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AMENDMENTS PREFACE 1. 1.1. INTRODUCTION GENERAL OVERVIEW 1.1.1. Layout of the Voice Server Interface (VSI) 1.1.2.

Communication between a Voice Server and an ISPBX 1.1.3. Standard Connection 1.1.4. Integrated Connection SERVERS VOICE-MAIL SERVER (VMS) 2.1.1. VMS Units 2.1.2. Handshaking Protocols HARDWARE INSTALLATION CIRCUIT BOARDS CABLES SOFTWARE INSTALLATION (ON-HOOK PROTOCOL) INTEGRATED CONNECTION 4.1.1. System Software 200/205/300/640 4.1.2. System Software 730/735/740/741/800/805/Call@Net SOFTWARE INSTALLATION (OFF-HOOK PROTOCOL) INTEGRATED CONNECTION 5.1.1. System Software 205/300 5.1.2. System Software 730/735/740/741/800/805/Call@Net ON-HOOK PROTOCOL CALLS FROM AN ISPBX TO A SERVER A.1.1. Format of Calls A.1.2. Timing of Calls A.1.3. Server Recovery from User Dialling Errors A.1.4. Call Type Identification OFF-HOOK PROTOCOL CALLS FROM AN ISPBX TO A SERVER B.1.1. Format of Calls B.1.2. Timing of Calls TONES AND SIGNAL LEVELS

1 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 7 7 7 9 11 11 11 13 15 15 15 16 16 17 18 18 18 19 20 Table of contents i

2. 2.1.

3. 3.1. 3.2. 4. 4.1.

5. 5.1.

A. A.1.

B. B.1.

C.

C.1. C.2. D. D.1.

THE SERVER THE ISPBX EXTRA INFORMATION CALLS FROM A SERVER TO AN ISPBX D.1.1. Timing of Calls D.1.2. Call Collision MESSAGE WAITING TYPES

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D.2.

Table of contents
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AMENDMENTS
The items that follow are incorporated in the update of this manual from issue 0010 to 0104:
CHAPTER/SECTION All chapters Call@Net introduced. DESCRIPTION

PREFACE
This book describes the hardware and software installation required to create an interface that can be used by various voice server products connected to a SOPHO ISPBX. Examples of voice servers are: VMS = Voice-mail server. The VSI (Voice-server Interface) uses two different protocols (on-hook protocol or off-hook protocol) and can be implemented in SOPHO ISPBX systems with the following System Software (SSW):

PROTOCOL ON-HOOK 200 205 300 640 730 735 740 741 800 805 and up OFF-HOOK --205.7 300.23 --730.30 735.25 740.23 741.21 800.23 805 and up

SSW

1.

INTRODUCTION

Voice servers are items of equipment that can be connected to an ISPBX to carry out various voice functions. Examples of voice servers are: VMS (Voice-Mail Server). A piece of equipment used for the purpose of storing and retrieving voice messages sent to it by the ISPBX. The messages are stored in "mail boxes" and can be retrieved by the ISPBX when requested. VoiceManager 5xx Series Starting with a small in-switch Voice Mail solution (VM 505) up to the large VM 560 with a lot a extra features, like hospitality, fax messages storage, networking of Voice Mail systems, TeLANophy, remote maintenance, etc.

This book describes: the hardware needed to connect a Voice Server; the projecting required in the ISPBX; the signalling protocol used on the Voice Server Interface (VSI) between a server and the ISPBX.

1.1.

GENERAL OVERVIEW

1.1.1. Layout of the Voice Server Interface (VSI)


Voice Servers are connected to an Analogue Line Circuit (ALC) via two wires (a/b wires) as shown in figure 1.1.

Figure 1-1 Connection of a Voice Server to an ISPBX

1.1.2.

Communication between a Voice Server and an ISPBX

There are two types of connection between a voice server and an ISPBX, they are the Standard Connection and Integrated Connection. Both types of connection use DTMF digits and other tones such as dial-tone and ring-tone.

1.1.3.

