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Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 132
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MICHELE DURAND/DAILY JOURNAL
‘The Heiress and Her Chateau: Carolands of California’s’producer and director Catherine Ryan looks at an old photograph in
the mansion’s library.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Hidden in Hillsborough, behind
massive gates, is a more than 65,000-
square-foot, 4.5-floor mansion con-
structed 100 years ago by an heiress to
the Pullman railway car fortune.
A new documentary, airing on PBS
this Sunday night, brings to light the
history of the 98-room Carolands
Chateau, which was built as on 554
acres of land purchased in April 1912
by Harriett Pullman Carolan, one of
the richest women in the country.
“The Heiress and Her Chateau:
Carolands of California” touches on
the changes the house has endured
since its inception. Gary Weimberg
and Catherine Ryan of Berkeley’s Luna
Productions produced, directed, edited
and wrote the film after being
approached by the Jenny Johnson,
who thought it would be a great story
to tell. Jenny is the daughter of the
Ann Johnson who undertook a multi-
million dollar restoration of the home
in the late 1990s.
“When we did research, we found the
stories of this building were so rich,”
Ryan said. “What a beautiful location
to film at and we found some treasures.
Doing research was really fun. We were
able to access letters between Harriett
and her mother. ”
She noted it was a historic time when
people came to Hillsborough to create
a grand social lifestyle for those in the
San Francisco area. Pullman Carolan
brought on the well-known French
architect Ernest Sanson to design the
home, which ultimately included a
grand staircase, three antique rooms
Carolands center of PBS documentary
Hillsborough mansion was home to heiress and rich local historical significance
Gov. Brown says state in the midst of
perhaps its worst dry spell in century
It’s official:
California
in drought
By Gillian laccus and Jason Dearen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — California is nearly
as dry as it’s ever been. High water marks
rim half-full reservoirs. Cities are
rationing water. Clerics are praying for
rain. Ranchers are selling cattle, and
farmers are fallowing fields.
Gov. Jerry Brown formally proclaimed
a drought Friday, saying California is in
the midst of perhaps its worst dry spell in a century. He made
the announcement in San Francisco amid increasing pres-
sure from lawmakers and as firefighters battled flare-ups in a
Southern California wildfire that chased thousands of people
from their homes.
Unless the state gets significant rainfall in the next two
months, television sets glowing with wildfires could play
San Mateo startup co-founder
makes ‘30 Under 30’ list again
Nic Borg began edtechcompany Edmodo six years ago
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Being named as one of Forbes’ “30 Under 30” two years in
a row is no small feat, but that’s the case of San Mateo start-
up Edmodo’s Nic Borg who even placed number one on the
list this year.
“Both times it was exciting for the team to get recog-
nized,” Borg said who is co-founder and chief product officer
STAFF AND WIRE REPORT
Asix-alarm fire at a machine shop in
Redwood City Friday morning spread
to four nearby buildings and displaced
16 residents, a fire marshal said.
Firefighters responded to the blaze at
894 Douglas Ave. at about 5:50 a.m.,
according to a San Mateo County fire
dispatcher.
FMW Machine Shop is located at
that address.
Firefighters contained the fire as of
about 9:15 a.m. and had it under con-
trol by 10:30 a.m., Redwood City Fire
Marshal Jim Palisi said.
Before firefighters could contain the
massive blaze, it spread to a nearby
Machine shop blaze goes to six alarms
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Nic Borg,co-founder and chief product officer of Edmodo,right,
works with Dan Carew senior product manager at Edmodo.
PHOTO COURTESY OF REDWOOD CITY FIRE DEPARTMENT
Firefighters responded to a fire at 894 Douglas Ave. at about 5:50 a.m. Friday.
Jerry Brown
See DROUGHT, Page 23
See BORG, Page 18 See FIRE, Page 18
See CHATEAU, Page 23
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Comedian Dave
Attell is 49.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1911
The first landing of an aircraft on a
ship took place as pilot Eugene B. Ely
brought his Curtiss biplane in for a
safe landing on the deck of the
armored cruiser USS Pennsylvania in
San Francisco Harbor.
“The compensation of growing old was simply this:
that the passions remain as strong as ever, but one
has gained — at last! — the power which adds the
supreme flavor to existence, the power of taking hold
of experience, of turning it round, slowly, in the light.”
— Virginia Woolf, English author (1882-1941)
Actor Kevin
Costner is 59.
Actor Jason Segel
is 34.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Spain’s Marc Coma rides his KTM motorcycle during the 12th stage of the Dakar Rally 2014, from El Salvador to La Serena.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the upper
60s. Northeast winds 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday night: Mostly clear. Lows in
the mid 40s to lower 50s. East winds 5 to
10 mph.
Sunday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 60s.
East winds 5 to 10 mph... Becoming
north in the afternoon.
Sunday ni ght: Clear. Lows in the upper 40s. Light
winds... Becoming east around 5 mph after midnight.
Martin Luther King Jr. Day: Sunny. Highs in the upper
60s.
Tuesday: Partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 40s to lower 50s.
Highs in the 60s.
Tuesday night through Friday: Partly cloudy. Lows in
the mid 40s to lower 50s. Highs in the 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1778, English navigator Captain James Cook reached
the present-day Hawaiian Islands, which he named the
“Sandwich Islands.”
I n 1862, the tenth president of the United States, John
Tyler, died in Richmond, Va., at age 71, shortly before he
could take his seat as an elected member of the Confederate
Congress.
I n 1871, William I of Prussia was proclaimed German
Emperor in Versailles, France.
I n 1919, the Paris Peace Conference, held to negotiate
peace treaties ending the (First) World War, opened in
Versailles , France.
I n 1943, during World War II, Jewish insurgents in the
Warsaw Ghetto launched their initial armed resistance
against Nazi troops, who eventually succeeded in crushing
the rebellion. AU.S. ban on the sale of pre-sliced bread —
aimed at reducing bakeries’ demand for metal replacement
parts — went into effect.
I n 1949, Charles Ponzi, engineer of one of the most spec-
tacular mass swindles in history, died destitute at a hospital
in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, at age 66.
I n 1957, a trio of B-52’s completed the first non-stop,
round-the-world flight by jet planes, landing at March Air
Force Base in California after more than 45 hours aloft.
I n 1967, Albert DeSalvo, who claimed to be the “Boston
Strangler,” was convicted in Cambridge, Mass., of armed
robbery, assault and sex offenses. (Sentenced to life,
DeSalvo was killed in prison in 1973.)
Movie director John Boorman is 81. Former Sen. Paul Kirk,
D-Mass., is 76. Singer-songwriter Bobby Goldsboro is 73.
Comedian-singer-musician Brett Hudson is 61. Country
singer Mark Collie is 58. Actress Jane Horrocks is 50. Actor
Jesse L. Martin is 45. Rapper DJ Quik is 44. Rock singer
Jonathan Davis (Korn) is 43. Singer Christian Burns
(BBMak) is 41. Former NAACP President and CEO Benjamin
Todd Jealous is 41. Actor Derek Richardson is 38. Actress
Samantha Mumba is 31. Country singer Kristy Lee Cook (TV:
“American Idol”) is 30.
M
ime artist Marcel Marceau
(1923-2007) created a char-
acter called Bip; a white-
faced clown that wore a striped shirt
and battered hat. Bip hunted butter-
flies, tamed lions and struggled with
umbrellas, all in mime.
***
Merv Griffin (1925-2007), a San
Mateo native, hosted the game shows
“Play Your Hunch” (1958-1963) and
“Word for Word” (1963) before creat-
ing and producing the game shows
“Jeopardy!” (1964-present) and
“Wheel of Fortune” (1975-present).
***
Although best known as supermarket
manager Mr. Whipple in Charmin
commercials, actor Dick Wi l son
(1916-2007) had recurring roles in tel-
evision sitcoms including
“Bewitched” (1964-1972), “Gidget”
(1965-1966) and “McHale’s Navy”
(1962-1966).
***
A popular toy of the 1970s was the
Evel Knievel Super Stunt Set in which
kids could recreate the motorcycle
jumps of Evel Knievel (1938-2007).
The set came with an action figure with
removable helmet, a motorcycle,
ramps and a hoop of fire.
***
The year of birth of actress Jane
Wyman (1917-2007) is often incor-
rectly stated as 1914. Wyman added
three years to her age hoping it would
help her break into acting. Born in St.
Joseph, Mo., Wyman’s actual birthday
was Jan. 5, 1917.
***
Bill Walsh (1931-2007) was a football
coach at Stanford University before he
became the head coach of the San
Francisco 49ers in 1979. Walsh led
the 49ers to three Super Bowl champi-
onships in 1981, 1984 and 1988.
***
Swedish film director Ingmar Bergman
(1918-2007) was a three time winner
of the Academy Award for best foreign
film. Can you name the movies he won
the awards for? See answer at end.
***
Beginning in 1992 opera singer
Luciano Pavarotti (1935–2007) held
the Pavarotti & Friends concert annu-
ally in his hometown of Modena,
Italy. The concert raised funds for char-
ities that aid child victims of war.
***
Robert Goulet (1933-2007) was born
in Massachusetts but moved to Canada
at age 13. As his singing career took
off Ed Sullivan (1902-1974) dubbed
Goulet the “American baritone from
Canada.”
***
Anna Nicole Smith (1967-2007)
appeared on the cover of Playboy in
March 1992. The cover got the atten-
tion of Guess president Paul Marciano
(born 1952) who made her the face of
Guess jeans the following year.
***
As a boy, Russian leader Boris Yeltsin
(1931–2007) blew off two fingers of
his left hand while playing with a live
grenade.
***
While her husband was vice president,
Lady Bird Johnson (1912-2007) was
an ambassador of goodwill for the
White House. She traveled to 33 for-
eign countries over three years.
***
In 2002, Tammy Faye Bakker Messner
(1942-2007) was asked to do a tele-
vised celebrity boxing match against
Sylvester Stallone’s mother Jackie
Stallone (born 1921). Tammy Faye
turned down the offer.
***
Answer: “The Virgin Spring” (1960),
“Through a Glass Darkly” (1961) and
“Fanny & Alexander” (1982).” Most
of Bergman’s films were set in Sweden.
His films were emotionally intense,
often with themes of illness, death and
insanity.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of
the Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
(Answers Monday)
ABIDE TRUTH STUDIO MORALE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When they put the finishing touches on the clock
tower, some people said —IT’S ABOUT TIME
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
CARTK
NUCED
SLOGYS
CROCHS
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
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Answer
here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Gorgeous
George,No.8,in first place; California Classic,No.
5, in second place; and Hot Shot, No. 3, in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:45.74.
7 4 1
1 10 26 31 51 11
Mega number
Jan. 17 Mega Millions
7 8 9 24 29 25
Powerball
Jan. 15 Powerball
12 15 20 24 37
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
1 1 2 3
Daily Four
6 0 4
Daily three evening
9 21 34 43 46 21
Mega number
Jan. 15 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Pet t y t hef t . A person was arrested for
stealing luggage at Costco on South
Airport Boulevard before 5:09 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 13.
Acci dent . A person called to report a
White GMC had hit a bicyclist on Junipero
Serra and Westborough Boulevard before
7:42 a.m. Monday, Jan. 13.
Suspi ci ous cal l t o 911 . Aperson called
911 and hung up but when the operator
traced and returned the call to check they
heard children playing in the background
on Avalon Drive before 10:45 a.m. Sunday,
Jan. 12.
SAN MATEO
Theft. Atenant moved out and took some
property with him on the 200 block of
Monte Diablo Avenue before 2:23 a.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 14.
Di sturbi ng the peace. Aperson report-
ed that his neighbor was taking his laundry
and changing the setting on the washing
machines on Hobart Avenue before 2:22
p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 14.
Theft. A woman reported that her purse
was taken from her car on the 1800 block
of South Grant Street before 3:37 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 14.
Police reports
Smells of romance in the air
A couple in a parked car at the sewage
treatment plant on 1100 block of
Airport Boulevard in Burlingame was
asked to leave before 12:26 a.m.
Sunday, Dec. 8.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Apossible $1 million white collar crime
fine is tripping up sentencing of two former
mosquito district workers who stole a half-
million dollars for personal needs, includ-
ing one’s legal bills in an earlier embezzle-
ment case.
Defense attorney Geoff Carr said news of
the previously unknown fine allows him to
withdraw the no contest plea by his client
Jo Ann Dearman but he’d prefer instead to
have prosecutors waive the penalty and let
her use some of that money to repay the ear-
lier victim. Carr also said there’s no way
his client can pay $1 million to the state on
top of the $233,000 restitution she’s put
together to repay the San Mateo County
Mosquito and Vector Control District.
“Where is she going to get that? It’s a
really bizarre statute developed for the
Madoffs of the world and this lady ain’t in
that circle,” Carr said.
Dearman, who is also known by the name
Joanne Seeney, pleaded no contest in April
2013 to 10 felonies out of the original 200
charged and her sentence is predicated
largely on restitution. Carr is seeking five
to six years while prosecutors are asking
for 10 years.
At the last court appearance, Carr pre-
sented a $200,000 check to the court but a
judge ordered Dearman, 62, into custody
without pending sentencing. She had been
out of custody largely the entire prosecu-
tion.
Her accomplice and former bookkeeping
assistant Vika Sinipata, 37, pleaded no
contest to 12 felonies in February 2013 but
her sentencing has been postponed repeat-
edly along with Dearman because attorneys
want them before a judge together. Sinipata
has been in custody on
$150,000 bail.
They next appear in
court Jan. 24 — the
eighth attempt at sen-
tencing — at which time
Carr said a decision about
the white collar fine
should be made.
District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe said Carr
should have been aware
of the fine component of one allegation to
which Dearman pleaded and that his office is
not planning to forgo it.
Sinipata did not admit a similar allega-
tion or face the fine.
Carr said Friday he suggested taking the
$233,000 earmarked for the district and
giving $33,000 or so of it to his client’s
previous employers from whom she stole
but that the county counsel wasn’t in favor
of the suggestion.
The aggravated white collar fine is calcu-
lated by doubling the amount a defendant
took, Carr said.
The California penal code says the desig-
nation is for a person who commits two or
more felonies involving fraud or embezzle-
ment with losses more than $100,000.
In the latest case, Dearman and Sinipata
embezzled the funds between 2009 and
2011 by giving themselves extra pay at a
higher pay rate and fraudulent time off,
excessively contributing to their deferred
compensation funds, using credit cards for
personal purchases and electronically
transferring money into their own
accounts. An audit showed more than
$635,000 missing but prosecutors only
charged them with stealing approximately
$450,000 because they could not prove an
actual loss of the greater amount. Other
evaluations have placed
the district loss closer to
$800,000 for the embez-
zlement and more than
$1.2 million when attor-
ney fees are added in.
The embezzlement
came to light after a
board member appointed
by the city of San Carlos
questioned the balance in
a pesticide account.
The charges against Dearman and
Sinipata raised questions about the dis-
trict’s oversight and operations, particular-
ly because at the time Dearman had one
embezzlement conviction on her record and
was being prosecuted for a second. District
Manager Robert Gay hired Dearman without
a background or reference check after
Sinipata, who Gay knew through her
accounting services, referred her. Dearman
then hired Sinipata.
According to a now-retired operations
director at the district, Dearman charged
defense attorney’s fees for that case to the
district and at one point took medical
leave, claiming she needed to care for her
mother but in actuality served two years and
eight months in prison for the two different
embezzlement cases. In one case, Dearman
ran up more than a half-million dollars on
her boss’ credit card.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Sentencing in mosquito district
embezzlement delayed, again
Jo Ann
Dearman
Vika Sinipata
4
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Diane Germain
Diane Germain died Jan. 14, 2014, in
Santa Clara.
She was 80.
She was born on a farm
in St. Severin, Quebec,
Canada, and was a daugh-
ter in a family of 14 chil-
dren.
Mother to Daniel,
Linda and Johanne;
grandmother to Danielle,
Michael, Anthony Jr.
and Lauren; and mother in law to Anthony
DiQuattro Sr., as well as relative to count-
less others and friends.
In her 30s, she obtained her real estate
license. After practicing with Allied Realty
for a short time, she returned to school and
obtained her brokers license and opened her
own firm, Germain Realty. Diane was and
extremely hard working and driven individ-
ual. Amember of The Women of the Moose,
she served as senior regent and volunteered
much of her time there. She was also a mem-
ber of the San Mateo/Burlingame/San
Francisco Board of Realtors.
“A strong, loving and talented woman
who had a true zest for life. She loved to
dance, entertain, sing, play music, garden
and help others.”
Viewing/rosary will be 5 p.m.-8 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 22 and the service for fam-
ily and friends will be noon Thursday, Jan.
23. All ceremonies will be held at Skylawn
Memorial in San Mateo.
Patricia Luna Gallelo
Patricia Luna Gallelo, born Dec. 5, 1966,
died Jan. 15, 2014, after bravely fighting
cancer, while showing
amazing strength and
grace.
She is survived by her
son Matthew; her daugh-
ters Gabriella and Mia;
her husband of 18 years,
Mark; mother Leonor;
brothers Frank and Tony;
sister Anna; in-laws,
nieces and a host of longtime friends.
Always a pet lover, Patricia received her
doctorate in veterinary medicine in 1996
from the University of California at Davis.
She practiced locally for 15 years, treating
animals and their owners.
She really enjoyed participating in activ-
ities pertaining to her kids’ school, espe-
cially being a room parent and teaching art
in the “Art in Action” program. She put a
lot of time into Girl Scouts, and once a year
the family garage was full of cookies. She
loved her photos and was always making
albums.
Memorial/mass will be 11 a.m. Jan. 25 at
The Church of the Immaculate Heart of
Mary located at 1040 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont, CA94002.
In lieu of flowers, please consider making
a donation to St. Jude Children’s Research
Hospital, www.stjude.org/donate.
Misaye Omai
Misaye Omai, born July 16, 1928, died
in Burlingame Jan. 11, 2014.
She was a resident of San Mateo.
Wife of Noboru Omai. Devoted mother of
Judy (Manuel) Nunes and Gary (Necy) Omai.
Grandmother of Nicole and Jonathan Omai.
Daughter of the late Tsuma Nakao and
Kaichi Yamanaka. Sister of Katsumi
Yamanaka, the late Kimiye Omai and
Tadami Yamanaka.
“She was a loving, devoted and dedicated
wife and mother and grandmother. ”
Family and friends are invited to attend a
memorial service 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 25
at the San Mateo Buddhist Temple, 2 S.
Claremont St. in San Mateo.
Obituaries
CITY
GOVERNMENT
• The Redwood
Ci t y Pl anni ng
Commi s s i on will
accept an informal
report on variance
proceedings to edu-
cate itself about the specifics before a
request comes before it. In January 2012,
the city gave the Planning Commission
the responsibility of hearing all appeals
of the zoning administrator.
The Planning Commission meets 7
p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 21 at City Hall, 1017
Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
• The Sout h San Franci sco
Pl anni ng Commi ssi on approved the
use permit and design review to allow
Bay Poi nt e Bal l et to use 271-275
Wattis Way for commercial entertain-
ment and recreation ballet. It also cate-
gorically exempt it under the
Cal i forni a Envi ronmental Qual i ty
Ac t .
EDUCATION
• The Burl i ngame El ementary
Sc hool Di s t r i c t approved of a
schematic design for a new building at
Burl i ngame Intermedi ate School .
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A San Francisco man charged with
throwing a hammer at picketing BART
workers and later threatening to “take
care” of jail officers is incompetent to
stand trial, according to two court-
appointed doctors.
The decision means Vincent
Matteucci, 39, will be hospitalized at
a state mental facility rather than pos-
sibly incarcerated. Competency is a
person’s ability to aid in his or her
own defense while sanity is the mental
state at the time of an alleged crime.
Matteucci was first arrested Oct. 21
after reportedly throwing the tool at
picketers outside the Daly City sta-
tion as his friend
yelled at the strik-
ers to “get your
asses back to
work.” The hammer
landed about 15 feet
away.
Officers who
arrested Matteucci
reported finding on
him a wood-handled
pick he called his
“whittler” and he allegedly told
authorities he threw the hammer in
self-defense.
While in jail awaiting prosecution
on felony counts of assault with a
deadly weapon, possessing a dirk or
dagger and a misdemeanor count of
brandishing a knife, Matteucci
allegedly refused to comply with
orders by two San Mateo County sher-
iff’s deputies working there.
Prosecutors say he repeatedly threat-
ened to “take care of them” on the out-
side and that he would “terminate their
unit” and “f— them up.” He resisted
the deputies trying to move him into a
holding cell and again threatened that
he “owned” them and would get even,
according to the District Attorney’s
Office.
