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Volume 126 Issue 64 kansan.com Tuesday, January 21, 2014
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2014 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 11
CROSSWORD 5
CRYPTOQUIPS 5
OPINION 4
SPORTS 12
SUDOKU 5
Intervals of clouds
and sunshine
Pick up your
basketball tickets.
Index Don’t
Forget
Today’s
Weather
Don’t forget coffee.
HI: 26
LO: 16
STUDENT HEALTH FACELIFT
Kansas brings down No. 13 Baylor BASKETBALL
PAGE 12
EXCLUSIVE ONLINE CONTENT
CAMPUS
AMELIA ARVESEN
news@kansan.com
Senate advisory board approves renovations to Watkins Memorial Health Center
Much of the Student Senate’s
attention this spring will be di-
rected toward the renovation
of Watkins Memorial Health
Center and the re-examination
of the Student Senate Residen-
tial Housing Board’s purpose.
In both cases, new lines of
communication were opened
in the fall and will continue to
develop this spring as the cur-
rent administration works to
complete party platforms.
While the redesign of Wat-
kins will include the partici-
pation of design, photography,
and journalism students, the
Residential Housing Board
will be restructured to address
the concerns of students living
and working on campus.
WATKINS RENOVATION
Student senators and the Stu-
dent Health Advisory Board
members are working togeth-
er on the “Prioritizing Student
Health” platform to redesign
the frst foor lobby, signage
and marketing materials. An
objective of the renovation
is to change the way students
view on-campus health ser-
vices.
“Tere are many students
who don't realize they even
pay a health fee or use the
services to which that fee enti-
tles them,” said Diana Malott,
associate director for Student
Health Services. “We want to
make sure our building is a
positive refection of that goal
and that students are more
comfortable while they are in
the building.”
Te executive staf connected
Health Services with students
to aid in the renovation – lob-
by layout planned by an inte-
rior design student, new sig-
nage created by graphic design
students, photos displayed
in the lobby provided by stu-
dent photographers and a new
brand innovated by journalism
students.
“When people go to Wat-
kins for checkups or to pick
up prescriptions, they'll see
their peers' work hanging on
the walls and around the lob-
by,” said Morgan Said, Student
Senate outreach director. “It'll
be really cool to compile so
much student talent into one
location.”
Plans will be fnalized afer
deliberation from Design and
Construction Management
and the Student Health Advi-
sory Board. Te project is slat-
ed to begin in late spring.
“Tis renovation will hope-
fully make a painful experi-
ence at the doctor seem a little
less painful,” Said said.
Funds from the health fee
will go toward the upgrading
40-year-old building, which
was last updated in 1996.
Te need for change was rec-
ognized before the current ex-
ecutive staf was involved but
the new partnership will con-
tinue to beneft students.
“I see Student Senate's in-
volvement with Watkins to be
kind of a soundboard that the
Watkins staf can bounce ideas
of of, and vice versa,” said
Said. “Tey're so receptive to
and interested in our opinions,
and we're excited to continue
building on our relationship
this semester.”
RE-EXAMINING HOUSING BOARD
Senate plans to restructure
the Student Senate Residen-
tial Housing Board in order
to more efectively address the
concerns of students living in
and working for residential
housing.
“Initially when coming into
ofce, we anticipated being
able to address housing issues
directly, but we have discov-
ered that the board Student
Senate currently has in place
cannot properly address those
concerns,” said Tyler Chil-
dress, chief of staf for the Stu-
dent Senate.
In the past, the board has
been underutilized, rarely
meeting and given few respon-
sibilities. If the board cannot
be adequately restructured,
discussions may lead to a re-
quest to disband the board.
However, a diferent structure
within Senate would be devel-
oped to respond to residential
housing community issues.
Originally the board coordi-
nated activities between halls.
Afer reorienting the goals and
charges, the Senate would like
to see it used as a contact for
housing concerns. From there,
the board would be able to
bring issues before the full Stu-
dent Senate.