Standard Connection

With a Standard Connection, the ISPBX treats the server as an ordinary analogue telephone set; it does not send information that describes the kind of call being sent to the server. The server has the same facilities assigned to it by the ISPBX as those that can be assigned to an ordinary analogue telephone set.

1.1.4.

Integrated Connection

With an integrated Connection, the ISPBX sends "calling extension number" and "called extension number" to the server. This can be used to identify the type of call being sent, for example an internal, external or diverted call.

2.

SERVERS

An example of a voice server is the VMS (Voice-mail server); it is described below.

2.1.

VOICE-MAIL SERVER (VMS)

There are various manufacturers of Voice-Mail Server (VMS) equipment and there are two different handshaking protocols for communicating with ISPBXs.

2.1.1.

VMS Units

VMS units used with ISPBXs are made by various manufacturers. Note: The VMS units used must conform to the protocols offered by the ISPBXs; see appendices A and B.

2.1.2.

Handshaking Protocols

The protocols used are: oN-hook Voice-Mail protocol: NVM; oFf-hook Voice-Mail protocol: FVM. The ISPBX with the various System Soft Ware (SSW) will use one protocol or the other depending on projecting and licensing, it will not support both protocols at the same time; see table 2.1.

Note:

SYSTEM SOFTWARE (SSW) ISPBXs TBX PROTOCOL SUPPORTED VSI LICENCE REQUIRED * DONGLE NEEDED

SSW 200/205/300/615/ SSW 615/620/630 NVM NO NO 620/630/640/730/740/ 741/800/805/ Call@Net SSW 205/300 FVM YES NO SSW 730/740/741/800/ FVM YES YES 805/Call@Net * If the ISPBX user has purchased a licence for the VMS facility, it is programmed into the dongle installed in the ISPBX. In a network of exchanges, a dongle containing an off-hook VSI licence is needed only in the ISPBXs where the off-hook protocol is used, therefore, not in ISPBXs where the VSI off-hook protocol is not used. Table 2-1 VMS Makers and Protocols Used

3.
3.1.

HARDWARE INSTALLATION
CIRCUIT BOARDS

The Voice-mail server can connected to one or more (depending on the number of lines between the server and the ISPBX) ordinary ALC circuits. Insert an ALC board in a shelf of the ISPBX (or use one that is already installed but not all circuits are allocated yet); Connect the a/b wires of front connectors to the MDF; Connect the Voice server to a/b wires in the MDF.

3.2.

CABLES

Servers from different manufacturers may have different connectors for the a/b wires that need to be connected to the MDF. Consult the server handbook to see what cable is necessary.

4.
4.1.

SOFTWARE INSTALLATION (ON-HOOK PROTOCOL)


INTEGRATED CONNECTION

The things that must be projected are: System Boundaries and System Options; System Timers; System Ring Rhythms; Number Analysis; Group Arrangements; Facility Class Marks; Message Waiting; Traffic Class; Signalling type for the ALC.

4.1.1.

System Software 200/205/300/640

System Boundaries and System Options

SSW

PE COMMANDS PROJPA:2039,0;

FUNCTION OFF-HOOK Voice-mail protocol (Selects ON-HOOK Voicemail protocol) Digit regeneration during a connection Service Displays required External control of service displays Digit regeneration during a connection : OFF

200/205/300 PROJPA:2032,1; PROJPA:1042,1; PROJPA:2027,0; PROJPA:2032,1;

: YES : YES : NO : YES

640

System Timers

SSW 200/205/640

PE COMMANDS PROJPA:2308,C40; PROJPA:2341,C40; PROJPA:2300,C20;

FUNCTION Tone Time Limit Tone Timeout on DDI calls Dialling Timeout on Dial Tone = 40 seconds = 40 seconds = 20 seconds

SSW

PE COMMANDS PROJPA:2394,C05; PROJPA:2308,0,40; PROJPA:2341,0,40; PROJPA:2300,0,20; PROJPA:2394,0,05; SSM Ringing time "A" Tone Time Limit DDI Tone Time Limit Dial Tone Time Limit SSM Ringing time "A"