He remains in custody on $125,000
bail and returns to court March 20 for
formal placement at a hospital.
5
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Speech-to-Speech (STS)
Relay Service
STS Relay is for individuals with
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Two more flu-related
deaths bump Bay Area total to 23
As flu season continues this winter, Santa Clara County
reported two more flu-related deaths Friday, bringing the Bay
Area total to 23.
Two women, ages 52 and 62, died this week from the H1N1
virus, also known as “swine flu,” Santa Clara County Public
Health Department spokeswoman Amy Cornell said Friday.
The county reported the first Bay Area flu-related death this
season when a 41-year-old woman passed away in December
shortly before Christmas, Cornell said.
This month two men, 61 and 56 years old, and a 62-year-old
woman have also died from the virus, she said.
There have been six flu-related deaths in the county this sea-
son.
There have also been 15 people who have been hospitalized
after coming down with severe cases of the flu this season,
according to Cornell.
Throughout the state, there have been 45 confirmed influen-
za deaths statewide and 50 more suspected cases as of Jan. 11,
according to Dr. Gil Chavez, deputy director and state epi-
demiologist with the Department of Public Health’s Center for
Infectious Diseases.
There have been at least 23 flu deaths in the Bay Area as of
Friday afternoon, according to local health departments. That
number is higher than the 14 confirmed in the region so far by
the state Department of Public Health.
The state health department is not required to report flu
deaths of people over age 65, Chavez said.
Three Bay Area federal judge
nominees clear Senate committee
Three nominees for federal judgeships in San Francisco and
San Jose moved a step closer to taking the bench when they
won approval from U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee.
The committee sent President Obam’s nominations of
Deputy San Francisco City Attorney Vince Chhabria, San
Francisco attorney James Donato and San Mateo County
Superior Court Judge Beth Freeman to the full Senate.
All three were nominated to the U.S. District Court for
Northern California by Obama last year and were approved by
the committee but were never given a vote by the full Senate
before the congressional session ended. Obama re-nominated
them this month.
The U.S. District Court is based in San Francisco and has
branches in Oakland and San Jose. Chhabria and Donato were
nominated for seats in San Francisco and Freeman for a post in
San Jose.
Local briefs
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A71-year-old registered sex offender
who allegedly molested a 10-year-old
girl in an isolated area of a San Mateo
bookstore in June and was later arrest-
ed in Mountain View for similar behav-
ior pleaded not guilty to the local case.
Christopher Wendell Miller, of San
Jose, is charged with kidnapping and
child molestation in the alleged June
23 incident at Barnes & Noble on
Hillsdale Boulevard. Bail was set at
$25,000 and he remains in custody.
Prosecutors say on June 23, a man
later identified as Miller approached
the girl in the San Mateo store’s chil-
dren’s reading area and exposed him-
self. He also allegedly ordered the girl
to touch his genitals
and lured her to a
secluded area past
the store bathrooms
where he exposed
himself again and
touched her groin
over her clothing.
The suspect then
asked the girl for her
name, address and
when she was alone
at home, prosecutors said.
The man remained at large until iden-
tified through photographs and video
circulated by police and arrested in
Mountain View for fondling himself in
front of two young girls at a Walmart
store. The mother yelled at the man and
alerted store employees who followed
him to his car and wrote down the
license plate for police who arrested
him Sept. 7.
Miller, who was already a sex offend-
er registrant, was convicted in Santa
Clara County in November 2014 for
felony indecent exposure and child
annoyance. He received four years
prison.
He is also suspected in a Union City
incident at a Burger King. Like Miller,
the suspect wore a fisherman-style hat.
Miller did not waive his right to a
speedy trial and returns to court Jan. 29
for a preliminary hearing.
Sex offender pleads not guilty
to molesting child in bookstore
Christopher
Miller
Vincent
Matteucci
Hammer throwing defendant incompetent
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
6
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A San Mateo County judge
denied a writ petition to overturn a
San Mateo City Council decision
to shut down a 7-Eleven store it
argued was operating illegally in a
residential area, according to
Councilman David Lim.
The petition came in a legal dis-
pute between the city and
Portfolio Development Partners
over the convenience store, which
opened in late 2012 after being
converted from a former deli. After
the deli closed, the location
should have reverted to a residen-
tial use but city staff issued build-
ing permits in error, city officials
have contended. Last January, the
City Council voted to shut down
the location and a court battle has
ensued.
Attorneys for both 7-Eleven and
PDP say they will lose a combined
$8 million if the store is forced to
close after buying the property for
$1 million and upgrading it from
an old deli into a modern market.
PDP had sought to strike down the
council’s decision.
The judge’s ruling can be
appealed. The original lawsuit
filed by the city to remove the 24-
hour convenience store will be
heard at a later date.
Judge rules in city’s
favor for 7-Eleven
T
he Burlingame
Mothers Club is host-
ing a panel discussion 7
p.m. Jan. 22 at the Burlingame
Recreation Center, 850
Burlingame Ave., about the
Burlingame Elementary
School Di stri ct. Participants
will have the opportunity to hear
from administrators, board
trustees and the Burlingame
Community for Education
Foundation president.
The panel will address dis-
trictwide and school-specific
issues, including information
about transitional kindergarten
registration; updates on projects
at the schools; and plans for the
reopening of Hoover
Elementary s chool .
***
State Education
Superintendent To m
Torl akson, former California
state assemblywoman Fiona Ma
and ABC 7 news reporter David
Louie will be honorary guest
speakers at a Lunar New Year
Gala fundraising event for
Friends of Mandarin
Schol ars 6 p.m. Jan. 25 at
Col l ege of San Mateo. The
event will feature a three-course
meal, silent auction, live auction,
entertainment and dancing.Achild
care option will be available to
attendees.
The event is intended to raise
funds for the only Mandarin lan-
guage immersion program in San
Mateo County’s public schools.
Tickets are $75 per person and
increase to $85 per person begin-
ning Jan.19. Reserved seating is
available. More information about
the Mandarin language immersion
program and the gala event,
including an option to purchase
tickets online, is available at
mandarinscholars.org.
***
Redwood City’s Dere k
Azzopardi has been named to the
fall 2013 dean’s list at American
Internati onal Col l ege i n
Springfield, Mass.
***
William Keller of Burlingame
was named to the fall 2013 dean’s
list at Choate Rosemary Hal l
in Wallingford, Conn.
Class notes is a column dedicated to
school news. It is compiled by educa-
tion reporter Angela Swartz. You can
contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105
or at angela@smdailyjournal.com.
LOCAL/STATE 7
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Taxi
By David A. Lieb
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — As legislatures
return to action and governors outline their
budget plans, politicians in many states are
facing a pleasant election-year challenge:
What to do with all the extra money?
A slow but steady economic recovery is
generating more tax revenue than many states
had anticipated, offering elected officials tan-
talizing choices about whether to ply voters
with tax breaks, boost spending for favorite
programs or sock away cash for another rainy
day.
It’s a tricky question because of the eco-
nomic experiments begun almost nationwide
since the recession. Acouple of dozen states
controlled by Republicans have been seeking
prosperity with tax cuts and less government.
Their Democratic counterparts have sought to
fortify their economies by investing more in
education and other social services.
The clamor for new spending is already
revealing fissures among some governors and
lawmakers. And clashes have arisen even
within the same party, suggesting that the
debate in some places could widen beyond
typical partisan disputes.
Democratic New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo,
for example, wants to tap a surplus to cut
taxes, despite other Democrats’ ideas for new
spending. In Louisiana, Republican Gov.
Bobby Jindal wants to steer the surplus to
education and health care.
The National Association of State Budget
Officers projects that almost all states will see
“fairly decent surpluses” in their 2014 budg-
ets. For some, it may be the first extra cash
since before the recession began in late
2007. In many states, the surpluses coincide
with elections that mark the first opportunity
for officials to be judged on the results of their
economic policies.
Voters in November will choose 36 gover-
nors and more than 6,000 state legislators in
what amounts to a referendum on whether
they want to continue the single-party domi-
nance that currently exists in three-fourths of
state capitols.
“I think this election cycle will tell us a lot
about whether or not we’re going to have bet-
ter fiscal-management officials in charge, or
whether we’re going to go back to business
as usual, which is if the revenue comes in,
let’s figure out a way to spend it,” said Ross
DeVol, chief researcher at the Milken
Institute, an economic think tank in Santa
Monica.
In California, once the epitome of busted
budgets, a resurgent technology sector and
recent temporary tax increases have generated
forecasts of a $3.2 billion budget surplus.
Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown wants some
increased spending but also to pay down
debts and rebuild a rainy-day fund.
“It isn’t time to just embark on a raft of new
initiatives,” Brown warned.
State surpluses spark debate on tax cuts, spending
San Francisco mayor touts new
housing proposal in city speech
San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee says at least
30,000 more housing units will be added in the
city within the next six
years as rental and hous-
ing costs continue to rise.
Lee said during his
State of the City address
on Friday that at least
one-third of new or reha-
bilitated housing built by
2020 will be for low- and
middle-income families.
He hopes it will address
San Francisco’s housing shortage that’s cre-
ating more demand and rising costs.
The mayor also outlined a seven-point
plan he believes will help affordable hous-
ing go up at a faster rate, protect residents
from eviction, stabilize rent-controlled
units and rebuild public housing.
The city has been criticized by many
longtime residents and housing advocates
who blame rising housing costs on the
region’s flourishing technology industry.
Around the Bay
Ed Lee
“It isn’t time to just
embark on a raft
of new initiatives.”
— Gov. JerryBrown
NATION 8
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
2
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Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever been
entrusted to make
final arrangements
for a funeral?
Those of you
who’ve had this
experience know
that important decisions are required and
must be made in a timely manner. The next
of kin is many times required to search for
information about the deceased which may
not be easily accessible, and must answer
questions without the time to think things
out. Even though your Funeral Director is
trained to guide you every step of the way, it
is still best for you to be prepared with the
proper information if the need should arise.
Ask your Funeral Director what info is
needed before you meet with him/her.
Making funeral arrangements can be very
simple, or can become difficult at times if
you are not prepared. A good Funeral
Director is experienced in leading you with
the necessary requirements, and will offer
details that you may not have thought about
or previously considered as an option.
Allowing him/her to guide you will make
the arrangements go by quickly and easily.
A number of items should be considered
in preparation for the future:
1. Talk to your loved ones about the
inevitable. Give them an indication on what
your wishes are regarding the type of funeral
you want, burial or cremation, etc., and ask
them their feelings about plans for their own
funeral. This is only conversation, but it is
an important topic which will help break the
ice and prevent any type of confusion when
the time comes.
2. Talk to your Funeral Director. Write
down a list of questions and make a phone
call to your Funeral Director asking how to
be prepared. He/she will gladly provide
detailed information and can mail this
information to you for your reference.
Asking questions doesn’t cost anything and
will help you with being organized.
3. Make an appointment and Pre-plan a
Funeral. Many more people are following
through with this step by making Pre-Need
Arrangements. Completing arrangements
ahead of time makes this process more
relaxed, and putting these details behind you
will take a weight off your shoulders. Your
wishes will be finalized and kept on file at
the Mortuary. Your Funeral Director will
even help you set aside funding now as to
cover costs at the time of death. Families
who meet with us at the CHAPEL OF THE
HIGHLANDS are grateful for the chance to
make Pre-Need Arrangements. With their
final details in place it helps to make matters
more calming for surviving loved-ones.
4. Enjoy Life. There are those who dwell
on situations that can’t be controlled.
Taking time to stop and look around at
beauty in the world and appreciate good
things can be therapeutic. If you need to use
a negative statement, try re-wording it into a
positive. Change “I had a lousy day today”
into “Today was demanding, but it made me
appreciate my better days.” As the song
goes: “Accentuate the positive; Eliminate
the negative; Latch on to the affirmative.”
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Accentuating The Positive
Can Eliminate The Negative
ADVERTISEMENT
By Tom Raum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — After last fall’s tumul-
tuous, bitterly partisan debt ceiling and
government shutdown fights, a sense of fis-
cal fatigue seems to be setting in among
many Washington policymakers as
President Barack Obama prepares for his
fifth State of the Union address later this
month.
A declining U.S. budget deficit, still-
accommodative Federal Reserve and a small-
bore budget deal negotiated last month —
given final approval Thursday in Congress
and signed by Obama on Friday — are help-
ing to temper partisan rhetoric in the short
term as attention in Washington shifts to
the approaching midterm elections.
The recovery from the deep recession of
2007-2009 has been one of the slowest in
history and still has a
ways to go, especially in
terms of regaining lost
jobs. That was driven
home by a Labor
Department report last
Friday that U.S. employ-
ers added just 74,000 jobs
last month, far fewer
than had been forecast
and the smallest monthly
gain in three years.
The overall jobless rate dropped to 6.7
percent from 7 percent in November, the
lowest level since October 2008. Much of
the decline came from Americans who
stopped looking for jobs and are no longer
being counted by the government as unem-
ployed. Meanwhile, a growing number of
baby boomers are retiring.
Still, economists are generally predict-
ing a pickup in economic growth in 2014
amid a continued favorable climate of low
inflation, falling oil prices, a housing
recovery and the Fed sticking to its plan to
only slowly pare back the hundreds of bil-
lions of dollars in financial stimulus it has
pumped into the economy over the past
four years.
Meanwhile, recent polls show rising pub-
lic distaste for brinkmanship and dysfunc-
tion on both sides of the political divide in
Washington. In a recent poll, conducted by
the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs
Research, 70 percent said they lacked confi-
dence in the government’s ability “to make
progress on the important problems and
issues facing the country in 2014.”
Last October, GOP conservatives forced a
16-day government shutdown with their
failed attempt to defund Obama’s health
insurance overhaul.
Fiscal fatigue grabs capital
as president preps speech
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Tightening the reins on
the nation’s sweeping surveillance opera-
tions, President Barack Obama on Friday
ordered new limits on the way intelligence
officials access phone records from hundreds
of millions of Americans — and moved
toward eventually stripping the massive
data collection from the government’s
hands.
But Obama’s highly anticipated intelli-
gence recommendations left many key
details unresolved, most notably who might
take over as keeper of the vast trove of U.S.
phone records. Final decisions on that and
other major questions were left to the
Justice Department and to intelligence
agencies that oppose changing surveillance
operations, and to a Congress that is divid-
ed about the future of the programs.
If fully implemented, Obama’s proposals
would mark the most significant changes to
the surveillance laws that were passed in
reaction to the Sept. 11, 2011, terror
attacks. While Obama has said he has wel-
comed the recent spying debate, it’s unlike-
ly to have happened without the national
and international backlash following a
wave of leaks from former National Security
Agency analyst Edward Snowden.
For now, the phone records will continue
to reside with the government. But the NSA
will need to get approval from the secretive
Foreign Surveillance Intelligence Court
each time it wants to access the data, a more
cumbersome process than currently
required. Exceptions will be made in the
event of a national security emergency, offi-
cials said.
Responding to outrage overseas, Obama
pledged on Friday to curb spying on friend-
ly allied leaders and to extend some privacy
protections to foreign citizens. The propos-
als appeared to ease some anger in Germany,
which had been particularly incensed by
revelations that the NSA had monitored the
communications of Chancellor Angela
Merkel.
Obama tightens reins on surveillance programs
FDA OKs mental disability
blood test for infants
WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug
Administration on Friday cleared a first-of-
a-kind blood test that can help diagnose
mental disabilities in babies by analyzing
their genetic code.
The laboratory test from Affymetrix
detects variations in patients’ chromo-
somes that are linked to Down syndrome,
DiGeorge syndrome and other developmen-
tal disorders. About 2 to 3 percent of U.S.
children have some sort of intellectual dis-
ability, according to the National Institutes
of Health.
The test, known as the CytoScan Dx
Assay, is designed to help doctors diagnose
children’s disabilities earlier and get them
appropriate care and support. It is not
intended for prenatal screening or for pre-
dicting other genetically acquired diseases
and conditions, such as cancer.
While there are already genetic tests used
to detect conditions like Down’s syndrome,
doctors usually have to order them individu-
ally and they can take several days to devel-
op.
Surgeon general urges
new resolve to end smoking
WASHINGTON — One in 13 children
could see their lives shortened by smoking
unless the nation takes more aggressive
action to end the tobacco epidemic, the U.S.
Surgeon General said Friday — even as,
astonishingly, scientists added still more
diseases to the long list of cigarettes’
harms.
“Enough is enough,” acting Surgeon
General Borish Lushniak declared at a White
House ceremony unveiling the 980-page
report that urges new resolve to make the
next generation a smoke-free generation.
“The clock is ticking,” Lushniak said.
“We can’t wait another 50 years.”
Around the nation
Barack Obama
OPINION 9
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Banking profits
Editor,
Latest news flash: banks post
increase in profits, bank employee
stock awards climb, bank stocks
rally on Wall Street. How could this
be after the whipping they took for
selling mortgage backed securities
that went south?
For those who think there is
another plan by banks to rip off the
unsuspecting public, here is your
opportunity to get involved. The
Senate Committee on Banking,
Housing and Urban Affairs, in
Washington, D.C., will need to get
your input as soon as possible. This
committee is composed of 12
Democrats and 10 Republicans.
They will need to hear from you now
to avoid another fiasco. It appears
that they missed the boat on the last
one and need a “heads-up” this time
around.
So, rather than complain in these
columns, it is your patriotic duty to
write or call your representatives in
Washington.
Rick Zobelein
San Mateo
Dimitre was on point
Editor,
My thanks to Dorothy Dimitre for
her column, “Thoughts on
droughts,” in the Jan. 15 edition of
the Daily Journal. As usual, she was
on point and insightful.
The only addition I would make is
to point out that almost a week
before Bishop Soto made his prayer
call, weather forecasters predicted
the dribble of rain we got a few days
after the “call.” So much for prayer.
The New York Times in its Jan. 17
edition has an article titled “U.N.
Panel Questions Vatican on
Handling of Clergy Sexual Abuse.”
Apparently it is being mostly not
handled and the Vatican is denying
responsibility for the “decades of
reports of clergy sexual abuse.” As
California and the now Cardinal
Mahony, formerly archbishop of
Los Angeles, are in the forefront of
the abuse scandal, I’m guessing that
Bishop Soto and friends may have a
little more to talk about and pray
about at their next Conference of
Catholic Bishops than the weather.
David Jonson
Burlingame
It’s still a hoax
Editor,
Recently, I wrote a letter asserting
my thoughts on the global warming
hoax which was disputed by one
Mike Slavens of San Mateo. Since
that time, I have done a little more
looking and have come to this con-
clusion; we probably should listen
to Mike and support the scholars
and experts he mentioned.
Why? Well, those scholars and
experts are the ones who came up
with the hockey stick temperature
scam. Oops! Then, Gore and his
computer model said the ice caps
would probably be melted by last
year. That didn’t happen, but the ice
caps have nearly doubled in one year
from September 2012 to September
2013. Oops! Then, there are the hun-
dreds and hundreds of emails by
scholars and experts around the
world trying to figure out what to do
to cover up the fact they cooked the
books on global warming. Oops! So
these are the scholars and experts we
should be listening to. Sorry I mis-
judged the whole thing, Mike.
One other thing, I want to thank
all those who have worn a military
uniform, mine was Navy, to keep
this country free; thank you for your
service. If you have not served your
country to keep it free, as far as I am
concerned, you do not have any
business talking about our country’s
military for any reason.
Irv Chase
Burlingame
Letters to the editor
New York Times
I
t has been three years since the
last new case of polio was
reported in India. The country
can now be declared polio-free.
India’s victory is an important mile-
stone in the global effort to elimi-
nate polio. In 2013, just 250 people
were paralyzed by polio. But the
viral disease remains a threat. The
World Health Organization reported
359 new polio cases as of Dec. 10,
2013, up from 213 in December
2012. And the number of countries
where polio is present rose to eight
from four between December 2012
and December 2013, with polio
spreading out of Nigeria into the
Horn of Africa and from Pakistan
into the Middle East. Violent con-
flict and distrust of vaccination pro-
grams are to blame.
Cases of polio in Pakistan, where
skepticism of vaccination efforts
remains after the revelation that the
United States Central Intelligence
Agency used a fake vaccination pro-
gram in its hunt for Osama bin
Laden, rose to 85 in 2013 from 58 in
2012. The W.H.O. also reported 17
confirmed cases and 60 suspected
cases of polio in 2013 in and along
the borders of war-torn Syria, a
country that had been free of polio
for 14 years.