About 4,700 students live on
campus, according to KU Info.
Childress said Senate will work
to resolve the structure quick-
ly, keeping input about student
housing a priority.
— Edited by Austin Fisher
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Much of the Student Senate’s attention this spring will be directed towards the renovation of Watkins Memorial Health Center. Part of Ad Astra’s “Priori-
tizing Student Health” platform was to redesign the first floor lobby, signage and marketing materials in Watkins.
1. Changes inside Watkins
Cellular charging stations added
Wi-Fi service available
New flooring, wall coverings, furniture, and art in lobby
Updated air conditioning and heating
New signage
2. Summarizing points
Student Senate utilizing student talent in the redesign of Watkins
Changing the way students view health services
Making the dreaded trip to the doctor more comfortable and
inviting
Partnering of Senate and Watkins
Re-examining the Student Senate Residential Housing Board
Changing the board’s charges and responsibilities
Directly addressing student housing concern
Keeping student housing input a priority

“There are many students who don’t realize they even
pay a health fee or use the services to which that fee
entitles them.”
DIANA MALOTT
Associate director for Student Health
Budget cuts could lead to higher student fees
STUDENT SENATE
HANNAH SWANK
news@kansan.com
Student Senate ended the fall
semester on their targeted bud-
get and aims to do so again this
semester, regardless of signif-
cantly lower funds due to lower
enrollment rates.
Senate receives funding from
student activity fees and appor-
tions funds into three accounts:
block allocation, line-item al-
location and unallocated. Te
block allocation account funds
campus institutions like the
Lied Center and the line-item
account funds student groups.
Te unallocated account acts
as a catch-all to fund other stu-
dent groups requesting money.
Tis fscal year, the unallocat-
ed account funds are approx-
imately $100,000 lower than
last year which was around
$150,000. Michael Graham,
Student Senate Treasurer, said
the biggest impact of the lower
budget is that student groups
are receiving less money.
“If groups have ever received
funding in the past, we’re en-
couraging them to apply for
line-item funding to lock in
their funding amount for the
following fscal year and to plan
now for what they need later,”
Graham said. Tis is mainly
for those groups that put on big
events like dance marathons.
Senate will apply this semes-
ter for student fee review to
increase budgets to allocate
funds and allow more money
from student activity fees. Te
current student activity fee is
$16.25 and the proposed in-
crease is $1.75 to create a new
charge of $18.
Graham said while the Sen-
ate doesn’t want to press more
SEE SENATE PAGE 2
Student Senate budget unallocated account balance is approxi-
mately $100,000 lower this fiscal year because of decreased en-
rollment rates.
The unallocated account aids student groups that request money.
Because of the lower balance, Senate has not been able to fund as
many groups this year.
Senate will apply for fee review process to increase student activity
fees $1.75 from the current balance of $16.25 to $18.
Money on my mind
At the University’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration yesterday, Kenton Rambsy, project digital initiative coordinator
for the Project on the History of Black Writing, spoke and a capella group Genuine Imitation performed.
http://bit.ly/1fUo1TY
Te Topeka Regional Air-
port now provides fights to
and from Chicago O’Hare In-
ternational Airport.
“With two fights a day, we
are starting light,” said Eric
Johnson, Metropolitan To-
peka Airport authority pres-
ident. “Getting the word out
has been so difcult, but it’s
time. We are a capital city, a
population of a 126,000 peo-
ple and no air service. It’s al-
ways been about making sure
that the service matches the
community and we’ve not had
that in the past.”
Topeka Regional Airport is
better known as Forbes Field
to the locals from the time it
was used as a military base.
However, with this service,
Johnson hopes to highlight
the airport’s presence.
“We’ve had some other stuf,
but it was never the right type
of service. It never did well,”
Johnson said. “What we did
with this is we worked with
an airline that could bring in
regional jet service and basi-
cally the same equipment that
is leaving in Kansas City for
Chicago.”
