very courteous host in G8ecause I 6ould Not -top for 5eathG. (iii) 8ring out pathos in G-ay This 6ity has Ten 2illion -oulsG. (v) 0ow does -antiago prove the truth of his remarkA G2an is not made for defeatGJ 3+3E$ NO. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. (G. +xplain. 5iscuss. (iv) 0ow does education overcome instinct in G-nakeGJ (v) +la!orate the first three stages of life in G$ll the .histling of 8irdsG) (ii) @loria +merson)s GTake the /lungeG is a candid account of writer)s hopes and fears.(i) 5iscuss .rite a !rief note on 0emingway)s style.orld)s a -tageG. (iii) .arJ (G8eauty IndustryG) (v) 0ow did the writer feel and !ehave when he discovered while in the !us that he had no money on himJ (G"n -aying /leaseG) C.hy didn)t -antiago mind when other fishermen made fun of himJ (iii) 5iscuss old man a )a strange old man).hat has the tailor in G2y TailorG to hideJ (iv) 0ow does human !ody compare with a 6hina .

hyJ (iv) . (iv) I)m the . (ii) 3or only gossamer# my gown 77 2y tippet 77 only tulle 77 (iii) To go into the unknown I must enter# and leave# alone I know not how. B.hat is )N$QI) solution of dealing with the people one does not likeJ (iv) .hen any why does @iovanni in his address to 8eatrice# call 5r. (iii) Towards the end of the story# the mayor calls the 0appy /rince# G*ittle !etter than a !eggarG. (v) +xcuse me# sir# I am not accustomed to listen to such expressions or to such a tone of voice. (iii) .hat harm can )pleasant illusions) doJ (-cience and Balues) . +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. +la!orate irony in this remark. I want to hear no more. -it there# and if you make a sound. (i) . E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2G (i) $nd my foe !eheld its shine $nd he knew that it was mine.olf 77 so watch out. I)ll plug you. . (i) .hy is 6larice in G-moke7-creensG so impatient a!out descri!ing her !rotherJ 3.hy didn)t the writer and his uncles think it wrong to outwit the grandfather)s violence and rigourJ (G2y @randfatherG) (ii) . %appaccini GIour awful fatherGJ (ii) G-ahi! 8ehadur where do you wish to !e takenG# says &stad 2angu with Gundisguised ironyG.hy is the ro!!er in G-omething to Talk $!outG compelled to remark while addressing 8ishop# Gyou might !e one of us yourselfGJ (v) .hat does 0uxley refer to as )%epellant) in the make7up of some modern womenJ (8eauty Industry). +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.0.

hat does T. *awrence curse his educationJ (G-nakeG) (iv) . (v) Towards the end of the novel# 2anolin goes crying to the hotel and does not hide his tears.0.-.hy does -antiago not mind the derogatory remarks of other fishermen on the terraceJ (ii) . 9 =*E+$ B007 .hat is the importance of GThe wellG in the gulf streamJ (iv) The old man is !rave !ut not reckless.(v) 0ow do various vitamins keep human !ody fitJ C. (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) .hy does .4$OU3 II> 0.ordsworth call the -olitary %eaper)s song )$ melancholy strain)J (ii) .hyJ 3+3E$ NO. . (i) . E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2G (i) $nd yet those voicesA If you were not afraid# you would kill himH (ii) $nd all who heard should see them there# $nd all should cry# !ewareH !ewareH (iii) -o little happens# the !lack dog 6racking his fleas in the hot sun Is history. . +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.hy does 5.hich is the great challenge for the old man1 struggle with the !ig fish or fight against the sharksJ (iii) .hen I 0ave 3earsG) 5. +liot mean !y )-tanding upon the shore of all we know) in his G5eparture and $rrivalGJ (iii) . +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. 6omment.hat similarity does %o!ert 3rost want to discover in woodchuck)s sleep and his ownJ (G$fter $pple /ickingG) (v) 0ow relia!le and dura!le are )*ove and 3ame) in they eyes of 4eatsJ (G.

+la!orate. B.eweller) (iii) The 3rench soldier feels grandeur of the desert with all its force and fascination. (iii) . 6hesterton in his G-ome /olicemen $nd a 2oralG call the target of his knife7throwing )2angled tree)J C. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. Ieats does not underestimate politics nor does he reject it. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.4.hat is your true estimation of the character of /rimroseJ (-moke7-creens) 3. (ii) The 5uchess is more loathsome than the jeweller.8. . 6omment. 0owJ (-cience and Balues) (v) .hy does -hakespeare call the world a stageJ (iii) 5escri!e +mily 5ickinson)s journey in the company of 5eathJ (iv) . (The 8ear) (v) . (i) @iovanni is no more than a pawn on the chess !oard of 5r.(iv) I)m afraid this isn)t my evening for listening to the conversation of my aunt.2..hyJ (ii) )Tolerance is not the same as weakness)# says +. 6omment.hy does the writer recommend the story of 6hesterfield to the lift7man in G"n -aying /leaseGJ (iv) 8ertrand %ussel argues that !y eliminating great wars we can a!olish poverty. (i) $ldous 0uxley in G8eauty IndustryG calls annual expenses of one hundred and fifty six million pounds on make up )$ tidy sum). 3orster. 6omment. . +la!orate. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. (v) The password# and uick a!out it# or I)ll plug youH I can)t mess around here all night. (i) 0ow is the patriot repaid for his pu!lic servicesJ (/atriot into Traitor) (ii) . %appaccini)s research.hy does @. ($ /assion in the 5esert) (iv) 5iscuss /opova as an unreal and fake prude. (The 5uchess and the .

8eing in *ondon is holiday. E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2G (i) @reat duties call the twentieth century 2ore grandly dowered than those which came !efore (ii) Its silence I hear and o!ey That I may lose my way $nd myself (iii) It melted and I let it fall and !reak 8ut I was well &pon my way to sleep !efore it fell. (v) . +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.rite a !rief note on the old man)s life on land. (ii) The old man is a great fighter.hat grace there was in his strengthH 5o you remem!erJ To!y# To!yH B. 6omment. (*ights "ut) 5. +xplain. (iv) 2y dear uncle# this is holiday. (i) /rove how 2anto was# !etween the lines# criticising all those who were praising India $ct# '(DF (The New 6onstitution) . (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) 5escri!e the old man)s poverty and lack of resources.(v) -leep is more powerful than all other passions.4$OU3 I> 0. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. 3+3E$ NO. (iv) 5iscuss 5i2aggio as a source of inspiration for the old man. (iii) 6ompare and contrast old man with other fishermen. (v) . 1 =*E+$ B009 .

(ii) /oison works through @iovanni)s system slowly !ut surely. (The %e!el) (v) . (8ecause I 6ould Not -top for 5eath) (iii) If we forgive others there will !e no need for poison trees. +la!orate.hy and how does 0uxley compare human !ody with a /orcelain . (The 8ear) (v) 8riefly compare and contrast characters of &ncle . +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. 6omment. (The 0untsman) (ii) 5eath is not the traditional fell sergeant !ut a friend and guide. (i) The 0untsman does discover his !lunder !ut too late. (i) . +la!orate. ($ /oison Tree) (iv) $pparently the re!el seems to !e ridiculous !ut in fact he is !rave. -cott experience on the moonJ (. +la!orate.arJ (8eauty Industry) (ii) .ames and /hilip. C. (Tolerance) (iv) "ur good manners prove that we respect others regardless of their station or status. 5iscuss. +la!orate.hy does +va turn down every offer of help of %osen)s (Take /ity) (iv) /opova makes a mere show as a mourner.hat similarity does the poet hope to discover !etween his sleep and that of the woodchuckJ ($fter $pple /icking) .alking on the 2oon) (iii) 0e who tolerates people different from him is )Truly 8rave).hat wonders does 5avid %. +la!orate. 5iscuss. (The 8oy 6omes 0ome) 3. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. 0owJ (%appaccini)s 5aughter) (iii) . ("n -aying /lease) (v) +volution from agriculture to industry was not only economic !ut also cultural and political.

5iscuss. (iii) 6over me with white 6old icy kisses and *et me rest tonight. (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) The old man looks upon 2anolin as not only his apprentice !ut also his friend and his e ual. 3+3E$ NO. (iv) "f all the challenges faced !y the old man# fight against the sharks is the greatest.4$OU3 II> 0. +la!orate. 6omment. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. +la!orate. (v) Thanks1 !ut I)ll make my own arrangements. (ii) No other fisherman is as skilled and as perfect in fishing as the old man. 00 =*E+$ B009 . E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2G (i) $nd on her dulcimer she played -inging of 2ount $!ora (ii) To go into the unknown I must enter# and leave alone# I know not how. Not a whisper to the . (v) -ea is as good a character as any other in the novel. (iii) The old man in his struggle against the 2arlin does get despaired !ecause that would !e worse than death.5. (iv) -peaking as a woman in love# I don)t see how my mother could have known 6harles for what he was. . 5iscuss.alla!ys# mind.

+tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. +la!orate. (%appaccini)s 5aughter) (iii) +va stands out as a person who can endure hardships for the sake of female glory. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. (-moke7 -creens) 3. 6omment. +la!orate. (The 8ear) (ii) @iovanni falls in %appaccini)s net involuntarily !ut with disastrous results. ("n -aying /lease) (v) . (Tolerance) (iii) +volution from agriculture to industry was positive and progressive. (-cience and Balues) (iv) *aw does not do so much to make social interaction sweet and smooth as do the good manners. +la!orate. (Take /ity) (vi) It is the /anther and not the -oldier who wins in the trial of love. +la!orate. (i) 2odern man can)t stand and stareJ 0ow can we change this attitudeJ (*eisure) (ii) . 0e is friendly and patronizing. 6omment. (8ecause I 6ould Not -top for 5eath) . (i) 0ow has it !ecome possi!le for a grandmother to look as young as her granddaughterJ (8eauty Industry) (ii) Tolerance lies in putting up with the people unlike us# not in loving them. ($ /assion in the 5esert) (v) *ucy fails not only as a mother !ut also as a wife.hat is unusual a!out the re!elJ Is there anything positive a!out itJ (The %e!el) (iii) 5eath is !y no means dreadful. 6omment.hich are the water solu!le vitamins and what are their !enefitsJ (The Bitamins) C. 6omment.B. (i) /opova catches our attention !y not only what she says !ut !y what she does. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.

.ill lie o) nights In the !ony arms "f %eality and !e comforted (ii) There)s no!ody on the housetops now . +la!orate. E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2G (i) . +la!orate. (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) The old man fights against the 2arlin to the very end without !eing despaired.4$OU3 I> 0. 00 =*E+$ B001 . (iv) Trace some of the sym!ols employed !y 0emingway in his novel. (iii) 3ight against the sharks is the real test of the old man)s mettle. +la!orate. (v) 5iscuss the ending of the novel. (ii) The old man is !y all means an extraordinary fisherman.ust a palsied few at the windows setA (iii) $nd -ighing like furnace# 2ade to his mistress) eye!row. 3+3E$ NO. (v) It is another of our fatal weakness and has kept us out of law and politics and diplomacy 7 in fact# everything !ut the church. 6omment. ($ /oison Tree) (v) .(iv) /oison is in fact unexcused anger and wrath.hy does the poet feel repentant after his encounter with the snakeJ (-nake) 5. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. then with the a woeful lover# !allad (iv) Now# understand once and for all# /hilip# while you remain in my house I expect not only punctuality# !ut also civility and respect.

ohn 4eats) fearsJ (. (iii) . (Tolerance) (iii) 5escri!e @loria +merson)s experience of parachute jumping.hat are . 3. ($ra!y) (iii) .hat does the empty !arrel signify in the poem G$fter $pple7pickingGJ (iv) .hen I 0ave 3ears) (v) . (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) . (iv) 0ow does 3rancine /rose distinguish gossip from rumour mongeringJ (v) 5o you agree with %ussel)s view that the esta!lishment of a single authority in the world will a!olish warJ (-cience and Balues) C. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.hy does @race /aley fail to write a story in keeping with the sensi!ilities of her father)s timesJ ($ 6onversation with 2y 3ather) (iv) 0ow did *is!y come to know of -imon 8yrne)s love for herJ (The *ittle .B.oman . (i) 0ow does a woman get tired of doing domestic choresJ (. (i) . +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.ork) (ii) .hy does the poet think of his education as GaccursedGJ (-nake) 5. (i) 5escri!e the experience and feelings of the people !efore and during the solar eclipse.hat kind of change &stad 2angu was expecting from the New $ct of '(DFJ (ii) 5escri!e !riefly the effect of romantic love on the adolescent mind of -mall !oy. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. +xplain.rite a note on the irony in the 0untsman.illow) (v) 5iscuss the play GThe 8earG !y $nton 6hekhov as a farce. (ii) )It is easy to see fanaticism in other people !ut difficult to spot in oneself). +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.

+tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. B.(i) . . E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2G (i) . (i) .rite a note on the heroic spirit of the old man.0ow could oneJ (v) There ain)t no criminal classes# any more than virtuous classes. (iv) .rite a note on +va)s character in GTake /ityG.hat was the reaction of other fishermen and the tourists when they saw the skeleton of the 2arlin tied to the old man)s skiffJ 3+3E$ NO.hat does that dream signifyJ (v) . The rogues and the rulers may !oth come from the gutter# or the /alace.hat did make the happy prince weep in GThe 0appy /rinceGJ (ii) . (iii) $nd ask no other uestion than to know That they have helped the cause of victory That with their aid the flag is raised on high. (ii) /erhaps the plaintive num!ers flow 3or old# unhappy# far7off things# $nd !attles long ago. (ii) 0ow far do skill and resolution of the old man count in his struggle against the !ig fishJ (iii) Narrate the hand game competition held !etween -antiago and the Negro.alked through a wood# saw the !irds in the trees1 They had no politicians and sang at their ease.hat does the old man dream a!outJ . 0B =*E+$ B001 .4$OU3 II> 0. (iv) $h# !ut you must not think that after four years of war one has uite the same ideas a!out the sanctity of human life.

+tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. (iv) 0ow will the poet change his dreams into realityJ (Tartary) (v) . +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. 5iscuss.(iii) .hy did the writer want to jump from the aeroplane with a parachuteJ (Take the /lunge) C.illow) (v) . (The Banishing Billage) (ii) . (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) . 5iscuss.hat happens when /rimrose declares to marry an ugly manJ (-moke7 -creens) 3.hat is the reason that the poet lets the snake depart unhurtJ (-nake) (iii) The poem G/atriot into TraitorG is a dramatic monologue. 5iscuss. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. 5iscuss. (0osts and @uests) (iii) G-ince now we live in a world of super7things# we might expect them to !e made !y a race of supermenG. +xplain. (v) . 3+3E$ NO. (-uper) (iv) +. (v) The fish is a sym!ol of an ideal life for the old man. (i) 5escri!e the revival of the colourful life in the village. 3orester in his essay GToleranceG does not favour love re!uilding civilization. (i) 0ow does 8ertrand %ussell prove that all Gfanatical creedsG are harmful to mankindJ (-cience and Balues) (ii) G"ur deepest instincts# !ad or good# are those which we share with the rest of the animal creationG. 5iscuss.hat is the poet)s idea of association and memoriesJ (The -olitary %eaper) 5. 5iscuss.hat were -antiago)s views a!out his failureJ (ii) G$ man can !e destroyed !ut not defeatedG.2. 03 . (iii) 0ow was the old man a!le to hook the 2arlinJ (iv) G3ishG# he said softly aloud# GI will stay with you until I am deadG.hy did the !oss make no replyJ (The 3ly) (iv) 0ow did -imon disclose his love for *is!yJ (The *ittle .

(@ossip) (iv) +xplain the utility of vitamins on human !ody. $m I rightJ B. (The Bitamins) (v) Q. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.hat was the condition of the survivors of the nuclear explosionJ (Nagasaki# $ugust (# '(MF) (ii) .hat were the feelings of -cot and Irwin on landing on the moonJ (.rite a note on the fourth and fifth stages of man)s life.alking on the 2oon) (iii) 5iscuss rumour# slander and gossip and differentiate !etween them.hen I 0ave 3ears) 5. (iii) 5iscuss the use of elements of suspense and irony in the poem GThe 0untsmanG.=*E+$ B000 . (i) 5o you think that the killer in the story is a sane personJ (The Tell7Tale 0eart) (ii) 0ow has the writer criticized the dark aspects of modern civilizationJ ($ra!y) (iii) . (GThe "ld 2an and the . (i) 6an you point out the su!tle changes in the poet)s relationship with snakeJ (ii) /ick out the fanciful images from GTartaryG. (i) .hy did &stad 2angu uarrel with the @ora -oldierJ (The New 6onstitution) (iv) 0ow did the -wallow help the poor peopleJ (The 0appy /rince) (v) 0ow has /opova !een ridiculed in the playJ (The 8ear) 3. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. (v) Iou had a!out two looks at me# gasped in horror# and ever since you)ve !een maneuvering for a chance to tell me what you think a!out me. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. 5iscuss. (iv) . Thomas in his essay GTo +rr is 0umanG# states that non7human !eings or things cannot possess the faculty of reasoning.hat are the poet)s fearsJ (. (v) . E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2G (i) $nd I sunned it with smiles $ns with soft deceitful viles (ii) Then practice losing farther# losing faster# /laces and names and where it was you went To travel (iii) I cannot ru! the strangeness from my sight I got from looking through a pane of glass I skimmed this morning from the drinking trough (iv) 2y dear friend# I know a !ush with a magnificent !ird on it# which you could secure with no trou!le whatever.4$OU3 I> 0. C.

+tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. 5iscuss. (iv) .hy did -antiago feel that the fish was killing himJ 3+3E$ NO. E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2G (i) $nd the dead man answeredA GTalking !rought me hereG. (v) Iou won)t get round me like that nowH I)ve had enoughH 8lack eyes# passionate eyes# ru!y lips# dimpled cheeks# the moon# whispers# timid !reathing 77777.histling of 8irdsG.hat were people)s expectations from the New 6onstitutionJ (v) . +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. (ii) GIf !ad manners are infectious# so also are good mannersG. (ii) $nd you see my harvest# what I reap This very day# now a year s run# (iii) $nd depart peaceful# pacified# and thankless# Into the !urning !owels of this earthJ (iv) I expect we should go through this little scene again tomorrow. 0C =*E+$ B000 . (i) @ive description of spring presented in G.rite a short note on the character of /rimrose. (iii) 0ow would you justify the ending of the novelJ (iv) . +la!orate. Iou haven)t enjoyed it# have youJ . 5iscuss. (ii) GThe fish is a sym!ol of an ideal life for the "ld 2anG.-eaG !y 0emingway) (i) .4$OU3 II> 0. (i) The writer calls his meeting with the poor family pleasant.ell# there)s lot more of it to come. 3.ho were the "ld 2an)s companions that always talked to in lonelinessJ (v) . ("n -aying /lease) .hat does the killing of fly !y the 8oss signifyJ (The 3ly) (iii) GThe NecklaceG is a criticism on pride and materialism.rite a note on the hand game competition !etween -antiago and the Negro.hyJ (8reakfast) (ii) . B. .

E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2G (i) $ legacy of !enefits 77 may we In future years !e found with those who try To la!our for the good until they die. (ii) $nd ere should wane the morning7star# I)d don my ro!e and scimitar. (iv) .hen I 0ave 3earsGJ 5. 3+3E$ NO. (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) 5iscuss 0emingway)s knowledge of fishing. +la!orate.hat effects do they createJ (v) .hat colour words has the poet used in GTartaryGJ . (ii) This fish is a living character with intention and contention.hat are Ieats) impressions of his grandfatherJ C. (iii) 8ut even so# honored still more That he should seek my hospitality . 05 =*E+$ B000 .hat is the central idea of G.hat is the relation !etween committing mistakes and free willJ (To +rr is 0uman) (iv) 5escri!e the writer)s experience of taking the plunge. 5iscuss. (iii) $n indifferent universe is represented here !y the sea and the creatures therein.hat different themes are discussed in the novelJ (v) 5iscuss the role of the sea in the novel.hat does the empty !arrel signifyJ ($fter $pple7/icking) (ii) G$ll the .4$OU3 I> 0. (i) .orld)s a -tageG in fact# discusses the journey of life. (iii) 0ow has the poet used the idea of association and memoriesJ (The -olitary %eaper) (iv) . +xplain.(iii) . (v) . +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.

hen I 0ave 3ears) (v) +xplain the significance of the title of the poem# G-ay This 6ity 0as Ten 2illion -oulsG. (. +la!orate. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. 5iscuss. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.histling of 8irds) (iii) 5escri!e the difficulties faced !y the people at the time of independence. (-uper) C. (iv) . 5iscuss. (iv) G$ra!yG is a psychological explanation of !oy)s emotional and mental condition. (GThe "ld 2an and the .e live# so to speak# like spiders# and never see the light. 5iscuss. 5o you agreeJ ("ne $rt) (ii) +xplain the central idea of GThe -olitary %eaperG. (iii) G$ /oison TreeG rightly descri!es the poet)s mental and emotional attitude towards his enemy. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. 5. +la!orate.illow) (iii) GThe NecklaceG is a satire on the vanity of women.orld) (iv) .rite a note on the good manners of the conductor on the !us. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.alking on the 2oon) (ii) G. It isn)t as if there were no good people around# for the district)s full of them. (iv) . ("n -aying /lease) (v) 5escri!e the origin of the word GsuperG. (v) G-omething to Talk $!outG reflects the modern attitude towards criminals and crime. +la!orate. (The *ittle . (v) Nothing)s secure to7day# so we let them have the !est we can while the going)s good. (.hat are 4eats) thoughts a!out his own life and mortalityJ (. 3. (i) $ccording to the poet losses cannot !ring any disaster. (i) . (/akistan and the 2odern . @ive our children a !etter time than we had ourselves# and 77777777 B.rite a note on the character of *is!y.histlingG is a sound sym!ol which stands for the life and movements of !irds and of all living creatures. The mice have eaten my livery. (i) G-ometimes I scarcely !elieve that I have actually walked on the moonG.hat are @iovanni)s sentiments for 8eatriceJ (%appaccini)s 5aughter) (ii) .3rom out the dark door of the secret earth.

(iv) The New 6onstitution was no more than a piece of $pril foolery.eweller. B.hat heroes greater than were ever of yore. -ummary of the whole novel will not !e accepted. . (i) They mayor calls 0appy /rince# G*ittle !etter than a !eggarG. (v) 5escri!e the relationship of -antiago and 2anolin. 3+3E$ NO. (iv) It isn)t particularly easy to !e me. 6omment. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.rite a note on the first portion of the novel. . E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2G (i) 0e was talking of you and me# my dear# 0e talking of you and me. That)s all# if you)ll just think that over !efore we discuss my young life.4$OU3 II> 0. +la!orate. (iv) +xamine the attitude of other people towards -antiago !efore he set sail to catch !ig fish. 6omment.hat con uest over pain and misery# . (The 8ear) (iii) The 5uchess is more loathsome than the . (ii) -o little happens# the !lack dog 6racking his fleas in the hot sun Is history.hyJ (ii) /opova catches our attention !y not what she says !ut what she does. 06 =*E+$ B000 . (v) 5o you think I might wake mammaJ -he)ll never forgive us if she misses this. (ii) Is it a novel of triumph of man or his defeatJ (iii) 5iscuss -antiago)s attitude towards the 2arlin.-eaG !y 0emingway) (i) . Iou know how she is always yearning for something to happen. (iii) .

+tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. 07 =*E+$ B00B . (ii) . (i) )*ord must !uild if the work is to stand . (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) The "ld 2an fights against the 2arlin without !eing despaired. +xplain. (iii) 0ow does the "ld 2an physically lookJ (iv) -antiago)s suffering is more remarka!le than even his killing of the fish. (ii) I will drain . (8ecause I 6ould Not -top for 5eath) (v) 2odern man can)t )stand and stare).hat does many a road track signify in G*ights "utGJ (ii) Is poison unexcused wrathJ ($ /oison Tree) (iii) The poet feels repentant after his encounter with the snake. (To +rr is 0uman) (iii) 0ow does the writer differentiate !etween hosts and guestsJ (iv) . 5iscuss. (i) .hyJ (-nake) (iv) 5eath is friendly and patronizing for the poetess.. 5iscuss.ife in GThe -hadow in the %ose @ardenG cannot help digging her past. 5.hy did the 2uslims of India ask for a country of their ownJ (/akistan and the 2odern . +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions.. (Tolerance) (ii) $ll exploration is !ased on human falli!ility. 3. 6omment. E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2G (i) -un# rain# curving sky 2ountains# oceans# leaf and stone# -tar shine# moon glow Iou are all that I can call my own. (v) Is -antiago a superstitious manJ 3+3E$ NO. 5iscuss.)J 6omment.4$OU3 I> 0.orld) (v) $ll Gfanatical creedsG are harmful to mankind. . (-cience and Balues) C.rite a note on "ld 2an)s life on land.(v) The . 6omment. +tte%!t any T5$EE of the followin2 /uestions. 6omment..

6all him1 @uy. (*ights "ut) (iv) +xplain the title of the poem G$fter $pple /ickingG in your own words. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. 5iscuss.hy was &stad 2angu so excited a!out the implementation of the New 6onstitutionJ . (ii) .hat did 2r. 2adam# in my life# I)ve seen more women than you have seen seen sparrows. +very!ody does. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. (The 5uchess and the . (8reakfast) (iv) The human relations in GThe 5uchess and the . 5iscuss.hat did he expect of itJ (The New 6onstitution) (iii) 8reakfast is a criti ue of modern civilization. (v) -mirnovA -illy and rudeH I don)t know how to !ehave !efore women. (The -olitary %eaper) (ii) 0ow does the poem G/artriot into TraitorG educate us a!out the political conditions prevailing in the third world countriesJ (/atriot into Traitor) (iii) G*ights "utG dwells upon the power of sleep. (2y @randfather) . (i) .rite down a character sketch of Ieats) @randfather. B. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions.hy does the song of the -olitary %eaper give immortal happiness to the poet Geven it was heard no moreG. (i) .ewellerG are rotten to the core. *ia at $li 4han expect of the $mericans for the development and sta!ility of /akistan.*ong draughts of uiet $s a purgation. C. (-moke -creens) (ii) . (iii) 8ut if this century is to !e more great Than those !efore# her sons must make her so (iv) *etticeA Iou)ll love uncle 6harles. 0e my not approve !ut he never criticizes any!ody. (i) +xplain the title G-moke -creensG# in you own words.eweller) 3.

4$OU3 II> 0. (iv) .e knew the place uite well !efore their time 77 decent people lived there once. .rite a note on the ending of the novel. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions.hy do the fellow fishermen make a fun of the old manJ (iii) . (ii) .hat strategies does the old man adopt to end an overwhelming isolation on the seaJ 3+3E$ NO. E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2G (i) I will drain *ong draughts of uiet $s a purgation. (ii) /aid !y the world# what dost thou owe 2eJ 77 @od might uestion1 now instead# )Tis @od shall repayA I am safer so. 09 =*E+$ B00B . 8ut not now.alla!y. (iii) The apparition of these faces in the crowd1 /etals on a wet !lack !ough. 5iscuss. (iv) . Not till I know you)ve thought over something I)m going to tell you.e are ac uainted with the . . (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) 2arlin is a sym!ol of hardships in life. (v) -ome time !efore you go home you can unleash your views of me.hat kind of a dilemma does a !achelor face in his lifeJ (8achelor)s 5ilemma) (iv) .hy are !ad manners infectiousJ ("n -aying /lease) 5.(iii) .

illow) (iv) . (iv) . (i) .rite down a critical appreciation of the sonnet# G.rite a note on "lde $nderson)s sicknesss with life.hat are %ussell)s views a!out science and valuesJ (-cience and Balues) C. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. (ii) 5iscuss the ending of the novel. (i) 0ow specific is the writer a!out what she expected to seeJ 5oes she suggest these expectation without stating themJ (The +clipse) (ii) 0ow does @loria +merson maintain the focus on her feelings throughout the essayJ 5o these feelings changeJ (Take the /lunge) (iii) 6ritically examine 3orester)s views on tolerance. (The 4illers) (ii) 0ow the murderer in the story is forced to confess his crimeJ (Tell7Tale 0eart) (iii) -imon keeps the willow as a token of *is!y)s love which gives him solace and strength !efore and at the time of death.ames.rite a detailed note on the nature of conflict !etween /hilip and . 5iscuss.4$OU3 I> . (The 8oy 6omes 0ome) 3. 01 =*E+$ B003 . (The *ittle . Is an idealization of some kind necessary for our survival as sane human !eingsJ (. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions.ork) (ii) 5iscuss in detail the use of elements of suspense and irony in GThe 0untsmanG. (iv) 2ake a comparison !etween Tartary and 4u!la 4han.hen I 0ave 3earsG.B. (i) .hat were -antiago)s views a!out his failureJ 3+3E$ NO. (GThe "ld 2an and the -eaG !y 0emingway) (i) The "ld 2an fights against the 2arlin to the very end without !eing despaired. (iii) Narrate the hand game competition !etween the "ld 2an and the Negro. 5iscuss. (iii) .rite a character sketch of the woman depicted in the poem. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. 5. (Tolerance) (iv) .oman .

(iv) I am not here as a creditor# and there is no dress prescri!ed specially for the creditors. (i) 5iscuss the element of humour and irony in GThe 0appy /rinceG.ewelerG. 5iscuss. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. 3+3E$ NO. 3. (v) 0e seemed just the same last night 777 and he still has !reakfast at eight o)clock. 5. B0 .ill lie o)nights In the !ony arms of reality $nd !e comforted (iii) The sun is !ehind me Nothing has changed since I !egan 2y eye has permitted no change I am going to keep things like this. (ii) Things are rotten at the centre and rotten at the core in GThe 5uchess and the . +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2sG (i) No time to turn at 8eauty)s glance $nd watch her feet how they can dance (ii) . 5iscuss. (i) Is it good to have re!els in societyJ 5iscuss with reference to the poem in your course GThe %e!elG. C. +lucidate. (iii) There is almost scientific precision in 0emingwian /rose. 8een making pots of money I suppose. (i) There is something essentially sad a!out the portrayal of the Tailor in G2y TailorG. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. (i) Isolation can !e destructive. 0ow does the old man com!at it in the NovelJ (ii) "ld man found meaning in existence during his com!at with the 2arlin.0. (ii) $re 5octors men of scienceJ 5iscuss. (iii) 5iscuss the title of the play GThe -moke -creensG. (ii) 0ow did the 0unter get hunted in GThe 0untsmanGJ (iii) 5iscuss the main theme in the G-nakeG. B. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. (iii) G/olicemen in 6hesterton)s essay !ehave exactly like our own policemenG. 5iscuss.

"f course.hen the night had veil)d the poleA In the morning glad I see 2y foe outstrech)d !eneath the tree. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. 0e makes me feel all funny inside. (ii) &stad 2angu is painted as a fool in GThe New 6onstitutionG. (iii) The fog comes "n little cat feet (iv) 8e !right# !e sensi!le. (i) +la!orate -antiago)s strategies to confront loneliness.rite a note on the character sketch of grandmother in G2y @randfatherG.ohn. I don)t mean marriage in general.hen I have 3ears.=*E+$ B003 .GJ 5. (Tartary) (ii) The protagonist in GThe %e!elG criti ues the monotony of modern life. +la!orate. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. -upport or refute the statement. . 5iscuss. 6omment. E?!lain with referen"e to the "onte?t any T5$EE of the followin2sG (i) $nd into my garden stole . +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. I mean marriage with . (iii) 0ow does 2ax 8eer!ohm differentiate !etween 0osts and @uestsJ C. %emem!er the day# the password is G-ophyG. (ii) +very day is a nes day# says -antiago. (iii) 5iscuss the sea as a living entity. (iii) . B.4$OU3 II> 0. (iii) 0ow does -mirnov make a fun of /opova in GThe 8earGJ 3. (i) The hero)s dreams are pure# innocent# and romantic. +tte%!t any TWO of the followin2 /uestions. (i) Is "le $nderson a cowardJ 5iscuss with reference to GThe 4illersG. (v) /rimrose.hat is the real nature of 4eats) fears in G. (i) 0ow were we# according to *ia uat $li 4han# justified in our demand for /akistanJ (ii) . (ii) "r to what distant lands were may have gone Through all the years will never have !een forgot.

/$--$@+. N"&N C.orld (iv) C.LESSON WISE PAPER B '.IT0 +ssay on (i) 2uslim &nity (CKKM (ii) 2uslims) 8ackwardness (CKKM (iii) /lace of %eligion in the 2odern . +--$I.3"% 6"2/%+0+N-I"ND. 6"%%+6TI"N '. /%"N"&N "&T*IN+ %eligion @roup I) @roup II) (CKK: @roup I) .

(CKK: @roup II) 'K. I5I"2F.rite a letter to the Nazim of your city regarding the poor sanitary conditions and !roken sewerage line of your area.rite a letter to the Inspector @eneral /olice a!out the discriminating attitude of the /olice towards the civilians.rite a letter to the +ditor of a Newspaper suggesting him certain conditions under which a person can take part in @eneral +lections. . $5B+%8 N.rite a letter to the +ditor of a newspaper a!out the acute traffic pro!lem on city roads.D. . (CKKN @roup I) :. (CKKN @roup II) E. . B+%8 M. .$/5$ meter readers. (CKKM @roup II) M. (CKKF @roup II) N. /0%$-$* B+%8- 6.+6TIB+ F.rite a letter to the +ditor of a Newspaper a!out the corruption !y the . . (CKKF @roup I) F. .rite a letter to the editor of a newspaper a!out the pro!lems faced !y commuters in the city.rite a letter to the editor of a newspaper a!out the pro!lems created !y the !eggars in the !usy streets and markets of your city. $%TI6*+ :. .rite a letter to the +ditor of a Newspaper a!out over7loading of passengers and over7charging of fares in the pu!lic transport. 6"N. &ETTE$S '. (CKKE @roup I) ''.rite a letter to the editor of a newspaper a!out smoking among students. $5. (CKKM @roup II) D. .&N6TI"N M. . . (CKK: @roup I) (. (CKKE @roup II) . /%+/"-ITI"N E. . (CKKM @roup I) C.rite a letter to the editor of a newspaper a!out traffic mess on city roads.rite a letter to the 0ealth 2inister a!out the lack of medical facilities in @overnment 0ospitals>5ispensaries.

(CK'K @roup I) 'F. .rite a letter to the +ditor of a newspaper# criticizing the dress and ha!its of students at college. . .'C. (CKK( @roup I) 'D.2. (CK'' @roup II) 'E.rite a letter to the +ditor of a Newspaper a!out the lack of medical facilities in @overnment 0ospitals. . . (CKKM @roup I) $"/T 0 "ccounts 1lerks in a well established Multi /ational %irm.rite a letter to the +ditor of a Newspaper protesting against the corruption that prevails in the offices. (CKKF @roup II) .rite a letter to the +ditor of a newspaper expressing the need for opening a girls) college in your city. (CK'D @roup II) 7. .$/5$ lower staff. &slamabad :. .rite a letter to the +ditor of a newspaper protesting against the corruption of . (CK'K @roup II) 'N. (CKKF @roup I) D. . 345. .rite a letter to the 5istrict /olice "fficer a!out the increasing street crimes.rite an application to the director of education for the post of an +nglish teacher.rite a letter to the +ditor of a newspaper# complaining a!out unscheduled load7shedding. +33&I)+TIONS 9.rite a letter to the +ditor of a newspaper a!out the missing 0ealth 3acilities in the 0ospital of your area. $rite an application in response to the following advertisement. (CK'D @roup I) C'. *o) /o.rite an application to the secretary of higher education for grand of scholarship for higher studies a!road. .rite a letter to the 2anaging 5irector# /akistan %ailways# complaining a!out the late arrival of trains. (CK'C @roup II) CK.rite a letter to the +ditor of a Newspaper on the evils of street !egging. . (CKK( @roup II) 'M. . (CK'C @roup I) '(. (CK'' @roup I) ':. !.