With eradication of polio so close,
these nations need to redouble
efforts to combat the disease. India
can play a vital role. It has wel-
comed experts from polio-affected
countries and has sent medical offi-
cers to Nigeria to help with eradica-
tion initiatives there. Pakistan is
also enhancing its efforts. It has
raised the salaries of vaccinators,
created police and army escorts to
ensure their safety and enlisted mul-
lahs and imams to calm fears that
vaccination is a Western plot.
In the most violent polio-affected
areas, warring factions and rebel
groups must be persuaded to embrace
Unicef’s strategy where they agree
to cease hostilities long enough for
health workers to reach vulnerable
populations. India’s technical and
logistical success and Pakistan’s
efforts to enlist trusted local leaders
are important examples to follow.
All of these tactics will be necessary
to eradicate polio in 2014 and to
ensure that by 2018 this terrible
virus is gone for good.
Eradicating polio everywhere
Legacy of MLK
By John McDowell
M
onday will mark Martin Luther King Jr. Day,
31 years since Congress passed, and
President Reagan signed, the law setting
aside the third Monday in January as a holiday honoring
the Rev. Dr. King, and all of those who engaged in the
Civil Rights struggle. Martin Luther King has rightly
entered the pantheon of American heroes and this week-
end will be devoted to his life and legacy, including a
nationwide Day of Service.
Many people are better able to tell his story than I
can, especially those who worked directly with him and
who participated in civil rights
actions from marches, sit-ins and
voter registration drives. Instead, I’d
like to explain how, in a personal
way, Dr. King’s legacy lives on today.
Early in the ’80s, I thought of MLK
Day as just one more three-day week-
end and paid scant attention to who
Dr. King was, or what he stood for. I
don’t think this attitude is all that sur-
prising for someone who grew up here in San Mateo
County. Even now, my town of San Carlos is less than 1
percent black, San Mateo County is 3 percent black, and
California as a whole is only 6.6 percent black.
The “out of sight, out of mind” nature of the black
population here insulated me from the evils of segregat-
ed America and the oppression suffered by those denied
education, employment and the right to vote simply
because their ancestors hailed from Africa. That same
insulation sheltered me from the fact that the black
community that did exist in East Palo Alto was the result
of racist real estate covenants and “sundown town”
police action in Palo Alto and other Peninsula cities.
In the mid-’90s, I moved to my birthplace,
Washington, D.C. There, through my church, I encoun-
tered some amazing people. These were people who had
no reason to befriend me, yet they did. These were peo-
ple with whom I had almost nothing in common, yet
they invited me into their homes and into their lives.
When I visited their homes, I would see in a place of
honor pictures of Martin Luther King. It was then that I
began to understand the importance of his struggle in a
personal way. No longer was Dr. King an abstract figure
of a vague dream from years ago. Instead, he was a real
person, with a real life, who had real meaning.
The power of his Christian vision of the beloved com-
munity is striking. It is a vision, in the words of
Kenneth Smith and Ira Zepp, “of a completely integrated
society, a community of love and justice wherein broth-
erhood would be an actuality in all of social life ... such
a community would be the ideal corporate expression of
the Christian faith.”
Dr. King knew that integration meant a change in atti-
tudes. Positive personal and social relationships require
more than legislating civil rights. They require a deep
understanding of the kingdom of God brought about by
the incarnation of Jesus and his radical love for all.
Once physical segregation was legally abolished, inte-
gration demanded reaching out across psychological
barriers of class, education and upbringing.
That’s what my friends did. They reached out across
those barriers. They aren’t theologians, or political
activists. They are just ordinary people who absorbed,
from church and community, the fundamental impor-
tance of reconciliation and redemption in one’s life.
They understand that forgiveness does more for the for-
giver, by lifting a heavy psychological burden, than it
does for anyone else. They learned from Dr. King.
Because of Dr. King’s leadership in demanding civil
rights for all — built on the foundation of the
Declaration of Independence and its expression in the
Constitution — and legacy of radical Christian love, I
have friends and family I would not otherwise have.
Because of Dr. King, I have godsons and goddaughters,
nieces and nephews who enrich my life. For that, I am
deeply grateful.
But beyond one person’s experience, Dr. King’s life
and work has touched millions. And for that, all of us as
Americans should be deeply grateful as well.
If you are interested in local events this weekend that
commemorate the life of Dr. King, visit mlksmc.com or
norcalmlkfoundation.org .
John McDowell is a longtime county resident having first
moved to San Carlos in 1963. In the intervening years, he
has worked as a political volunteer and staff member in
local, state, and federal government, including time spent
as a press secretary on Capitol Hill and in the George W.
Bush administration.
Other voices
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 16,458.56 +41.55 10-Yr Bond 2.83 -0.02
Nasdaq 4,197.58 -21.11 Oil (per barrel) 94.30
S&P 500 1,838.70 -7.19 Gold 1,253.60
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
United Parcel Service Inc., down 58 cents to $99.91
December shipping problems amid “an unprecedented level of online
shopping”took a bite out of the company’s fourth-quarter earnings.
General Electric Co., down 62 cents to $26.58
The conglomerate met the expectations of Wall Street analysts in the
fourth quarter, but margins were under pressure.
Best Buy Co. Inc., down $2.40 to $24.43
The fallout continues from the electronics retailer’s dismal holiday sales,
as UBS and Goldman Sachs both issue downgrades.
Silver Spring Networks Inc., down $5.81 to $17.69
The networking company, which helps utilities upgrade their grid
infrastructures, said it could lose money in the fourth quarter.
Forest Laboratories Inc., up 46 cents to $68.74
Seeing “early innings of a multi-year rejuvenation story,” Credit Suisse
upgrades the drug developer to an “Outperform”rating.
Nasdaq
Intel Corp., down 69 cents to $25.85
The chipmaker’s fourth-quarter profits fell short of most Wall Street
expectations as the shift from PCs to tablets continues.
Electronic Arts Inc., up $2.56 to $24.10
Cowen and Co. cites strong December video game sales for the game
maker.
SLM Corp., down $2.67 to $24.47
Fourth-quarter profit fell 22 percent even though the student loan
company was required to set aside less money for loan losses.
Ariad Pharmaceuticals Inc., up 16 cents to $6.90
The pharmaceutical company announces the availability of its leukemia
drug Iclusig after addressing the safety concerns of regulators.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Investors weren’t
impressed with the earnings news
from big U.S. companies Friday.
Intel slumped after giving a weak
revenue forecast and General Electric
dropped after its profit margins fell
short. Capital One also fell after the
bank’s earnings missed expecta-
t i ons.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
slipped 7.19 points, or 0.4 percent,
to 1,838.70. The Dow Jones industri-
al average rose 41.55 points, or 0.3
percent, to 16,458.56. The Nasdaq
composite fell 21.11 points, or 0.5
percent, to 4,197.58.
The S&P 500 index retreated from a
record high close on Wednesday. It
ended the week 0.5 percent lower and
continued its lackluster start to
January.
Still, many investors aren’t ready
to give up on the stock market’s lat-
est rally, which capped an exception-
ally strong 2013 with a gain of
almost 10 percent in the final three
months of the year.
“Markets don’t go straight up to
the moon,” said Doug Cote, chief
market strategist at ING Investment
Management. “This flat-lining is the
market regrouping ... it’s a healthy
pause.”
GE slumped 62 cents, or 2.3 per-
cent, to $26.58 after profit margi ns
in the company’s industrial unit fell
short of its own targets.
Intel dropped 69 cents, or 2.6 per-
cent, to $25.85 after its first-quarter
revenue forecast disappointed Wall
Street. Intel said revenue would reach
$12.8 billion, “plus or minus” $500
million, less than analysts expected.
The earnings news on Friday wasn’t
all bad.
American Express rose $3.19, or
3.6 percent, to $90.97 after the com-
pany said late Thursday that its net
income more than doubled in the
fourth quarter. Amex cardholders
boosted their spending and borrow-
ing during the holiday season. The
news also lifted Visa. The payment
company’s stock climbed $10.41, or
4.7 percent, to $232.18.
The two companies are members of
the Dow and together boosted the
blue-chip index by 87 points.
Without them, the Dow would have
ended the day down.
Morgan Stanley also rose after
reporting earnings that beat fore-
casts. The bank’s stock climbed
$1.40, or 4.4 percent, to $33.40.
Investors were impressed by improv-
ing profitability at the bank’s wealth
management unit, and its pledge to
return more capital to shareholders in
the form of dividends and stock buy-
backs, said Shannon Stemm, an ana-
lyst at brokerage firm Edward Jones.
About 10 percent of the companies
in the S&P 500 have reported fourth-
quarter results so far. Despite the dis-
appointing earnings on Friday, prof-
its are still forecast to climb 5.3 per-
cent for the period to a record of
$27.76 a share, according to S&P
Capital IQ.
Thirteen more companies, includ-
ing Johnson & Johnson, Delta Air
Lines and International Business
Machines, will report earnings on
Tuesday.
The stock market is closed on
Monday for the Martin Luther King
Jr. Day holiday.
In government bond trading, the
yield on the 10-year note fell to 2.82
percent from 2.84 percent late
Thursday. In commodities trading,
the price of oil rose 41 cents to
$94.37 a barrel. Gold climbed
$11.70, or 0.9 percent, to $1,251 an
ounce.
Stocks mostly lower as earnings fall short
“Markets don’t go straight up to the moon. ...This
flat-lining is the market regrouping ... it’s a healthy pause.”
— Doug Cote, chief market strategist at ING Investment Management
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — U.S. employers adver-
tised more jobs in November and more
Americans quit, positive signs for millions
who are unemployed and looking for work.
The Labor Department said Friday that
job openings rose 1.8 percent to a season-
ally adjusted 4 million, the most in 5 1/2
years. And the number of people quitting
increased 1.9 percent to a seasonally adjust-
ed 2.4 million, a five-year high.
Job openings haven’t topped 4 million
since March 2008, just a few months after
the Great Recession began. Openings at
that level are generally consistent with a
healthy job market.
And more workers quitting can also be a pos-
itive signal, because people usually quit when
they either have a new job — typically for
more pay — or are confident they can find one.
The data suggest the competition for jobs
is getting a little bit easier. There were 2.7
unemployed workers for each available job
in November, down from 6.7 just after the
recession ended in July 2009. In a healthy
economy the ratio is roughly 2 to 1.
More job openings and quits suggest
greater opportunities for the unemployed.
But those positive trends haven’t recently
translated into additional hiring. Overall
hiring ticked up just 0.2 percent in
November to nearly 4.5 million.
The figures also follow a disappointing
report on December job growth. The gov-
ernment last week said employers added just
74,000 jobs in December. That’s the fewest
in three years and below an average gain of
214,000 in the previous three months.
The unemployment rate fell to 6.7 per-
cent, the lowest in more than five years. But
the rate dropped mostly because more
Americans gave up looking for work. The
government counts people as unemployed
only if they are actively hunting for jobs.
Last week’s employment report shows net
payroll gains — the number of people hired
minus those who were laid off, quit or
retired. Friday’s report, known as the Job
Openings and Labor Turnover survey, pro-
vides more details.
For example, it shows the overall number
of people hired each month, rather than just
the net gain. Total hires reached 4.6 million
in September, a five-year high, but hiring
has dipped since then.
In the past year, the number of job open-
ings has increased 5.6 percent. But total
hiring is only 1.7 percent higher.
U.S. employers advertise most jobs since March 2008
Slumping Intel to cut
more than 5,000 jobs in 2014
SAN FRANCISCO — Intel plans to trim
more than 5,000 jobs from its workforce this
year in an effort to boost its earnings amid
waning demand for its personal computer
chips.
The Santa Clara company confirmed the
job cuts Friday, the day after Intel Corp.
reported its profit and revenue had fallen for
the second consecutive year.
The purge represents about 5 percent of the
roughly 108,000 jobs that Intel had on its
payroll at the end of December. The company
intends to jettison the jobs without laying
off workers, said Intel spokesman Bill
Calder. The reductions instead will be
achieved through attrition, buyouts and early
retirement offers.
Jos. A. Bank rejects
Men’s Wearhouse $1.61B bid
Jos. A. Bank Clothier Inc. has rejected a
$1.61 billion takeover offer from rival
Men’s Wearhouse.
The two men’s clothing retailers have been
engaged in a strange courtship for months.
Jos. A. Bank made a bid for The Men’s
Wearhouse Inc. last year that was rejected.
Men’s Wearhouse then turned the tables
and made a bid for Jos. A. Bank that was
denied in December. It then raised the offer to
$57.50 per share from $55 per share. But
Jos. A. Bank said Friday that the offer is still
too low and not in the best interest of share-
holders.
By David Koenig
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DALLAS — UPS may be forced to change
the way it plans for the holiday season after
December shipping problems took a bite
out of fourth-quarter earnings.
The company said Friday that it took
“extraordinary” steps to meet holiday
demand, including hiring 85,000 seasonal
employees — 30,000 more than planned.
But the company’s network of brown
trucks and planes was overwhelmed by
what it termed “an unprecedented level” of
online shopping including “a surge of
last-minute orders.” Bad weather and a
shorter shopping season were also fac-
tors, it said in a news release. Company
officials declined interview requests.
Analysts said the company will make
changes including higher last-minute prices
to smooth out the peak caused by the final
rush of shopping just before Christmas.
Online shopping is good for UPS, as cus-
tomers count on delivery companies to get
those packages where they are supposed to
go on time. But volumes were so high last
month that hundreds of thousands of pack-
ages didn’t get to their destinations before
Christmas — UPS hasn’t disclosed the exact
number. Amazon.com offered shipping-
charge refunds and a $20 credit for some cus-
tomers affected by UPS delays.
On Friday, UPS said that it delivered a
record 31 million packages on Dec. 23.
That peak, however, came six days later
than UPS had planned, and it was 7.5 per-
cent more packages than the company had
expected on the busiest day of the season.
Jim Corridore, an analyst with S&P
Capital IQ, suggested the company learned a
lesson.
“We think UPS did a poor job forecasting
the holiday season, but we expect improved
readiness this year as online shopping con-
tinues to grow,” he said in a note to clients.
Online shopping, he added, “is a positive
trend, but UPS needs to do a better job capi-
talizing upon it.”
Kevin Sterling, an analyst with BBT
Capital Markets, said UPS had to catch up
after icy weather delayed early-December
deliveries, only to get slammed by a wave of
late online shopping.
UPS: Last-minute online shopping hurt 4Q profit
By Bree Fowler
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — An email sent to the rough-
ly 70 million Target customers who may
have been affected by a pre-Christmas data
breach is causing panic among those who
fear it could be an attempt to victimize them
again.
Target says the email, which offers free
credit monitoring services to potential vic-
tims of the breach, is legitimate. But the
company has identified a handful of scam-
mers who are trying to take advantage of the
public’s fear and confusion.
Consumers have been on edge since news
of the data breach broke last month. And
they’ve been warned to be on alert for pos-
sible follow-up attacks that could come in
the form of phishing emails, electronic
messages designed to implant malicious
software on their computers or draw them to
websites that prompt them to enter person-
al information.
So when Target’s email began circulating
earlier this week, many recipients ques-
tioned its authenticity. The email was espe-
cially suspicious to people who say they
haven’t set foot in a Target store in years.
Jim Reid, 60, of Minneapolis says he was
a little nervous about clicking on the link in
the email and he questioned whether it was a
good idea to send Target even more personal
information when they were unable to pro-
tect it in the first place.
“There’s too much uncertainty,” Reid
says. “They keep changing what they’re
saying about how many people were affect-
ed, about what kinds of information were
stolen. It’s obvious that they really don’t
know. ”
Shoppers fret about authenticity of Target emails
Business briefs
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With Carlmont shooting guard Anisah
Smith struggling with her shot, the Menlo-
Atherton girls’ basketball team hung with
the Scots for the better part of three quarters.
When Ilana Baer, a freshman making her
varsity debut for the Bears, hit a bucket with
2:48 left in the third quarter, M-Atrailed by
just four points, 28-24.
Aminute and 20 seconds later, Carlmont’s
lead was 14, 38-24. The Scots cruised home
from there, recording a 58-38 win to remain
unbeaten in Peninsula Athletic League South
Division play Friday night.
“Our defensive intensity picked up in the
second half and that was the difference,” said
Carlmont coach Dan Mori.
Carlmont (4-0 PAL South, 15-1 overall)
showed Friday it is more than just a one-per-
son team. If you just looked at the Carlmont
box scores from the season, the number that
jumps out in the one in the scoring column
for Smith, who is averaging over 20 points
per game this season.
But a box score doesn’t show what kind of
impact the Scots’ pressure defense has. It
was that swarming defense that forced M-A
(2-2, 10-5) into a number of turnovers —
nine in the second half alone — that turned
into easy baskets.
And while Smith still got hers — she fin-
ished with 24 points — it was her teammates
Carlmont turns close game into rout
See SCOTS, Page 14
<<< Page 12, South City and CSM
standout Rika Levi commits to Texas Tech
Weekend, Jan. 18-19, 2014
AFC CHAMPIONSHIP: BOTH BRONCOS AND PATRIOTS HAD TO OVERCOME A LOT TO GET TO THIS POINT >> PAGE 17
San Francisco and Seattle will go to war with a trip to the Super Bowl as the reward
By Barry Wilner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RENTON, Wash. — Big, bad football
players don’t get intimidated. Not by
noise, weather, statistics or hard hits.
Tell that to the two defenses about to
attempt to dominate the NFC champi-
onship game Sunday.
Or to the offenses, for that matter.
Seattle and San Francisco ranked first and
third in points allowed this season. The
Seahawks (14-3) won the NFC West with
the stingiest defense in yardage yielded,
and the 49ers (14-4) were fifth in that cate-
gory.
The Seahawks led the league in take-
aways (39), interceptions (28) and
turnover margin (plus-20), while the
Niners had a plus-12.
They did it with units that don’t back
down — ever. Physical, aggressive,
relentless. Choose your favorite term.
“I think DBs playing physical is the way
football should be,” Seahawks All-Pro cor-
nerback Richard Sherman said. “A lot of
people want to see great offense. You see
great offense all the time, people running
through zones and guys not being able to
cover them.
See NFC, Page 16
SPORTS 12
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It appears Rika Levi is trading his Bulldog
blue for some Texas Tech red.
Levi, the former South San Francisco
superstar and reigning California Defensive
Player of the Year for the College of San
Mateo football team, ended the suspense
Thursday when he verbally committed to
Texas Tech after two stellar seasons at CSM.
The 6-2, 350-pound defensive tackle is
expected to fit right into the Raiders’ 3-4
defensive scheme and be a major contributor
on the defensive line. Levi had offers on the
table from Kentucky, Missouri and
Washington of the Pac-12.
“He told me he was really excited about
playing at Texas Tech,” said Tim Tulloch,
CSM assistant head coach and defensive
coordinator. “They’re going to use him as a
3-4 nose guard similarly to what we did. He
has the opportunity to go make an impact in
the Big 12 and a great opportunity to play a
couple years and go on to the NFL.”
Levi’s dominance his sophomore season
at College Heights had very little to do with
his individual numbers. He recorded a mod-
est 25 tackles, 6.5 tackles for loss, three
sacks and two forced fumbles. But his con-
tributions to the Bulldogs were invaluable
as part of a defensive team that was near the
top of every statistical category in the
NorCal Conference and the state. Hence,
when it came down for the California
Community College Athletic Association
to choose its best defender, Levi was at the
top of list.
“He’s great on and off the field,” Tulloch
said. “He’s got so much passion for the
game. He loves playing football. He’s
explosive with his hands. He’s got unbe-
lievable power and athleticism for his size.
… They’re getting someone who is going
to be dominant on the football field and he’s
going to help change the locker room. He’s
going to help and create a championship
culture at Texas Tech. And that’s the thing
coach [Kliff] Kingsbury was hoping for.
“Every day we try to get better and he’s
continuing to grow as a man. He established
himself as a leader of his team and everyone
wanted to work hard with him and get on the
field with him and that’s what made it so
special. He just does that in every aspect of
his life.”
Levi made his official trip to Texas Tech in
December and fell in love with the place,
according to Tulloch — this after strong
suspicions floated around recruiting web-
sites that he was leaning toward
Washington of the Pac-12.
But, as recently as last Wednesday, Levi
began dropping strong hints on his Twitter
account and went final with his commit-
ment: “Just committed @RedRaiderSports
#GunzUp #RedRaiderNation”
Levi joins an already strong transfer class
of Bulldogs that includes former Daily
Journal Athlete of the Year Trevor Kelly,
who committed to the University of
California at Berkeley. Other universities
adding Bulldogs to their rosters include
Alabama, Oregon and Washington State.