FUNCTION = 5 seconds of soft ring = 40 seconds = 40 seconds = 20 seconds = 5 seconds of soft ring

300

System Ring Rhythms (TMS)

SSW 200/205 300/640

PE COMMANDS PROJPA:2437,,58;

FUNCTION SSM Ringing rhythm "A" = 60 ms ON 800 ms OFF

Number Analysis
The numbers chosen as prefixes are examples only.
SSW PE COMMANDS PROJPA:6095, 00, *590,, 085; PROJPA:6095, 00, #590,, 086; PROJPA:6095, 00, *591,, 085; PROJPA:6095, 00, #591,, 086; PROJPA:6095, 00, *592,, 085; PROJPA:6095, 00, #592,, 086; FUNCTION Set message waiting prefix Cancel message waiting prefix Set message waiting prefix Cancel message waiting prefix Set message waiting prefix Cancel message waiting prefix

200/205 300/640

Group Arrangements
Group arrangements are optional and depend on how the server is used.
SSW 200/205 300/640 OM COMMANDS CRGRPA:2000, group DNR,,,; FUNCTION Create group arrangement

Facility Class Marks


Facility class mark 47 'Preferent to operator' must be assigned; this is useful when server transfers incoming calls to operator.

SSW

OM COMMANDS ASFACM: 29&47&51&57&72, server DNRs; or ASFACM: 29&47&51&94&72, server DNRs;

FUNCTION Assigns facilities to server DNRs 29 = Data protected 47 = Preferent to operator 51 = Test call entitled 57 = Service display extension 72 = Post dialling allowed 94 = Voice-mail server (preferred for new installations) Assigns facilities to server DNRs 29 = Data protected 47 = Preferent to operator 51 = Test call entitled 57 = Service display extension 72 = Post dialling allowed

205/300

ASFACM: 29&47&51&57&72, server DNRs; 200/640

Message Waiting

SSW 200/205 300/640

OM COMMANDS CHMWRE:0, *590, #590; CHMWRE:1, *591; #591; CHMWRE:2, *592, #591;

FUNCTION Set/cancel message-waiting type: 0 1 2

Traffic Class
The traffic class of the server DNRs must be set to maximum: usually traffic class 6.

4.1.2.

System Software 730/735/740/741/800/805/Call@Net

The ISPBX must be projected as follows:


PG2 PARAMETERS BOUND018 = 50 LOSYSOP019 = NO LOSYSOP027 = YES LOSYSOP047 = YES NETIMER000 = 20 FUNCTION Message-waiting softring time Voice-mail protocol selection Message-waiting queuing softring Postdialling available Internal dial tone time VALUE SELECTED 50x100ms On-hook protocol yes yes 20 seconds

PG2 PARAMETERS NETIMER006 = 40 NETIMER041 = 40 OM COMMANDS ASINTN:0, *590, 0, 76; ASINTN:0, #590, 0, 79; ASINTN:0, *591, 0, 77; ASINTN:0, #591, 0, 80; ASINTN:0, *592, 0, 78; ASINTN:0, #592, 0, 81;

FUNCTION Tone limit time DDI tone time

VALUE SELECTED 40 seconds 40 seconds FUNCTIONS

Message-waiting LED on/off type:

0 = ON 0 = OFF 1 = ON 1 = OFF 2 = ON 2 = OFF

Group Arrangements
Group arrangements are optional and depend on how the server is used: use group properties type number 16.

Facility Class Marks


Facility class mark 11 'Preferent to operator' must be assigned; this is useful when server transfer incoming calls to operator.
OM COMMANDS ASFACM:4&11&32&33, server DNR/BSP-IDs FUNCTION Assigns facilities to server DNRs 4 = Data protection 11 = Preferent to operator 32 = Keytone postdialling allowed 33 = Voice-mail server

Traffic Class
The traffic class of the server DNRs must be set to maximum: usually traffic class 6.