. (CK'C @roup I) . (CK'' @roup II) 'N. .rite an application to the Inspector @eneral of /olice complaining against the ever deteriorating condition of law and order in the city. . (CKK: @roup I) :.rite an application to the 5irector +ducation (-chools) for the appointment of a teacher.anted active and smart young graduate lady to work as Telephone "perator in a 2ulti National 6ompany /. (CK'K @roup II) 'M. .rite an application to the 5istrict 0ealth "fficer a!out the a!sence as well as the maltreatment of doctors of the rural areas with the patients.rite an application to the 5irector of +ducation for the post of an +nglish Teacher. F.M. . (CKK( @roup II) 'C.rite an application to the @eneral 2anager of a 2ultinational 3irm for the appointment of a 2edical %epresentative.rite an application in response to the following advertisement. (CK'' @roup I) 'F. . . .rite an application to the 5irector of +ducation for the post of an +nglish Teacher.B. (CK'K @roup I) 'D. .". (CKKN @roup II) N. (CKKE @roup I) (.rite an application to a landlord to hire you as a manager of his farm servants. (CKK: @roup II) E. (CKKN @roup I) .rite an application to the 3inance 2anager of a 2ultinational 3irm for the appointment of an $ccount 6lerk.rite an application to the @eneral 2anager of a 6ement 3actory for a jo! of a 2echanical +ngineer.rite an application to the 3inance 2anager of a 2ultinational 3irm for the appointment of an $udit "fficer. . (CKK( @roup I) ''. . .rite an application to the 3inance 2anage of a 2ultinational 3irm for the appointment of an $udit "fficer. $lso provide your 6. 8ox MF# *ahore. . (CKKE @roup II) 'K.rite an application to the director of a theatre to case to in his stage drama as a hero>heroine.

rite a jo! application to the $ccountant @eneral for the /ost of an $ssistant. .':. . +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CKKM @roup II) . (CK'D @roup I) '(.rite a jo! application to the 5istrict 6oordinating "fficer for the post of a 6omputer "perator.$. +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CKKM @roup I) 8. (CK'D @roup II) 9.rite a jo! application to the 5irector of a /rivate 3irm for the post of an $ccountant.$. . (CK'C @roup II) 'E. 3+$+4$+35S 'O$ T$+NS&+TION 8.

+N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CKKF @roup I) 8. +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CKKN @roup I) 8. +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CKKN @roup II) . +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CKKF @roup II) 8.$.$.8.$.$.

$.8. +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CKKE @roup I) . +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CKK: @roup I) 8.$.$. +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CKK: @roup II) 8.

+N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CKK( @roup I) 8. +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CK'K @roup I) .$. +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CKK( @roup II) 8.$.$. +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CKKE @roup II) 8.8.$.

+N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CK'K @roup II) 8.$. +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CK'' @roup I) 8.8. +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CK'' @roup II) 8.$.$.$. +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- .

+N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CK'D @roup II) 1.$. +N@*I-0 7 /$/-T /$/+%- (CK'D @roup I) 8. +N@*I-0 7 /$-T /$/+%- (CK'C @roup II) 8. 8I+&O4UES .$.$.(CK'C @roup I) 8.

(CK'K @roup I) 'M.'.rite a dialogue !etween two friends a!out the waywardness among the youth. (CKKE @roup II) ''. .rite a dialogue !etween two friends on some TB programme. . (CK'' @roup I) . (CKK( @roup II) 'D. . (CKKN @roup II) :.rite a dialogue !etween a mother and her daughter on the advantages and disadvantages of an arranged marriage. .rite a dialogue !etween a student and a teacher on the importance of discipline. (CKK: @roup II) (. . (CKKF @roup I) M.rite a dialogue !etween two friends a!out the waywardness among the youth. . . .rite a dialogue !etween a teacher and a student who is a ha!itual late comer. (CKKM @roup II) D.rite a dialogue !etween two friends a!out the waywardness among the youth. (CKKE @roup I) 'K.rite a dialogue !etween a student and a police sergeant on one wheeling. .rite a dialogue !etween the 2anager and the customer a!out the stale food items of the !akery. (CKK: @roup I) E.rite a dialogue !etween a daughter and a mother a!out the modern trends in dressing. (CKKM @roup I) C. . (CKKN @roup I) N. (CKKF @roup II) F.rite a dialogue !etween two friends a!out 8lack7marketing of food items. .(CKK( @roup I) 'C. (CK'K @roup II) 'F.rite a dialogue !etween a traffic sergeant and a student a!out violation of traffic rules which the latter has committed. .rite a dialogue !etween a student and a teacher on the importance of discipline.rite a dialogue !etween two close friends on the ill effects of smoking. . . .rite a dialogue !etween a student and a canteen manager a!out the !ad food items and their high prices in the canteen.

.rite a dialogue !etween a student and a teacher on the importance of 8ook %eading. . (!) . (CK'' @roup II) ':. 0 (a) No time to see# in !road -treams full of stars# like skies at night.rite a dialogue !etween two friend on upcoming elections. . (c) 2ountains# oceans# -tar shine# Iou)re all that I can call my own. .rite a dialogue !etween two persons a!out change in weather. .rite a dialogue !etween two men on dearness.rite a dialogue !etween father and son on the choice of profession. have re!els o) !ony leaf moon and daylight# nights arms stone glow .'N. QUESTION NO. (CK'C @roup II) '(. (CK'D @roup II) 7UESTIONS (PAPER A' QUESTION NO. (CK'D @roup I) CK.ill lie In the "f %eality and !e comforted. (CK'C @roup I) 'E.B (a) It is very good that we Iou may not find it very good to !e one.

C (a) $nd on her -inging of 2ount $!ora. 3 (a) $ll the world)s a $nd all the men and women merely players.(!) Thus I entered# and thus In triumphs people have dropped down dead. (c) The music in my *ong after it was heard no more. (c) $nd yet those If you were not afraid# you would kill himH QUESTION NO. They have no politicians and sang at their ease. heart I I go !ore# stage (!) $ legacy of !enefits 77 may we In the future years !e found with those who try To la!our for the good until they die. (c) In the morning glad 2y foe outstretched !eneath the tree. dulcimer she played I see (!) . voicesA .alked through a wood# saw the !irds in the trees. QUESTION NO. QUESTION NO. 5 (a) G*uka# tell them in the sta!les that To!y isn)t to have any oats all to7dayG.

G QUESTION NO. (The New 6onstitution) QUESTION NO. +la!orate. 6 (a).(!) G3ortunately# I have other means of impressing you.hy does +va turn down every offer of %osen in GTake /ityGJ (!) 0ow does the -wallow sacrifice his life for the love of the 0appy /rinceJ (c) 5escri!e the effect of romantic love on the adolescent mind of the -mall 8oy. 7 (a) .hat is the role of Nick $dams in GThe 4illersGJ (!) GI would rather have !een loved# not fearedG says 8eatrice !efore dying in G%appaccini)s 5aughterG. (c) 5escri!e the uarrel !etween &stad 2angu and the @ora -oldier. The rogues and the rulers may !oth come from the gutter# or the /alace. ($ra!y) QUESTION NO. 9 . The power of the purse goes a long way in this world. I propose to use itG. (c) There ain)t no criminal classes# any more than virtuous classes.

00 (a) In the light of *ia uat $li 4han)s speech# explain the circumstances which led to the creation of /akistan.$.ewelerG reflect the moral decadence of the +nglish aristocracyJ QUESTION NO. . (c) 0ow does the story GThe 5uchess and the . 1 (a) The . (!) 5escri!e the love !etween the 3rench -oldier and the /anther.(a) 0ow does +.hy has /rimrose decided to marry an ugly manJ QUESTION NO. (!) . /oe !uild an atmosphere of horror in GTell7Tale 0eartGJ (!) GThe NecklaceG is a satire on the vanity of women. 00 (a) 5iscuss the play GThe 8earG as a farce. (c) 0ow is *is!y different from her elder sistersJ QUESTION NO.hat is the conflict !etween &ncle .ife in GThe -hadow in the %ose @ardenG cannot help digging her past. 5iscuss.ames and his nephew# /hilipJ (c) . 5iscuss.

hy does Ieats include a comparison of his grandmother with his grandfatherJ QUESTION NO. (c) .hy does *eacock regard the tailor as GimmortalGJ (!) /oint out the examples of irony and humour in 0uxley)s essay GThe 8eauty IndustryG.hat is the significance of the conclusion that Gthe whole fa!ric of civilization was modelled and mouldedGJ (c) G. (!) @ive an account of the disaster occurred on $ugust (# '(MF at Nagasaki# as given !y Ichimaru. 0B (a) 5escri!e @loria +merson)s experience of parachute jumping.(!) . 0C (a) 0ow does 2ax 8eer!ohm differentiate !etween 0osts and @uestsJ (!) . QUESTION NO.histling of 8irdsG shows its writer)s love for nature. 0ow far do you agree with -hawJ QUESTION NO. 03 (a) . (c) G5octoring is not even the art of keeping people in healthG.hat are the real pro!lems faced !y a !achelorJ . +la!orate.

5iscuss in the light of %ussell)s essay G-cience and BaluesG. 06 (a) .orkG. (c) 0ow do various vitamins keep human !ody fitJ QUESTION NO. (c) 5o you agree with +liza!eth 8ishop that the art of losing is not hard to masterJ . (!) GThere are certain things that our age needs# and certain things that it should avoid.hat is personificationJ +xplain personification in G*eisureG. (!) 5iscuss the poem G/atriot into TraitorG as a dramatic monologue. 05 (a) GIf !ad manners are infectious# so also are good mannersG.hat in your opinion is the most fanciful image in GTartaryGJ (c) .(c) GIt is very easy to see fanaticism in other people# !ut difficult to spot in oneselfG. +la!orate. 07 (a) .hat are the new year resolutions of +liza!eth -ewellJ QUESTION NO. Is it really soJ QUESTION NO.oman .rite a character7sketch of the woman as depicted in G. (!) .

hen I 0ave 3earsGJ (!) .hy does -hakespeare call old age )a second childishness)J (c) 0ow appropriate is the title of the poem G$ /oison TreeGJ QUESTION NO. B0 (a) 5escri!e -antiago)s search for the fish. 09 (a) . . *awrence think of his education as GaccursedGJ QUESTION NO.hat does the empty !arrel signify in G$fter $pple /ickingGJ QUESTION NO.hy does . B0 (a) .hy does Ieats wish to !e young again in G/oliticsGJ (c) .QUESTION NO. 01 (a) . +la!orate.hy does 5. (!) 5escri!e the old man)s struggle with the marlin.hy does +mily 5ickinson use the image of journey in G8ecause I 6ould Not -top for 5eathGJ(!) G*ights "utG !y +dward Thomas dwells on the power of sleep. (c) .hat are 4eats)s fears as you find in G.ordsworth call the solitary reaper)s song )a melancholy strain)J (!) .0.

(!) 5escri!e the old man as a tragic (c) . QUESTION NO. (c) 8ring out the comparison !etween -antiago and 5i2aggio. 5iscuss. 6omment. 5escri!e 2anolin)s role in the light of a!ove remarks. (c) 5escri!e the old man as a religious figure. QUESTION NO. QUESTION NO. QUESTION NO. .(c) 5escri!e the old man)s struggle with the sharks. B3 (a) +la!orate -antiago)s hand game with the Negro. (!)GThe !oy keeps me aliveG. (c)G$ man can !e destroyed !ut not defeatedG. BB (a) The sea is a living !eing. (!) Is -antiago a superstitious manJ +xplain. (!)G+very day is a new dayG# says -antiago. B5 (a) 5escri!e -antiago as a )strange old man).hat is the significance of -antiago)s dreamsJ 7UESTIONS (PAPER B' hero. BC (a) 5iscuss the old man as a skillful fisherman. +la!orate.

6 .rite an essay# with outline# of DKK7DFK words on the topic G6omputer +ducationG QUESTION NO. 3 .rite an essay# with outline# of DKK7DFK words on the topic GImportance of 2ass 2ediaG. B . 0 . .rite an essay# with outline# of DKK7DFK words on the topic G%eligious +xtremismG QUESTION NO.omen in -ocietyG. 5 . 7 .rite an essay# with outline# of DKK7DFK words on the topic G-ocial +vilsG QUESTION NO. QUESTION NO. C .rite an essay# with outline# of DKK7DFK words on the topic G%ole of .rite an essay# with outline# of DKK7DFK words on the topic G5emocracyG QUESTION NO.rite an essay# with outline# of DKK7DFK words on the topic GBillage &pliftG QUESTION NO.QUESTION NO.

QUESTION NO.eddingG. QUESTION NO.rite an essay# with outline# of DKK7DFK words on the topic G3eatures of a /akistani . 1 .QUESTION NO. 9 .rite a general essay# with outline# of DKK7DFK words that covers the following topics1 (i) +nergy 6risis (ii) &nemployment (iii) Terrorism (iv) 5rug $ddiction (v) 8lack 2arketing (vi) 6orruption (vii) Inflation 7 %ising /rices (viii) "ver7/opulation (ix) +nvironmental /ollution (x) -muggling (xi) 2ass Illiteracy . 00 .rite an essay# with outline# of DKK7DFK words on the topic G/leasures of 6hildhoodG.

The vast expenditure of money and human effort now !eing devoted to projects of putting man into space might well !e applied to ends .en at the en .(xii) 5rug Trafficking (xiii) -ectorianism (xiv) +conomic 6risis (xv) 8eggary (xvi) 8ri!ery (xvii) Nepotism (xviii) Tax +vasion (xix) Biolence (xx) /overty (xxi) /olitical Insta!ility (xxii) *awlessness (xxiii) -ocial and +conomic 6risis (xxiv) -ocial and +conomical /ro!lems (xxv) Injustice and Ine uality QUESTION NO. 00 =a> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i. -pace travel is !y far the most expensive type of exploration ever undertaken !y man.

hy is man pouring his resources into spaceJ (iv) +xplain the meanings of the following wordsA (a) -courge (!) +radication (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. QUESTIONS (i) . The money and effort that go into the development and construction of a single type of space7rocket would more than suffice to rid several countries of such s"our2e as malaria or typhoid fever# to name only two of diseases that medical science has con uered !ut which still persist in the world simply !ecause not enough money and effort are devoted to their era i"ation. .hy do malaria and typhoid still exist in the worldJ (iii) . . It is a strange world in which tens of millions of pounds are spent to give one man a ride round the earth at thousands of miles an hour# while !eneath him in his or!it live millions for whom life is a daily struggle to win a few coins to !uy their !read and !utter.hy is it a strange worldJ (ii) .more practically useful and more conducive to human happiness. (vi) 2ake a summary of the passage.hy should the richer countries of the world !e pouring their resources into space when poverty and disease on the earth are crying out for reliefJ "ne could give a cynical answer to this uestion and assert that man)s expensive adventures into space are merely the !y7 products of the struggle !etween great powers for prestige and possi!le military advantage.

It is possi!le now# if the population of the world does not increase too fast# for one man)s la!our to produce much more than is needed to provide a !are su!sistence for himself and his family. Its use in raising the standard of life has depended mainly upon three things1 democracy# trade unionism# and !irth control.> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i. 3ortunately# however# the growth of industrialism has coincided in the west with the growth of democracy. If these three things can !e extended to the rest of the world as it !ecomes industrialized# and if the danger of great wars can !e eliminated# poverty can !e a!olished throughout the whole world# and excessive hours of la!our will no longer !e necessary anywhere. In particular# if the world population continues to increase at the present rate# the a!olition if poverty and excessive work will !e totally impossi!le. It has !een so used to a limited extent# in 8ritain and $merica# and would have !een so used more effectively !ut for war. @iven an intelligent democracy not misled !y some dogmatic creed# this possi!ility will !e used to raise the standard of life. QUESTIONS (i) .hat connection does the writer show !etween . 8ut without these three things industrialism will create a regime like that in which the /haraohs !uild the pyramids.en at the en .=. $ll three# of course# have incurred hostility from the rich.

"n the contrary# +urope su!ordinates the use of machines to human happiness and welfare. QUESTION NO. .ith mass production# the amenities of life are availa!le to almost every citizen.industrialism and democracyJ (ii) 0ow can the standard of life !e raisedJ (iii) 0ow can poverty !e a!olishedJ (iv) . 0is individual li!erty and personality suffer an irretrieva!le loss. 0B =a> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i. It encourages man)s reliance on his own faculties and realizes the dangers inherent in the $merican scheme.hat will !e the impact of increase in population at the present rateJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. @reat progress has !een made !y $merica in the field of mechanization. 0owever# great the advantages of mechanization# it crushes the creative faculty of man and makes a machine out of him. These goods . (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. +fficient organization if highly mechanized system has resulted in maximum productivity in $merica. In his moments of leisure the worker finds it difficult to turn his hands to creative work !ecause the machine7made goods do not inspire him in the direction of refinement. It is spending lavishly on la!our7saving machines.en at the en .

The +uropeans# therefore# contend that it is !etter to sacrifice a few material comforts that crush the aesthetic and spiritual urge in the individual which large scale mechanization is doing in $merica.also lose their fascination !ecause mass production has given a set !ack to the individuality of the articles produced.> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i. $ tutorial should help a student to clarify his mind .hat is the result of progress in the field of mechanization in $mericaJ (ii) 0ow has it affected $mericaJ (iii) .hy do +uropeans sacrifice a few material comfortsJ (v) 2ake a suita!le title of the passage. QUESTIONS (i) .en at the en . $ tutorial is not an occasion for a lecture !y a teacher nor it is an informal conversation piece. It is# in fact# an opportunity for a teacher to get to know his students. In universities in the . It is further a means to discover their potential a!ilities# stimulate them !y discussion# test their response to what they have read# and to give them individual advice on their studies. 8y a tutorial we mean a regular weekly meeting of a teacher and small group of students.est# a large part of teacher)s time is spent on tutorial work. =. (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage.hat is the case in +uropeJ (iv) .