Flights to Chicago started
in January with a partnership
with United Airlines. From
Chicago, passengers can take
connecting fights to 160 des-
tinations in the world.
Topeka hopes to attract rid-
ership with the ease of fying
local.
“I’ve used the service al-
ready,” Johnson said. “I’ve
heard from other people
who’ve used the service al-
ready, and there’s nothing nic-
er than when you fy home,
you are actually home instead
of in a diferent state.”
Every year, nearly a million
passengers from the Topeka
area use Kansas City Interna-
tional airport, Johnson said.
Tey have to travel 75 miles
or farther to get to the Kansas
City airport. Also, parking at
KCI can be pricey compared
to the $5 fat fee at Topeka, no
matter the duration.
At Kansas City, overnight
parking in the garage is $22
per day. Te cheapest choice
with a daily rate of $7 has
people park 15 minutes away
from the airport and take a
shuttle.
“Te Topeka metropolitan
statistical area spends about
a $127 million a year at the
Kansas City airport,” Johnson
said. “Tat’s income and rev-
enue that’s leaving the state
of Kansas and we are trying
to bring a piece of that back
home.”
With the success of the ser-
vice, Topeka hopes to expand
destinations and airlines.
Currently, only United ofers
this service at Topeka.
For students in search of
bargain fights, Topeka is lim-
ited in options.
Freshman Melissa Stasi
from Overland Park, travels
to Chicago two to three times
a year to visit friends and
family. In her travel, she sticks
to the best price, which ofen
times, is not United.
“Sadly I wouldn’t use it be-
cause I use Southwest. It’s the
cheapest,” Stasi said. “But I
think once it expands the ser-
vice it’d be great.”
Even with cheap parking,
more options in ticket prices
with more airlines still makes
KCI more appealing to stu-
dents, said Kenzie McLean,
freshman from Mooresville,
N.C.
As an out-of-state student,
McLean usually has a layover
either in Chicago or Atlanta.
With ticket prices being so
expensive, McLean counts on
fnding the best deal.
“I would be more likely to
use it once it ofers more air-
lines and prices,” McLean
said.
Once the service proves to
be successful, Johnson hopes
to have additional fights and
other major connecting hubs
like Denver and Dallas.
“KU is an important piece of
this,” Johnson said. “We’d love
to see students recognize the
ease of fying Topeka rather
than fying Kansas City and
we can save them money on
parking.”
— Edited by Casey Hutchins
NEWS MANAGEMENT
Editor-in-chief
Katie Kutsko
Managing editor – production
Allison Kohn
Managing editor – digital media
Lauren Armendariz
Associate production editor
Madison Schultz
Associate digital media editor
Will Webber
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT
Advertising director
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Sales manager
Kolby Botts
Digital media and sales manager
Mollie Pointer
NEWS SECTION EDITORS
News editor
Emma LeGault
Associate news editor
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Sports editor
Blake Schuster
Associate sports editor
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Entertainment editor
Christine Stanwood
Special sections editor
Dani Brady
Head copy chief
Tara Bryant
Copy chiefs
Casey Hutchins
Hayley Jozwiak
Paige Lytle
Design chiefs
Cole Anneberg
Trey Conrad
Designers
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Clayton Rohlman
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Opinion editor
Anna Wenner
Photo editor
George Mullinix
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Michael Strickland
ADVISERS
Media director and
content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014 PAGE 2
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weather,
Jay?
What’s the
— weather.com
THURSDAY
HI: 20
LO: 6
Clouds giving way
to sun.
Warm drink, warm hands.
WEDNESDAY
HI: 41
LO: 4
Partly cloudy. Winds
NNW at 20 to 30 mph.
Caffeine is necessary.
FRIDAY
HI: 46
LO: 25
Windy with a mix of
sun and clouds.
Grab a cold one.