Tulloch said the next batch of commitments
will happen in February.
Last year was the best to date for CSM.
They had 32 players sign their transfer
papers to 4-year universities — a record.
CSM’s Levi commits to Texas Tech
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Rika Levi, shown here during a 2012
intrasquad scrimmage, who was named the
California Community College Defensive
Player of the Year this past season, has orally
committed to Texas Tech.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Sometimes in heavyweight basketball
confrontations, it’s the unusual suspects
that land the most important blows.
And that was the case Friday night at
Burlingame HIgh School as the Panthers
survived a furious second-half comeback by
Mills to come away with the 57-51 victory.
The Panthers led by as many as 14 points
on a couple of occasions before the Vikings
pulled to within three with less than half a
quarter of basketball to play.
But as was the case the entire night,
Burlingame relied on its supporting cast
during a couple of key stretches to thwart
Mills momentum.
“A lot of the attention is to me and Nick
(Loew),” said Burlingame guard Frankie
Ferrari, who finished with 11 points. “I kind
of get a double (team), or different looks.
So, I just try to get everyone else involved
and they knocked down shots, thankfully. ”
By “they,” Ferrari is referring to Kevin
Abuyaghi, Bassel Mufarreh and Jack Larratt
— all of whom had major contributions in
the game.
“[Mills’ defensive] zone was tough,” said
Burlingame head coach Pete Harames. “You
have to work every single time down
because they extend it. There are a lot of
arms moving and you better hit your shots.”
In the first half, the Panthers had very lit-
tle trouble doing just that. Burlingame shot
almost 57 percent from the floor in the first
16 minutes including 7 of 15 from beyond
the arc. Justin Gutang came out nice and hot
to start the contest and he fueled an early 8-
0 run that helped Burlingame to a 16-10 lead
after one quarter.
Mills picked up their offensive output in
the second quarter. After hitting just two
Panthers earn big win over Mills
Giants agree to deals
with Blanco, Petit, Abreu
SAN FRANCISCO — The Giants have
agreed to one-year deals with three of their five
players in salary arbitration: outfielder Gregor
Blanco, right-hander Yusmeiro Petit and
infielder Tony Abreu.
Blanco’s deal announced Friday is for
$2,525,000, Abreu’s is for $987,500 and
Petit’s is for $845,000.
First baseman Brandon Belt and infielder
Joaquin Arias remain in arbitration. Belt asked
for $3.6 million and the team offered $2.05
million; Arias is seeking $1.5 million to the
team’s $1.1 million.
Blanco batted .265 with three home runs
and 41 RBIs last season. He has been a defen-
sive specialist since joining the Giants two
years ago, including making a diving catch to
preserve Matt Cain’s perfect game in 2012.
Petit went 4-1 with a 3.56 ERA in eight
games last season with San Francisco. Abreu
batted .268 with two home runs and 14 RBIs
in 53 games.
A’s agree to 1-year
deals with Lowrie, 3 others
OAKLAND — The Oakland Athletics have
agreed to one-year contracts with four players
in arbitration: infielders Jed Lowrie and
Brandon Moss, outfielder Craig Gentry and
reliever Luke Gregerson.
Gregerson’s deal announced Friday is worth
$5,065,000, Lowrie’s is for $5.25 million,
Moss’ contract is for $4.1 million and
Gentry’s is for $1,145,000.
The switch-hitting Lowrie batted .290 with
15 home runs and 75 RBIs last year. Moss hit
a team-leading 30 home runs and finished sec-
ond with 87 RBIs while hitting .256.
Gregerson was acquired from San Diego on
Dec. 3 for slugger Seth Smith after going 6-8
with four saves and a 2.71 ERA. And the A’s
got Gentry from Texas in a four-player trade on
Dec. 3 after he batted .280 with two home runs
and 22 RBIs.
The only Oakland player remaining in arbi-
tration is right fielder Josh Reddick. He asked
for $3.25 million and the A’s offered $2 mil-
lion.
Scherzer, Tigers agree at $15,525,000
DETROIT— ALCy Young Award winner has
agreed to a one-year contract with the Detroit
Tigers for $15,525,000, setting himself up
for an even bigger payday when he becomes
eligible for free agency after the season.
Scherzer went 21-3 with a 2.90 ERAand 240
strikeouts.
Baseball briefs
See BGAME, Page 15
SPORTS 13
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Boys’ basketball
M-A 40, Carlmont 35
With the score tied at 11 at the half,
Menlo-Atherton used a 17-point third quar-
ter to distance themselves from the Scots en
route to the victory.
Royce Branning led all scorers with 12
points while Michael Costello scored 11
points for the Scots in his second game
back from injury.
Hillsdale 59, Capuchino 41
The Knights improved to 3-1 in PAL
South play with a victory over the
Mustangs.
Brian Houle led all scorers with 22 points
for Hillsdale (3-1, 8-7). Capuchino (0-4, 4-
11) was led by Raoul Ligon, who scored 19
points. Lucas Magni added 11.
Girls’ basketball
Mills 50, Burlingame 42
The Panthers kept Vikings’ center Julia
Gibbs in check, but Madison Sui and Taylor
Cormier picked up the slack to keep Mills
unbeaten in Peninsula Athletic League
South Division play this season.
Gibbs, who scored 21 points in a
Wednesday, had just four points against
Burlingame, but Sui and Cormier each had
11 points to lead Mills (4-0 PAL South, 10-
6 overall) to the win.
Lindsay Huffman added seven points for
the Vikings, while Stephanie Mar and
Aubrie Businger each scored six.
Pinewood 70, Sacred Heart Prep 47
The Gators ran into a buzzsaw in the
Panthers Friday night, falling to one of the
top teams in the Central Coast Section for
their first loss in West Bay Athletic League
play.
Pinewood (1-0 WBAL, 14-0 overall) all
but put the game away in the first half, scor-
ing 23 points in each of the first and second
quarters to take a 46-23 lead at halftime.
SHP (1-1, 10-6) was led by Ma’ata
Makoni, who scored 14 points. Meghan
Holland added 11 for the Gators.
Menlo 48, Mercy-SF 45
Menlo School pulled out a win against
Mercy-San Francisco after being down by a
point with 52 seconds to play. It’s then that
Sam Erisman hit a free throw and then
Kenzie Duffner scored a bucket followed by
a steal and free throw by De'jeane Stine with
seven seconds to play for the eventual out-
come.
Menlo was led by Hannah Paye, who hit a
Menlo record seven 3-pointers en route to a
25-point night.
Olivia Pellarin and Duffner chipped in
with eight rebounds each and Pellarin also
had five blocks. The Knight are now 1-1 in
league.
Girls’ soccer
Sacred Heart Prep 5, Monta Vista 1
Tierna Davidson scored a hat trick as the
Gators thumped the Matadors in a non-
league game Friday afternoon.
Davidson scored her first two goals in the
game’s first 12 minutes to take control.
Carey Bradley added a third first-half goal
for SHP (8-1-2 overall). Cameron Gordon
added the Gators’ fourth goal five minutes
into the second half before Davidson capped
the afternoon with her third goal of the
game in the 65th minute.
Kate Bechtel, McKenna Angotti and
Bradley each had an assist in the win.
Harker 3, Crystal Springs 1
The Eagles scored twice in the first half
and added an insurance goal late in the sec-
ond to hold off the Gryphons Thursday
afternoon.
EV Nora scored the only goal for Crystal
Springs (1-1 WBAL, 5-4 overall), with an
assist from Megan Duncanson.
Harker remains undefeated in West Bay
Athletic League play at 3-0 and has an over-
all record of 7-1.
Boys’ soccer
Sacred Heart Prep 5, Pinewood 1
The Gators remained undefeated in West
Bay Athletic League play, routing the
Panthers.
Isaac Polkinhorne scored the first two
goals for SHP (4-0 WBAL, 5-4-1 overall),
while Ricky Grau, Matthew MacFarquhar
and Frankie Hattler each added a score.
Will Mishra and Andrew Segre each added
a pair of assists.
St. Ignatius 3, Notre Dame-Belmont 1
The Wildcats scored a pair of goals within
five minutes of each other to down the
Tigers in a West Catholic Athletic League
matchup Thursday.
Luca Deza scored the only goal for Notre
Dame-Belmont (1-4 WCAL, 7-5 overall).
Wrestling
Half Moon Bay 64, El Camino 16
The Cougars opened the Peninsula
Athletic League Bay Division dual meet sea-
son with dominating win over the Colts
Thursday night.
Half Moon Bay (1-0 PAL Bay) won 11 of
the 14 matches. Khalil Droubi (128),
Spencer Boling (134), Jim Alves (162),
Dominic Pintarelli (172), Raul Hernandez
(184) and Jose Ayon (heavyweight) all won
by pins for the Cougars. Half Moon Bay
also picked up four wins by forfeit.
El Camino (0-1) got pins from Roman
Reich (147) and Alex Goff (154).
Women’s college basketball
CSM 63, Chabot 58
McKenna Hilton scored 16 points as
College of San Mateo came back from a 29-
27 halftime deficit to defeat host Chabot
College for the Bulldogs’ third straight
Coast Conference North women’s basket-
ball triumph Friday evening.
San Mateo (11-7 overall, 3-1 Coast
North) outscored the Gladiators, 36-29 after
the intermission.
Hilton, a freshman guard out of Half
Moon Bay High, tallied 12 of her points
from the free throw line. Chureel
Kanongata’a and Mia Maffei each scored 11
points and Kate Larson added nine.
San Mateo will play its second home
league contest on Wednesday against co-
leader Ohlone (12-7, 3-0) at 5:30 p.m.
Local sports roundup
By Cliff Brunt
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OKLAHOMACITY— Kevin Durant scored
a career-high 54 points to help the
Oklahoma City Thunder beat the Golden
State Warriors 127-121 on Friday night.
Durant made 19 of 28 field goals and 11 of
13 free throws in his third straight game
with at least 36 points.
Serge Ibaka had 21 points and eight
rebounds, Reggie Jackson scored 14 points
and Kendrick Perkins added 12 rebounds for
the Thunder (30-10), who won for the third
time in four games. Oklahoma City shot 58
percent from the field and scored a season-
high point total.
Stephen Curry had 37 points and 11
assists and Klay Thompson added 26 points
for the Warriors (25-16), who shot 52 per-
cent but simply couldn’t match up with
Durant.
Durant drained back-to-back 3-pointers
with Draymond Green in his face to give the
Thunder a 116-103 lead. He hit another 3
with 5:25 left to reach 50, and then, with
the crowd on its feet, made a turnaround
jumper to match his career high.
The crowd chanted M-V-P as he made two
foul shots with 2:45 remaining to establish
a new career best.
Oklahoma City led 39-32 at the end of the
first quarter after shooting 78.3 percent
from the field. Even at the end of the period,
after Jeremy Lamb missed a fadeaway,
Steven Adams was there to tip it in with less
than a second remaining.
It was the most points the Thunder have
scored in a first quarter this season and their
second-most for any quarter this season.
Golden State shot 57 percent from the field
in the period, yet found itself barely hang-
ing on.
Golden State managed to stay with the
Thunder by kicking its offense into an even
higher gear, and a 3-pointer by Thompson
tied it at 48 midway through the second
quarter.
Oklahoma City created some distance at
the free-throw line to take a 71-65 lead at
the break. It was a season high for points in
a half for the Thunder.
Durant scores 54, Thunder hold off Warriors
Thunder 127, Warriors 121
who helped pick up the slack.
“Since my shot wasn’t falling, I decided to
work on other parts of the game,” Smith
said.
In addition to her two dozen points, Smith
also came up with five steals, a handful off
assists and two rebounds.
While Smith had a pair of baskets during
that 10-0 run in the third quarter, she also
set up her teammates. Cam Kondo started
the run by burying a jumper. Smith followed
with a pair of layups on a fastbreak and a
steal, then assisted on Kondo and Sophia
Paupusa buckets.
“We’re starting to trust our game more,”
Smith said. “I’m trusting my teammates
because even if they don’t catch (my pass),
there’s always the next possession.”
Given that Smith is the only senior on a
team that also features a pair of freshmen
and sophomores, that trust has taken a
while to build. But if the Scots can get con-
sistent points elsewhere, not only will it
take pressure off Smith, it was also make the
Scots a more potent team.
Smith’s teammates definitely took the
pressure off of her in the second half. In the
first two quarters, Smith scored 11 of the
Scots’ 19 first-half points.
While Smith scored 13 in the second half,
her teammates chipped in with 30 over the
final two periods. Kondo, a freshman, fin-
ished with nine points and nine rebounds,
while Rachel Lum, a junior, added seven. In
all, nine players got in the scoring column
for Carlmont.
“It’s a growth process. [The rest of the
team] is playing with a lot more confi-
dence,” Mori said. “Anisah’s leadership has
been great in helping the other players.”
After scoring 19 points in the first half,
Carlmont exploded for 39 in the second
half.
M-A was led by Ilana Baer’s 12 points.
Natalie Fonseca added eight and pulled down
eight rebounds. Freshman Ofa Sili had six
points and six boards.
Despite the final score, the game was
much closer in the first half. The first quarter
was a battle between Smith and M-A’s
Fonseca. Smith scored eight in the first
quarter, while Fonseca went for six as the
Scots led 13-8 after one quarter.
The Bears scored the first five points of
the second period on a bucket from Ilana
Baer and a 3-pointer from Sarah Howell to
tie the game at 13. After Smith made 1 of 2
free throws to give the Scots a 14-13 lead,
Fonseca hit a pair from the charity stripe to
give M-A a 15-14 advantage — one of two
times the Bears led in the game.
Carlmont responded with a Lum 3 and a
layup off a steal from Smith to retake the
lead for the Scots and they went into half-
time leading 19-17.
M-A stayed with Carlmont early in the
third quarter. Smith hit 1 of 2 free throws to
push the Scots lead to 20-17, but layups
from Sili and Erin Goode gave M-Aa 21-20
lead — the Bears’ last lead of the game.
The Scots responded with an 8-1 run for a
28-22 lead. Ilana Baer’s bucket with 2:48 to
make the score 28-24, which would be as
close as the Bears would get the rest of the
way as they were held to just 21 second-half
points.
SPORTS 14
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NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Carlmont’s AnisahSmith shoots over a M-A defender during the Scots’ 58-38 victory Friday
night. Smith scored a game-high 24 points.
Continued from page 11
SCOTS
SPORTS 15
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Senior Citizen Discounts
Wheelchair Access Vans
www.serrayellowcab.com
CALL GOOºOO1ºÆOAO
Book Your Ride
Call or Make Online Reservation
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 20 18 .526 —
Brooklyn 16 22 .421 4
New York 15 25 .375 6
Boston 14 27 .341 7 1/2
Philadelphia 13 26 .333 7 1/2
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 28 11 .718 —
Atlanta 20 19 .513 8
Washington 19 19 .500 8 1/2
Charlotte 17 24 .415 12
Orlando 10 30 .250 18 1/2
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 31 7 .816 —
Chicago 18 20 .474 13
Detroit 16 23 .410 15 1/2
Cleveland 15 25 .375 17
Milwaukee 7 31 .184 24
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 31 9 .775 —
Houston 26 15 .634 5 1/2
Dallas 24 17 .585 7 1/2
Memphis 20 19 .513 10 1/2
New Orleans 15 23 .395 15
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Portland 30 9 .769 —
Oklahoma City 30 10 .750 1/2
Denver 20 19 .513 10
Minnesota 18 21 .462 12
Utah 14 27 .341 17
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 28 13 .683 —
Golden State 25 16 .610 3
Phoenix 22 17 .564 5
L.A. Lakers 15 25 .375 12 1/2
Sacramento 14 24 .368 12 1/2
Friday’sGames
Miami 101, Philadelphia 86
Washington 96, Chicago 93
L.A. Clippers 109, New York 95
L.A. Lakers 107, Boston 104
Portland 109, San Antonio 100
Dallas 110, Phoenix 107
Cleveland 117, Denver 109
Oklahoma City 127, Golden State 121
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 47 30 15 2 62 136 104
Tampa Bay 48 28 15 5 61 137 115
Montreal 48 27 16 5 59 123 115
Toronto 49 24 20 5 53 136 149
Ottawa 48 21 18 9 51 138 151
Detroit 47 20 17 10 50 118 128
Florida 47 18 22 7 43 109 144
Buffalo 46 13 27 6 32 83 129
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 48 34 12 2 70 156 115
Philadelphia 48 24 19 5 53 128 136
N.Y. Rangers 49 25 21 3 53 120 126
Washington 48 22 18 8 52 141 146
New Jersey 49 20 18 11 51 113 120
Columbus 47 23 20 4 50 134 132
Carolina 46 19 18 9 47 111 130
N.Y. Islanders 49 19 23 7 45 134 157
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 50 31 8 11 73 181 137
St. Louis 46 32 9 5 69 164 104
Colorado 47 30 12 5 65 137 118
Minnesota 50 26 19 5 57 122 123
Dallas 47 21 19 7 49 134 145
Nashville 49 21 21 7 49 117 146
Winnipeg 49 21 23 5 47 138 148
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 50 36 9 5 77 172 124
San Jose 48 30 12 6 66 153 117
Los Angeles 48 29 14 5 63 124 97
Vancouver 49 24 16 9 57 124 125
Phoenix 47 22 16 9 53 136 143
Calgary 48 16 26 6 38 107 153
Edmonton 50 15 30 5 35 129 178
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday’sGames
Columbus 5,Washington 1
Chicago 4, Anaheim 2
Saturday’sGames
N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa, 11 a.m.
San Jose at Tampa Bay, 11 a.m.
Edmonton at Winnipeg, 11 a.m.
Columbus at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
Montreal at Toronto, 4 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
SATURDAY
Boys’ basketball
Bellarmine at Serra, 7:30 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Notre Dame-Belmont at Presentation, 6:30
p.m.
Boys’ soccer
Serra at St. Francis, 11 a.m.
Girls’ soccer
Mitty at Notre Dame-Belmont, 11 a.m.
MONDAY, JAN. 20
Girls’ soccer
Westmoor at Oceana,Half Moon Bay at Mills,
El Camino at Jefferson, 3 p.m.; South City at
Terra Nova, 4 p.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BALTIMOREORIOLES—Agreed to terms with 1B
Chris Davis, RHP Tommy Hunter, LHP Brian Matusz,
RHP Bud Norris and LHP Troy Patton on one-year
contracts.
BOSTONREDSOX—Agreed to terms with 1B/OF
Mike Carp, INF Jonathan Herrera, and RHP Junichi
Tazawa on one-year contracts.
CHICAGOWHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with
INF Gordon Beckham and OF Alejandro De Aza on
one-year contracts.
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with
LHP Marc Rzepczynski on a one-year contract.
DETROITTIGERS—Agreed to terms with RHPs Al
Alburquerque,Rick Porcello and Max Scherzer and
OFs Andy Dirks and Austin Jackson on one-year
contracts.
National League
ARIZONADIAMONDBACKS —Agreed to terms
with LHP Joe Thatcher on a one-year contract.
ATLANTABRAVES —Agreed to terms with RHP
KrisMedlen,LHPMikeMinor,INFChrisJohnsonand
OF Jordan Schafer on one-year contracts.
CHICAGOCUBS—Agreed to terms with OF Nate
Schierholtz, INF Luis Valbuena, LHP James Russell
and RHP Pedro Strop on one-year contracts.
CINCINNAI REDS — Agreed to terms with RHP
Sam LeCure on a two-year contract and RHP Al-
fredo Simon and RHP Mike Leake on a one-year
contracts.
COLORADO ROCKIES —Agreed to terms with
RHP Juan Nicasio and OF Drew Stubbs on one-year
contracts.
TRANSACTIONS
shots in the first period, they were
7 of 12 from the floor in the sec-
ond quarter. But because
Burlingame stayed consistent, the
lead was up to 10 on a couple of
occasions. A big part of that was
Larratt, who scored eight of his 10
points in the second quarter,
including two buckets in the last
couple of seconds, that pushed
Burlingame’s lead to 13 come
recess.
“We were able to get inside a lit-
tle bit, at the end of the first half
and at the end of the third quarter, ”
Harames said.
Mills’ defense was the catalyst
for its first run of the evening —
that and Robert Noland started to
heat up.
Burlingame only got up 10
shots in the third quarter and, with
Tyler Wright dominating the
glass, Mills pushed, going on an
11-1 run to close the gap the
Panthers built behind Loew’s
tough work under the hoop and at
the free throw line.
Noland knocked down some
buckets and Marquis Adkins found
some offensive rhythm. Before
the period was over, Mills was
only down five.