The usual form is that the students read original essays in turn and these are discussed# analyzed and evaluated !y the group as a whole under the guidance of the teacher.en at the en . The teaching of science in schools tend to o!scure the meaning of science. QUESTIONS (i) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. . Bery few students have really any clear idea of what science mean.!y the exchange of ideas# and should send him !ack to his !ooks with a new awareness and a new interest.hy do the teacher of the . 03 =a> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i.hat does the writer mean !y a tutorialJ (iii) .estern &niversities spend his much time on tutorial workJ (iv) .hen pupils at school work for a pass in science su!ject# they regard it their . (ii) . QUESTION NO.hat do the students gain !y tutorial workJ (v) -hould we adopt this system in our countryJ If yes whyJ (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. $ further advantage of the tutorial is that it ena!les the teacher to !ecome intimately ac uainted with his students# !oth as individual as a scholar. It should encourage him to think for himself and give him practice in formulating and expressing opinions.

hen does science cease to !e scienceJ (iv) .hat should we teach to our students of scienceJ (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. It is# therefore# most important to give our young students of science an awareness of skepticism and open7mindedness that is part of the very soul of science. $ scientist must have a certain num!er of facts# principles and theories at his finger tips. -cience has advanced rapidly in recent history !ecause scientists have !een greedy for new knowledge# and !ecause they have !een so ready to dis!elieve in text !ooks of their youth. *et them not think that any !ranch of science is a su!ject that one can sit down and learn.main !usiness to learn a large num!er of facts and a smaller num!er of principles and theories.> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an the /uestions 2i. The essence of science is the gathering of new facts and the esta!lishment of new theories.en at the answer en . QUESTIONS (i) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. .hat is the essence of scienceJ (iii) . =. (ii) . 8ut science would cease to !e science if scientists merely worked from fixed sets of facts and theories. Now all this is good in its way. *et them realize that science is essentially a creative activity.hat are the two causes of the advancement of scienceJ (v) .

2oreover# &rdu is still in a stage of infancy. This thing mars the growth of intellectual power and as a result their personality remains undeveloped. 8ut that is not a sensi!le way of thinking.hat do the people against +nglish sayJ .. The change# of course# must !e there# !ut it must !e very gradual one. . There are uite a few points to !e considered in this connection.hen they are compelled to write the answers in +nglish# they feel pained. . Thus they prove a complete failure in their lives.hether the su!ject should !e taught in +nglish in our educational institutions or through the medium of our other tongue is one of the most important pro!lems of the present day. QUESTIONS (i) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. (ii) . It is impossi!le for it to compete with +nglish and !ecome mature enough to a!sor! suita!le e uivalents of technical terms !efore it is introduced as a medium of instruction. $s a matter of fact# it is not simply the medium of instruction that counts in the educational affairs. 0ence they develop a sort of inferiority complex. There are some other factors as well to !e taken into consideration of mind etc. Those who oppose the introduction of +nglish as a medium of instruction think that the su!jects taught in +nglish are not properly understood !y the students.hen they are not a!le to understand a point properly# they are evidently una!le to express it properly.

(iii) . QUESTION NO. 8ut man was not an animal. This was the first step in man)s progress. 8y this means . Individuals fought among themselves and strong destroyed the weak# for that is the law of jungle 777 the law of irrational life. These faculties gradually developed and appeared in his actions# and man gave up the laws of jungle and evolved his own rational law. The earliest men lived like !rutes.hat is the greatest difficulty in changing over to &rduJ (iv) Till when should we wait for this change7overJ (v) .hat sort of change does the writer suggestJ (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. 3or instance# a man can !e strong in reasoning tools# or in controlling the actions of other rational !eings !y the power of song and speech. 2en saw that the law of physical strength was not applica!le to their lives.en at the en . 0e possessed rational faculties. 2ankind has undou!tedly progressed since medieval time. 0C =a> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i. They realized that they have souls and the strength of a !eing with a soul can consist in a variety of capa!ilities other than the power to hack and hew and tear and !ite. Thus men realized that they should not !e fighting among themselves !ut should !e working together and giving one another opportunities to develop their respective strength.

=.men gained such control over the force of nature and made each other so much wiser and more comforta!le that they were convinced that they were the !est creation of @od.en at the en .hat is the law of jungleJ (iv) . There is a lot at stake in the coming election for the political parties preparing to contest and the leaders who manage them. This is what makes politics so volatile in the country as it marches towards yet another election. QUESTIONS (i) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. -uccess in the next electoral contest will come only to those political parties that are a!le to win the support of the people not happy with their current economic situation. $ vast majority 77 more than (F per cent 77 will vote with no assurance that their welfare is the main concern of the parties seeking their support. (ii) 0ow did the earliest men liveJ (iii) . To win the support of the discontented# the parties and their leaders will need to offer their well7developed programmes aimed at improving .hat did men learn to do when his reason developedJ (v) 0ow were men convinced that they were the !est creation of @odJ (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage.> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i.

05 =a> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i. It is plagued with falling standards# loss of direction# and insensitivity on the part of governments. 8ut that can only happen if the people are presented with programmes in which they can place some trust. It is my !elief that only those parties will succeed in 2arch who have developed programmes to redress some of the pro!lems created !y the model pursued over the last five years. QUESTIONS (i) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. QUESTION NO.hat does it make politics so volatile in the countryJ (iv) 0ow can the support of the discontented !e wonJ (v) 0ow can the trust of the people !e wonJ (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. +ducation# in general is enigmatic in /akistan. 2isguided and chaotic as it is# education in /akistan is misunderstood as . This model will need to !e changed significantly to win the political !acking of the deprived and disadvantaged.the welfare of the citizens.ho will win the next electionsJ (iii) .en at the en . (ii) . That model was focused on developing the principal cities of the country !y promoting the sectors that provided a limited amount of employment and yielded in comes to a very small proportion of the population.

The computerized 65# The . Though history of eduction is not as old as humanity# its demands for the present world are enormous and pressurizing. The most common way to get education is to attend school# !ut much education also takes place outside the classroom.restricted to passing examinations or o!taining degrees.orld 8ook# states that education is the process !y which people ac uire knowledge# skills# ha!its# values and attitudes. It should also help them develop an appreciation of the cultural heritage and teach them to live more satisfying lives. The world today clearly demands specialization and realization of uality education. The word education is also used to descri!e the results of the educational process. -imply speaking# teaching two plus two makes four is education# !ut application of four is all spheres of life is its uality. The "xford dictionary defines education as awakening and development of one)s character and mental powers. +ducation should help people !ecome useful mem!ers of society. (ii) 3rom which defects does education in /akistan sufferJ . $nd a!ove all it fails to im!i!e in our students# human values which are !asic to our Islamic society. The world has expanded itself to an era of phenomenal growth and development with multiplying technology. QUESTIONS (i) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. It is totally deprived of career planning and skill development.

0e lives a clean and honest life. 0e realizes that he should live in harmony with other mem!ers of society. These conditions and standards of !ehaviour are for the common good and welfare of the society and individuals. 8ut living in a society means co7operation with other mem!ers of that society. $ person who is aware of his duties and rights in his society is a good citizen. 0e cannot live alone.(iii) 0ow can do /akistanis think education isJ (iv) 0ow is general education different from uality educationJ (v) @ive in your own words the definition of education. . $ good citizen does his !est to do his duty to the society. 0e must live with his fellow human !eings.en at the en . (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. 0e knows that he is a mem!er of a group with which he is associated !y a thousand and one ties. . 2an cannot live without a society. 0e always keeps in vies the interests of his society and state. =. 0e keeps away from such activities that may harm the interests of his fellow citizens.> $ea the followin2 !assa2e "arefully an answer the /uestions 2i. Iou have to accept the conditions and traditions that a society prescri!es for its mem!ers.hen you live in society# you have to live as others live. -ociety gives you some rights and some duties.

QUESTION NO. =Noun> (i) I need a ten rupees note.$ good citizen is aware of the fact that he is inde!ted to his society in many ways. 0e pays his taxes. 0e takes keen interest in the affairs of his state.hat are the duties of a good citizenJ (v) @ive other words for1 (a) 0armony (!) /rescri!e (c) Inde!ted (d) Isolation (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. .ho is a good citizenJ (iii) . (ii) . 06 =a> )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. 0e knows that the la!our and work of countless persons have enriched his life. 0e is tolerant and kind and virtuous. 0e has received much in material and spiritual !enefits from others. 0e life# to a very great extent# depends on others. 0e does not live in isolation. 0e is not selfish. It is only just and right that he should pay his de!ts. 0ow does a good citizen pay his de!ts to the societyJ 8y living useful and fruitful life# he lives not for himself alone !ut he lives for others. QUESTIONS (i) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage.hy is society formedJ (iv) .

(iv) 0e has given up his study.> )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. (vii) 0e availed of the opportunity. (ii) "ne should take care of his health. (v) 0e is the student who I think deserves praise. . (v) I took pain in my work. (viii) I have many works to do. (iii) 0e has ten heads of cattle. (vi) 0e gave order to release him. (x) .e enjoyed at the concert. (iii) +veryone raised their hands. (vi) The !oy who was promoted# he was my !rother. (viii) . (ix) The chair)s leg is !roken.hat is this !ook)s priceJ =.(ii) 0e ran three hundred meters race. (vii) 0e gave me many advices. (iv) -aleema is the woman which gave me courage to work. =3ronoun> (i) *et -a!iha and I go there.

(ix) 0e has come yesterday. (ii) Ten miles are a long distance. (x) . . (iii) 3aisala!ad is 2anchester of /akistan.(ix) These two !oys hate one another.$. while his friend is 8. (v) %ose is the sweetest of all flowers. (iv) The gold is more costly than the silver.$. (vii) 0e made three goals in the last match. (vi) I re uest you not to cut jokes in the class. (viii) 0e is reading in the medical college. =+rti"le> (i) 0e is 2.> (i) The wages of sin are hell. ="> )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. (iii) 2y !rother)s only help were his friends. =@er. (iv) 0is friend and !enefactor have left the room. (v) They found that the ship is leaking.hy he wrote that foolish letterJ = > )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. (x) *ittle children love each other. (ii) In *ahore we stayed at hotel.

(vii) "f the two routes# this is the shortest. (iii) 0e is a coward person. 07 =a> )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. (iv) . . (viii) I am stronger of the two. (vi) *ahore is larger than any city in the /unja!. (ii) .e> (i) 0e is a famous gam!ler. (x) This is a !est !ook. (ix) 0e enjoys the most worldwide reputation.e met at the house of a mutual friend to make peace. (vii) I have headache. =+ Ae"ti. =+ . (viii) 2umtaz is the most uni ue teacher. (v) -he is more clever than he. =. QUESTION NO.er.e visited many worth7seeing places.> )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. (ix) 0igher we go# cooler it is. (x) It is much hot today.(vi) The man is selfish !y nature.> (i) 0e goes there never.

="> )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. (viii) 0e is hardly hit !y the !ank)s failure. (v) 0e died two months !efore. (ix) 0e wrote with red ink. (iii) The patient has !een operated.(ii) 0e comes here seldom. (vii) The rotten eggs smell !adly. . (x) It is much interesting !ook.e reached at the platform soon after the train left. (iv) $tif sings good. (vii) It is half past five in my watch. (v) I shot the !ear !ut missed. (vi) I cannot pull on my work. (viii) -he is angry on me. (ii) . =3re!osition> (i) The lion attacked at him. (iv) *ook this word in the dictionary. (vi) The straw!erry shortcake tastes deliciously. (ix) I seldom or ever take medicine. (iii) 0e faced !ravely the enemy.

(iv) 0ardly had we set out than the !ad weather !egan. (i) 8eggar description (ii) 6arry weight (iii) 6ompare notes (iv) 3all flat . (viii) Neither he comes# nor he writes. =)onAun"tion> (i) If you don)t come# then I shall not help you. = > )orre"t the followin2 senten"es. (ix) 0e wears like his friend does. (iii) $lthough he is old# !ut he is strong.(x) I have not seen you since a long time. (vii) &nless you don)t work hard# you cannot secure good marks. (v) -carcely had he gone than a policeman knocked at the door. 09 =a> Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es. QUESTION NO. (ii) If he is poor# then I will help him. (vi) No sooner he left than the storm !roke. (x) 0e cried as if he was mad.

(i) 8ell the cat .> Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es.(v) 3ollow suit (vi) 0old water (vii) 0ush money (viii) 2ake amends (ix) /lay havoc (vi) .ork wonders =. (i) 8ecome a !yword (ii) 6ut a sorry figure (iii) +at a hum!le pie (iv) 3log a dead horse (v) 2ake a clean !reast (vi) 2ake a face (vii) /ocket an insult (viii) /ull a long face (ix) -mell a rat (x) Take a fancy ="> Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es.

(ii) 8reak the ice (iii) 8reak the news (iv) 8ury the hatchet (v) 6arry the day (vi) 3ace the music (vii) @rease the palm (viii) 0it the mark (ix) 4ick the !ucket (x) -teal the show = > Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es. (i) $dd insult to injury (ii) 8eat a!out the !ush (iii) 8urn the candle at !oth ends (iv) 8urst into tears (v) 6ast pearls !efore swine (vi) 5ie in harness (vii) +nd in smoke (viii) 3all in love with (ix) *eave in the lurch .

01 =a> Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es.(x) *ive from hand to mouth QUESTION NO. (i) $ fishy deal (ii) $ freudian slip (iii) $ maiden speech (iv) 6rocodile tears (v) 5emocle)s sword (vi) 5utch courage (vii) 3rench leave (viii) /andora)s !ox (ix) The under dog (x) Thum!nail sketch =.> Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es. (i) $ll and sundry (ii) 8ag and !aggage (iii) 3ew and far !etween (iv) 3irst and foremost (v) 3lesh and !lood .

(i) $ !lue stocking (ii) $ !roken reed (iii) $ dark horse (iv) $ laughing stock (v) $ live wire (vi) $ rolling stone (vii) $ scape goat (viii) $ sugar daddy (ix) $ turn coat (x) $ wet !lanket = > Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es.(vi) Null and void (vii) /art and parcel (viii) %ank and file (ix) %oot and !ranch (x) To and fro ="> Use the followin2 i io%s in your own senten"es. (i) $t a loss (ii) $t a stretch .

s in your own senten"es. (i) 8ack away (ii) 8ack out (iii) 8ear with (iv) 8ear up (v) 8eat !ack (vi) 8low out (vii) 8reak down (viii) 8reak into .er. B0 =a> Use the followin2 !hrasal .(iii) $t daggers drawn (iv) $t logger heads (v) 3or good (vi) In cold !lood (vii) In the pipeline (viii) "n the anvil (ix) "ut at el!ows (x) &nder a cloud QUESTION NO.

> Use the followin2 !hrasal .s in your own senten"es. (i) 2ake off with (ii) 2ake up for (iii) /ass away (iv) /ull down . (i) 6ome a!out (ii) 6ome off (iii) 6arry off (iv) 5rop in (v) 5o away with (vi) 3all out (vii) 3all in with (viii) @ive up (ix) @o a!out (x) *ook down upon ="> Use the followin2 !hrasal .s in your own senten"es.(ix) 8reak out (x) 8uy off =.er.er.

er.ear out QUESTION NO.alk away with (x) .(v) /ull up (vi) /ut off (vii) /ut up with (viii) %un down (ix) %un over (x) %un up against = > Use the followin2 !hrasal . B0 . (i) -et up for (ii) -tand !y (iii) -tand for (iv) -tick to (v) Take down (vi) Take in (vii) Turn away (viii) Turn down (ix) .s in your own senten"es.

B5 =a> Translate the followin2 !ara2ra!h into En2lish.rite a dialogue !etween a student and a teacher on the importance of !ook reading. (!) .rite an application for jo!. B3 (a) . QUESTION NO.rite a letter to the editor of a newspaper expressing your views a!out G%eckless 5rivingG. QUESTION NO.rite a dialogue !etween father and son on the choice of profession. BB (a) .rite a letter to the editor of a newspaper expressing your views a!out G*oad -heddingG. QUESTION NO.(a) . (!) . .rite an application to provide information. (!) . (!) .rite a dialogue !etween two friends a!out the waywardness among the youth. QUESTION NO.rite a dialogue !etween two men a!out dearness. BC (a) .

=. +nglish 7UESTION WISE PAPER B 3+3E$ QUESTION NO. ="> Translate the followin2 !ara2ra!h into En2lish. 0 =ESS+*S> . +ureka @uess /aper 7 8.> Translate the followin2 !ara2ra!h into En2lish. = > Translate the followin2 !ara2ra!h into En2lish.$.

0. with an outline. *E+$ B00C =4$OU3 I> W"() !* ++!. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) $n Ideal 6ollege (ii) -cience and $rts (iii) 2uslims) 8ackwardness (iv) 0ealth 6are in /akistan (v) %ole of +lectronic 2edia 3. $0 3##-35# -$"1+ $* ONE $0 ). -().. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) %eading for /leasure (ii) Ills of -moking (iii) *iteracy 6ampaign . with an outline. *E+$ B005 =4$OU3 I> Write an essay. !* $%)/(* . *E+$ B00C =4$OU3 II> Write an essay. 0$//$-(*2 )$&(3+4 (i) Muslim Unity (ii) Social vils in !akistan (iii) Music "ddiction (iv) lementary ducation (v) "fter#effects of Modern $ar B.

with an outline.(iv) $n Ideal -tudent (v) 0ow to 2ake /akistan -trong and -ta!le C. *E+$ B006 =4$OU3 I> Write an essay.omen in -ociety 6. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) Importance of Newspapers (ii) 3emale +ducation (iii) 5emocracy in Theory and /ractice . of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) /unja!A The *and of 3ive %ivers (ii) 5reams of a 6ollege -tudent (iii) Information Technology (iv) Terrorism and Image of /akistan $!road (v) %ole of . with an outline. *E+$ B005 =4$OU3 II> Write an essay. with an outline. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) 2o!ile /hone (ii) 5rug $ddiction (iii) $n Ideal 6ollege (iv) -ocial +vils in /akistan (v) 6haracter is 5estiny 5. *E+$ B006 =4$OU3 II> Write an essay.

orld 9.ife (ii) "ur +ducational /ro!lems (iii) -ports as a /astime (iv) -cience without 6onscience is a %uin of Nature (v) /lace of %eligion in the 2odern .(iv) 2y 6hildhood (v) -ome /ro!lems 3acing /akistan Today 7. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) *ife of a 5octor)s .omen (iv) The %ole of 3ilms in "ur -ociety (v) The New 5istrict -ystem in /akistan 1. *E+$ B009 =4$OU3 I> Write an essay. with an outline. with an outline. with an outline. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) $ 2odel 6itizen (ii) The $ge of 2achines (iii) Importance of $dvertising . *E+$ B007 =4$OU3 I> Write an essay.orking . of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) @rowing Trends of 5rug7$ddiction among the -tudents (ii) 6ell /hones 7 $ -ocial 8ane (iii) /ro!lems 3aced !y . *E+$ B007 =4$OU3 II> Write an essay.