Calendar
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
Tuesday, Jan. 21 Wednesday, Jan. 22 Thursday, Jan. 23 Friday, Jan 24
Topeka airport offers flights to Chicago
REGIONAL
YU KYUNG LEE
news@kansan.com
WHAT’S NEXT?
Tell us.
2015 KU Common Book
nominations are open.
Submit your favorites.
firstyear.ku.edu
749-0055 | 704 Mass. | rudyspizzeria.com
Toppings
Small Pizzas
Drinks
only
plus tax 2
$12.99
FREE DELIVERY
“VOTED BEST PIZZA IN LAWRENCE”
TUESDAY SPECIAL
What: Kansas Food: What We Eat,
Who Produces It, Future Trends and
Legal Developments
When: 3 to 5 p.m.
Where: The Commons in Spooner Hall
About: Four local experts will speak
about current issues in agriculture.
What: Hallmark Symposium Lecture
Series
When: 6 to 8 p.m.
Where: 110 Budig Hall
About: Previous faculty member
Richard Downs will speak about his
experience with printmaking.
What: Watchtower screening
When: TBA
Where: Lied Center
About: Pelin Esmer, a Turkish
filmmaker, will present her film
and answer questions following the
screening.
What: First day of Spring 2014
classes
When: All day
What: KU School of Music Student
Recital Series: Kai Yin Crystal Lam,
Carrie Groenewold
When: 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Where: Swarthout Recital Hall,
Murphy Hall (Lam), Bales Organ
Recital Hall (Groenewold)
About: Lam will perform on piano
and Groenewold will perform on
organ. These concerts are free.
What: Philosophy Lecture: “Brutal
Propositions”
When: 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Where: Pine Room in Kansas Union
About: Ben Caplan, a professor
from Ohio State University, will
speak. The event is free to the
public.
What: Benjamin Britten’s “The Rape
of Lucretia” (KU Opera)
When: 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Where: Crafton-Preyer Theatre,
Murphy Hall
About: Tickets $15 for adults, $10
for seniors and students. Additional
show on Sunday at 2:30 p.m.
Topeka Regional Airport to Chicago O’Hare
6 a.m. and 2:54 p.m.
Chicago O’Hare to Topeka Regional Airport
12:54 p.m. and 8:38 p.m.
WHEN ARE THE FLIGHTS?
costs onto students, the fee
increase would be benefcial if
there is demand and it allows
groups to continue doing
great things.
“Student Senate has been
harboring an attitude of aus-
terity to spend money where
we can and continue to allow
the same level of service to
groups so they can continue
to do the things they’re great
at,” Graham said.
Drew Harger, Student Sen-
ate assistant treasurer, said
the Senate allocated their re-
sources efciently to end last
semester on targeted budget.
Harger said by continuing to
keep track of money given out
at meetings, this can be ac-
complished again this semes-
ter and next year.
Harger thinks that the past
year was a learning experi-
ence. “When the budget is
bigger, we’ll be able to help
groups we wanted to help
this year but weren’t able to,”
Harger said.
— Edited by Jack Feigh
SEE SENATE PAGE 1

“We are a capital city ... It’s
always been about making
sure that the service
matches the community.”
ERIC JOHNSON
President of Metropolitan Topeka Airport
Welcome back to campus,
Jayhawks! There are 39
class days until Spring
Break and 73 until Stop
Day. You can make it!
TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014 PAGE 3 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Last month, the American
Bar Association imposed sev-
eral sanctions on the Univer-
sity of Kansas School of Law.
Te sanctions, described in
a Dec. 19 ABA press release,
include a public censure and a
$50,000 penalty.
Te sanctions were an-
nounced afer the Section of
Legal Education and Admis-
sions to the Bar’s accreditation
committee determined the
School of Law had violated its
standards for approval. Te
violation was admitting two
students into a new Masters
of Law (LLM) program before
receiving or seeking the ABA’s
approval for the establishment
of the new program.