Signalling Type for ALC


The ALC circuit(s) to which the server is connected must be projected with signalling type 3208 'Enquiry by hook-flash'.

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5.

SOFTWARE INSTALLATION (OFF-HOOK PROTOCOL)


INTEGRATED CONNECTION

5.1.

The things that must be projected are: System Boundaries and System Options; System Timers; System Ring Rhythms (TMS); Number Analysis; Group Arrangements; Facility Class Marks; Message Waiting; Traffic Class; Signalling type for the ALC.

5.1.1.

System Software 205/300

System Boundaries and System Options

SSW 205/300

PE COMMANDS PROJPA:2039, 1; PROJPA:2032, 1;

FUNCTION OFF-HOOK Voice-mail protocol Post-dialling available : ON : YES

System Timers

SSW 205

PE COMMANDS PROJPA:2308, C40; PROJPA:2341, C40; PROJPA:2300, C20; PROJPA:2394, C05; PROJPA:2308, 0, 40; PROJPA:2341, 0, 40; PROJPA:2300, 0, 20; PROJPA:2394, 0, 05; Tone Time Limit DDI Tone Time Limit Dial Tone Time Limit TMS Ringing time "A" Tone Time Limit DDI Tone Time Limit Dial Tone Time Limit TMS Ringing time "A"

FUNCTION = 40 seconds = 40 seconds = 20 seconds = 5 seconds of soft ring = 40 seconds = 40 seconds = 20 seconds = 5 seconds of soft ring

300

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System Ring Rhythms (TMS)

PE COMMANDS PROJPA:2437,, 58; TMS Ringing rhythm "A"

FUNCTION = 60 ms ON 800 ms OFF

Number Analysis
The numbers chosen as prefixes are examples only.
PE COMMANDS PROJPA:6095, 00, *590,, 085; PROJPA:6095, 00, #590,, 086; PROJPA:6095, 00, *591,, 085; PROJPA:6095, 00, #591,, 086; PROJPA:6095, 00, *592,, 085; PROJPA:6095, 00, #592,, 086; FUNCTION Set message waiting prefix Cancel message waiting prefix Set message waiting prefix Cancel message waiting prefix Set message waiting prefix Cancel message waiting prefix

Group Arrangements
Group arrangements are optional and depend on how the server is used.
OM COMMANDS CRGRPA:2000, group DNR,,,; FUNCTION Create group arrangement

Facility Class Marks


Facility class mark 47 'Preferent to operator' must be assigned; this is useful when server tranfers incoming calls to operator.
OM COMMANDS ASFACM:29&47&51&72,server DNRs; FUNCTION Assigns facilities to server DNRs 29 = Data protected 47 = Preferent to operator 51 = Test call entitled 72 = Post dialling allowed 94 = Voice-mail server (preferred for new installations)

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Message Waiting

OM COMMANDS CHMWRE:0, *590, #590; CHMWRE:1, *591, #591; CHMWRE:2, *592, #592;

FUNCTION Set/cancel message-waiting type: 0 1 2

Traffic Class
The traffic class of the server DNRs must be set to maximum: usually traffic class 6. Note: When the server is dialled via inter-ISPBX links (for example, DPNSS, CLC, tielines, it might be useful to set the route option to "keytone regeneration" (PE 5057). If this were done then it would allow users, with extension sets such as SOPHO-SET P171, K365, to postdial to the server.

5.1.2.

System Software 730/735/740/741/800/805/Call@Net

The ISPBX must be projected as follows (the prefixes shown are examples only):

Boundaries, Options and Timers

PG2 PARAMETERS LOSYSOP019 = YES LOSYSOP027 = YES LOSYSOP047 = YES NETIMER000 = 20 NETIMER006 = 40 NETIMER041 = 40 NETIMER165 = 30 (only for SSW 730)

FUNCTION Voice-mail protocol selection Message-waiting queuing softring Postdialling available Internal dial tone time Tone limit time DDI tone time POM DTAP inform guard time

VALUE SELECTED Off-hook protocol yes yes 20 seconds 40 seconds 40 seconds 30 seconds