*E+$ B001 =4$OU3 II> Write an essay. with an outline.edding 00. *E+$ B009 =4$OU3 II> Write an essay. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) .(iv) "ur +conomic /lanners (v) -cope of Tourism in /akistan 00. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) $n Ideal -tudent (ii) -ecurity 2easures at /u!lic /laces (iii) 5rug $ddiction . with an outline. *E+$ B001 =4$OU3 I> Write an essay. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) /leasures of 6hildhood (ii) Interest 3ree 8anking -ystem (iii) Iran)s Nuclear /rogramme (iv) Billage &plift (v) 3eatures of a /akistani .hy I *ove /akistanJ (ii) $n +xcursion Trip (iii) *ife is -truggle (iv) Importance of %eading (v) *ife in a 8ig 6ity 0B. with an outline.

$. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 I> Write an essay.(iv) Inflation 7 %ising /rices (v) The /ower of +lectronic 2edia 03. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) 5ifficulties of a 8. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 I> Write an essay. with an outline. with an outline. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) /leasures of 6hildhood (ii) Billage &plift (iii) *iteracy 6ampaign . -tudent (ii) 0ow to -pend Iour -pare Time (iii) Noise /ollution (iv) 0uman %ights in /akistan (v) "ld /arents 0C. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 II> Write an essay. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) @ood 2anners (ii) +nergy 6risis (iii) 2o!ile /hone 7 $ 6urse (iv) 6ulture of Tolerance (v) $ %escue "peration 05. with an outline.

(iv) 2oney is Not +verything (v) 3eatures of a /akistani . *E+$ B00B =4$OU3 II> Write an essay.eeding 06.omen +ducation (ii) 3estivals in /akistan (iii) Billage *ife .orking . of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) Importance of . with an outline.omen (v) "ld /arents 07. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 II> Write an essay. with an outline. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) 2edia and -ociety (ii) Internet 7 $ Tool of 2odern $ge (iii) 5ignity of .ork (iv) 6hallenges for /akistan (v) $dverse +ffects of /olitics in 6olleges 09. with an outline. *E+$ B00B =4$OU3 I> Write an essay. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) 5rug $ddiction $mong -tudents (ii) Importance of $dvertising (iii) Noise /ollution (iv) /ro!lems of .

" ). with an outline. 5% +)($*+ 2(6 * !) ). *E+$ B00C =4$OU3 I> R !1 ). with an outline. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) -pring -eason (ii) National &nity (iii) 6hildhood (iv) +lections (v) /ro!lems of /akistan 3+3E$ QUESTION NO. of 300-350 wor s on ONE of the followin2 to!i"sG (i) 6ollege 2emories (ii) Iour 3avourite +nglish 5rama (iii) 6orruption in -ociety (iv) %ole of *aptop in +ducation (v) 3reedom of 2edia B0. *E+$ B003 =4$OU3 II> Write an essay. 0$//$-(*2 &!++!2 !*1 !*+. . B =)O(3$E5ENSIONS> 0. *1.(iv) 6omputer %evolution (v) 6harm in T 7 CK 6ricket 01. *E+$ B003 =4$OU3 I> Write an essay.

and birth control. &t has been so used to a limited e)tent. poverty can be abolished throughout the whole world. and e)cessive hours of labour will no longer be necessary anywhere. in *ritain and "merica. &f these three things can be e)tended to the rest of the world as it becomes industriali. 7% +)($*+4 (i) $hat connection does the writer show between industrialism and democracy(ii) .%ortunately. *ut without these three things industrialism will create a regime like that in which the !haraohs build the pyramids. if the world population continues to increase at the present rate. &ts use in raising the standard of life has depended mainly upon three things+ democracy. &t is possible now. of course. the abolition if poverty and e)cessive work will be totally impossible.ed. have incurred hostility from the rich. and would have been so used more effectively but for war. however. for one man's labour to produce much more than is needed to provide a bare subsistence for himself and his family. (iven an intelligent democracy not misled by some dogmatic creed. "ll three.ow can the standard of life be raised- . trade unionism. the growth of industrialism has coincided in the west with the growth of democracy. if the population of the world does not increase too fast. this possibility will be used to raise the standard of life. and if the danger of great wars can be eliminated. &n particular.

3or the lovely vase was either empty or filled with some corruption. $n ugliness also of greed# of lasciviousness# of avarice. There are numerous forms of psychological ugliness. I have seen women who# !y the standards of a connoisseur of porcelain# were ravishingly lovely. The surface of the human vessel is affected !y the nature of its spiritual contents. $nd conversely# there is an interior light that can transfigure forms that the pure aesthetician would regard as imperfect or downright ugly. The !eauty of a porcelain jar is a matter of shape# of colour# of surface texture.ow can poverty be abolished(iv) $hat will be the impact of increase in population at the present rate(v) Suggest a suitable title for the passage.here does the !eauty of a porcelain jar lieJ (iii) 5ifferentiate !etween inner !eauty and outer !eauty. The jar may !e empty or tenanted !y spiders# full of honey or stinking slime 7 it makes no difference to its !eauty or ugliness. QuestionsG (i) . "n the pretty faces of those especially who are trying to have a continuous good time# one sees very often a kind of !ored sullenness that ruins all their charm. B. (vi) Make a precis of the passage. Their shape# their colour# their surface texture were perfect. %eal !eauty is as much an affair of the inner as of the outer self. -piritual emptiness or ugliness shows through.(iii) . (iv) /oint out some forms of psychological ugliness. .en at the en .hat does real !eauty signifyJ (ii) . 8ut a woman is live# and her !eauty is therefore not skin deep. *E+$ B00C =4$OU3 II> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. $ll the deadly sins# indeed# have their own peculiar negation of !eauty. There is an ugliness of stupidity# for example# of unawareness (distressingly common among pretty women). $nd yet they were not !eautiful.

0e realizes that he should live in harmony with other mem!ers of society. QuestionsG (i) @ive a suita!le title to passage. 0e is not selfish. 0e does not live in isolation. 0is life# to a very great extent# depends on others. $ good citizen is aware of the fact that his is inde!ted to his society in many ways. 0e must live with his fellow human !eings. 0e cannot live alone. -ociety gives you some rights and some duties. 0e knows that he is a mem!er of a group with which he is associated !y a thousand and one ties. 0e always keeps in view the interests of his society and state. . Iou have to accept the conditions and traditions that a society prescri!es for its mem!ers.(v) 2ake a precis of the passage. . 0e lives a clean and honest life.ho is a good citizenJ (iii) . *E+$ B005 =4$OU3 I> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. (ii) .hat are the duties of a good citizenJ (v) @ive other words forA (a) 0armony (!) /rescri!e (c) Inde!ted (d) Isolation (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage in a!out 'KK words. It is only just and right that he should pay his de!ts. 8ut living in a society means cooperation with other mem!ers of that society. $ good citizen does his !est to do his duty to the society. $ person who is aware of his duties and rights in his society in a good citizens. 0e takes keen interest in the affairs of his state. 0e keeps away from such activities that may harm the interests of his fellow citizens. 2an cannot live without a society. 0e knows that the la!our and work of countless persons have enriched his life. 0e is tolerant# kind and virtuous. 0e lives for others. These conditions and standards of !ehaviour are for the common good and welfare of the society and individuals. 0e lives not for himself alone. 0ow does a good citizen pay his de!ts to the societyJ 8y living a useful and fruitful life. 0e pays his taxes.hen you live in a society# you have to live as others live.en at the en . 0e has received much in material and spiritual !enefits from others. 3.hy is society formedJ (iv) .

8ut women can do one thing that men cannotA they can produce children. *E+$ B005 =4$OU3 II> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. 3or this reason# many women are happier if they stay at home and look after their house and family than if they go out and do the same work as men do. If you had asked# G.hy would you have !een told a hundred years ago that women ought not to have the same rights as menJ (ii) . Thousands of years ago# when men lived in caves and hunted animals for food# strength of !ody was the most important thing1 !ut now# in the Twentieth 6entury# !rains are more important.hat a!out women)s !rainsJ "f course# in countries where girls are not given so good an education as !oys they know less. 8ecause they# and not men# do this# they usually love their children more# and are !etter a!le to look after them# since they are more patient and understanding with small children. . "ught women to have the same rights as menJ $ hundred year ago# the answer in every country in the world would have !een# GNoG.C.hy was strength of !ody important thousands of years agoJ (iii) 0ow can we see that it is no longer so importantJ . +ven now# in the Twentieth 6entury# there are many countries where women are still treated almost like servants# or even slaves. There have !een women judges in Turkey# women am!assadors in $merica# women ministers in the 8ritish government and women &niversity professors in many countries. -trength of !ody is still needed for a few kinds of work# !ut the fact that such kinds of work are not well paid shows that the Twentieth 6entury does not think that muscles are of very great importance. $nd among the greatest and strongest rulers of +ngland were Lueen +liza!eth and Lueen Bictoria.en at the en . 8ut in countries where there is the same education for !oth# it has !een clearly shown that there is no difference at all !etween the !rain of the average woman and that of the average man. QuestionsG (i) .hy notJG you would have !een told# scornfully and pityingly# that women were weaker and less clever than men# and had worse characters. It is certainly true that the average woman has weaker muscles that the average man. It is their own choice# and not the result of !eing less clever than men.

0olding a meeting is pro!a!ly the simplest form in influencing pu!lic opinion# !ut it is still a very important method. 5. *E+$ B006 =4$OU3 I> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.hat is particular a!out women that men can)t doJ (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage in not more than 'CK words. They wish to present to the pu!lic what they consider to !e suita!le programme for legislation when and if they are elected# and they seek to show why their programme should !e chosen in preference to that their opponents. QuestionsG (i) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. They hold meetings !efore the elections !ecause they wish to appeal the electorate.hen the time for a general election approaches# candidates who wish to !e elected travel around with loudspeakers and hold meetings. The candidates are in this way seeking to influence pu!lic opinion. . 8ut pu!lic meetings are not the only means of influencing pu!lic opinion. Nevertheless if# as a speaker# he is unimpressive he may do a lot to reduce his party)s chances in the election. In these days of political parties# it is more the political party that wields the greater influence# rather than the individual speaker and what he has to say.hat are the means of influencing pu!lic opinionJ (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage in a!out '>D of the whole. . The speaker faces his audience# which is then a!le to gauge his honesty and sincerity.hat work does the writer mention that women have done as well as menJ (v) .hen people meet and formulate opinion they are really helping to govern themselves.en at the en .(iv) . (ii) .hy does an unimpressive speaker reduce his party)s chancesJ (v) . . In a democracy it is important that there should always !e this attempt to get some expression of opinion even among the hum!lest people.hat is meant !y GelectorateGJ (iv) . -o this method of assessing and gauging pu!lic opinion and there!y arriving at an agreement is of the greatest importance.hat is the importance of holding pu!lic meetingsJ (iii) . +very time people assem!le in a group and discuss some matters# they are employing a method of forming and persuading opinion.

*ately# another trend is developing which can hurt as still more as injury is !eing added to insult. /akistanis are sometimes treated as suspects as they enter -audi $ra!ia. These goods also lose their fascination !ecause mass production has given a set!ack to the individuality of the articles produced. +fficient organization of highly mechanized system has resulted in maximum productivity in $merica. 0is individual li!erty and personality suffer on irretrieva!le loss. The +uropeans# therefore# contend that it is !etter to sacrifice a few material comforts than crush the aesthetic and spiritual urge in the individual which large7scale mechanization is doing in $merica. . 7. *E+$ B006 =4$OU3 II> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.hat is the result of progress in the field of mechanization in $mericaJ (iii) 0ow has it affected the citizensJ (iv) . They procedures for search and investigation are aggressive# and naturally# time7 consuming may !e a humiliating experience for a self7respecting /akistani. @reat progress has !een made !y $merica in the field of mechanization.6.en at the en in your own wor s. It is spending lavishly on la!our7saving machines. It encourages man)s reliance on his own faculties and realizes the dangers inherent in the $merican scheme. The answers %ust .hy do +uropeans sacrifice a few material comfortsJ (vi) 2ake a summary of the passage. Luite a few -audis are now unwilling to employ /akistanis as .ith mass production# the amenities of life are availa!le to almost every citizen.en at the en .hat is the case in +uropeJ (v) . *E+$ B007 =4$OU3 I> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.e in your own wor s. In his moments of leisure the worker finds it difficult to turn his hands to creative work# !ecause the machine7made goods do not inspire him in the direction of refinement. 0owever great the advantages of mechanization# it crushes the creative faculty of man and makes a machine out of him. "n the contrary +urope su!ordinates the use of machines to human happiness and welfare. QuestionsG (i) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. (ii) .

The revered Imam tried to associate the masses in his own and other 2uslim countries with his o!jective. 0e addressed them directly# had a silent dialogue of the heart with them even when he could not meet them personally. *E+$ B007 =4$OU3 II> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions at the en .ho is technologically responsi!le for the production of heroinJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title to the passage. Thus# having started as a producer of heroine in '(:(# thanks to the transfer of such technology !y a western adventurer# it is now the major consumer.they used to do in the -eventies. "ne of the main o!jectives of Imam 4homeini)s foreign and domestic policy was the propagation of the humanitarian principles of Islam.hy is the treatment humiliating for /akistanis on entering -audi $ra!iaJ (ii) . /akistan is a victim as drugs produced in $fghanistan pass through our territory. "ne main reason cited is the incidence of drug7 trafficking (!usiness) through expatriate /akistanis who# at times# colla!orate with drug7traffickers. 0owever# in the western countries# the treatment meted out to /akistani nationals is humiliating.e in your own wor s. Thus# instead of appealing to the unpopular and . Thus# the channel of employment of our la!our in -audi $ra!ia is drying up# partly owing to our failing as a people. It cannot !e denied that drugs are produced in /akistan# !ut the @overnment is trying to curtail their production. Iran explained this stand at every international forum. 9.hat is the main reason for the reduction of employment opportunities in -audi $ra!iaJ (iii) 0ow much is /akistan responsi!le for drug7traffickingJ (iv) . The people in almost all the 2uslim countries# and even in others whether they were inha!ited !y 2uslims or followers of other faiths# listened to his speeches and talks attentively and devotedly. The Islamic %epu!lic of Iran took a !old stand on the !asis of this o!jective. (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage. 0owever# with an estimated indigenous (native) population of just over three million addicts the local production of drugs does not appear enough to meet the home demand. The answers %ust . The divine commands that have shaped the Iranian policies are perhaps common to every major religion. QuestionsG (i) .

(vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage. This policy was instantly successful in winning the support of the 2uslim masses even in the countries that were !eing ruled !y the so called representatives. It is common in our day# as it has !een in many other periods of the world)s history to suppose that those among us who are wise have seen through all the enthusiasms of earlier times and have !ecome aware that there is nothing left to live for. I do not myself think that there is any superiority rationality in !eing unhappy. The wise man will !e as happy as circumstances permit and if he finds the contemplation of the universe painful !eyond a point# he will contemplate something instead. *E+$ B009 =4$OU3 I> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions at the en . This view is too simple1 undou!tedly there is some slight compensation in the feeling of superiority and insight which these sufferers have# !ut it is not sufficient to make up for the loss of simple pleasure.e in your own wor s. QuestionsG (i) +xplain the main o!jective of Imam 4homeini. (ii) . The answers %ust . The men who hold this view are genuinely unhappy !ut they are proud of their unhappiness which they attri!ute to the nature of the universe and consider to the only rational attitude for an enlightened man.reactionary governments of the day# he esta!lished dura!le and lasting contacts with the common people and their true representatives. The great leader demanded the common people)s presence# through their representatives# at important meetings and participation in his decision7making. In this way he wanted to ensure the achievement of the aims of the Islamic %evolution. Their pride on their unhappiness makes people suspicious of its genuinenessA they think that man who enjoys !eing misera!le is not misera!le. 1.hat was his mode of achievement towards his goalJ (iii) 0ow can you call The Iranian %evolution a Gpeople)s revolutionGJ (iv) 6omment on the success of The Iranian %evolution. I am persuaded that those who uite sincerely attri!ute their sorrows to their views a!out the universe are putting the cart !efore the horseA the truth is that they are unhappy for some reasons of which they are not aware. . (v) -uggest a suita!le title to the passage.