Te law
school has
since put in
place new
procedures
to prevent a
similar in-
cident from
occurri ng
in the fu-
ture.
“We now have procedures
put in place so, as soon as the
law school considers any cur-
riculum change, an approv-
al process is triggered,” said
Stephen Mazza, dean of the
School of Law. “Te ABA nev-
er questioned the quality of the
program.”
Te Accreditation Commit-
tee determined that the school
did not clarify to the ABA its
exact intentions.
Of the two students admitted
to the program, one student
has since been awarded their
degree. Te other student re-
mains in the program. In the
sanction, the ABA points out
the school put both students at
“signifcant risk” by admitting
them to a program that had
yet to be granted acquiescence,
and described the school’s fail-
ure to seek the ABA’s approval
before making the curriculum
change as grossly negligent.
“Mistakes happen,” said Mark
Savoy, a third-year law student
from Overland Park. “Te im-
portant thing is that once the
mistake was out in the open,
the law school really owned it
and took responsibility… my
overall perspective of the law
school remains the same.”
— Edited by Jack Feigh
Law school fined for improper admission
ACADEMICS
DALTON KINGERY
news@kansan.com
Mazza
Story summary
Lindsey Douglas has been
hired as the new director of
state relations for the Univer-
sity. In this position, Douglas
will advocate for the Universi-
ty’s priorities at the state gov-
ernment level. She will replace
Kathy Damron, who will con-
tinue working as a consultant
for the transition period.
Tis session, Douglas will
focus on restoring more than
$13 million in budget cuts
made in the previous session
and passing the Health Edu-
cation Initiative, which will
allow for a new building at KU
Medical Center to train more
doctors each year and provide
health care to people across
Kansas.
Douglas thinks it’s important
to emphasize the impact of the
University’s priorities for peo-
ple across the state, especially
the Health Education Initia-
tive.
“In rural areas of Kansas
many doctors are retiring and
there are not enough doctors
to replace them,” Douglas said.
“We want to train doctors to
stay in Kansas and provide a
critical need in the future.”
In order to accomplish these
goals, Douglas will have to
work closely with members of
the Kansas Senate, House of
Representatives, the Board of
Regents and the Brownback
Administration.
“Legislators appreciate when-
information is provided in a
quick manner so that they may
be fully informed in making
decisions,” Douglas said. “My
job is to provide that informa-
tion and to assist them with
constituent questions and re-
quests.”
She will work with Vice
Chancellor for Public Afairs
Tim Caboni to provide this in-
formation.
“Ultimately we have a re-
sponsibility for communica-
tion and outreach, as well as
state relations,” Caboni said.
“We can marry the two, with
in person and broad public
messages, to make messages
that are tightly integrated in a
way that few others can.”
Previously, Douglas worked
at the Kansas Department
of Transportation where she
played a key role in passing
the T-WORKS legislation that
funded statewide transporta-
tion construction by keeping
contact with the legislators.
Caboni feels that this expe-
rience and her relationships
make Douglas particularly
suited to her position.
“Lindsey had remarkable ex-
perience in the Department of
Transportation with moving
legislature through and pre
existing contacts, which are
incredibly valuable,” Caboni
said.
Douglas also feels that her
work with KDOT will help her
in her new position.
“Knowing how to protect
dollars and advocate for them
is something I learned at
KDOT and can continue at
KU,” Douglas said.
Douglas is excited to start the
session by getting to work with
her former colleagues that
work in legislature and start-
ing to work as a liaison.
“Te newness and getting to
learn what KU is doing is ex-
citing,” Douglas said. “I had a
great KDOT family and I’m
excited to become a part of the
KU family.”