“I wasn’t surprised they made a
comeback,” said Mills head coach
Rick Hanson. “These kids have a
lot of fight in them.”
“I guess we didn’t hit as many
shots and the ball movement was-
n’t as good. I thought fouls —
they were driving more on us,”
Harames said of Mills’ run. “I
thought our defense dropped off a
bit.”
The entire fourth quarter was
tense, with Mills seemingly
always having the emotional
momentum. But for every one of
their big baskets, there was a play-
er like Abuyaghi and a big 3, or
Mufarreh, who had a couple of
massive hoops in the paint to
calm things down.
“He played terrific,” Harames
said of Mufarreh. “He’s a factor. If
teams come in bigger, we can put
him in.”
The Vikings had one more run in
them. Noland’s drive to the hoop
made it a three-point game, but he
missed the free throw and from the
27-second mark on, Burlingame
added some freebies to ice the win.
“Just momentum swings,”
Ferrari said about the difference in
the game. “They’re part of the
game. Fortunately, we were able to
hit key shots down the stretch and
that propelled us to the win.”
The Panthers improve to 4-0 in
league while Mills is now 2-2.
Continued from page 12
BGAME
16
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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“We stand up there and have a dog fight
every play. You know, there are going to be
some pushing-offs and grabbing here and
there, and that is the game of football.
That’s how it is. That’s how it’s always
been.”
Pointing to the Seattle secondary for
instilling trepidation in opponents is a nat-
ural place to start. They specialize in tight
coverage and rugged tackling. They don’t
back down.
“Our aggression, our intensity is the same
as it’s been,” Sherman said as he looked
ahead to a third meeting with their division
counterpart in what has become a tense and
bitter rivalry. “In practice, our practices
now are the same as they’ve been. We’ve
been going 100 percent, competing, com-
peting, and nothing has changed. We have
the most intense competitors out there, and
that is showing on the practice field, and it
shows up on game day. ”
As it does with the 49ers. For every
Sherman, Kam Chancellor, Bobby Wagner
and Michael Bennett in Seattle, there are
Patrick Willis, NaVorro Bowman, Donte
Whitner and Justin Smith in San Francisco.
And more. Everywhere.
“You have to be physical, you want to
make them think about you out there,” said
Whitner, who considered changing his
name to Hitner last year. “That’s an impor-
tant part of the game.”
It works both ways, too. Bowman, an All-
Pro linebacker, revels in the physicality of
Anquan Boldin, the veteran receiver who
joined the 49ers this season. Boldin is
among the toughest players at his position
in the NFL.
Make that one of the toughest at any posi-
tion, offense or defense.
“Him making the big plays for us when we
need it, understanding where the stick is
when he’s catching the ball, all those
things,” Bowman says in praising Boldin,
who helped beat the 49ers in last season’s
Super Bowl while he was a Ravens wideout.
‘And intimidating those cornerbacks. He’s
so strong that corners understand that, so
they back off on him and just try to make
that tackle. But he just does a great job with
just making big plays for us.”
Any meetings on the field Sunday between
Sherman and Chancellor against Boldin
could be epic. They surely will make high-
light reels the way NASCAR crashes tend
t o.
Yet Pete Carroll, whose coaching style
always has leaned toward the assertive — he
made his mark as a defensive coordinator
whose units attacked to the whistle — does-
n’t quite buy the intimidation label, even if
some of his players do.
“That’s a word I would not go to,” he said
Friday. “It does not seem like it fits, to me.
There are a bunch of guys on this football
team and that football team who are very
serious about playing good ball on
defense.”
And serious about letting offensive play-
ers know who is boss.
“Ask Kam Chancellor,” Seahawks receiv-
er Doug Baldwin said of the safety he often
practices against. “I would say yes to some
degree, some players get intimidated, some
don’t. I always tell Kam if he ever tried to
mess with me I’ll punch him in the mouth. I
don’t take to intimidation very well.”
There are other ways of putting fear — or
at least hesitation — in an opponent, any-
way.
Baldwin’s fellow wideout in Seattle,
Golden Tate, stresses performance.
“Intimidation comes from what you lay
out there for them to see on film, what you
do on the field,” he said. “I think my play —
jumping for catches, going across the mid-
dle, catching the ball in the end zone, break-
ing a punt return with the guys blocking for
me up front — and backing it up by making
more plays, that’s what can be intimidat-
ing.”
Continued from page 11
NFC
3:30 p.m., FOX
No. 4 Cardinals rout Wildcats 96-52
TUCSON, Ariz. — Chiney Ogwumike had
24 points and 12 rebounds, Karlie Samuelson
added 16 points and No. 4 Stanford rolled over
Arizona 96-52 Friday night.
Stanford (16-1, 5-0 Pac-12) allowed Arizona
to keep it close early in the first half before
using a big run to build a 21-point lead. The
Cardinal cruised from there, shooting 63 per-
cent while hitting 15 of 32 from 3-point range
for their 59th straight Pac-12 road win.
Ogwumike made 12 of 13 shots, Lil
Thompson added 12 points and six assists,
and Stanford had 28 assists on 40 field goals to
win its 23rd straight over the Wildcats.
Mayweather: Last fight
will be in September 2015
JOHANNESBURG — Floyd Mayweather
Jr. says he’ll fight for the last time in
September next year.
Mayweather told guests at a gala dinner in
South Africa on Friday that he remembers
his first fight when he was a kid in 1987, and
that “September 2015 will be my last.”
The unbeaten five-division world champi-
on, considered by many the best boxer of
his era, said after beating Canelo Alvarez in
a dominating display last September that he
had four fights and two years left in his
career.
Sports brief
SPORTS 17
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
By Arnie Stapleton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — Embarrassing headlines. Sidelined
superstars. Retooled offenses. Shredded defenses. It’s a won-
der the New England Patriots and Denver Broncos made it this
far.
Bill Belichick’s smarts and Tom Brady’s tenacity always
seems to trump tribulation.
This season, they brushed aside the Tim Tebow distraction
and overcame Aaron Hernandez’s arrest and the losses of Rob
Gronkowski, Wes Welker, Vince Wilfork and Jerod Mayo to
put the Patriots (13-4) into the AFC championship for the
third straight year.
“I’m sure every team is probably at this point overcome a
lot,” Brady said. “I know Denver has done a lot of those
things, too. They’ve overcome a lot of things and injuries and
so forth. It’s just part of the NFLfootball season.
“To get out there and play 16 weeks and
really see where you stand at the end of
those 16 weeks, getting to the playoffs,
play the best teams and see if you can
advance. It’s certainly not easy to do. It’s
very challenging.”
Nobody does it better than Brady and
Belichick, the best quarterback/coach
combo in history with a record 18 playoff
wins.
After last year’s stumble against
Baltimore in the playoffs, John Fox and
Peyton Manning also steered the Broncos
(14-3) through a minefield to send Denver
to its first conference championship in
eight years.
“That shock of what happened against
the Ravens contributed to this team being
able to be as flexible as it has been and
survive the adversity that it’s gone
through,” said Hall of Fame quarterback
John Elway, who led the Broncos to back-to-back Super
Bowls in the late 1990s and now leads them from the front
office instead of the huddle.
After losing Elvis Dumervil in the infamous fax fiasco when
his renegotiated contract didn’t reach team headquarters in
time, Elway hit the jackpot in free agency by signing Welker
and Louis Vasquez on offense and Shaun Phillips, Terrance
Knighton and Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie on defense.
They helped the Broncos weather an injury epidemic that
claimed Von Miller, Kevin Vickerson, Rahim Moore, Derek
Wolfe and Chris Harris while rendering captains Champ
Bailey and Wesley Woodyard backups for most of the season.
Fox overcame his own heart operation that sidelined him
for a month and even a player quitting on him at midseason,
and Manning set a slew of records, including throwing for 55
TDs and 5,447 yards, to help the Broncos become the first
600-point team in league history.
The Broncos did it despite losing exceptional blindside pro-
tector Ryan Clady in Week 2 and being anchored by a con-
verted guard who hadn’t played a full season at center in 14
years.
So, Manning sits just one win shy of returning to the Super
Bowl just two years after he was jettisoned by the
Indianapolis Colts following four neck surgeries that
strengthened his resolve but weakened his throwing arm.
“You don’t take it for granted,” Manning said, “especially
when you’ve been through an injury, been through a major
change and you’re in the home stretch of your career.”
Patriots, Broncos overcame plenty of obstacles
TomBrady
Peyton
Manning
Noon, CBS
18
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/WORLD
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm
www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Lutheran
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)
2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am
Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
Non-Denominational
of the edtech company. “And to spread
what’s happening to classrooms.”
Borg, 27, and his company have had a
good last few years. In 2012, Edmodo
raised $25 million, bringing Edmodo’s
total funding raised to $57 million.
Founded in 2008, Edmodo is free and pro-
vides teachers, administrators, parents and
students a secure place to connect and col-
laborate, share and compare content and
educational applications, and access home-
work, grades, tests, class discussions and
notifications. Edmodo also offers a plat-
form for app developers. There are now
about 600 apps from which the company
takes a revenue share.
“I’m always extremely excited and
amazed by how they’re (teachers) spreading
it to other teachers,” said Borg, who grew
up in the Midwest and is married.
The company is growing, both in terms
of user base and employees, and recently
moved from downtown San Mateo to a
48,370-square-foot space at the newly
developed office spaces at 1200 Park Place
in San Mateo. There are now more than 30
million teachers and students who use the
platform in about 190 countries. Edmodo’s
goal is to help educators use social media to
customize the classroom for each and every
learner.
“San Mateo is the perfect spot to attract
talent from San Jose and San Francisco,”
said Borg who lives in Foster City. “We
loved the atmosphere here. There are a lot
of options for going out to lunch.”
Edmodo is different from other edtech
startups since it works at a much larger
scale than others.
“They were all lonely islands,” he said.
“Ours is very teacher-centric and we want to
get teachers working on the same things
connected. That all comes from getting a
very large network.”
Edmodo is what brought Borg, who has a
computer science and education back-
ground, out to California in the first place.
Borg met his co-founder Jeff O’Hara
through O’Hara’s wife, who taught at the
same school Borg worked at and was also
his high school biology teacher. The two
co-founders decided they wanted to build
projects to help students and teachers. Borg
also has an education background, as his
father worked in universities and his mom
taught as well.
“Seeing how connected everyone was
outside of the classroom and how you got
back into the past when you go in,” he said.
“We wanted to help them see how they can
engage students and share what content is
effective.”
Edmodo has helped Borg for his personal
growth, he said.
“Edmodo’s been my graduate school,” he
said.
With the shift to Common Core standards
in California and 44 other states, there will
be more project-based and team collabora-
tive learning in schools. There is also the
new Smarter Balance testing, which aligns
with these new standards, that will go into
effect during the 2014-15 school year.
“We’re focused on providing tools teach-
ers need to best leverage the transition,” he
said. “It’s an opportunity for us to help.”
For now, the company is focused on
“unlocking of the power of the world’s
largest learning network.” Borg wants
teachers to be able to turn feedback from
one another into actionable items.
“People have a real belief that moving
the needle in K-12 education makes soci-
ety’s problems so much easier,” he said.
To learn more about Edmodo or to sign up
for the service, visit edmodo.com.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Ban Ki-moon says four U.N.
personnel killed in Kabul attack
UNITED NATIONS — Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon says four United Nations per-
sonnel have been killed in the “horrific
attack” on a Kabul restaurant.
Officials say a suicide bomber blew him-
self up outside a Kabul restaurant filled with
foreigners and affluent Afghans having din-
ner Friday night, while two gunmen sneaked
in through the back door and opened fire.
The U.N. chief condemned Friday’s attack
“in the strongest terms,” saying “such tar-
geted attacks against civilians are com-
pletely unacceptable and are in flagrant
breach of international humanitarian law, ”
U.N. deputy spokesman Farhan Haq said.
Ban said the U.N. per-
sonnel, who were not
identified, were among at
least 14 foreigners and
Afghans killed, including
a number of people from
other international
organizations. Kabul
police say 16 people
were killed.
Ban demanded an
immediate end to the attacks.
Pope defrocked 400
priests in two years
VATICAN CITY— In his last two years as
pope, Benedict XVI defrocked nearly 400
priests for raping and molesting children,
more than twice as many as the two years
that preceded a 2010 explosion of sex abuse
cases in Europe and beyond, according to a
document obtained Friday by the Associated
Press and an analysis of Vatican statistics.
The data — 260 priests defrocked in 2011
and 124 in 2012, a total of 384 — repre-
sented a dramatic increase over the 171
priests defrocked in 2008 and 2009.
It was the first compilation of the number
of priests forcibly removed for sex abuse by
the Vatican’s in-house procedures — and a
canon lawyer said the real figure is likely far
higher, since the numbers don’t include sen-
tences meted out by
diocesan courts.
The spike started a year
after the Vatican decided
to double the statute of
limitations on the crime,
enabling victims who
were in their late 30s to
report abuse committed
against them when they
were children.
The Vatican has actually made some data
public year by year in its annual reports.
But an internal Vatican document prepared
to help the Holy See defend itself before a
U.N. committee this week in Geneva com-
piled the statistics over the course of sever-
al years.
Continued from page 1
BORG
apartment building, causing “significant”
damage, Palisi said.
The displaced residents who lived in the
building received aid from the American
Red Cross, he said.
One firefighter injured his hand but there
were no other injuries, according to city
officials.
Damage to the machine shop was exten-
sive, including the collapse of the build-
ing’s roof, Palisi said.
The fire also spread to three nearby indus-
trial businesses, he said.
All streets within a one-block radius of
the fire remained closed to traffic late into
the morning, city spokeswoman Sheri
Costa-Batis said.
The San Mateo County Health System
advised residents to stay indoors during the
blaze to avoid exposure to smoke.
An inspector from the Bay Area Air
Quality Management District was at the
scene of the fire for most of the morning to
monitor the air quality in the area, district
spokesman Tom Flannigan said.
San Mateo County is a “boundary drop”
county, meaning that when a fire occurs, fire
departments from across the County are
called to assist. Redwood City firefighters
were the first to arrive on scene as Redwood
City has the closest fire station to the FMW
Machine Shop.
“For Redwood City to endure four fires
since the summer of 2013, and now a fifth
in unincorporated San Mateo County is
hard to come to terms with,” said Redwood
City Manager Bob Bell.
“We know the area, especially in this dry
weather, is seeing a lot of fires, but our
community definitely feels overbur-
dened.”
With several recent arson fires in Santa
Clara County, the city has received ques-
tions about links between fires and suspi-
cious activity. However, Redwood City Fire
Chief Jim Skinner said there is no reason to
believe the fires from the past several
months are linked in any way.
Based on California state law, buildings
built before 1980 are not required to have
sprinklers. The building in Friday’s blaze
did not have fire sprinklers and its owners
were not required to install them, according
to city officials.
Continued from page 1
FIRE
Around the world
Benedict XVI Ban Ki-moon
By Janani Kumar
O
K. So it’s here. The final semester
of high school. Ever. And let me
just say, for the record, that
senioritis is not some made-up thing that
people use to justify the certain degree of
“slacking off” that happens; it’s very much
real. Though it is only
my second week back, I
can see the early signs
of a shorter attention
span in class and an
overall lack of detail
when it comes to study-
ing and doing homework
assignments. I don’t
even feel like I have
fully come back to school yet.
All in all, it’s pretty great.
I had the great experience of falling real-
ly sick on the last few days of winter break,
and had to miss a couple of days of school
last week. Under normal circumstances, i.e.
any other semester of high school, I would
have roughed out those days by taking
Claritin and Advil to control my symp-
toms.
As a second semester senior, I was able to
miss those days and have a complete recov-
ery, without the strain of worrying about
having my grades slip.
Another awesome perk of being in the
last semester of high school is the ability
to do everything I missed doing for the last
four years, when my primary concern was
maintaining my grades.
For example, as soon as my last set of
finals finished last month, I literally went
crazy with catching up on my favorite TV
shows and spent so much time as a volun-
teer gift wrapper at the mall, something
which I love to do, but was not really able
to spend much time in years past. And, for
the first time, I actually visited Union
Square during the holiday season with
friends. That was pretty great — just roam-
ing around Macy’s and sipping peppermint
hot chocolate.
Now, I also get to focus on those things
that I, unfortunately, had to put on the back
burner during the college application
process, like my musical training. I get to
spend more time singing and dancing
Indian classical music and dance and per-
form more.
Senioritis strikes
City Scene
Major Barbara, at
A.C.T.’s Geary Theater
SEE PAGE 21
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Hollywood may be hoping
for a little less drama in 2014.
2013 was a tale of two cinemas.
Blockbusters like “The Lone Ranger” and
“After Earth” flopped spectacularly while
many in the industry (including Steven
Spielberg) bemoaned the increasingly com-
mercial trajectory of the studios. And yet by
the end of the year, Hollywood had set a
record with nearly $11 billion in revenue,
while critics hailed the year’s crop — from
“Gravity” to “12 Years a Slave” to “Inside
Llewyn Davis” — as one of the best in
years.
The movie business remains, as ever, an
incomprehensible Jekyll and Hyde act of up
and down, hit and bomb.
How will 2014 unfold? The plot, at least,
will be unchanged. However much some
would like to see a new rhythm to
Hollywood’s seasonal cycle, the year will
move to the familiar pattern of sketchy
spring releases, summer superhero block-
busters and fall awards-contenders.
Here are 10 things to look for at the
movies in 2014:
STELLAR SCI-FI
Anticipation runs especially high for
“Interstellar” (Nov. 7), Christopher Nolan’s
deep space travel adventure starring
Matthew McConaughey. Nolan, the director
of “Inception” and “The Dark Knight,” is
one of few directors whose name alone
makes fanboys salivate. His imprimatur
promises a cinematic experience (he likes
to shoot with IMAX cameras) that few today
can match. Nolan’s name also looms large
in “Transcendence” (April 18), which he
produced. The artificial intelligence tale,
starring Johnny Depp and Rebecca Hall, is
the directorial debut of Nolan’s longtime
cinematographer Wally Pfister. Other sci-
ence-fiction entries in 2014 include a
reboot of “Robocop” (Feb. 12), a futuristic,
time-traveling war film with Tom Cruise;
“Edge of Tomorrow” (June 6), the
Wachowskis’ latest fantasy oddity, “Jupiter
Ascending” (July 18); and Ryan Gosling’s
directorial debut “How to Catch a Monster”
(no date yet), a less effect-heavy domestic
drama that tunnels into an underwater realm.
HOLD-OVERS FROM 2013
This year will benefit from last year’s
unusually good leftovers. George
Clooney’s World War II art rescue tale “The
Monuments Men” will open Feb. 7 after
being delayed from December. James Grey’s
Ellis Island drama “The Immigrant” (undat-
ed), starring Joaquin Phoenix and Marion
Cottilard, could emerge as an Oscar dark
horse after earning acclaim on the festival
circuit. Bennett Miller’s “Foxcatcher,” fea-
turing a dark turn from Steve Carell, will
bow sometime in 2014. “Grace of
Monaco,” with Nicole Kidman as Grace
Ten things to look for in 2014 at the movies
See MOVIES, Page 20
See STUDENT, Page 20
‘Jack Ryan’ a reboot
of ‘Patriot Games’
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Having clung to the Russians as go-to villains long
after the Cold War thawed, the movies find themselves
current again with their favorite arch-enemy.
Cooling Russo-American relations have yielded
an opening for the return of Tom Clancy’s CIA
analyst, just in time for the Sochi Olympics. In
the Jack Ryan reboot, “Jack Ryan: Shadow
Recruit,” Chris Pine takes over as the spy
who was played by Alec Baldwin (“The
Hunt for Red October”), Harrison Ford
(“Patriot Games,” “Clear and Present
Danger”) and Ben Affleck (“The Sum of
All Fears”).
It’s a decent legacy of a dark-haired,
See RYAN, Page 22
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
And now for the potentially biggest
advantage to being a senior: I finally
get to be an outdoor ed counselor!
Ever since I was a camper at outdoor
ed in the fifth-grade, all I wanted was
to be able to come back as a coun-
selor.
I potentially had the option of
doing this my junior year, but the
prospect of missing an entire week of
school, especially at a time when the
makeup work would have literally
killed me was just not appealing. And
while skipping a week of school is
still not ideal, I have much more
bandwidth to do it this semester.
I have so many fond memories of
going to Pebble Beach and taking the
Night Hike, so I look forward to see-
ing the camp counselors’ experience.
Call me crazy, but I still remember
the camp songs and my cabin’s spirit
songs.