Number Analysis

OM COMMANDS ASINTN:0, *590, 0, 76; ASINTN:0, #590, 0, 79; ASINTN:0, *591, 0, 77;

FUNCTION Message-waiting LED on/off type: 0 = ON 0 = OFF 1 = ON

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OM COMMANDS ASINTN:0, #591, 0, 80; ASINTN:0, *592, 0, 78; ASINTN:0, #592, 0, 81;

FUNCTION 1 = OFF 2 = ON 2 = OFF

Group Arrangements
Group arrangements are optional and depend on how the server is used: use group properties type number 16.

Facility Class Marks


Facility class mark 11 'Preferent to operator' must be assigned; this is useful when server transfers incoming calls to operator.
OM COMMANDS ASFACM:4&11&32&33,server DNR/BSP-IDs FUNCTION Assigns facilities to server DNRs 4 = Data protection 11 = Preferent to operator 32 = Keytone postdialling allowed 33 = Voice-mail server

Traffic Class
The traffic class of the server DNRs must be set to maximum: usually traffic class 6.

Signalling Type for ALC


The ALC circuit(s) to which the server is connected must be projected with signalling type 3208 'Enquiry by hook-flash.'

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A.

ON-HOOK PROTOCOL

Communication between an ISPBX and a server uses CCITT Q.23 DTMF signalling. This appendix tells you: the format of the information the ISPBX sends to a server; the errors that might occur in the information sent to a server; how a server is expected to react when errors occur; how a server is expected to identify the type of a call that it receives.

A.1.

CALLS FROM AN ISPBX TO A SERVER

A.1.1. Format of Calls


Figure A.1. shows the information sent from the ISPBX to the server when the ISPBX is setting up a call. In the figure you see, as an example, a string of digits and letters (D 123456 A 654321 C DC), followed by ringing current (see note 5).

Figure A-1 ISPBX to Server Call Setup Sequence

Note:

The digits shown are only an example of what a calling DNR might be. - With internal calls this field contains up to 6 decimal digits (0...9), representing the DNR of the calling party or operator. Look also at section A.1.3. "Server Recovery from User Dialling Errors". - With external calls this field contains 4 stars (****). ISPBXs with SSW 200/205/300 and TBX will send the identifier digit and called number only on diversion, or when the called number was a hunt group number. If the server extension number was dialled directly, the identifier and called number will be suppressed. The digits shown are only an example of what a called DNR might be.

Note:

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With non-diverted calls, this field contains up to 6 decimal digits (0 ... 9), representing the DNR of the server. Look also at section A.1.3. "Server Recovery from User Dialling Errors". With diverted calls, this field contains up to 6 decimal digits (0 ... 9), representing the DNR of the diversion initiator.

Note:

At the end of a voice-mail call, when the caller and called party both go on-hook, the ISPBX and TBX send a clear display sequence ("DC") to the server ("DC" is sent to the server by SSW 200/205/300/640, "DC" is not sent by SSW 730/735/740/ 741/800/805 and up). Ringing current is sent to the server after the setup data has been sent.

A.1.2. Timing of Calls


The ISPBX sends the calling number and the called number to the server in a DTMF string, followed by ringing current; see figure A.1. After the data (calling number and called number) is received, the server expects to receive ringing current within a specified time (specified in the server). If ringing does not start within this specified time the data received is discarded.

A.1.3. Server Recovery from User Dialling Errors


The "Calling Number" and "Called Number" fields in figure A.1. can have a maximum of 6 characters in them: look at the notes 1 and 3 above. Nevertheless, a user might dial the wrong number of digits, or a digit that is not allowed; this section tells you what the server equipment is expected to do in such cases.
USER DIALLING ERROR CALLING NUMBER More than six digits sent to server Correct (no error) Correct (no error) Contains * or # (**** is allowed) Number contains error CALLED NUMBER Correct (no error) More than six digits sent to server Contains * or # Correct (no error) Number contains error Calling number discarded Called number retained Called number discarded Called number discarded Caller prompted to supply mailbox number Calling number discarded System reverts to "standard connection" for that call, rather than "integrated connection". SERVER ACTION