— Edited by Casey Hutchins
University names new director of state relations
CAMPUS
MCKENNA HARFORD
news@kansan.com
University hires Lindsey Douglas as the new director of state
relations
Her focus this session will be on restoring budget cuts and the
Health Education Initiative
She will work with Timothy Caboni to tailor messages for the
public and for legislators
Has previous experience at KDOT that will transfer to her position
at the University
Her relationships with the legislators are valuable, and they
helped get her the position
Story summary
School of Law formally disciplined by American Bar Associa-
tion
Admitted two students into degree program before having
degree program approved
Discipline will take the form of public censure and $50,000
fine

“Knowing how to protect dollars and advocate for
them is something I learned at KDOT and can continue
at KU.”
LINDSEY DOUGLAS
Director of state relations
@UniversityDailyKansan
TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014 PAGE 4
What I missed during break?
Texting the FFAs!
Why does it have to get drastically
colder the day we go
back to school?
I have a love/hate relationship
with my UDK horoscope.
Today it is love.
Duck.
You know you’ve met a dedicated
transfer student when they’re
practicing riding the buses the day
before spring semester starts.
The world is a better place when
it’s this warm in January.
What do the squirrels of KU do
when the students are gone?
Go nuts?
Did you miss me?
“I wish I was a boy
so I could be gay.”
Unless the course is on Blackboard
and fully equipped with a syllabus,
I’ll just pretend that I don’t have to
go to class tomorrow.
My room in the Schol Halls flooded
over break. At least I get a new
carpet?
Can I get in the FFA after gradu-
ating or would that tear a hole in
the Matrix?
Sucks to BU
Did you know it’s possible to be too
tall to play Baby Jay and too short
to play Big Jay?
Campus=wind and hills=I will
never look good going to class
More Page One stickers on
gameday, please
Editor’s Note: The above are all
of the FFAs submitted yesterday.
So, until you give me new stuff,
VINTAGE FFAS.
This person in the next stall is
obviously speed texting on the
toilet. The keyboard clicking sound
and the ringer blew his cover..
Am I the only selfish who likes peo-
ples FB status if they like mine?
There should be an
FFA Hall of Fame
Sneeze in Strong, have the entire
building say “bless you”.
Wibbly Wobbly Timey-Wimey
How about we put all of the smok-
ers in a box like at the airport.
My girlfriend and I are laying
together in our futon, about to
sleep, when she turns to me and
says, “Sometimes I worry I’m a
vampire.”
Send your FFA
submissions to
785-289-8351 or
kansan.com
HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
LETTER GUIDELINES
Send letters to opinion@kansan.com. Write LET-
TER TO THE EDITOR in the e-mail subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the author’s name,
grade and hometown. Find our full letter to the
editor policy online at kansan.com/letters.
Katie Kutsko, editor-in-chief
kkutsko@kansan.com
Allison Kohn, managing editor
akohn@kansan.com
Lauren Armendariz, managing editor
larmendariz@kansan.com
Anna Wenner, opinion editor
awenner@kansan.com
Sean Powers, business manager
spowers@kansan.com
Kolby Botts, sales manager
kbotts@kansan.com
Brett Akagi, media director and content
strategest
bakagi@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board
are Katie Kutsko, Allison Kohn, Lauren
Armendariz, Anna Wenner, Sean Powers
and Kolby Botts.
@EmaontheWayy
@KansanOpinion Dream on.
@NLongsfeld
@KansanOpinion kids today do this thing
called “twerking,” so humanity is pretty
much dead by 2014
@thecalebchin
@KansanOpinion Thanks for the contri-
butions to further social justice/3 day
weekend
If you could go back in time
and say one thing to MLK
what would it be?
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
W
e have been
taught from a
young age the
evolutionary phrase “survival
of the fttest.” I have always
nodded in agreement, think-
ing, “Sure, that makes sense,”
all while picturing Dave the
Barbarian dominating us
all, until a recent trip I took
to Eastern Europe led me to
think otherwise.
When I frst heard that KU
Hillel was ofering a pioneer
mission trip to Bulgaria and
Romania, I was intrigued. A
few months ago, I couldn’t lo-
cate Bulgaria or Romania on
a map. Tese two countries
were as unknown to me as the
answer to a math equation.