Of course, I do have to acknowledge
that we seniors obviously still have
to maintain a certain degree of respect
toward our classes and grades. While
colleges don’t accept you based on
your second semester senior year
grades, you don’t want to risk letting
your grades drop so low that you get
prevented from graduating.
But enough of that. I think I can say
that we can all be OK if we maintain a
work ethic. But this is what we have
been waiting for, for four years!
So while we start the countdown to
Graduation Day, I am going to cram in
as many fun and amazing experiences
as I can, by which I will remember my
high school life.
Janani Kumar is a senior at Burlingame High
School. Student News appears in the week-
end edition. You can email Student News at
news@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 19
STUDENT
Kelly, opens March 14. The schedule for 2014 will doubt-
less contain its own shifts, too. The seventh “Fast &
Furious” film, planned for July, was moved to 2015 fol-
lowing the death of star Paul Walker in November.
MARVEL’s EXPANDING UNIVERSE
Marvel’s world domination continues with “Captain
America: The Winter Soldier” (April 4), “The Amazing
Spider-Man 2” (May 2), “X-Men: Days of Future Past”
(May 23) and “Guardians of the Galaxy” (Aug. 1). The
last, the lone non-sequel, represents Marvel’s reach for
another ensemble team-up film, and, with a cast including
Chris Pratt and Bradley Cooper, perhaps something a lit-
tle different than its usual output.
MUSICALS SING AGAIN
Though 2013 contained no major live-action musical,
several are coming this year. Clint Eastwood, of all peo-
ple, directs the screen adaptation of the hit production
about Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons in “Jersey Boys”
(June 20). “Annie” (Dec. 19), produced by Will Smith and
Jay Z, will get a contemporary update with “Beasts of the
Southern Wild” star Quvenzhane Wallis as the titular
orphan. Rob Marshall (“Chicago”) will transfer James
Lapine and Steven Sondheim’s Grimm fable “Into the
Woods” to the big screen (Dec. 25), with Meryl Streep as
the Witch and Depp as the Big Bad Wolf. The Muppets,
too, will be back in “Muppets Most Wanted” (March 21),
a caper where Jim Henson’s furry troupe travels to Europe.
And not yet dated is John Carney’s “Once” follow-up,
“Can a Song Save Your Life?” a similarly naturalistic
musical starring Keira Knightley as an aspiring singer
and Mark Ruffalo as a record producer.
SURE BETS FROM VETERAN HANDS
Paul Thomas Anderson (“There Will Be Blood,” “The
Master”) releases have become the highlight of many a
movie buff’s year. His “Inherent Vice” (not yet dated),
adapted from Thomas Pynchon’s novel and starring
Phoenix, continues the director’s series of California-set
films. Also hotly anticipated is David Fincher’s version
of Gillian Flynn’s best-selling thriller, “Gone Girl” (Oct.
3), starring Ben Affleck. Other directors to watch in 2014
include Wes Anderson (“The Grand Budapest Hotel,”
March 7), Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu (“Birdman,” undat-
ed), Woody Allen (“Magic in the Moonlight,” undated)
and Tim Burton (“Big Eyes,” undated). Terrence Malick’s
latest is also expected this year, though little is ever cer-
tain with “The Tree of Life” director.
BEARDED MEN OF THE BIBLE
This year will boast not just a Noah, but also a Moses.
First will come Darren Aronofsky’s “Noah” (March 28),
starring Russell Crowe and a very big boat. Ridley Scott
will follow on Dec. 12 with “Exodus,” starring Christian
Bale as Moses. Greek mythology will also double up in
2014 with two Hercules movies. The demigod will be
played by Dwayne Johnson in Brett Ratner’s “Hercules”
(July 25) and by Kellan Lutz in “The Legend of Hercules”
(out Friday). More Greek warfare comes with the sequel
“300: Rise of an Empire” (March 7).
SEQUELS, REMAKES
AND, AT LAST, A FINAL HOBBIT
Naturally, 2014 boasts a boatload of sequels and
remakes including “Godzilla” (May 16), “The Hunger
Games: Mockingjay, Part 1” (Nov. 21), “Transformers:
Age of Extinction” (June 27), “Dawn of the Planet of the
Apes” (July 11), “22 Jump Street” (June 13), “The
Expendables 3” (Aug. 15) and “How to Train Your Dragon
2” (June 13). Peter Jackson will finally close out his life-
time with J.R.R. Tolkien with his final “Hobbit” install-
ment: “The Hobbit: There and Back Again” (Dec. 17).
Other franchise expansions include “The Lego Movie”
(Feb. 7), “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” (Aug. 8) and
“Veronica Mars” (March 14), the cult TV show propelled
to the big screen by a crowd-funding campaign on
Kickstarter.
THAT WAS NOT THE END
Co-directors Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg will quick-
ly follow up their 2013 hit “This Is the End” with “The
Interview” (Oct. 10), a comedy starring James Franco as a
talk-show host caught up in an assassination plot. Rogen
also stars with Zac Efron in “Neighbors” (May 9), by
“Forgetting Sarah Marshall” director Nicholas Stoller,
about a young family living next to a frat house. The
2014 comedy lineup also includes “Dumb and Dumber To”
(Nov. 14), with Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels; the one-
night-stand comedy “Walk of Shame” (April 25) with
Elizabeth Banks; “Sex Tape” (Aug. 1) with Cameron Diaz;
the spelling bee farce “Bad Words” (March 14), directed
by and starring Jason Bateman; Seth MacFarlane’s comic
Western “A Million Ways to Die in the West” (May 30);
and the road trip comedy “Tammy” (July 2) with Melissa
McCarthy, directed by her husband, Ben Falcone.
JOLIE’S RETURN
Angelina Jolie hasn’t starred in a live-action film since
2010’s forgettable “The Tourist,” but she’ll be a large
presence in 2014. She stars as the title villain in
“Maleficent” (May 30), the twisted “Sleeping Beauty”
tale. She also directs her second feature in “Unbroken”
(Dec. 25), a World War II prisoner-of-war drama co-script-
ed by Joel and Ethan Coen. Jolie’s famous companion,
Brad Pitt, stars in a WWII story of his own, “Fury” (Nov.
14), about an American tank crew in Nazi Germany.
HUNTING THE HUNGER GAMES
The competition is thick for the next hit young-adult
franchise. Among the films looking to draw teenage audi-
ences with stories from popular young-adult novels are:
the post-apocalyptic “Divergent” (March 21); the high-
school vampire fantasy “Vampire Academy: Blood
Sisters” (Feb. 14); and the sci-fi dystopia “The Maze
Runner” (Sept. 19). May the odds be ever in your favor.
Continued from page 19
MOVIES
V
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WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FLESH AND METAL: BODY AND MACHINE IN EARLY 20TH-CENTURY ART IS JOINTLY
ORGANIZED BY THE CANTOR ARTS CENTER AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY AND
THE SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART.
FERNAND LÉGER, DEUX FEMMES SUR FOND BLEU (TWO WOMEN ON A BLUE
BACKGROUND), 1927; SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, FRACTIONAL
GIFT OF HELEN AND CHARLES SCHWAB; © ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS),
NEW YORK/ADAGP, PARIS; PHOTO: BEN BLACKWELL.
NOV 13

MAR 16
museum.stanford.edu
F L E S H
AND
M E T A L
Body and Machine in Early 20th-Century Art
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
GEORGE BERNARD SHAW’S
MAJOR BARBARA AT AMERICAN
CONSERVATORY THEATER RAISES
TIMELESS QUESTIONS OF MONEY
AND MORALS. Should a charity accept
money from questionable sources in order to
fund programs that benefit the poor? In
George Bernard Shaw’s 1905 play Major
Barbara, young and idealistic Barbara
Undershaft has joined the Salvation Army to
help the downtrodden. When her wealthy
father offers a large contribution, Barbara
rejects the money because it represents prof-
its from his armaments factory. Her church’s
decision to accept his donation forces
Barbara, along with her friends and family,
to wrestle with the economic realities of the
cost of doing good. The pros and cons are
lobbed back and forth in elegant, fast-paced
and often very funny verbal volleys.
Directed by Dennis Garnhum. Two hours and
40 minutes with a 15-minute intermission.
Through Feb. 2.
OH, AND DID YOU KNOW?: In his
1906 Preface to Major Barbara: First Aid to
Critics, playwright Shaw said: “On the point
that the Army ought not to take such money,
its justification is obvious. It must take the
money because it cannot exist without
money, and there is no other money to be
had. Practically all the spare money in the
country consists of a mass of rent, interest
and profit, every penny of which is bound up
with crime, drink, prostitution, disease and
all the evil fruits of poverty, as inextricably
as with enterprise, wealth, commercial pro-
bity and national prosperity. The notion
that you can earmark certain coins as tainted
is an unpractical individualist superstition.
None the less the fact that all our money is
tainted gives a very severe shock to earnest
young souls when some dramatic instance of
the taint first makes them conscious of it.”
AN ASIDE: A.C.T. Artistic Director
Carey Perloff said: “As I was planning the
season and wrestling with the enormous
conflicts in this country around guns, vio-
lence and money, it suddenly seemed an
urgent time to revisit Shaw’s visionary
Major Barbara. I can think of no other play
that so brilliantly explores the uneasy rela-
tionship between ill-gotten gains and cor-
porate philanthropy, as Undershaft tries to
appease his passionate daughter Barbara by
paying for her good deed with gunpowder
profits.”
TICKETS: Tickets, starting at $20, can
be purchased from the A.C.T. box office at
405 Geary St., by phone at (415) 749-2228,
or online at www.act-sf.org.
STAGE DIRECTIONS: A.C.T. ’s Geary
Theater is located at 415 Geary St., just off
Union Square in the heart of downtown San
Francisco. Parking is available one block
away at the Mason/O’Farrell Garage, 325
Mason St. The theater is a relatively level
four-block walk from the BART-Powell
Street Station (Market Street).
***
CIRQUE DU SOLEIL’ S AMALUNA
MOVES TO SAN JOSE AND VISITS
SAN MATEO. Hillsdale Shopping Center
in San Mateo hosts performers from Cirque
du Soleil’s Amaluna on 3:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 5. This exclusive Peninsula
mall appearance features beautifully cos-
tumed artists performing stunning acrobatic
feats. Kids and their families will get an up-
close meet and greet photo opportunity with
the artists in costume after the performance.
60 31st Ave. San Mateo. Cirque du Soleil’s
Amaluna, which has concluded a long run at
AT&T Park in San Francisco, opens Jan. 22
at the Taylor Street Bridge in San Jose. For
information visit cirquedusoleil.com/amalu-
na.
***
SAN FRANCISCO GAY MEN’S CHO-
RUS ADDS LUSTER TO THE MUSIC
SCENE. In March, the San Francisco Gay
Men’s Chorus celebrates 20th Century
American music in its program LUSTER,
featuring the 300 men of the chorus and
guest Ann Hampton Callaway singing clas-
sics from George Gershwin, Cole Porter,
Duke Ellington and Irving Berlin. The per-
formance includes the world premiere of
“Tyler’s Suite,” presented in collaboration
with the Tyler Clementi Foundation, which
promotes safe social environments for vul-
nerable youth, LGBT youth and their allies.
The creators of “Tyler’s Suite” include com-
poser Stephen Schwartz (Godspell, Pippin);
singer, composer, lyricist, pianist and
actress Ann Hampton Callaway (Swing!);
composer and singer Craig Carnelia
(Working, Sweet Smell of Success); Winner
of the Pulitzer Prize, three Grammy Awards
and an Academy Award John Corigliano;
composer Jake Heggie (Moby-Dick, Dead
Man Walking, Three Decembers); and lyri-
cist and librettist Pamela Stewart, who wrote
lyrics for the entire work. Davies Symphony
Hall. 201 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco. 8
p.m. Tuesday, March 25 and Wednesday,
March 26. Tickets from $25 - $75 available
at www.SFGMC.org or (415) 392-4400.
Susan Cohn is a member of the American Theatre
Critics Association and the San Francisco Bay Area
Theatre Critics Circle. She may be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com.
PAK HAN
CAN BAD MONEY DO GOOD? Salvation Army Major Barbara Undershaft (Gretchen Hall),center,
watches with dismay as her superior (Jennifer Clement as Mrs.Baines) accepts a donation from
Barbara’s armaments manufacturer father (Dean Paul Gibson as Andrew Undershaft),in George
Bernard Shaw’s Major Barbara, at A.C.T.’s Geary Theater through Feb. 2.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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intellectual action hero. Ryan is a naviga-
tor of murky, reasonably realistic, interna-
tional espionage worlds. He has neither
James Bond’s preternatural suavity nor
Jason Bourne’s visceral butt-kicking
skills, but instead anxiously finds his way
with patriotic cunning.
“Shadow Recruit,” which was scripted
without a Clancy book by Adam Cozad and
David Koepp, tells a new backstory for
Ryan. Inspired by Sept. 11, he joins the
Marines and is heroically injured in
Afghanistan. During his recovery, he
meets his eventual fiancee (a doctor named
Cathy played by Keira Knightley) and is
lured to the CIA by a mysterious recruiter
(Kevin Costner, unconvincingly trying to
exude a Donald Sutherland-like gravitas).
He’s covertly embedded at a Wall Street
bank where he uncovers a Russian plot to
buy up U.S. Treasury bonds, which he sus-
pects will be sold off in a coordinated act
of terrorism and currency devaluation.
Surely, if Ronald Reagan (whose endorse-
ment of Clancy’s first novel, “The Hunt for
Red October,” propelled his fame) was still
around, he’d swoon over a spy thriller
based on the harrowing threat of inflation.
Ryan’s investigation leads him to the
Russian oligarch Viktor Cherevin, played
by Kenneth Branagh, who also directed the
film. Certainly, it takes a bite out of the
nationalistic politics when the movie’s
villain is played by a knighted British
actor known for his Shakespeare work.
Branagh endows his film with (mostly)
old-fashioned competency — something
often lacking in today’s action films —
but little to distinguish it from superior
thrillers that have come before. The best
thing here is the sleekness of modern
Moscow, where much of the action takes
place. The film is filled with a nighttime
mix of neon and taillights set against the
Kremlin and other monuments — a hand-
some enough rendering to send a viewer
back to the recent Bond, “Skyfall,” for
those elegant Shanghai scenes.
But “Shadow Recruit” is also disappoint-
ingly formulaic, relying on the familiar
set piece-driven story of an implausible
heist and a time-bomb finale. Knightley is
too strong a force for this girlfriend role.
And when the global scheme is figured out
in a minute with a bank of computer-
searching analysts, one foresees the obso-
lescence of the action film: sprawling
plots undone with a few keystrokes.
“Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit” is perhaps
most significantly a test for Pine as a
movie star. Early in the film, when Ryan is
forced to defend his life in a hotel room
battle, he ably depicts the shock and hor-
ror of a man encountering such a circum-
stance for the first time.
But Pine also fails to make his Jack
Ryan more than an afterthought to
Baldwin’s know-it-all or Ford’s reluctant
hero. As Costner’s character says, he too
much resembles “a Boy Scout on a field
trip.”
One unlikely cameo should be noted:
New York’s famed repertory art-house the-
ater, the Film Forum, appears early in the
movie when Ryan swaps information at a
screening of “Sorry, Wrong Number.” At
least in “Shadow Recruit,” the interior has
finally been upgraded to plush stadium
seating.
“Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit,” a
Paramount Pictures release, is rated PG-13
by the Motion Picture Association of
America for “sequences of violence and
intense action, and brief language.”
Running time: 105 minutes. Two stars out
of four.
Continued from page 19
RYAN
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WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, JAN. 18
SingFest! 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 178
Clinton St., Redwood City. Join the
Ragazzi Boys Chorus for a free half-
day of musical games and fun. Boy
between ages 7 to 10 who love to
sing are invited to participate. Pre-
registration is required. To pre-regis-
ter or for more information go to
www.ragazzi.org or call 342-8785.
Volunteer Information Session. 10
a.m. Little House Activity Center,
Lucy Uhl Room, 800 Middle Ave.,
Menlo Park. Learn how you can help
seniors in our community. For more
information contact
mrached@peninsulavolunteers.org.
South San Francisco AARP
Chapter Meeting. 10:30 a.m.
Magnolia Senior Center ( Third
Floor), 601 Grand Ave., South San
Francisco. Free. For more informa-
tion call (415) 467-7205 or 991-
4111.
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Enjoy a vari-
ety of Lego creations made by
members of the club, featuring train
layouts, Bay Area landmarks, castles,
miniature cities, sculptures and
more. Admission is $2. Exhibit runs
through Jan. 19 on Fridays,
Saturdays and Sundays.
Dad and Me at the Library. 11:15
a.m. Woodside Library, 3140
Woodside Road, Woodside. Free. For
more information go to
www.fatherhoodcollaborative.org.
Oysters and Chardonnay Open
Day. Noon to 4 p.m. La Honda
Winery, 2645 Fair Oaks Ave.,
Redwood City. Fresh $1 oysters; five
fine wines and cheese for $10. For
more information call 366-4104.
CSM Painting Class Exhibition.
Noon to 4 p.m. Twin Pines Art Center
Manor House, 10 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont. Through Jan. 31,
Wednesdays to Sundays from noon
to 4 p.m. For more information call
the Twin Pines Manor House at 654-
4068.
Dad and Me at the Library. 2 p.m.
Main South San Francisco Library,
840 W. Orange Ave., South San
Francisco. Free. For more informa-
tion go to www.fatherhoodcollabo-
rative.org.
Art Liason hosts an artists’ recep-
tion. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Mistral
Restaurant and Bar, 370 Bridge
Parkway, Redwood Shores. For more
information go to artliasons.com or
call 596-0868.
‘Rx’ by Kate Fodor opens Dragon
Theatre’s 2014 Main Stage
Season. 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre,
2120 Broadway, Redwood City. The
production is rated R. Shows runs
through Feb. 9. $30 tickets. For more
information go to http://dragonpro-
ductions.net.
SUNDAY, JAN. 19
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Enjoy a vari-
ety of Lego creations made by
members of the club, featuring train
layouts, Bay Area landmarks, castles,
miniature cities, sculptures and
more. Admission is $2. Exhibit runs
through Jan. 19 on Fridays,
Saturdays, and Sundays.
CSM Painting Class Exhibition.
Noon to 4 p.m. Twin Pines Art Center
Manor House, 10 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont. Runs to Jan. 31,
Wednesdays to Sundays from noon
to 4 p.m. For more information call
the Twin Pines Manor House at 654-
4068.
Third Sunday Ballroom Tea Dance
With Bob Gutierrez Band. 1 p.m. to
3 p.m. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno. $5.
For more information call 616-7150.
Third Sunday Book Sale. 1 p.m. to
4 p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. For more information go
to www.friendsofscl.org.
‘Rx’ by Kate Fodor opens Dragon
Theatre’s 2014 Main Stage
Season. 2 p.m. Dragon Theatre,
2120 Broadway, Redwood City. The
production is rated R. Through Feb.
9. $30 tickets. For more information
go to http://dragonproductions.net.
The Dream Marches On With
Clayborne Carson. 3 p.m. to 4:30
p.m. First United Methodist Church,
625 Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto.
Clayborne Carson will be the guest
speaker. Free. For more information
call 856-3780.
Mike Galisatus Big Band. 4:30 p.m.
Douglas Beach House, 307 Miranda
Road, Half Moon Bay. Swinging big
band standards by 17 Bay Area
musicians and vocalist Duane
Lawrence. $35. For more informa-
tion go to www.bachddsoc.org.
Screening of the Documentary
Film ‘Dirty Wars.’ 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Unitarian Universalists of San
Mateo, 300 E. Santa Inez Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
call 342-8244.
MONDAY, JAN. 20
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more informa-
tion call 523-0804.
Groovy Judy. 6:30 p.m. Hola!
Mexican Restaurant, 1015 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. For more
information call 591-1735.
Dance Connection with Music by
Nob Hill Sounds. Free dance les-
sons from 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m. with
open dance from 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m.
Burlingame Woman’s Club, 241 Park
Road, Burlingame. $8 members, $10
guests. Free admission for male
dance hosts. Light refreshments. For
more information call 342-2221.
TUESDAY, JAN. 21
Dig It Teen Video Workshop:
‘Story.’ 3:30 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. This program will be a
three-part workshop (one per week)
for students to complete a movie to
submit to the SMCL Teen Film
Festival. This week will teach stu-
dents how to write a story for film.
Bring your own movie equipment or
rent from the Belmont Library. Teen
and guardian must sign liability
form before renting equipment.
Ages 12 to 19. For more information
contact conrad@smcl.org.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more informa-
tion call 523-0804.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
weekly networking lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 22 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more
information contact Mike Foor at
mike@mikefoor.com.