Table A-1

User Dialling Errors and Server Action

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A.1.4. Call Type Identification


Table A.2. shows the types of call that a server might receive from an ISPBX. The server should recognise these.
CALLED NUMBER IS SERVER DNR OR SERVER HUNT GROUP DNR YES NO YES NO

TYPE OF CALL

CALLING NUMBER IS **** NO NO YES YES

Direct internal call Diverted internal call Direct external call Diverted external call Table A-2 Server Type of Call Identification

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B.

OFF-HOOK PROTOCOL

Communication between an ISPBX and a Server uses CCITT Q.23 DTMF signalling. This appendix tells you the format and timing of the information the ISPBX sends to a server.

B.1.

CALLS FROM AN ISPBX TO A SERVER

B.1.1. Format of Calls


Figure B.1. shows the information sent from the ISPBX to the server when the ISPBX is setting up a call. In the figure you see, as an example, a string of digits and letters (X Y 123456 A 654321 C). The caller hears ringing tone while the ISPBX is sending digits, as shown in figure B.1.

Figure B-1 ISPBX to Server Call Setup Sequence

Note:

1. X = 0: no diversion 1: diversion on busy 2: diversion on no reply 3: other diversion cause (e.g. follow me) 4: diversion on not reachable (empty S0 bus or handset out of reach/switched off) 2. Y = 0: external party, identified by route number (analogue trunk) 1: internal party or party connected to a local network via DPNSS or CLC 2: external party, identified by calling line identity (ISDN) 3. The digits shown are only an example of what a calling DNR might be. Look at table B.1. to see what the digits mean. 4. ISPBXs with SSW 205/300 will send the identifier digit and called number only on diversion, or when the called number was a hunt group number. If the server extension number was dialled directly, the identifier and called number will be suppressed.

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As from SSW 300.32: when facility class mark 50 is assigned SS to the voice mail server, the Called Line Identity (preceeded by A) is included in the digit string that is sent to the voice mail server after answering the call. 5. - Diverted calls: up to 20 digits (0 ... 9, *, #) DNR of the diversion initiator. - Non-diverted calls: up to 20 digits (0 ... 9, *, #) DNR of the server. Note: 6. When the server has received the stop digit it must wait 1 second before sending an announcement; this time is needed for path switching in the ISPBX.

CALLING PARTY TYPE see note 2 Y=0

MAX. NBR OF DIGITS AND SPACES 20

TYPE OF DIGITS 0 ... 9, *

NUMBER REPRESENTS Route number of trunk line. Line number of trunk line. DNR of the calling extension or operator. Unrestricted calling line identity of the calling party.

REMARKS Format = ROUTE * LINE (Two numbers separated by *)

Y=1 Y=2

20 20

0 ... 9, *, # 0 ... 9, *, #

If the calling line identity is restricted (SSW 205/ 300 or SSW 740 and higher) the route and line number are displayed instead of the calling line identity.

Table B-1 Meaning of Digits in Calling DNR

B.1.2. Timing of Calls


ISPBXs send the calling number and the called number to the server in a DTMF string; while this is happening, the user hears ringing tone (see figure B.1.). After the data (calling number and called number) is sent, the ISPBX connects the caller to the server.

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C.

TONES AND SIGNAL LEVELS

The signal levels of the the server and the ISPBX both have to be programmed correctly in order for the two to interface properly; this means the following should be programmed: Audio levels; DTMF signalling levels.

Look at table on page 20 to see what these levels should be: they are the same for both the on-hook protocol and the off-hook protocol.
DTMF SIGNALLING LEVELS SIGNAL DIRECTION AUDIO (SPEECH) SIGNALS LOW GROUP - 11 to - 2 dbm - 5 to - 35 dbm HIGH GROUP - 9 to - 2 dbm - 5 to - 35 dbm

Transmit : Server to ISPBX - 6 to - 12 V Receive : ISPBX to Server 0 to - 50 V Table C-1 Audio and DTMF Signal Levels

Note:

The Audio and DTMF signal levels are specified across an a/b wire pair with an input impedance of 600 ohms.