Afer spending time with
local peers from the Jewish
communities in each country,
I started to better understand
both the people and the plac-
es. A few days into the trip,
we were talking about the
lifestyle diferences between
Bulgaria and America with
a 19-year-old Bulgarian Jew
that we had come to know.
Before standing up to have a
cigarette, she shared her in-
sight in one simple sentence.
She told us, “I don’t want to
survive, I want to live.”
For me, survival can be as
simple as waking up when my
alarm goes of on a Monday
morning or going an entire
day without cofee. Tough
the more I thought about
these two words, the more
difculty I had defning
the distinction. While I
have always had a surface
understanding that the Jewish
history is a story of survival,
afer having spent some time
in the Jewish communi-
ties of Sofa, Bulgaria, and
Bucharest, Romania, — each
country’s respective capital —
I realized that survival is not
just a thing of the past.
It wasn’t until about the
fourth day of our trip that I
had this moment of clar-
ity. We were sitting in the
Bucharest Jewish Community
Center listening to the vice
president tell us about Jewish
life in Romania when he said,
“60 percent of the Jewish
population in Romania is
over the age of 65.”
I was startled. I was eager
to know how this percent-
age compared to that of
American Jews. According
to a study done in 2012 by
Brandeis University, 24 per-
cent of the American Jewish
population is over the age of
65—about one million peo-
ple. In America, I am in the
majority, though in Romania,
I would largely be in the
minority. Tis issue launches
an entirely new struggle for
survival, leaving less than
half of the Romanian Jewish
population with the respon-
sibility of sustaining their
Jewish culture.
While contemplating this
daunting task – I suddenly
understood what I was doing
in Eastern Europe. Tough
at frst I struggled to see how
singing and dancing with the
elderly or playing American
“Jeopardy” with high school
students could count as
service, I came to understand
that our time spent with these
people allowed for moments
of living.
In Bulgaria, each of us was
given a golden sedekah box
with the words, “A little for
one is a lot for another,”
engraved onto it. I think this
same principle applies to far
more than just money.
Te little bit of enthusiasm
and energy that we brought
with us into these Jewish
communities hopefully
resonated with the residents,
supplying not only smiles but
also the notion that surviving
and living can occur simulta-
neously.
I don’t think survival is for
the fttest. I think it’s safe
to say we have all found
ourselves on the ever-illusive
struggle bus once or twice,
but eventually, we fnd our
stop. I’m not saying survival
is easy, but neither is life. In
the words of Destiny’s Child,
“keep on survivin’.”
Lyndsey Havens is a sophomore
from Chicago studying
journalism.
W
e’ve all heard
things will be
diferent in
college. We’ve been assured
that laziness will not be tol-
erated as we climb through
the ranks of American
academia, and that our frst
lesson upon entering college
will be how difcult life
really is. But, afer fnishing
my frst semester and receiv-
ing my frst wave of grades, I
haven’t come away with that
impression at all. Tis isn’t
due to the class material or
the instruction provided by
professors; all of these were
generally engaging and ap-
propriately challenging. No,
this impression stems from
one thing: grade infation.
Tis practice of fufng
grades has become increas-
ingly prominent in higher
education. While this trend is
troublesome, grade infation
is not a universal detriment.
Tere are circumstances in
which extraordinary classes
earn extraordinary grades.
So, too, are there occasions
where professors genuinely
raise the bar too high. How-
ever, these are few and far be-
tween. In order to fnd these
instances while still pro-
moting necessary academic
standards, professors must
strike a pragmatic balance
between recognizing when
their tasks are too difcult
and when their students are
too apathetic.