CSM Painting Class Exhibition.
Noon to 4 p.m. Twin Pines Art Center
Manor House, 10 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont. Through Jan. 31. Noon to 4
p.m. Wednesdays to Sundays. For
more information call the Twin
Pines Manor House at 654-4068.
City Talk Toastmasters Club
Meeting. 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Redwood City Main Library,
Community Room on the Second
Floor, 1044 Middlefield Road,
Redwood City. Free. For more infor-
mation contact
johnmcd@hotmail.com.
Historian Discusses San Mateo
County at Sofitel San Francisco
Bay. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Bay 223 Sofitel
San Francisco Bay, 223 Twin Dolphin
Drive, Redwood City. Free. For more
information call (713) 524-0661.
Preschool Preview Night. 6 p.m. to
8 p.m. Community Activities
Building, 1400 Roosevelt Ave.,
Redwood City. Free. For more infor-
mation call 780-7311.
Lifetree Cafe Conversations: Care
for Caregivers. 7 p.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Free. Includes compli-
mentary snacks and beverages. For
more information contact Angelina
Ortiz at angelina@bethnay-mp.org.
An evening with author Lisa
Unger. 7 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Unger will read from her latest
novel, ‘In the Blood.’ Light refresh-
ments and a book signing will fol-
low. For more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
San Carlos Children’s Theater
presents ‘The Little Mermaid Jr.’ 7
p.m. Mustang Hall, Central Middle
School, 828 Chestnut St., San Carlos.
$12 for students 18 and under, $15
for adults. Through Jan. 22 to Jan. 26.
Tickets and information are avail-
able online at www.sancarloschil-
drenstheater.com.
NAMI General Meeting: Mental
Health Court Systems. 7 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. Hendrickson Aud./Mills
Health Center, 100 S. San Mateo
Drive, San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 638-0800.
Introduction to Brewing Beer. 7
p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Join Jonnie Dukes of brew-
beer101 as he covers the basics of
home brewing and offers taster
samples of two different brews for
those 21 or over. For more informa-
tion call 697-7607.
THURSDAY, JAN. 23
Lifetree Cafe Conversations: Care
for Caregivers. 9:15 a.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Free. Includes compli-
mentary snacks and beverages. For
more information contact Angelina
Ortiz at angelina@bethnay-mp.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
like reruns throughout the year.
Reservoir levels in the north and
central parts of the state were more
depleted than in Southern California,
but Brown still asked Los Angeles to
do its part to conserve — and gave a
nod to the politics of water in the vast
state.
“The drought accentuates and further
displays the conflicts between north
and south and between urban and rural
parts of the state. So, as governor, I’ll
be doing my part to bring people
together and working through this.”
Farmers and ranchers in the nation’s
No. 1 farm state already are making
hard choices to conserve. Some cities
are in danger of running out of water.
And the first snow survey of the winter
found more bare ground than fluffy
white stuff — a key barometer of future
supply.
“I am a fifth-generation cattle ranch-
er, and it has never been this bad ever
in my lifetime — and from my fami-
ly’s history, it’s never been anywhere
close to this bad ever,” said Kevin
Kester, 58. He said his family’s
records show the area’s worst drought
previously was in the 1890s.
Kester’s Central California ranch
normally gets 20 inches of rain
between October and April. It’s gotten
about a half-inch of precipitation
since late fall. His cattle usually graze
on lush green hillsides in winter. Now,
they’re eating hay instead — a propo-
sition that is too expensive to contin-
ue for long.
“I hope it’s something we can tell
our great-grandkids about, but right
now we’re just trying to figure out how
we’re going to survive,” he said.
The drought doesn’t bode well for
California’s notorious wildfire sea-
son, either.
Previous super-dry years led to cata-
strophic wildfire seasons in California
in 2003 and 2007, said Tom Scott, a
natural resources specialist with the
University of California system. Fire
crews beat back a wildfire northeast of
Los Angeles earlier this week, but it
was a stark reminder of the dry and
dangerous conditions.
“People say that the fire season is
starting early, but I guess you could
say it never ended,” Scott said. “If you
live in the backcountry, come July
you probably should be thinking
about putting your valuables in stor-
age.”
Droughts also are persisting or
intensifying elsewhere in the U.S.
On Wednesday, federal officials said
they were designating portions of
Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada,
Kansas, Texas, Utah, Arkansas,
Hawaii, Idaho, Oklahoma and
California as primary natural disaster
areas, highlighting the financial
strain facing farmers in those regions.
Even in the moist Pacific Northwest,
things were a little bit drier.
In Seattle, rainfall dropped by near-
ly 70 percent in December, with just
1.66 inches falling. Ski resorts are
opening several weeks late, and a
Bavarian-themed town in the Cascade
Mountains had to modify its annual
“ice fest” because there isn’t enough
snow on the ground for activities. A
plan to truck in snow was scrapped
with high temperatures forecast this
weekend.
And despite heavy flooding in
Colorado in September, large portions
of Colorado and Wyoming are abnor-
mally dry, while ranchers on the
plains of southeastern Colorado have
severe drought conditions.
In California, the governor’s
drought declaration will help battle
unemployment in the agriculture
industry as fields are left fallow.
Nearly 10,000 people lost their
jobs during the last drought in 2009,
said Karen Ross, California’s agricul-
ture secretary. The drought also
increases the burden on food banks in
rural and agricultural communities.
The lack of rain also could have
long-standing implications for the
demand for crops that are almost
entirely exclusive to California.
Eighty percent of the world’s
almonds, for example, are grown in
California, and the Almond Board of
California receives 3 cents for every
pound sold to build future demand for
the nut. With many almond growers
having to irrigate their crops three
months early, a smaller crop might
put a dent in the board’s ability to mar-
ket almonds as broadly as it has been,
said David Phippen, an almond grower
who serves on the board.
“There’s huge implications every-
where you look,” he said. “What about
five years down the road?”
Continued from page 1
DROUGHT
that had been carefully measured in
Paris so the architect could incorporate
them into his design without altering
their historic proportions and a
kitchen with white glass tiling. There
is also a large wood library, which
holds 10,000 volumes. The yellow
salon is Louis XVI style with a view of
the large outside garden.
The 56-minute movie, filmed in 19
days, also documents how the French-
style chateau wasn’t always so grand at
times. The home suffered through
years of decline as owners couldn’t
keep up with the mantienance costs
and nearly bankrupted the heiress and
subsequent owners. The heiress closed
the house in 1918 after only living in
the chateau for two years. Next, the
home became dilapidated until a count-
ess purchased it in 1950 to save it from
demolition by promoters. It deteriorat-
ed once again when the countess was
unable to maintain it. During the next
decline, a pornographic film was made
on the premises. Then, in 1985, a care-
taker sexually assaulted and stabbed
two teenage girls he had given a tour of
the house to while he was on duty. One
ultimately died from her wounds. In
1989, the Loma Prieta earthquake
struck the home. After the home was
used as a designer showcase home, the
Johnson family took it upon them-
selves to restore the mansion.
“It was a sleeping beauty,” said
Carolands historian Paul Price. “It’s as
if the Titanic were refloated in perfect
condition. The house was her (Pullman
Carolan’s) pride and joy. There is a
great deal of misinformation about
this house partly because she only
lived here from 1916-18.”
On Jan. 1, the home officially
became preserved as a public nonprof-
it foundation. There have been very
few times for the public to access the
home and since it is now a public non-
profit, there is a chance there could be
public docent led tours. There also
needs to be logistics for security, said
historian Allen Deering.
“They wouldn’t want to open it up to
a bus,” he said. “Why wouldn’t you
want to show people such a jewel
though?”
One other film has been made about
the mansion called “Three Women and
a Chateau.”
The new film premiers 7 p.m. Jan. 19
on KQED 9. The film was made in asso-
ciation with the San Mateo County
Historical Association. The founda-
tion’s website is coming soon at car-
olands.org.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
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ACROSS
1 — support
5 Greeted formally
10 Empty
12 Cope
13 Home of the Illini
14 Lone Star nine
15 Get wind of
16 Baby beaver
18 Tire pressure meas.
19 Untouched by time
23 Apprehend a suspect
26 Cuttlefish defense
27 Fleece
30 Develop slowly
32 Juicy morsel
34 Contradicted
35 Is of benefit
36 Crib filler
37 Homer Simpson’s dad
38 When Paris sizzles
39 Paving material
42 Go back and forth
45 Stockholm carrier
46 Cold War power
50 Dough raisers
53 Full-length garment
55 Soften
56 Aquatic mammals
57 Upright
58 Como — usted?
DOWN
1 Zoomed
2 Napoleon’s island
3 Ms. Barton
4 Term of endearment
5 — -relief
6 Can. province
7 “Star Trek” speed
8 Id companions
9 Mr. Arnez
10 What was that?
11 Came to
12 Jane, to Tarzan
17 Variety
20 Basic assumptions
21 Turn
22 Fizzy beverage
23 Beak of a bird
24 With, to Maurice
25 String tie
28 Tony kin
29 Cheery tune
31 Milan money, once
32 Hot sauce
33 Mao — -tung
37 Just as I thought!
40 Attention getter
41 Tassels
42 Ceremonial fire
43 Wolf’s expression
44 Harvard rival
47 Proofer’s word
48 Writer — Paretsky
49 ER personnel
51 Jiffy
52 Explosive letters
54 Had a meal
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Don’t let impulse
take over, or you may make a costly mistake. Make
choices based on knowledge and facts, not hearsay
and fear of missing out. Love should be a priority.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Speak up and
let everyone know what you think and how you
feel. Someone will try to take advantage of your
kindness and enthusiasm if you’re not careful.
Protect your heart and your money.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Join a group that
will help you reach your personal goals. Starting a
diet or a new exercise routine will get you back on
track and boost your confidence.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — A fast-paced
approach to whatever you do will attract interest.
Develop your ideas and share your thoughts. A
partnership with someone who is pursuing a similar
dream will help you excel.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Staying in the
background may be difficult. Someone will try to
flesh out your ideas. Focus on what you can offer
physically, rather than mentally, and you will avoid
an unsettling situation.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Enjoy your home today.
Entertain friends and new acquaintances, and share
what you have to offer. Your hospitality will result in an
interesting proposal that could lead to good fortune.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Partnerships should
take top priority. Offer something special, or make a
move on someone you want to get to know better. An
unusual discovery will result in a moneymaking idea.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Your willingness to make
the changes that are necessary to keep your personal
relationships running smoothly will not go unnoticed.
An unusual offering will lead to certainty and security.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Participate in
community events or activities that will allow you to
be indulgent with friends, family or someone you love.
Don’t let an impulsive move quash your good time.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Be careful how you
handle domestic situations. Invest your time and
money wisely. Home improvements, a move or altering
the way you live will result in greater happiness.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Keep your emotions
well- hidden. Consider what you can do to help a
greater cause. A unique approach to the way you live
will make you feel more at ease.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Let your
competitive side take over. Play a game of chance
or make a personal change that will inspire you to
follow your dreams.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
MECHANIC - Spare Time work, mostly
evenings. Call Tom, (650)327-5200.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
CUSTOMER CONTACT -
OUTSIDE POSITION
FULL TIME/PART TIME
$15.62 per hour start
to $35 per hour
with bonuses
Full training and expenses
Mr. Connors (650)372-2810
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $500
Guaranteed per week. Taxi Permit
required Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
GREETER /
SALES PERSON
Greet customers and up-sell car
wash and detail services. $8.00 +
commission. Potential for $15-$30
per hr. Jacks Car Wash. 3651 S. El
Camino Real, SM. 650-627-8447.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
110 Employment
NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff (easy job)
$9.00 per hr. Apply in Person at or email
resume to info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
OFFICE HELP NEEDED -
Part time, college student welcome. 3
days a week for tax office. Bookeeping
and tax experience preferred. Call
(650)624-9583
TAXI & Limo Driver, Wanted, full time,
paid weekly, between $500 and $700
cash, (650)921-2071
SOFTWARE -
Sr. Software Engineer. Shutterfly, Inc.
has a Sr. Software Engineer position
available. Responsible for implementing
and helping design a flexible, scalable,
data-intensive infrastructure supporting
composition and efficient print output
generation. Integrate with best of class
composition engine and coordinate with
non-technical team members
(content/creative/production) to under-
stand their workflow and communicate
technical limitations. Review engineering
designs and provide constructive feed-
back. Interface with marketing and user
experience for requirements gathering
and refinement. Define and scope high-
level design and development tasks. RE-
QUIRES: Bachelor's degree or equiva-
lent in Computer Engineering or a related
field and 5 years of progressive experi-
ence in the job offered or as a Software
Engineer, Web Engineer, Programmer
Analyst, or any combination thereof. Al-
ternatively, the employer will accept a
Master's degree or equivalent in Comput-
er Engineering or a related field and 3
years of progressive experience in the
job offered or as a Software Engineer,
Web Engineer, Programmer Analyst, or
any combination thereof in lieu of a
Bachelor's degree or equivalent in Com-
puter Engineering or a related field and 5
years of progressive experience in the
job offered or as a Software Engineer,
Web Engineer, Programmer Analyst, or
any combination thereof. Academic
background or work experience to in-
clude: Adobe Flex or C/C++. Work expe-
rience to include: 1. implementation and
design of flexible, scalable, data-inten-
sive infrastructure supporting content
management; 2. ensuring systems meet
documented SLA and system standards;
3. bug triage and prioritization of devel-
opment tasks and defects; 4. resolving or
escalating problems to appropriate per-
sonnel and managing risks for both de-
velopment and production support; 5. de-
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
26 Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
110 Employment
veloping applications using Java/J2EE
and Tomcat; 6. iOS development; 7.
Adobe CQ web content management; 8.
SQL and relational databases (Oracle or
SQL server); 9. creating WebServices
using SOAP, REST, and Java Messag-
ing; 10. JavaScript, JSON, Akamai, and
Java caching; 11. Agile development
methodology. M-F 8A-5P. 40 hrs/wk.
Salary: $132,080/yr. Standard company
benefits. Job site: Redwood City, CA.
Submit resume to: Recruitment & Em-
ployment Office, SHUTTERFLY, INC.,
Attn: Job Ref#: SHU98912, PO Box
56625, Atlanta, GA 30343.
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
180 Businesses For Sale
ESTABLISHED BUSINESS FOR SALE
in Downtown San Mateo (510)962-1569
or (650) 347-9490.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 525906
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Mark Ramin
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Mark Ramin filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
a) Present name: Mark Ramin
a) Propsed Name: Mark Omran
b) Present name:Avid Ramin
b) Propsed Name: Avid Omran
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on March 4,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 01/14/ 2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 01/09/2014
(Published, 01/18/14, 01/25/2014,
02/01/2014, 02/08/2014)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259062
The following person is doing business
as: Bubbly Berry, 81 Bay Ct.,SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA, 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owners: 1)
Jose A. Flores III, 2224 Derry Way,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080,
2) Raymond Sio, same address, 3)
Lignne David Maronilla, 1373 Mission
Rd., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Jose A. Flores III /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/18/14, 01/25/14, 02/01/14, 02/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258793
The following person is doing business
as: Fox Window Gutter and House
Cleaning Service, 2217 Shelter Creek
Ln., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Welli-
da Goncalves Leite and Joci R. Leite,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN.
/s/ Wellida G. Leite /
/s/ Joci R. Leite /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14, 01/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258649
The following person is doing business
as: BWE Bay Mortgage, 1410 B Burlin-
game Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Reic Marenco, same address, and
Carlos Bone, 215 Victoria Rd., #1, Burlin-
game, CA 94010 The business is con-
ducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN.
/s/ Eric Marenco/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/28/13, 01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
Regular Meeting of the
City of Half Moon Bay
Planning Commission
Tuesday, January 28,
2014
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIV-
EN that the Planning Com-
mission of the City of Half
Moon Bay will hold a pub-
lic hearing at 7:00 PM on
Tuesday, January 28,
2013, at their regular
meeting place in the De-
partment Operations Cen-
ter (DOC), 537 Kelly Ave-
nue to consider the follow-
ing application:
CITY FILE #: PDPz-003-
14
LOCATION: Citywide
APPLICANT: City of Half
Moon Bay - Tony Condotti,
City Attorney
DESCRIPTION: AN
AMENDMENT TO CHAP-
TER 18.06 “RESIDENTIAL
USE (R-1, R-2, R-3)” TO
DELETE PARAGRAPH D
“TWO-YEAR PERMIT”
FROM SECTION
18.06.025.D.5 “CONVA-
LESCENCE FACILITIES
AND DAY CARE, GENER-
AL.” The proposed zoning
code amendment would
amend Chapter 18.06
(RESIDENTIAL LAND
USE R-1, R-2, R-3) to de-
lete Section
18.06.025.D.5, which im-
poses a two-year limitation
and two-year administra-
tion extension on use per-
mits for convalescence fa-
cilities and day care facili-
ties providing care for sev-
en or more persons.
For More Information : Ad-
ditional information regard-
ing the proposed project
may be obtained by exam-
ining the application mate-
rials on file at City Hall,
501 Main Street, during
regular business hours or
by calling Bruce Ambo,
Planning Manager at (650)
726-8252,
BAmbo@hmbcity.com.
Right of Appeal : Any ag-
grieved person may ap-
peal the decision of the
Planning Commission to
the City Council within ten
(10) working days of the
date of the decision. The
project is located within
the Coastal Appeal Zone;
therefore, final action is
appealable to the Califor-
nia Coastal Commission.
1/18/14
CNS-2578796#
SAN MATEO DAILY
JOURNAL
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258835
The following person is doing business
as: Birch Street, 1765 E. Bayshore Rd.,
Loft 219, PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Carol (aka Lanny) Danenberg and
Daniel A. Danenberg, same address.
The business is conducted by a Married
Couple. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/15/14.
/s/ Carol Danenberg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/11/14, 01/18/14, 01/25/14, 02/01/14).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #M-232490
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Pani-
ni Time, 319 S. Maple St., Ste. 206,
South San Francisco, CA 94080. The fic-
titious business name was filed on
12/09/2009 in the county of San Mateo.
The business was conducted by: The
Box Lunch Company, same address.
/s/ Julie DeMason/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 12/24/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 12/28/2013,
01/04/2014, 01/11/2014, 01/18/2014).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
Regular Meeting of the
City of Half Moon Bay
Planning Commission
Tuesday, January 28,
2014
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIV-
EN that the Planning Com-
mission of the City of Half
Moon Bay will hold a pub-
lic hearing at 7:00 PM on
Tuesday, January 28,
2014, at the City of Half
Moon Bay Department Op-
eration Center (DOC), 537
Kelly Avenue to consider
the following application:
CITY FILE #: PDP-065-13
LOCATION: 695 Terrace
Avenue
APPLICANT: John Hagen
APN: 056-082-450
DESCRIPTION: Coastal
Development Permit, Lot
Line Adjustment, Subdivi-
sion Exception, and Var-
iance to adjust the lot line
between one developed
and one undeveloped par-
cel in the R-1-B-2 Single
Family Residential Zoning
District so that the two lots
are of equal size. The Var-
iance would allow the ex-
isting house to exceed the
Maximum Building Enve-
lope.
CEQA REVIEW: Categori-
cally Exempt pursuant to
CEQA Guidelines Section
15305, minor alterations in
land use limitations in
areas with an average
slope of less than 20%,
which do not result in any
changes to land use or
density.
For More Information :
Additional information re-
garding the proposed proj-
ect may be obtained by
examining the application
materials on file at City
Hall, 501 Main Street, dur-
ing regular business hours
or by calling Carol Hamil-
ton, Senior Planner, at
(650) 712-5836, chamil-
ton@hmbcity.com.
Right of Appeal : Any ag-
grieved person may ap-
peal the decision of the
Planning Commission to
the City Council within ten
(10) calendar days of the
date of the decision. The
project is not located with-
in the Coastal Appeal
Zone; therefore, City ac-
tion on the project is final.
1/18/14
CNS-2578798#
SAN MATEO DAILY
JOURNAL
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259021
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Panini Time, 2) The Box Lunch
Company, 360 Shaw Rd., #8, South San
Francisco, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Esposto’s
Fine Foods, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 12/23/2013.
/s/ William Esposto /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/28/13, 01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259041
The following person is doing business
as: Yllakusi, 941 Glennan Dr., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Lianides,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 12/01/2013.
/s/ Matthew Lianides /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/28/13, 01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258839
The following person is doing business
as: Pacific Work Apparel, 881 Sneath
Ln., Ste. 113, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Automotive Workwear, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN.