It is a strange world in which tens of millions of pounds are spent to give one man a ride round the earth at thousands of miles an hour# while !eneath him in his or!it live millions for whom life is a daily struggle to win a few coins to !uy their daily !read.QuestionsG (i) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage.hy do malaria and typhoid still exist in the worldJ (iii) .en at the en .hat is the result of pride on unhappinessJ (iv) 0ow can a wise man !e happyJ (v) +xplain the meanings of the following wordsA (a) +nthusiasms (!) 6ontemplation (vi) 2ake a summary of the passage.e in your own wor s. The vast expenditure of money and human effort now !eing devoted to projects for putting man into space might well !e applied to ends more practically useful and more conducive to human happiness.hy should the richer countries of the world !e pouring their resources into space when poverty and disease on the earth are crying out of reliefJ "ne could give a cynical answer to this uestion and assert that man)s expensive adventures into space are merely the !y7 products of the struggle !etween great powers for prestige and possi!le military advantage. *E+$ B009 =4$OU3 II> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. (ii) .hy is man pouring his resources into spaceJ (iv) +xplain the meanings of the following wordsA (a) -courge (!) +radication .hy is it a strange worldJ (ii) . =The answer %ust . QuestionsG (i) . The money and effort that go into the development and construction of a single type of space7 rocket would more than suffice to rid several countries of such scourge as malaria or typhoid fever# to name only two of the diseases that medical science has con uered !ut still persist in the world simply !ecause not enough money and effort are devoted to their eradication. -pace travel is !y far the most expensive type of exploration ever undertaken !y man. 00..hat is common with the wise today to supposeJ (iii) .

est with the growth of democracy.e in your own wor s. It is the direct opposite of camouflage. G$dvertising colourationG is a familiar !iological phrase denoting the colours developed !y certain animals to make them stand out against their natural !ackground. 00. $s regards advertising through the written word there is archaeological evidence that it was !eing practiced at least D#KKK years ago.hat does the phrase Gadvertising colourationG meanJ (iii) . 0B. $s such# its origin can !e traced right !ack to the origin of the species.> 3ortunately# however# the growth of industrialism has coincided in the . $n advertisement offering a gold coin as a reward to anyone tracing out a runaway slave was unearthed in the ruins of The!es and is computed to !e as old as the third millennium 8. It was the prototype of our Glost and foundG classified ad that was painted on a wall. QuestionsG (i) . In human life# advertising through the mouth must have !egun with the !eginning of commerce. It is possi!le now# if the population of the world does not increase too fast# for one man)s la!our to produce much more than is .6.en at the en . title of the passage. *E+$ B001 =4$OU3 II> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.e in your own wor s.hen did ver!al and written advertising !egin in human lifeJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage.hat was advertisingJ (ii) .> $dvertising is essentially the art of communication. =The answers %ust .hile camouflage is tricky and timed# GadvertisingG is honest# confidant# and forthright# as far as the world of nature goes.en at the en . (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. =The answers %ust .hat is the difference !etween camouflage and advertisingJ (iv) . There is always a message in these colours# such as1 Gkeep away# Gmind your stepG# Gdarling won)t you care for a danceJG .(v) -uggest a suita!le (vi) 2ake a summary of the passage. *E+$ B001 =4$OU3 I> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. The tradition is still kept alive !y hawkers and street vendors in our towns and villages.

e in your own wor s> %ecently the mass media# formerly su!servient to the medical profession# have !ecome increasingly restive and occasionally hostile. 03.needed to provide a !are su!sistence for himself and his family.hat is re uired in the relationship !etween the doctor and the patientJ The trust and unshaka!le trust# I would say. In @ermany# in particular the newspaper and television have given a great deal of time and space to the complaints against the medical profession. Is this antagonism to the profession justifiedJ $nd if so# whyJ I have tried to answer that uestion !y looking at the way it deals with some of the diseases of our civilization# including the most lethal# heart7attacks and cancer. If these three things can !e extended to the rest of the world as it !ecomes industrialized# poverty can !e a!olished throughout the whole world# and excessive hours of la!our will no longer !e necessary anywhere.hat connection does the writer show !etween industrialism and democracyJ (ii) 0ow can the standard of life !e raisedJ (iii) 0ow can poverty !e a!olishedJ (iv) . 2ontaigne said1 GI . .en at the en . Its use in raising the standard of life has depended mainly upon three thingsA democracy# trade unionism# and !irth control. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 I> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. In 8ritain on 886 radio and television# the medical practices have come under sharp and aggressive criticism. (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. $ll three# of course# have incurred hostility from the rich. QuestionsG (i) .hat will !e the impact of increase in population at the present rateJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. If what emerges is an indictment of the profession# then I would re!ut the charge that I am anti7doctor. It has !een so used to a limited extent# in 8ritain and $merica# and would have so used more effectively !ut for war. =The answers %ust . 8ut without these three things industrialism will create a regime like that in which the /haraohs !uilt the pyramids. @iven an intelligent democracy not misled !y some dogmatic creed# this possi!ility will !e used to raise the standard of life. In particular# if world population continues to increase at the present rate# the a!olition of poverty and excessive work will !e totally impossi!le.

hen science learns to understand human nature# it will !e a!le to !ring happiness into our lives which machines and the physical science have failed to create. 0C.> 2oral self7control# and external prohi!ition of harmful acts# are not ade uate methods of dealing with our anarchic instincts. -ince spontaneity is what is most thwarted !y machine# the only thing that can !e provided is opportunity# the use made of opportunity must !e left to the initiative of the individual. . QuestionsG (i) .hat is a lethal diseaseJ +xplain.honour physicians not for their services !ut for themselvesG. =The answers %ust .e in your own wor s. That goes for me too.en at the en . No dou!t# considera!le expense would !e involved !ut it would not !e compara!le to the expense of war.hat do you understand !y the mass mediaJ (ii) . *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 II> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.hat is the writer)s stance towards the medical professionJ (iii) . (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. (iv) Is there a radical change in the presentation of the art of healing !y the mass mediaJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. &nderstanding of human nature must !e the !asis of any real improvement in human life. The only ade uate method is to discover what are the needs of our instinctive nature# and then to search for the least harmful way of satisfying them. QuestionsG (i) . -cience has done wonders in mastering the laws of the physical world# !ut our own nature is much less understood# as yet than the nature of stars and electrons. The reason they are inade uate is that these instincts are capa!le of many disguises as the 5evil in medieval legend# and some of these disguises deceive even the elect.hy are moral self7control# and external prohi!ition inade uate to deal with our anarchic instinctsJ .

QuestionsG (i) . 06. The poverty of most $fghan farmers and herders has imposed an elemental uality on their culture. Throughout the century their diet consists of coarse !read# tea# and dairy products# supplemented !y fruits and vegeta!les in season and an occasional serving of mutton or chicken. *oyalty to the primary group ultimately takes precedence over self7assertion# despite the great importance given to personal independence.e in your own wor s. Balues are oriented toward social survival. =The answers %ust . Though the food is never plentiful# the $fghan diet during good crop years appears to !e sufficient to support a vigorous population# !ut the precariousness of the food supply is o!vious from the drastic and continuing erosion of the soil and the creeping desertization of its landscape. (vi) 2ake a precis of the passage. (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage. The conflict !etween these competing values is a major feature of $fghan life# !ut in7group loyalty has necessarily played the paramount role in the shaping of the attitudes toward fellow $fghans and outsiders.hy is the food supply !ecoming so precariousJ (iv) .hat does the diet of $fghan people consist ofJ (iii) .hat is the economic condition of the people of $fghanistanJ (ii) .e in your own wor s. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 II> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.(ii) .> . 05. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 I> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. =The answers %ust .hat should !e the !asis of any real improvement in human lifeJ (iv) 0ow can science help humanity to achieve happinessJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage.> /overty is almost as widely shared as Islam in $fghanistan.hat is the major feature of $fghan lifeJ (v) 2ake a suita!le title of the passage. +xcept for a small num!er of wealthy traders# nomadic tri!al leaders# and the %oyal family and its retainers# few $fghans have lived far from the !asic level of su!sistence.hat is the ade uate method of anarchic instinctsJ (iii) .en at the en .en at the en .

It is spending lavishly on la!our7saving machines. QuestionsG (i) .en at the en .ith mass production# the amenities of life are availa!le to almost every citizen. The +uropeans# therefore# contend that it is !etter to sacrifice a few material comforts than crush the aesthetic and spiritual urge in the individual which large7scale mechanization is doing in $merica. The sun# therefore# offers a free supply of thermo7dynamically high7 uality fuel 77 sunshine 77 to countries that are located in the earth)s solar !elt (DFN# DF. These goods also lose their fascination !ecause mass production has given a set!ack to the individuality of the articles produced.> The rich nations have made adjustments after the '(:D oil crisis# !ut the poor nations# who cannot afford the continue using oil# have to look for alternatives in order to keep up the pace of their development. In his moments of leisure the worker finds it difficult to turn his hands to creative work# !ecause the machine7made goods do not inspire him in the direction of refinement. =*our own "onstru"te answers will fet"h you . . *E+$ B00B =4$OU3 I> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.hy do +uropeans sacrifice a few material comfortsJ (v) 2ake a suita!le title of the passage.of the + uator)# where the sun comes .etter %ar6s. (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage.hat is the result of progress in the field of mechanization in $mericaJ (ii) 0ow has it affected the citizensJ (iii) . "n the contrary +urope su!ordinates the use of machines to human happiness and welfare. 0owever great the advantages of mechanization# it crushes the creative faculty of man and makes a machine out of him. +fficient organization of highly mechanized system has resulted in maximum productivity in $merica. It encourages man)s reliance on his own faculties and realizes the dangers inherent in the $merican scheme.@reat progress has !een made !y $merica in the field of mechanization. 07. 0is individual li!erty and personality suffer on irretrieva!le loss.hat is the case in +uropeJ (iv) .

09.hat system of distri!ution does the author recommend for solar energyJ (iv) . 0e had a !lock prepared in +ngland for the title page of the periodical# which was to !e called the Tahzib-ul-Akhlaq in &rdu and the Mohammedan Social eformer in !n"lish. =*our own "onstru"te answers will fet"h you . -yed $hmad addressed himself to the periodical first.en at the en . QuestionsG (i) . . The term )on7site) derives from the limited areas within which the energy produced !y a system is consumed.hy were the two projects interlinked in his mindJ . QuestionsG (i) . (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage.> The grand strategy for his campaign against 2uslim !ackwardness envisaged two main activities# namely1 a weekly periodical to propagate progressive social and religious ideas among the intelligentsia and an institution of higher learning to impart modern education to the new generation.out every day# keeping its radiant energy undiminished.hat# however# stand in the way# are a series of institutional and economic !arriers which must !e overcome if solar energy is to have an impact on the energy scene.hat does the term Gon7siteG meanJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage. 0e had tentatively proposed it in a letter# dated CC $pril 'E:K# to 2ehdi $li as the organ of an association which he wanted organized !efore his return to India for Gthe uplift and reform of the 2uslimG# !ut with which his connection was not to !e divulged.hat are the o!stacles in the way of ac uiring solar energyJ (iii) . The solar energy plan re uires new ways of thinking. It rests its emphasis on the social !enefits rather than the cost !enefits of a system. The two projects in his mind were closely interlinked1 for without an enlightened pu!lic opinion ade uate support for the educational institution could not !e ensured and# o!versely# without modern education the new generation would never outgrow its elders) prejudices and misconceptions. It calls for a shift from centralized energy supply systems to on7site decentralized distri!ution of energy. *E+$ B00B =4$OU3 II> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.hat was the strategy against 2uslim !ackwardnessJ (ii) .hat is the effect of '(:D oil crisis on poor nationsJ (ii) .etter %ar6s.

In former days# a teacher was expected to !e a man of exceptional knowledge or wisdom to whose words men would do well to attend. *E+$ B003 =4$OU3 II> .etter %ar6s. The profession has a great and honora!le tradition extending from the dawn of history until recent times# !ut any teacher in the modern world who allows himself to !e inspired !y the ideals of his predecessors is likely to !e made sharply aware that it is not his function to teach what he thinks# !ut instill such !eliefs and prejudices as are thought useful !y his employers. 01. (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage.> Teaching more even than most other professions# has !een transformed during the last hundred years from a small# highly skilled profession concerned with a minority of the population# to a large and important !ranch of the pu!lic service.en at the en . In anti uity# teachers were not an organized profession and no control was exercised over what they taught. -ocrates was put to death and /lato is said to have !een thrown into prison# !ut such incidents did not interfere with the spread of their doctrines. *E+$ B003 =4$OU3 I> $ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i.hat changes have occured in the profession of teaching during the last hundred yearsJ (ii) .hat was -yed $hmed)s proposal a!out the (iv) . (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage. periodicalJ periodicalJ passage. QuestionsG (i) . B0. =*our own "onstru"te answers will fet"h you .hat were the teachers supposed to !e in golden daysJ (iii) . It is true they were often punished afterwards for their su!versive doctrines.hat is the function of a teacher nowadaysJ (iv) .(iii) .rite a note on the rewards that a teacher gets nowadays.hen did he propose the esta!lishment of the (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage.

3+3E$ QUESTION NO. *E+$ B00C =4$OU3 I> . 5emocracy is not a 8eloved %epu!lic really and never will !e. QuestionsG (i) .$ea the followin2 !assa2e an answer the /uestions 2i. (iii) . The people I admire most are those who are sensitive and want to create something or discover something and do not see life in terms of power and such people get more of a chance under a democracy than elsewhere. It does start from the assumption that the individual is important and that all types are needed to make a civilization is does not divide its citizens into !ossers and !ossed as an efficiency regime tends to do. (vi) 2ake a precis of the a!ove passage. They find religions great or small or they produce literature and art or they do disinterested scientific research or they may !e what is called ordinary people who are creative in their private lives# !ring up their children decently for instance or help their neigh!ours. 3 =&ETTE$SN+33&I)+TIONS> 0. 8ut it is less hateful than other contemporary forms of @overnment and to that extent it deserves our support.hat type of people does the writer likeJ (v) -uggest a suita!le title for the passage.hat other advantages of democracy can you think of in addition to the fact that it allows most li!ertyJ (ii) -ummarize the writer)s definition of creative persons. =*our own "onstru"te answers will fet"h you .etter %ar6s. $ll those people need to express themselves1 they cannot do so unless society allows them li!erty to do so and the society which allows them most li!erty is democracy.en at the en .> This !rings me along to democracy# even love the !eloved %epu!lic which feed upon freedom.hy does the writer call democracy a less hateful form of @overnmentJ (iv) .

345.y )$ ).le%s fa"e "o%%uters in the "ity. !3%) )"!00(3 &"$8/ 9 $* 3(). !. &slamabad B. *E+$ B005 =4$OU3 I> Write a letter to the e itor of a news!a!er a. O$ Write a letter to the e itor of a news!a!er a. . "$!1+.ern%ent 5os!italsN8is!ensaries.out the la"6 of %e i"al fa"ilities in 4o. *E+$ B005 =4$OU3 II> Write a letter to the e itor of a news!a!er a. of C.out traffi" %ess on "ity roa s.2. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the se"retary of hi2her e u"ation for 2ran s"holarshi! for hi2her stu ies a.roa . OR W"() !* !&&/(3!)($* (* " +&$*+ !16 ")(+ 9 *). E1()$" $0 ! * -+&!& " !8$%) ). *o) /o. *E+$ B00C =4$OU3 II> Write a letter to the 5ealth (inister a.W"() ! / )) " )$ ). 0$//$-(*2 3. O$ . $"/T 0 "ccounts 1lerks in a well established Multi /ational %irm.out s%o6in2 a%on2 stu ents.out the !ro.

*E+$ B006 =4$OU3 I> Write a letter to the E itor of a News!a!er a. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the ra%a as a heroNheroine.ilians.Write an a!!li"ation to the ire"tor of e u"ation for the !ost of an En2lish tea"her.out the !ro. .y the W+38+ %eter rea ers.er-"har2in2 of fares in the !u. 6. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to a lan lor ser.ertise%ent. O$ Write an a!!li"ation in res!onse to the followin2 a .out o.e22ars in the . *E+$ B007 =4$OU3 II> Write a letter to the e itor of a news!a!er a.le%s "reate the . of a (e"hani"al En2ineer.out the attitu e of the 3oli"e towar s the "i. *E+$ B006 =4$OU3 II> Write a letter to the E itor of a News!a!er a. 5.usy streets an %ar6ets of your "ity.out the "orru!tion .y .ants. ire"tor of a theatre to "ase to in his sta2e 7.er-loa in2 of !assen2ers an o. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 4eneral (ana2er of a )e%ent 'a"tory for a Ao. *E+$ B007 =4$OU3 I> Write a letter to the Ins!e"tor 4eneral 3oli"e a.li" trans!ort. to hire you as a %ana2er of his far% is"ri%inatin2 9.

*E+$ B001 =4$OU3 II> Write a letter to the E itor of a News!a!er a. 00.out the la"6 of %e i"al fa"ilities in 4o.ils of street . O$ Write a letter to the NaEi% of your "ity re2ar in2 the !oor sanitary "on itions an .ern%ent 5os!itals.er eterioratin2 "on ition of law an or er in the "ity. 00.ro6en sewera2e line of your area. *E+$ B001 =4$OU3 I> Write a letter to the E itor of a News!a!er on the e. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 I> . O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 8ire"tor of E u"ation for the !ost of an En2lish Tea"her.out the a. 03. 0B.e22in2. *E+$ B009 =4$OU3 II> Write an a!!li"ation to the 8istri"t 5ealth Offi"er a. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the Ins!e"tor 4eneral of 3oli"e "o%!lainin2 a2ainst the e. *E+$ B009 =4$OU3 I> Write a letter to the E itor of a News!a!er su22estin2 hi% "ertain "on itions un er whi"h a !erson "an ta6e !art in 4eneral Ele"tions.1. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 'inan"e (ana2er of a (ultinational 'ir% for the a!!oint%ent of an +""ount )ler6.sen"e as well as the %altreat%ent of o"tors of the rural areas with the !atients.

"o%!lainin2 a. 05. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 8ire"tor of E u"ation for the !ost of an En2lish Tea"her.@. +lso !ro. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 'inan"e (ana2e of a (ultinational 'ir% for the a!!oint%ent of an +u it Offi"er. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 II> Write a letter to the E itor of a news!a!er !rotestin2 a2ainst the "orru!tion of W+38+ lower staff. 06. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 4eneral (ana2er of a (ultinational 'ir% for the a!!oint%ent of a (e i"al $e!resentati. 0C.Write a letter to the E itor of a News!a!er !rotestin2 a2ainst the "orru!tion that !re.ails in the offi"es. O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 'inan"e (ana2er of a (ultinational 'ir% for the a!!oint%ent of an +u it Offi"er. . "riti"iEin2 the ress an ha.out uns"he ule loa -she in2. 07."olle2e in your "ity.its of stu ents at "olle2e. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 II> Write a letter to the E itor of a news!a!er e?!ressin2 the nee for o!enin2 a 2irls.e. *E+$ B00B =4$OU3 I> Write a letter to the E itor of a news!a!er.i e your ). *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 I> Write a letter to the E itor of a news!a!er.

*E+$ B00C =4$OU3 I> C$"" 3) !*.ate 'ir% for the !ost of an +""ountant.out the %issin2 5ealth 'a"ilities in the 5os!ital of your area.out the late arri. :IVE $0 ).O$ Write an a!!li"ation to the 8ire"tor E u"ation =S"hools> for the a!!oint%ent of a tea"her. 01. a!!li"ation to the 8istri"t )oor inatin2 Offi"er for the !ost of a )o%!uter O!erator. 3+3E$ QUESTION NO. O$ Write a Ao. *E+$ B003 =4$OU3 II> Write a letter to the 8istri"t 3oli"e Offi"er a. *E+$ B00B =4$OU3 II> Write a letter to the E itor of a news!a!er a. "o%!lainin2 a. a!!li"ation to the 8ire"tor of a 3ri.al of trains. *E+$ B003 =4$OU3 I> Write a letter to the (ana2in2 8ire"tor. O$ Write a Ao. 3a6istan $ailways. B0. 0$//$-(*2 + *) *3 +4 . a!!li"ation to the +""ountant 4eneral for the 3ost of an +ssistant. O$ Write a Ao. C =)O$$E)TION O' SENTEN)ES> 0. 09.out the in"reasin2 street "ri%es.