C.1.

THE SERVER

The Programming of tones and signal levels in the server should already have been done by the manufacturer of the server; these settings have been chosen to suit the telephone system requirements of the country in which the server is used; If you need to change the settings look in the server manufacturer's handbook to see how to do this.

C.2.

THE ISPBX

Transmit and receive signal levels of an ALC are country dependent. These signal levels and DTMF tones are defined in the ALC card being used.

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D.
D.1.

EXTRA INFORMATION
CALLS FROM A SERVER TO AN ISPBX

A server often supports several kinds of messages, such as: Standard messages; Priority messages; Fax messages.

These can be classed as different message waiting types, for example: text message 1; text message 2; text message 3.

In an ISPBX, each of these can have a message-waiting activation and deactivation prefix. When a message is received in a mailbox of the server, the server may initiate a call to the ISPBX telling it there is a message waiting. The server will tell the ISPBX to turn on the message waiting indicator (usually an LED or soft ring) on a particular telephone extension and will indicate what type of message is waiting (with simple sets, only one message type can be indicated, because the set may have only one lamp or soft ring). The following examples show how a standard message-waiting indication would be turned on or off. Turn the standard message waiting indication ON - Connect to a line; - Detect dial tone; - Send the message waiting activation prefix: you defined this (*590) in the number analysis section of chapters 4 and 5) - send the DNR of the telephone set; - Wait for confirmation tone; - Disconnect. Turn the standard message waiting indication OFF - Connect to a line; - Detect dial tone; - Send the message waiting deactivation prefix: you defined this (#590) in the number analysis section of chapters 4 and 5) - Send the DNR of the telephone set; - Wait for confirmation tone; - Disconnect.

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Note:

The DNR is the extension number of the user whose message waiting indicator is to be changed. DNRs in other DPNSS nodes are allowed (only in SSW 805) The DNR may contain up to: 6 digits (0 ... 9) (On-hook protocol) 12 digits (0 ... 9, *, #) (Off-hook protocol)

D.1.1. Timing of Calls


When the server connects to a line it expects to receive dial tone within a certain period of time; if no dial tone is detected within this period the server disconnects. On receiving dial tone, the server will send a string of DTMF digits to the ISPBX and wait for confirmation tone, if no confirmation tone is received within a certain time then the server will disconnect. The tone and timeout value of the confirmation tone are projectable within the ISPBX and must also be projectable within the server. If the call from the server to the ISPBX fails it might be because dial tone or confirmation tone are not detected, or the timeouts are exceeded. In this situation the server will make another two attempts to establish a connection. If these two also fail, the server will make no further attempts. The maximum number of call setup attempts will therefore be three. Look at figure D.1. for an indication of the call setup protocol.

Figure D-1 Server to ISPBX Call Setup Sequence (Server Actions)

D.1.2. Call Collision


If the server seizes a line in order to make a call to the ISPBX but receives a keytone digit instead of dial tone, then it is obvious that an incoming call is colliding with the outgoing call; call collision is occurring. When call collision occurs, the server should withdraw its outgoing call to the ISPBX and give precedence to the incoming call from the ISPBX. It is recommended that the server should wait a few seconds after the last call is finished (incoming or outgoing), before it sets up any new call to the ISPBX. This should avoid collisions with new incoming calls, from the ISPBX to the server, that had been waiting as "camped on busy" calls.

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D.2.

MESSAGE WAITING TYPES

The three message waiting types mentioned in section D.1. can be indicated only on feature telephone sets. On simple sets only one message waiting type can be indicated because the simple set has only one lamp or soft ring. This means that, on a simple set, only one message waiting type should be used because switching other message waiting types off on simple sets will result in switching off all message waiting types. If all three message waiting types are to be used, the server must know the types of sets in an installation and which of the telephone sets are simple sets.

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