/s/ Jonathan Sullivan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/28/13, 01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259022
The following person is doing business
as: MC Accountancy, 1415 Rollins Rd.,
Ste 204, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Yu Ming Chen, 684 Higate Dr., Daly City,
CA 94015. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN N/A.
/s/ Yu Ming Chen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/28/13, 01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258720
The following person is doing business
as: Magic Foot Massage, 2948-A S. Nor-
folk St., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Feng Xu, 228 Thrift St., San Francisco,
CA 94112. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN 12/03/2013.
/s/ Feng Xu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/28/13, 01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258737
The following person is doing business
as: Projects Capital Worldwide, 215 Sev-
enth St., MONTARA, CA 94037 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Ire-
na Savvon, 7708 Imogene St., Houston,
TX, 77074. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN.
/s/ Irena Savvon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14, 01/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258944
The following person is doing business
as: Meet.FM, 425 Broadway St., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: OSIX Cor-
poration, DE. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN 01/13/2011.
/s/ Cary Cole /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14, 01/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259023
The following person is doing business
as: Leave It to Sarah!, 250 New Bridge
St., MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Sarah
Magnuski, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 10/07/2013.
/s/ Sarah Magnuski /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14, 01/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258881
The following person is doing business
as: Shabuway, 145 E. 3rd St., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered by
the following owner: 168 International,
Inc, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN.
/s/ Yim Murphy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14, 01/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259061
The following person is doing business
as: Kestrel Knives, 946 King St., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Nathan
Chun-Chreech, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN .
/s/ Nathan Chun-Chreech /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14, 01/25/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258872
The following person is doing business
as: Converged Soulutions, 310 Roose-
velt Blvd., HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Roi F. Reede, same address. The
business is conducted by a Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Roi F. Reede /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/11/14, 01/18/14, 01/25/14, 02/01/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259117
The following person is doing business
as: All About Me, 222 8th Ave., #324,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Luong
Pham, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Luong Pham /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/18/14, 01/25/14, 02/01/14, 02/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259214
The following person is doing business
as: Sharevest Property Management
Services, 330 Primrose Rd., Ste 512,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Sharev-
est, Inc, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ William J. Gilmartin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/15/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/18/14, 01/25/14, 02/01/14, 02/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259274
The following person is doing business
as: Reusal, 230 W. 5th Ave., Apt. 101,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Zak Saidin
and Jennifer Williams 3257 Sacramento
St., San Francisco, CA 94118. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Zak C. Saidin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/17/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/18/14, 01/25/14, 02/01/14, 02/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259248
The following person is doing business
as: Dentaclique Staffing Solution, 2660
Flores St., #7, SAN MATEO, CA 94403
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Cleofe Aragon, same address.
The business is conducted by an individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Cleofe Aragon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/16/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/18/14, 01/25/14, 02/01/14, 02/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259161
The following person is doing business
as: Jersey Mike’s Subs, 1690 Stock-
bridge Ave., REDWOOD CITY, CA
94061 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Compel Capital Management,
Inc., CA The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
01/02/14.
/s/ Edward C. Phillips /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/08/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/10/14, 01/17/14, 01/24/14, 01/31/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258928
The following person is doing business
as: Events Central, SF, 2224 Derry Way,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Jose A. Flores III, same address. The
business is conducted by an individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Jose A. Flores III /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/18/14, 01/25/14, 02/01/14, 02/08/14).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Dec. 24, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
SHARON HEIGHTS GOLF &
COUNTRY CLUB
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
2900 Sand Hill Rd.
MENLO PARK, CA 94025-7006
Type of license applied for:
20-Off Sale Beer And Wine
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
January 4, 11, 18, 2014.
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
John P. Sheehan, aka John Sheehan,
aka Jack Sheehan
Case Number: 124038
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: John P. Sheehan, aka
John Sheehan, aka Jack Sheehan. A Pe-
tition for Probate has been filed by Di-
ane Key in the Superior Court of Califor-
nia, County of San Mateo. The Petition
for Probate requests that Diane Key be
appointed as personal representative to
administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
able for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ister the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: January 29, 2014 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal au-
thority may affect your rights as a cred-
itor. You may want to consult with an at-
torney knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Karl R. Vorsatz, Esq.
1601 Bayshore Highway, Ste. 350
BURLINGAME, CA 94010
(650)697-9591
Dated: December 31, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on January 4, 11, 18, 2014.
27 Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FINDING OF NO SIGNFICANT IMPACT
AND
NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS
January 18, 2014
Housing Authority of the County of San Mateo
264 Harbor Blvd., Bldg. A
Belmont, CA 94002
This Notice shall satisfy the above-cited two separate but related procedural notification require-
ments for activities to be undertaken by the Housing Authority of the County of San Mateo.
REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS
On or about February 3, 2014, the Housing Authority of the County of San Mateo will submit a re-
quest to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for the release of 33
Project-Based Section 8 Vouchers as authorized by the United States Housing Act of 1937, Sec-
tion 8(c)(9), as amended, to undertake a project known as Foster Square Affordable Senior
Housing for the purpose of providing affordable housing to seniors.
MidPen Housing Corporation proposes to develop a half-acre on a portion of a vacant 15-acre
site in Foster City, adjacent to Foster City’s City Hall. Located at the southwestern corner of Fos-
ter City Blvd. and Balclutha Drive, the development will be comprised of ground level commercial
and retail space and 66 affordable senior housing units contained in a four-story building. The
ground floor space will accommodate meeting rooms, office space, computer lab, laundry, fitness
room and other amenities and approximately 10,000 square feet of retail space. The second floor
will have a landscaped terrace available for private tenant use as well as residential units. The
third and fourth floors will contain residential units. Parking for residents will be provided on an
adjacent surface parking lot to the east of the site. There are 39 dedicated spaces for residents
and an additional 316 general parking shared spaces.
The approximately 10,000 square feet of ground level commercial space will be owned and man-
aged by The New Home Company and will most likely attract retail tenants in the casual dining
category.
There will be 65 one-bedroom units in three floor plans. A total of 47 units will be 593 square feet
in size; 12 units will be 562 square feet; and 6 units will be 613 square feet in size. One two-bed-
room unit will be 793 gross square feet in size.
Total project cost is estimated to be $26,661,101 from all funding sources.
FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
The Housing Authority of the County of San Mateo has determined that the project will have no
significant impact on the human environment. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement
under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 is not required. Additional project
information is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ERR) on file at the Housing Au-
thority of the County of San Mateo, 264 Harbor Blvd., Bldg. A, Belmont, CA 94002, and may be
examined or copied weekdays 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
PUBLIC COMMENTS
Any individual, group or agency disagreeing with this determination or wishing to comment on the
project may submit written comments to Debbie McIntyre, Administrative Services Manager,
Housing Authority of the County of San Mateo, 264 Harbor Blvd., Bldg. A, Belmont, CA 94002.
All comments received by 5:00 PM on Sunday, February 2, 2014 will be considered by San Ma-
teo County prior to submission of a request for release of funds. Comments should specify which
Notice they are addressing.
ENVIRONMENTAL CERTIFICATION
The Housing Authority of the County of San Mateo certifies to HUD that William Lowell, in his ca-
pacity as Executive Director of the Housing Authority of the County of San Mateo, in his capacity
as NEPA Certifying Officer consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is
brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process and that these
responsibilities have been satisfied. HUD’s approval of the certification satisfies its responsibili-
ties under NEPA and related laws and authorities, and allows San Mateo County to use Program
funds.
OBJECTIONS
HUD Office will accept objections to the Responsible Entity’s (RE) Request for Release of Funds
and Environmental Certification for a period of fifteen days following the submission date speci-
fied above or the actual receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on the following
bases: (a) the certification was not executed by the Certifying Officer or other officer of the Hous-
ing Authority of the County of San Mateo approved by HUD; (b) the RE has omitted a step or
failed to make a determination or finding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR Part 58 or by
CEQ regulations at 40 CFR 1500-1508, as applicable; (c) the RE has omitted one or more steps
in the preparation, completion or publication of the Environmental Assessment or Environmental
Impact Study per 24 CFR Subparts E, F or G of Part 58, as applicable; (d) the grant recipient or
other participants in the development process has committed funds for or undertaken activities
not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before release of funds and approval of the environmental cer-
tification; (e) another Federal, State or local agency has submitted a written finding that the proj-
ect is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared
and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58, Section 58.75) and
shall be addressed to Maria Cremer, Office of Community Planning and Development, U.S. HUD
– San Francisco Regional Office, Region IX, 600 Harrison Street, 3rd Floor, San Francisco, CA
94107-1300. Potential objectors should contact HUD to verify the actual last day of the objection
period.
William Lowell, Executive Director and NEPA Certifying Officer
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
NOTICE TO BIDDERS RE: PUPIL TRANSPORTATION
SERVICES SAN MATEO COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT
OF SCHOOLS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the San Mateo County Su-
perintendent of Schools hereby invites and will receive sealed
bid quotations from interested and qualified vendors for fur-
nishing Pupil Transportation Services, beginning with the
2014-15 school year. Each Request for Proposal submittal
must contain a completed Proposal Form Price Schedule (cost
proposal), a completed Proposal Questionnaire, and any pro-
posed modifications to the Contractual Agreement for furnish-
ing Pupil Transportation Services, and a bid bond. A mandato-
ry pre-bid conference will be held at 3:00 pm, Tuesday, Febru-
ary 4, 2014 at 101 Twin Dolphin Drive, Redwood City. Bidders
failing to attend this conference will have their quotations re-
jected and returned unopened. Please contact Nicole Pecson
at the San Mateo County Superintendent of Schools, 101 Twin
Dolphin Drive, Redwood City (650) 802-5460, for copies of the
bid package and information on the correct bidding procedure.
Said sealed quotations should be delivered to the San Mateo
County Superintendent of Schools, 101 Twin Dolphin Drive,
Redwood City, California 94065-1064. The envelope contain-
ing the sealed RFP should be clearly marked: “PUPIL TRANS-
PORTATION SERVICES BID” ATTN: Nicole Pecson, Special
Education Services. Said sealed quotations must be received
by the San Mateo County Superintendent of Schools no later
than 4:00pm on Friday, February 14, 2014. The San Mateo
County Superintendent of Schools reserves the right to reject
any and all quotations and to waive any informality, technical
defect or clerical error in any RFP, as the interest of the San
Mateo County Superintendent of Schools may require. Any
bidder may withdraw his or her quotation, either personally or
by written request, at any time prior to the scheduled closing
time for receipt of quotations. SAN MATEO COUNTY SUPER-
INTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. By: Denise Porterfield, Deputy
Superintendent, Business Services Division.
203 Public Notices
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CLJ515327
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): Elizabeth Castillo, an Individ-
ual; and Does 1-100 inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): PerSolve,
LLC, a limited liability company, dba Ac-
count Resolution Associates
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
203 Public Notices
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
203 Public Notices
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
203 Public Notices
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
MAIN COURTHOUSE - HALL OF JUS-
TICE, 400 County Center, Redwood City,
CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Alaine Patti-Jelsvik, SBN 194748,
Edit Alexander Ryan SBN 249323
PerSolve, LLC a limited Liability Compa-
ny, dba Account Resolution Associates
9301 Winnetka Avenue, Ste. B
CHATSWORTH, CA 91311
(818)534-3100
Date: (Fecha) Jul 12, 2012
G. Marquez Deputy
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
January 11, 18, 25, February 1, 2014.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
210 Lost & Found
295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ART: 5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”,
signed Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all.
650-345-3277
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! (650)430-6556
G.E. ELECTRIC DRYER - New, pur-
chased Sept 2013. Paid $475. Will sell
for $300. Excellent condition. Call
(650)712-1291.
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
(650)430-6556
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
296 Appliances
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL REFRIGERATOR great for of-
fice or studio apartment . Good condition
$40.00 SOLD
STOVE AND HOOD, G.E. XL44, gas,
Good condition, clean, white.. $250.
(650)348-5169
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 SOLD!
SCHWINN 20” Boy’s Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, SOLD
120 Foreign (70), U.S. (50) USED Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$5.00 all, SOLD
19 TOTAL (15 different) UN postage-
stamp souvenir cards, $70 catalog value,
$5, (650)-366-1013.
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
255 US used postage-stamp blocks &
strips (1300 stamps) and more, mounted,
$20, (650)-366-1013.
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRAMED 19X15 BARBIE USPS Post-
mark picture Gallery First Day of issue
1960. Limited edition $85.
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TONKA EXCAVATOR, two arms move,
articulated,only $22 SOLD!
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
28 Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL floor lamp, marble
table top. Good condition. $90. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL table lamps, (2),
shades need to be redone. Free. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BOX FULL TOYS Original Pkg., 40’s -
50’s, $90 for all (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
30" SHARP T.V. w/ remote - $65.
(650)333-5353
32 “ FLAT SCREEN TV - Slightly Used.
HDMI 1080, $100 SOLD
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPAD 4, brand new! 16 GB, Wi-Fi, black,
still unopened in box. Tired of the same
old re-gifts? Get yourself something you
really want... an iPad! $500. Call
(954)479-8716 (San Carlos)
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PHOTO ENLARGER, new in box $25.
650-726-6429
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO SOLD
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO SOLD
AMOIRE ENTERTAINMENT cabinet $50
(650)622-6695
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
SOLD
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE SET, round 42" glass table,
with 4 chairs, pick up Foster City. Free.
(650)578-9045
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINNING ROOM table with chairs excel-
lent condition like new. $99.00 SOLD
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - Five Drawer - $30.
(650)333-5353
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $200 OBO
SOLD!
304 Furniture
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, SOLD
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $80
RETAIL $130 OBO (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable
coast $600.00 sacrifice $80.00 SOLD
RECLINING CHAIR (Dark Green) - $55.
(650)333-5353
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SMALL VANITY chair with stool and mir-
ror $99. (650)622-6695
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 SOLD!
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO
(650)345-5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
SOFA- FABRIC, beige w/ green stripes
(excellent cond.) - $95. (650)333-5353
SOLID OAK bed frame, dresser, mirror
and night table, $75, 650-726-6429
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
T.V. STAND- Excellent Condition - $35.
(650)333-5353
TABLE 4X4X4. Painted top $40
(650)622-6695
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72” tall x 13”
wide, $20 SOLD!
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. SOLD.
TWIN BED including frame good condi-
tion $45.00 SOLD
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE METAL daybed $40. 650-726-
6429
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. SOLD!
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS(3) stainless steel
21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5 gal. - $10 all
(650)574-3229
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GAS STOVE - Roper, Oven w 4 Burners,
good condition $95 (650)515-2605
306 Housewares
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 (650)368-0748
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench 20-150 lbs,
warranty & case $25 650-595-3933
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW 18VOLT Drill/Driver w/ light,
warranty, only $29.99 SOLD!
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
WINCHESTER POCKETKNIFE scis-
sors, bade, sdriver file $10 650-595-3933
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
PANASONIC FAX machine, works
great, $20. (650-578-9045)
SLIDE PROJECTOR, Vivitar + slide
trays/carousels $25. 650-726-6429
SUPER 8 projector $25. 650-726-6429
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
16 BOOKS on Histoy if WWII Excllent
condition $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BALANCING SANTA, Mint condition,
Santa rocks back/forth, 20 in high, sturdy
metal, snowman, chimney, $12.00
(650)578-9208
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used
( 26"x49") aqua - $15 each
(650)574-3229
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used(
26"x49") aqua - $15 each (650)574-3229
BLACK LEATHER Organizer, Unop-
ened, Any Year, Cell Holder, Wallet, Cal-
ender., In Box $12 (650)578-9208
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
310 Misc. For Sale
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CEILING FAN 44", three lights, Excel-
lent condition, white or wood grain rever-
sible blades. $25. 650-339-1816
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRIC OMELET Maker quesadillas
& sandwich too $9 650-595-3933
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.SOLD!
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO SOLD!
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 SOLD!
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER CURTAIN set: royal blue
vinyl curtain with white nylon over-curtain
$15 (650)574-3229
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
310 Misc. For Sale
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra $35
(650)873-8167
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR no brand $65
(650)348-6428
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, SOLD!
VIOLIN $50 (650)622-6695
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $10
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK JACKET faux, hip length, satin lin-
ing. Looks feels real. Perfect condition
$99 OBO 650-349-6969
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
316 Clothes
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB LOUNGE exercise machine cost
$100. sell for $25. Call 650-570-6023
BASEBALLS & softballs 6 in all for only
$5 650-595-3933
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 SOLD!
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
SOLD!
TAYLOR MADE 200, driver & Fairway
metals. 9 PC iron set $99 OBO. SOLD!
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $45., (650)873-8167
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
WOMAN'S BOWLING ball, 12 lbs, "Lin-
da", with size 7 shoes and bag, $15.
(650)578-9045
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
LAWN MOWER High performance
Cordless Electric 21" self propelled. Ex-
cellent working cond. $80. Call
(650)593-1261.
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
29 Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Lake Titicaca
forms part of its
border
8 Rug treatment
15 Demanding
attention
16 Performing a
spiritual ritual
17 Traditional
Austrian dish
19 Promise that
doesn’t always
work out
20 Baby blues, e.g.
21 Half a Gabor?
22 It can help you
avoid ads
24 __ Gras
25 Swabber’s aid
26 Bohemia native
28 Food often
served in chains
29 Cry upon arriving
32 Breezes (through)
34 Anabaena or
chlorella
35 Andean root
vegetables
36 Cyclist’s wear
39 Milky
43 Patty Hearst’s
SLA alias
44 “Pearly Shells”
singer
45 Prophetess in
Luke
46 Conforms
51 Fresh-mouthed
52 Way to go: Abbr.
53 More than just
enthusiastic
55 Mark, as a ballot
56 Annual People
feature
59 Didn’t need
instructions
60 Christmas eave
sparklers
61 Straightforward
demand
62 Banks, e.g.
DOWN
1 Entrance
2 Discolor, as
banana peels,
e.g.
3 Be postponed for
later attention
4 Engine starter:
Abbr.
5 #2
6 Directed against
a thing, to
lawyers
7 Clueless
8 TV listing
9 ’50s-’70s
Montreal
Canadiens star
__ Richard
10 Spanish cordial
11 Colo. hours
12 Dash
13 It fits all, so they
say
14 Crazy Horse and
Red Cloud
18 “Kiss of life,”
briefly
23 “1984” location
25 Rest area visit
27 “Broom-__”:
comic strip
28 Geometric
pattern
30 Gray
31 Nth degree
32 Blow away
33 Rhine whine
36 2004 Stiller title
role
37 Pro-V hair care
brand
38 Takes over
40 Banished
41 McGovern’s
running mate
42 Sex appeal
46 Bourne of
Ludlum’s novels
47 Apart, in a way
48 “... like THAT!”
49 .biz biz
50 “__ I Don’t Have
You”: 1959 hit
53 NHL Players’
Association
director Donald
54 “Am I my
brother’s
keeper?”
speaker
57 Iconic Japanese
island, familiarly
58 PC monitor type
By Mark Bickham
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
01/18/14
01/18/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
REDWOOD CITY WEST OF EL CAMI-
NO - WALK TO STORES - 1 BR, 1 BA
W/NEW RUGS AND PAINT - WALK IN
SHOWER - ELECTRIC OVEN AND
HEAT - 2 CLOSETS WITH CABINETS -
CARPORT - NO SMOKING.
MANAGER AVAILABLE 9-4.
NON REFUNDABLE APPLICATION
FEE $30. $1500/ MONTH (650)361-1200
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2,400 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
ISUZU ‘96 RODEO, V-6, 153K miles,
clean body, red, no dents, immaculate in-
terior. Kenwood stereeo with boom box
included. Great car! Asking $3,750.
SOLD!
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
MA'S AUTO
REPAIR SERVICE
Tires • Service • Smog checks
***** - yelp!
980 S Clarem’ont St San Mateo
650.513.1019
704 N San Mateo Dr San Mateo
650.558.8530
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
670 Auto Parts
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
30 Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
MyErrandServicesCA.com
Concrete
Construction
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTERS AND ROOF
REPAIR
• New Installation seamless,
• Cleaning and Screening,
• Commercial and Residential
Power Washing
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1976
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED
DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters, Faucets,
Toilets, Sinks, & Re-pipes
(650)461-0326
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
31 Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
Champagne Sunday Brunch
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Furniture
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Massage Therapy
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
www.unionspaand salon.com
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
32 Weekend • Jan. 18-19, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
º 0eaI With £xperts º 0uick 8ervice
º 0nequaI 0ustomer 0are
www.8est8ated6oId8uyers.com
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 1/31/14
WEBUY
$â0
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR

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