(ii) 0e does not care for his money. (vi) There is nothing such as chance. (iv) I am ill since three months. (vii) 2y friend told me that he is not to !lame. (i) "pen this knot. ()) & don't know the reason why he dislike me. B. (iii) 0e !ehaved cowardly. (viii) & went there with a view to get first hand information. he fell head long. (i)) Though he has enough money. . (ii) Tell me the last news of war. (iv) . (iii) They decided for starting on their 7ourney. but he will not purchase a house.(i) 1limbing down the stairs. *E+$ B00C =4$OU3 II> )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es.e denied to accept the invitation. (v) -end this letter on my home address. (v) The 7ury were unanimous in their verdict. (vi) $hom was she talking(vii) The population of 8arachi is greater than any other town in !akistan.

. (iv) No sooner he left than the storm !roke.(viii) The judge disposed the case at once. (iii) -he died from cancer. (viii) -he was too pleased to hear the news. (vi) 8etween you and I# he is a cheat. (ii) -he is more intelligent of the two. (i) 0e or she is a thief.e saw much less films than last years. (iii) . (vi) -lower you move# greater the time you take.hat to speak of 3rench# he does not know even +nglish. *E+$ B005 =4$OU3 II> )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. C. (ix) 0e walks as if he is lame. (i) 3or goodness)s sake leave my alone. (x) . (ix) No sooner I had fallen than they ran away. 3. *E+$ B005 =4$OU3 I> )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. (v) I would sooner uit than to do it. (x) "ne can learn his lesson if he applies his mind to it.ho do you want to seeJ (iv) *et -a!iha and I go there. (ii) 6ertificates are attached herewith. (v) . (vii) They considered him as a great fool.

(vii) The climate of 2ultan is !etter than *ahore. (viii) I only did two sums. (ix) *atest part of the !ook is very difficult. (x) There is a little truth in your statement.

5. *E+$ B006 =4$OU3 I>
)orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. (i) They found that the ship is leaking. (ii) 0e was arrested under the charge of stealing. (iii) 0e is sitting !esides his mother. (iv) -o nice a man I have never seen. (v) 3aisala!ad is 2anchester of /akistan. (vi) The gold is more costly than the silver. (vii) 0e is a man of words. (viii) ,hat is this !ook)s priceJ (ix) 0is hairs have turned white. (x) +ither he or I are right.

6. *E+$ B006 =4$OU3 II>
)orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. (i) I met him prior than his departure for 4arachi. (ii) 0e is the a!lest and efficient teacher. (iii) They did their duty should !e rewarded. (iv) It is no dou!t that the man is dead. (v) I dou!t that he will come.

(vi) No sooner he left than the storm !roke. (vii) 0e likes me reading the novel. (viii) I asked him what he ate. (ix) 0e ran as fast as he could run. (x) I said it in his face.

7. *E+$ B007 =4$OU3 I>
)orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!t will ,e %ar6e .> (i) 0e made three goals in the last match. (ii) ,hen $mjad or his !rother visits us we are delighted. (iii) 0e asked me where I came from. (iv) There is little to do in such a hopeless case as this. (v) 0e always had hatred against inefficiency. (vi) Iou ought to have treated him you e ual. (vii) 0e enjoys the most worldwide reputation. (viii) The !oy who was promoted# he was my !rother. (ix) 0e availed of the opportunity. (x) I would sooner uit than to do it.

9. *E+$ B007 =4$OU3 II>
)orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will ,e %ar6e .> (i) 0e is 2.$. while his friend is 8.$. (ii) 0e has !een died today. (iii) 0e is hardly hit !y the !ank)s failure.

(iv) This is another side of the uestion. (v) The de!ate was now coming to a close. (vi) 0e ran three hundred meters race. (vii) 2y tooth is paining very !adly. (viii) Najma eats like -alma does. (ix) 0e has lit up the fire of reform. (x) I did not know that honesty was the !est policy.

1. *E+$ B009 =4$OU3 I>
)orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will ,e %ar6e > (i) "ur parents may !e resem!led to a tree which gives us cool shade. (ii) I do not know where was he at that time. (iii) I re uest you not to cut jokes in class. (iv) If I fail in this examination I will give the next. (v) ,e met at the house of a mutual friend to make peace. (vi) 0ave you heard of your son)s ro!!eryJ (vii) The downfall of the king is to !e attri!uted to nothing else than pride. (viii) If you do not come# then I shall not help you. (ix) -carcely had he gone than a policeman knocked at the door. (x) 0ave you seen her latest photograph.

00. *E+$ B009 =4$OU3 II>
)orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =In "ase of o.er atte%!t only the 'irst 'i.e will ,e %ar6e .> (i) /oetries have their appeal to the heart.

(ii) This poultry !elongs to him. (iii) &nless you don)t work hard# you cannot secure good marks. (iv) I hate those sorts of men. (v) 0e has !een operated. (vi) 0e is such a man who is linked !y everyone. (vii) 0e said to them if can you help me. (viii) The rotten mangoes smell !adly. (ix) /lease# do the needful. (x) *eave was availed at once.

00. *E+$ B001 =4$OU3 I>
)orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will ,e %ar6e .> (i) -aleem and I am enemies. (ii) 0e has often !eat me at tennis. (iii) 0e was !orn in nineteen hundred eighteen. (iv) I have not seen you since a long time. (v) The time passed off uickly. (vi) I cannot pull on my work. (vii) ,rite with ink. (viii) I do not care for these sorts of things. (ix) -he is not clever to do it. (x) 0e is a coward !oy.

0B. *E+$ B001 =4$OU3 II>

)orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will ,e %ar6e .> (i) 2y !rother)s only help were his friends. (ii) These two !oys hate one another. (iii) ,e should pray @od every morning. (iv) It is half past five in my watch. (v) 0e availed of the leave. (vi) 0e visited many worth7seeing places. (vii) Neither he comes# nor he writes. (viii) ,hy he wrote that foolish letterJ (ix) I shall stay at 2urree for few days. (x) 0e only is responsi!le for this act.

03. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 I>
)orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will ,e %ar6e .> (i) There is a !est teacher in that class. (ii) These all pears are ripe. (iii) 0e is reading at the medical college. (iv) 3ew people attended the meeting. (v) The man is selfish !y nature. (vi) I seldom or ever take medicine. (vii) The child died at three year old. (viii) Not a line of the lectures were written. (ix) 0e is !ent to do it.

(x) It is much hot today.

0C. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 II>
)orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will ,e %ar6e .> (i) 0e made a goal against our college. (ii) I shot the !ear !ut missed. (iii) They pay no attention to their old father. (iv) 0e is the student whom I think deserves praise. (v) Is not he your !rotherJ (vi) $ darkest cloud has a silver lining. (vii) $slam has !een ill from five days. (viii) /lease tell me where is your !rotherJ (ix) No less than twenty people died in the accident. (x) 0imalayas lie in the North of India.

05. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 I>
)orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will ,e %ar6e .> (i) The wages of sin are death. (ii) +ight miles are a long distance. (iii) I !elieve your are !etter now. (iv) I am studying the newspaper. (v) 0e aims to please every!ody. (vi) -he came here for singing. (vii) I felt the cold air to strike my face.

(viii) $larmed at the news# the police was informed. (ix) %ose is the sweetest of all flowers. (x) I am much glad that you are here.

06. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 II>
)orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will ,e %ar6e .> (i) 0is friend and !enefactor have left the room. (ii) +very one of them want to go to sea. (iii) 0e is reading at the medical college. (iv) 3ew people attended the meeting. (v) +ither of these two houses are to let. (vi) The teacher took a test of the students. (vii) 0e insisted to do it. (viii) 0e has no money for giving you. (ix) I !ade him to do it. (x) It is much hot today.

07. *E+$ B00B =4$OU3 I>
)orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will ,e %ar6e .> (i) 0e had come yesterday. (ii) $hmad plays good. (iii) -he is angry on me. (iv) Neither of these ten !oys has failed. (v) ,e enjoyed at the concert.

(vi) I reached prior than him. (vii) -uch students who don)t work hard fail. (viii) 0e re uested me to say little more. (ix) -he is cooking the meal for DK minutes. (x) 0e goes there never.

09. *E+$ B00B =4$OU3 II>
)orre"t an %ar6e .> 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will ,e

(i) The poor is neglected. (ii) "ne of the players is injured. (iii) I am senior than him in service. (iv) I read the same !ook which you purchased. (v) *ahore is a worth7seeing city. (vi) 0e has any !ooks. (vii) None of the !oys were naughty. (viii) 0is hairs are !rown. (ix) The lion attacked at him. (x) -he is more cleverer than he.

01. *E+$ B003 =4$OU3 I>
)orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will ,e %ar6e .> (i) 2r. Qahis with his wife and children live here. (ii) $ num!er of !oys is a!sent. (iii) ,e should avail of this chance.

late. me. :IVE $0 ).&" ++($*+ (* . cousin.S> 0. cookJ night. *E+$ B003 =4$OU3 II> will .(iv) They went to the fair and enjoyed. =No e?tra atte%!ts %ar6e . (v) The murdered was hung. 0$//$-(*2 (1($9!)(3 + *) *3 + $0 . B0. )orre"t any 'I@E of the followin2 senten"es. 5 =I8IO(S +N8 35$+S+& @E$. played. days.$%" $-*4 (i) (ii) *ear up 0ie out .> (i) -he sings (ii) 0e comes often (iii) 5o you know to (iv) I had not written any letter last (v) 0e did nothing !ut (vi) 0e is suffering from fever for ten (vii) 0e said that he can help (viii) -he was married with her (ix) $lthough he is old !ut (x) Tari as well as $sad are my friends. (vii) Iou need not to go there. *E+$ B00C =4$OU3 I> U+ !*.e good. (vi) Iou are very kind on me. (ix) If you will come to me# I will help you. 3+3E$ QUESTION NO. (viii) 0e has visited *ahore yesterday. active. (x) 0e swore of @od.

(iii) 1ome to (iv) 6est (v) 0amocles' sword (vi) %eather in one's cap (vii) (ift of the gab (viii) " fishy (i)) Stand of ceremony ()) Make a bee line for B. *E+$ B005 =4$OU3 I> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 i io%ati" e?!ressions in senten"es. (i) 5o up (ii) @et away with (iii) *ive !y (iv) $t loggerheads (v) "ut of !ounds (vi) /lay upon (vii) $s the crow flies (viii) The under dog (ix) The school master is a!road (x) $ !lue stocking 3. (i) 8ring forth (ii) 5ie down (iii) @o against (iv) 4nock a!out (v) 0ouse of cards (vi) *aughing stock (vii) Nip in the !ud (viii) /lay truant . *E+$ B00C =4$OU3 II> in story Use any 'I@E of the followin2 i io%ati" e?!ressions in senten"es of your own.

*E+$ B006 =4$OU3 II> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 i io%ati" !hrases in senten"es. (i) -tick to (ii) -tand out (iii) %un out (iv) 6arry weight (v) 6ut a sorry figure (vi) 8ury the hatchet (vii) 5o up (viii) Turn coat (ix) $ dark horse (x) 8y and large 5.(ix) 4eep (x) 0ave a !ee in one)s !onnet one)s fingers crossed C. (i) 8ear away (ii) $ccede to (iii) $ct for (iv) 2ake at (v) $ dog in the manger (vi) $ la!our of love (vii) The "ld $dam (viii) 8oil over (ix) 5o away with (x) 3all in with 6. *E+$ B006 =4$OU3 I> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 i io%ati" !hrases in senten"es. (i) $ !ull in a china shop (ii) 8revity is the soul of wit (iii) @et at the !ottom of (iv) $ cat and dog life (v) -peak daggers . *E+$ B005 =4$OU3 II> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 i io%ati" !hrases in senten"es of your own.

e %ar6e > (i) *ook !ack (ii) 3reudian slip (iii) @et at (iv) 5rop a line (v) 5eliver the goods (vi) 6ut in (vii) 6ry down (viii) 8olt from the !lue (ix) $round the corner (x) $t a stretch 9. *E+$ B007 =4$OU3 II> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es.e %ar6e > (i) @o !ack upon (ii) @et into a scrape (iii) 8reak away (iv) 8uy off (v) 6onfide to (vi) 0old off (vii) Throw cold water upon (viii) 3all out with (ix) 6ast a!out (x) 0old water 1. *E+$ B007 =4$OU3 I> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. *E+$ B009 =4$OU3 I> . =No e?tra atte%!ts will .(vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) 3all across 6all 6ut 6ry 8ear @od to off out up witness 7. =No e?tra atte%!ts will .

*E+$ B001 =4$OU3 I> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will .> (i) -tick (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) 3ace (x) 3log a dead horse to 0ush 8ring 8eat 5ie @o %un 8roken the the point up through !ack away a!out down reed music 00.e %ar6e .e %ar6e > (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) 8ecome (ix) 3all (x) 0ave no touch with Take Take Throw -tand -trike -tand %ing a foul down in up for down for out !yword of 00.Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will . *E+$ B009 =4$OU3 II> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es.> (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) 6ome 3ix *ook Turn a!out up up up .e %ar6e . =No e?tra atte%!ts will .

(v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) /ull up %un %oot 0ang 4ick "n up and the the against !ranch fire !ucket cards 0B. *E+$ B001 =4$OU3 II> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es.> (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) In a mess 8low 8ear 8ear 8ack 5rop 6ompare 6rocodile 3ollow in out up with out in notes tears suit cap 3eather one)s .> (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) -it !ack 8ear 3all 2ake -et %ound Thum!nail 3ishy In %ule the off up out out with for up sketch deal pipeline out 03. =No e?tra atte%!ts will .e %ar6e .e %ar6e . =No e?tra atte%!ts will . *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 I> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es.

*E+$ B000 =4$OU3 II> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es.e %ar6e .> (i) (ii) (iii) 8e (iv) (v) @o (vi) 3all (vii) (viii) (ix) Through (x) The under dog 8lind 8ack up @ive !ack short +very 3or thick in away to up on of inch good thin and 05.> (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) *ame duck 8uy 8reak Turn 0old 8ear into 6onfide $t 5utch a off away away on out scrape to stretch courage @et a 06. =No e?tra atte%!ts will .e %ar6e .> (i) -tick to (ii) -tand out . =No e?tra atte%!ts will . *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 I> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es.0C.e %ar6e . *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 II> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will .

=No e?tra atte%!ts will .> (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) 8reak 8ring /ass 2ake *ook up down down up away for upon .e %ar6e .(iii) 8ear with (iv) 8ack out (v) %un out (vi) 6ompare notes (vii) 6arry weight (viii) 3ollow suit (ix) In cold !lood (x) $ !lock head 07.e %ar6e .ork wonders 3all 8reak @et @et 2ake $pple $t 3ace -mall pie a the out out through over for order loss music talk 09.> (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) . =No e?tra atte%!ts will . *E+$ B00B =4$OU3 I> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. *E+$ B00B =4$OU3 II> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es.

*E+$ B003 =4$OU3 II> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es. =No e?tra atte%!ts will .e %ar6e . =No e?tra atte%!ts will .e %ar6e . *E+$ B003 =4$OU3 I> Use any 'I@E of the followin2 !hrases in senten"es.> (i) @ive up the ghost (ii) 5ie in harness (iii) 6old comfort (iv) 6ock and !ull story (v) 6ut to the uick (vi) 6ome of age (vii) @et over (viii) 3all in with (ix) 2ake out (x) /ut up with B0.(vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) "ut of el!ows "ily 3rench 6arry 6at)s the tongue leave day paw 01.> (i) /ut in (ii) 2ake over (iii) *ook into (iv) @o over (v) 4eep down (vi) 6at)s paw (vii) 3or good (viii) 0ard nut to crack .

(ix) @ive (x) In !lack and white

the

devil

his

due

3+3E$ QUESTION NO. 6
=T$+NS&+TIONN8I+&O4UES>

0. *E+$ B00C =4$OU3 I> T"!*+/!) ). 0$//$-(*2 (*)$ E*2/(+.4

OR W"() ! 1(!/$2% 8 )- * ! +)%1 *) !*1 ! &$/(3 + "2 !*) $* $* -. /(*2. B. *E+$ B00C =4$OU3 II>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a "o%er. ialo2ue ,etween a tea"her an a stu ent who is a ha,itual late

3. *E+$ B005 =4$OU3 I>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween a stu ent an a tea"her on the i%!ortan"e of is"i!line.

C. *E+$ B005 =4$OU3 II>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween two frien s on so%e T@ !ro2ra%%e.

5. *E+$ B006 =4$OU3 I>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween two frien s a,out ;la"6-%ar6etin2 of foo ite%s.

6. *E+$ B006 =4$OU3 II>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween a traffi" ser2eant an a stu ent a,out .iolation of traffi" rules whi"h the latter has "o%%itte .

7. *E+$ B007 =4$OU3 I>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween a tren s in ressin2. au2hter an a %other a,out the %o ern

9. *E+$ B007 =4$OU3 II>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween a %other an her an isa .anta2es of an arran2e %arria2e. au2hter on the a .anta2es

1. *E+$ B009 =4$OU3 I>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween a stu ent an a "anteen %ana2er a,out the ,a foo ite%s an their hi2h !ri"es in the "anteen.

00. *E+$ B009 =4$OU3 II>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a youth. ialo2ue ,etween two frien s a,out the waywar ness a%on2 the

00. *E+$ B001 =4$OU3 I>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween the (ana2er an foo ite%s of the ,a6ery. the "usto%er a,out the stale

0B. *E+$ B001 =4$OU3 II>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$

Write a ialo2ue ,etween two "lose frien s on the ill effe"ts of s%o6in2.

03. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 I>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a youth. ialo2ue ,etween two frien s a,out the waywar ness a%on2 the

0C. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 II>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween a stu ent an is"i!line. a tea"her on the i%!ortan"e of

05. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 I>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a youth. ialo2ue ,etween two frien s a,out the waywar ness a%on2 the

06. *E+$ B000 =4$OU3 II>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween father an son on the "hoi"e of !rofession.

07. *E+$ B00B =4$OU3 I>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$

Write a ialo2ue ,etween a stu ent an ;oo6 $ea in2.

a tea"her on the i%!ortan"e of

09. *E+$ B00B =4$OU3 II>
Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween two %en on earness.

01. *E+$ B003 =4$OU3 I>
Tranlsate the followin2 into En2lish.

O$ Write a ialo2ue ,etween two frien on u!"o%in2 ele"tions.

B0.

*E+$

B003

=4$OU3

II>

Translate the followin2 into En2lish.

etween two !ersons a.8. (city) -ir# 2ost respectfully# it is stated that I am a !ona fide student of your college.6. I hum!ly re uest you to grant me 777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777 777777777777777777777777777 .O$ Write a ialo2ue .TEN IN ONE The principal# @ovt.out "han2e in weather. 4ENE$+& +33&I)+TION . 6ollege# $.

+!!li"ation for S"holarshi! scholarship !ecause my father)s income is very small. 7. +!!li"ation for $e%ission of 'ine remission of fine !ecause my father)s income is very small.une KD# CK'D Iours o!ediently# P.in2 )ertifi"ate . B.I. +!!li"ation for 'ee )on"ession fee concession !ecause my father)s income is very small. +!!li"ation for )olle2e &ea.777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777 7777777777777777777777777777777. +!!li"ation for Si"6 &ea.e sick leave for one week !ecause I am seriously ill. I will ever endeavour to uphold my exceptional performance in future. +!!li"ation for $e-a %ission permission for re7admission 6. +!!li"ation for +tten in2 the We in2 )ere%ony leave for one week for attending the wedding ceremony of my elder sister. 9.Q. I will undou!tedly !e o!liged if you consider my application sympathetically. 2y prior academic records validate my diligence and dedication to studies. 0. 3. C. 5. . +!!li"ation for )hara"ter )ertifi"ate character certificate !ecause I am to take admission in the university. Thank you in anticipation.

00.alletG I like 6hinese !allet. +%i"a. . +!!li"ation for +!olo2iEin2 (is"on u"t 3+I$ O' WO$8S 0.aronG 8aron is a social rank in +ngland. 5.leG 0e has amica!le relations with his family. +ffe"tionG $slam likes affectation in every matter. +ffe"tionG -he has great affection for her hus!and. +!!li"ation for )han2e of Su. IllusionG This life is an illusion. 3. . +%ia. 7. . +""essG 0e has not access to the minister. 6.leG 0er amia!le nature makes her lova!le. E?"essA +xcess of money makes people proud. C.Ae"ts permission to change my su!jects !ecause the present selected su!jects are rather tough for me.allotG 0e was elected !y !allot. .college leaving certificate !ecause my family has shifted to Islama!ad. +llusionG 2ilton)s poetry is full of allusions. . +""e!tG -he has decided not to accept the jo!. 1.arrenG 5o not !uy this !arren land. B. E?"e!tA +veryone was present at the party except $li.

00. 8isease G 0e uprooted the diseased plant. )or!sG $slam serves the medical corps of $rmy )or!seG I saw a corpse on the !ank of the river yesterday. SeiEeG I tried to seize the pistol from him. 3rin"i!leG Luaid7e7$zam was a man of principles. )oun"ilG "ur college council is very active. )anonG . )annonG The cannon was firing in the !attlefield. 3rin"i!alG The principal of our college is very generous. 'artherG . 'areG $slam paid the train fair. Si2htG The sight after rain is very soothing. B3. 0C. (arryG -he will not marry a poor man. )astG .assG 6andidates are canvassing these days. Hu i"ialG $ policeman has no judicial powers. Hu i"iousG 0er judicial remarks impressed me a lot. )an. B0. )ueG $li gave him a cue to solve the riddle. &essonG I always learn my lesson. 'airG . 00.e cannot go farther !ecause it is dark now. BB. 09. )easeG 0e ordered his soldiers to cease fire. 06. BC. 8e"ease G The deceased was !uried. )an. 01. E%!ireG 0e has set up a !usiness empire. B5.9. 1. . (erryG 3orget your past and !e merry.e should cast our votes. B0.e should follow the canons of Islam. SoulG The soul of man is immortal. QueueG There was a long ueue outside the !ank. SoleG The sole of this shoe is made of leather. 0B. )ounselG The counsel of teachers is vital.e must play fair. U%!ireG $n umpire should !e honest.e should lessen our expenditures.asG I like canvas shoes for morning walk. )asteG I do not !elieve in caste and creed. 05. 07. SiteG This site is for sale. 'urtherG There is no need of giving further explanation. 03. &essenG . &oseG $slam lost his !ook in the college. &ooseG *oose shirts are not in fashion now.

/eople have !ecome greedy and .> .e enjoyed summer vacation a lot. There are many factors which are responsi!le for ??????????.B6. @aleG The vale of 4ashmir is very !eautiful. 30. 9.i> . TenorG This work has changed the tenor of my life.e in One =i> Ener2y )risis =ii> Une%!loy%ent =iii> Terroris% =i.$isin2 3ri"es =. Tee%G This well teems with insects. B7.la"6 (ar6etin2 =.asion =?i?> @iolen"e =??> 3o.iii> Ta? E.e22ary =?. KKKKKG I searched the meaning of 77777777 in the dictionary.le%s =??.ii> Inflation . 0owever# a close analysis reveals that craze for wealth and power is the !ase of all kind of ??????????.> 8ru2 + i"tion =. It indicates our moral# social and religious downfall. @o"ationG Teaching is my vocation.er-3o!ulation =i?> En.erty =??i> 3oliti"al Insta.ery =?. B1. B9.Twenty 'i.> So"ial an E"ono%i"al 3ro.ility =??ii> &awlessness =??iii> So"ial an E"ono%i" )risis =??i.ri. Illiteracy# poverty and false ideas of society are the major causes of this social evil. TenureG The tenure of National $ssem!ly is five years.iron%ental 3ollution =?> S%u22lin2 =?i> (ass Illitera"y =?ii> 8ru2 Traffi"6in2 =?iii> Se"tarianis% =?i.> .i> )orru!tion =.> E"ono%i" )risis =?. @eilG Beil is o!ligatory for 2uslim women. Tea%G $ cricket team has eleven players.iii> O.ii> Ne!otis% =?. It is a matter of great shame that in spite of !ecoming a nuclear power# we are far !ehind other nations in the way of character and faith.> InAusti"e an Ine/uality -------------------?????????? is a major pro!lem in most !ackward and developing countries. @a"ationG . KKKKKG I asked my teacher the meaning of 777777777. 4eneral Essay .

They do not know the virtues of love# sympathy and sacrifice. Non7availa!ility of education# health care and jo!s also paves the way to spread ??????????. ??????????? is highly dangerous and devastating for a country like /akistan that has a weak economy and political insta!ility. . 6onse uently# a nation)s good image is spoiled in all over the world. The main causes of ?????????? are illiteracy# poverty# economic policies of government and man)s !urning desire to !ecome rich and !igwig over night. It also paves way for !loody revolutions and military take7overs. 3eudalism# capitalism and uneven distri!ution of wealth and opportunities# non7 availa!ility of !asic necessities and fundamental rights also spread ??????????. It deprives masses from mental# physical# spiritual# moral and economic health. ?????????? has !ecome one of the most important pro!lem of all the world especially of the third world countries like /akistan. It creates and spreads the feelings of uncertainty# insta!ility and insecurity among the masses. ????????? !adly shatters people)s faith in institution and supremacy of the constitution. If it creeps in a society# it eats into its vitals and soon roots out its inner strength. It desta!ilizes and demoralizes nations and gives !irth to depression and frustration in the society and state. "nly then we can raise our heads as a free and dignified nation. It destroys its outer splendor# economic prosperity# social peace and national unity. +xternal factors like agencies of neigh!ouring states like India also play a vital role in spreading ?????????? in /akistan in order to desta!ilize it. In the end we can say that our officers as well as the scholars# educationists# political parties# N@")s and national mass media should take necessary steps to eradicated this wicked pro!lem for the !est national and human interest. It it is not effectively# properly and promptly checked# the entire judicial# moral and economic fa!ric of a nation will !e collapsed. ?????????? creates economic pressure# social and economic injustice. *awlessness !ecomes order of the day due to poverty# corruption# violence# indiscipline and mass illiteracy. If the evil of ?????????? is not nipped in the !ud# it may spread like a !ush fire and engulf the whole nation or region like and epidemic.selfish. It is full of danger of evil impacts.

"ur armies are honoured all over the world. 7 Translation /akistan armies are strong and sta!le like iron. 3ara2ra!h No. 4akool $cademy is one of the !est training centres in the world. 9 . The standard of their training and discipline is very high. They have completed many missions of &N" a!road.I%!ortant 3ara2ra!hs for Translation 3ara2ra!h No. They help people in every hour of need.

. 3ara2ra!h No. If some part of !ody is in pain# the whold !ody feels its effect. 3ara2ra!h No. "n the one hand they suffer pain and on the other hand spend money on medicine and treatment. $ sick man is a living corpse. "ur enemies are planning to harm us !y day and night.e need to learn a lesson from our glorious past. They do not learn self7dependency. If one is healthy# he enjoys eating# drinking# walking and working. . The enemey of 2uslim nation is very clever and canny.hen once someone gets addicted to it# then it is hard to get rid of it. To get rid of all these difficulties# we need a sincere and honest leader who can save us from the state of chaos and anxiety.e all know a!out it very well. 3ara2ra!h No. 00 .Translation These days /akistan is entangled in many national and international pro!lems. They do not follow others !lindly. 1 Translation @ood health is a great !lessing. It does not develop confidence among students. 0owever# man does not value this !lessing so long he is healthy.hen even a minor disease attacks him# he realizes its value. 00 Translation 6ramming is a disease. If the health !reaks down# one cannot find any pleasure in anything. It is the duty of teachers that they should develop confidence in students at an early stage and encourage those students who develop the a!ility to comment themselves. . . The life of those people who often remain ill !ecomes a !urden for them and their relations. -uch students grow into good writers.

0B Translation The most important demand in the present circumstances is to increase the production and decrease the prices. $uden )onte?tG This poem is an imaginary dialogue !etween two opposite forces1 good and evil. $uden )onte?tG This poem is a !eautiful description of a train that carries mails for everyone.0.an -tallworthy )onte?tG This poem is a sym!olic presentation of the world threatened with war and poverty... ED3&+N+TION WIT5 $T) =+> $)T =$eferen"e to the )onte?t> =i> $eferen"eG The %ain !y .here are Iou @oingJ !y . . 3ara2ra!h No. 0is income is less than his daily expenses.0.. =i. 5ue to less income# the prices of daily commodities should !e less.Translation $ teacher is the most important and useful mem!er of the society. In this way he makes strong the foundations of society for the time to come.> $eferen"eG In the -treet of 3ruit -talls !y . -o the need of hour is that the appointment of the teacher should !e made with utmost care# and !etter opportunities should !e provided to him. 5avies )onte?tG This poem is a !eautiful description of two natural phenomena1 rain and sunshine. 0e provides guidance to those people who are to take over the duties of the country and nation after few years. =ii> $eferen"eG *oveliest of Tress# the 6herry Now !y $. 6ommon man is much worried economically.> $eferen"eG " . This is only possi!le that there should !e a tremendous increase in agricultural and industrial production and people work hard day and night. +. =ii> $eferen"eG Night 2ail !y . =.0. 0ousman )onte?tG This poem is a !eautiful description of cherry tree in spring and winter.

. =. =??> $eferen"eG In 8roken Images !y %o!ert @raves .0.> $eferen"eG 2y Neigh!our 3riend 8reathing 0is *astH !y 8ullah -hah )onte?tG This poem descri!es that the death of others creates feelings of fear in us and we remem!er $llah.an -tallworthy )onte?tG This poem is a rich tri!ute to hard work even under a pressure. =i?> $eferen"eG The 3eed !y $hmad Nadeem Lasmi )onte?tG This poem shows the love of mother for her young ones and criticizes modern science. =?. 5avies )onte?tG This poem satirizes modern !usy men who have no time to enjoy the !eauties of Nature.alaluddin %umi )onte?tG This poem descri!es three limitless attri!utes of @od1 G-eeingG# G0earingG and G4nowingG.ords and Not of 5eeds !y 6harles /erault )onte?tG This poem criticizes those lazy people who waste their time and finally meet a tragic end.oman !y . =?i. =?. -cott 2onaday )onte?tG This poem reflects the inner happiness of the poet due to his good relation with man and nature. =?i> $eferen"eG *eisure !y .ohn /eter )onte?tA This poem praises the people of .ii> $eferen"eG The 5elight -ong !y N.iii> $eferen"eG *ove 7 $n +ssence of $ll %eligions !y . =?.> $eferen"eG 0e 6ame to 4now 0imself !y -achal -armast )onte?tG This poem tells us that $llah comes on the earth in the guise of 0is lovers like 2ansur.ii> $eferen"eG Times from +cclesiastes )onte?tG This poem tells us that everything happens in this world according to a planned schedule. =?ii> $eferen"eG %u!a)iyat !y $llama I !al )onte?tG This poem tells the misera!le condition of the 2uslims and urges upon the need of strong faith. =?iii> $eferen"eG $ Tale of Two 6ities !y . =?i?> $eferen"eG $ 2an of . =?> $eferen"eG The 0ollow 2en !y T.iii> $eferen"eG "zymandias !y /. =. +liot )onte?tG This poem satirizes modern men who are leading aimless and worthless lives.apan for their hard work to regain their lost strength.=.alaluddin %umi )onte?tG This poem suggests that love can solve pro!lems and change adversities into pleasures.8. -helly )onte?tG This poem shows the pride of man and tells that human !eings are mortal !ut art is not.i> $eferen"eG @od)s $ttri!utes !y .-.i> $eferen"eG $ -indhi . =?.

3.a"6 out 0e !acked out of the contract at the last moment. 0owever# the hidden meaning is somewhat complex and not easy to discern for a common reader. The surface meaning is simple and easy to understand. 77777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777 7.ear u! .rea6 own . B.> ED3&+N+TION These are very reflective and thought7provoking lines. .s SET NO. 0 0. I%!ortant 3hrasal @er. 77777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777 7.)onte?tG This poem tells that man meditates to know the facts of life !ut remains curious a!out them. =.In these lines the poet says that 77777777777777777777777777777777777. . These have many layers of meanings. 77777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777 7.e should !ear up the hardships of life !ravely. .

'all out The hus!and fell our with his wife over a trifle. 'all in with I fell in with an old friend on my way. )o%e off . /lease call in the doctor. 4i. 3 00. 5. C.The car !roke down on the way. 7. 9. 03. )o%e a.hat time did this party come offJ 00. )all in I am seriously ill. B 6. 0B.rea6 out 6holera has !roken out in the city. . SET NO. )ut off The company has cut off our -ui gas connection. )arry off The kidnappers carried the child off.rea6 into The thief !roke into his house last night. . .e u! 0e has given up smoking forever.out 0ow did this damage come a!outJ 1. SET NO.

3ull own They are going to pull down the old !uilding today. 3ut off 5o not put off your meeting. &ay .0C. :ee! . 3ass away The patient passed away in the morning. B3. SET NO. 09.3ut u! with . B0.a"6 .e should lay something for the rainy day. 5ol .a"6 . BB.e should not hold !ack any thing from our parents. SET NO. &oo6 own u!on . BC.e should not keep !ack any thing from our parents.y . 01. 05. 4et into 0e got into de!t !ecause of high living. 07. &oo6 after There is none to look after the poor child. 5 B0. C 06.e should not look down upon the poor. 4et throu2h 0e got through the examination in his first attempt.

Set off . B7. 0 0. --------------777777777777 is a famous phrasal ver! used in daily converstation. B9. $un o. B. Ta6e after -he takes after her mother.ury the hat"het . /osted !y shah!az asghar at KEAF: No commentsA +mail This8logThisH-hare to Twitter-hare to 3ace!ook SECOND YEAR ENGLISH .rea6 the news The doctor had to !reak the news to $yesha a!out her hus!and)s cancer. 30. SET NO. Ta6e in I was taken in !y his friendly manners. 6 B6. .GUESS PAPER I%!ortant I io%s SET NO. B5.e shall set off to *ahore next morning. . Stan for In a traffic signal# the red light stands of GstopG.I cannot put up with my insult.er $ child was run over !y a car. B1.

+ fuel to the fire -houting at a crying child just adds fuel to the fire.out the . C. En in s%o6e $ll his efforts to start a new !usiness ended in smoke. )at"h at a straw $ drowning man catches at a straw.u Nip the evil in the !ud. 9. B 6. 1.ush 5o not !eat a!out the !ush and come to the point.ro6en ree 5o not tell your secrets to him !ecause he is a !roken reed.*et us !ury the hatchet and !e friends again. 00. 3 00. )arry the ay "ur team didn)t play well at first# !ut we carried the day in the end. . 'a"e the %usi" The politicians have to face the music. 0B.lue sto"6in2 -he is not well educated !ut she is a !lue stocking. )ut a sorry fi2ure -he cut a sorry figure in the presence of her ugly hus!and. SET NO. SET NO. + . 7. 5. . + . Ni! in the . 3.eat a.

0C. + su2ar a y The woman went on a nice winter holiday with her sugar daddy. +ll an sun ry $ll and sundry went to see the village fair. B3.a e. SET NO. + rollin2 stone $ rolling stone gathers no moss.t 0e will not pay you !ack1 it is a !ad de!t. SET NO.a2 an .loo 3lesh and !lood cannot tolerate this act of cruelty. 05. BB.a22a2e 0e has left *ahore !ag and !aggage. 09.03. 3art an !ar"el 0ard work is a part and parcel of success. + narrow s!ee"h . 'lesh an . + wet . 'irst an fore%ost 3irst and foremost# we should take care of our health. 07. + %ai en s!ee"h 0is maiden speech in the $ssem!ly was successful. + .lan6et $slam is fun at parties !ut his !rother is a wet !lanket. 5 B0. . 01. B0. C 06.

B9. $ainy ay . B5. B1. I asked my teacher the meaning of 77777777777. ------------ .e should lay !y something for the rainy day. SET NO. B7.Iesterday# he had a narrow escape from a serious accident.e 0e got tired with his jo!# so he took 3rench leave. +t ele. BC. +t stone-s throw 2y college is at a stone)s throw from my house. 'or 2oo 0e is leaving this 30. +t a22ers rawn $ll the religious parties in /akistan are at daggers drawn with one another. 'ren"h lea.enth hour The meeting was cancelled at the eleventh hour. 6 B6. place for good.