Grade infation has been an
ever-worsening issue in high-
er education. A 2012 Teach-
ers College Record study by
Stuart Rojstaczer and Chris-
topher Heally examined the
matter by compiling data on
grades from more than 200
four-year colleges. Accord-
ing to this study’s fndings,
43 percent of all grades
given at the university level
are either A’s or A-‘s. Tis
staggering statistic represents
an increase of 28 percentage
points since 1960. Te study
concludes, “As a result of
instructors gradually low-
ering their standards, A has
become the most common
grade on American college
campuses.” With the slashing
of academic standards, the
efort required in order to
earn an A has dramatically
decreased, leading to a scar-
city of incentive for students
to arduously study.
As I slogged my way
through last semester, I
began to prioritize studying
based upon a professor’s
willingness to curve. If I
knew that a professor was
unwilling to curve exams, I
allotted signifcantly more
time towards studying for
the class. I got much more
fulfllment and knowledge
out of classes that presented
a struggle – a trial that re-
quired the investment of time
and energy to overcome.
If schools wish to root out
the academic underperfor-
mance that causes professors
to lower their standards and
institute outlandishly gener-
ous grading curves, then they
must stop accommodating
academic underperformance.
While the current num-
ber of A’s is ludicrous, my
intention is not to expound
a regimented system in
which fewer people succeed
despite giving all they had in
pursuit of academic success.
Rather, large amounts of A’s
ought to signify outstanding
collective efort rather than
collective apathy. If students
are not meeting the required
standards of knowledge a
class is meant to impart, then
a professor must not lower
the standard out of fear of
poor evaluations or a poor
reputation with the student
body. Such an action is more
detrimental to a student than
a lower grade.
With the dawn of a new
semester upon us, let us take
steps towards a reality where
college substantively prepares
students for the world
beyond academia. Tis is
not achieved by declaring 43
percent of pupils “outstand-
ing” and thus robbing the
grading system of its ability
to ofer comparative stand-
ing. Indeed, infating grades
to these levels diminishes the
very value of what it means
to earn an A. Instead, this
ideal can only be realized
through fdelity to reason-
able standards that incite
advancement.
Jesse Burbank is a freshman
from Quinter studying history and
political science.
I
f you’re fed up with
the usual New Year’s
resolutions, I’d be happy
to suggest a goal for you in
2014: increase your geo-
graphic literacy.
Last Tanksgiving, Buzz-
feed had British citizens
label maps of the U.S. If
you’ve seen the results, you
know they are laughable and
entertaining. Our own state
of Kansas was identifed
as “No one knows” in one
attempt. We all snickered at
this and shared it with our
friends, but when Buzzfeed
had Americans label a map
of Europe, the responses
were just as cringe-worthy.
While being able to label
a map is helpful, it’s not
all there is to geography.
It’s nice to know which
countries border which, but
being aware of our spatial
surroundings and under-
standing our relationship
with the land is a much
larger concept.
Today’s world requires
more than a minimum,
fact-based, one-dimensional
knowledge of geography,
says Christian Cruz, a ge-
ography graduate student at
the University of Nebras-
ka-Lincoln.
“By limiting our geography
knowledge to rivers, political
boundaries and capital cities,
we miss out on much larger
concepts,” Cruz said.
In today’s global world,
we must move beyond the
political lines drawn on
maps. Americans deserve
better geo-literacy, especially
considering how much we
rely on geography every day
without even realizing it.
Each time you plug a des-
tination into Google Maps,
look up a city’s population
or marvel at how Utah’s
Delicate Arch formed, you
are delving into geogra-
phy. Meteorology, urban
planning, culture theory and
geopolitics also stem from
geography. Still think it’s just
boring states and capitals?
University geology doc-
toral student Austen Telen
thinks geographic literacy is
necessary for understanding
and appreciating diference,
understanding how places
and territories are made,
rather than accepting them
as given, and understanding
the complex relationships
between humans and our
many environments.
Unfortunately, many peo-
ple take all of these facets of
geography for granted. My
high school (and, I assume,
many others) didn’t even
ofer a geography class. Few
high school students saw
geography as a viable college
major. However, geogra-
phy has many practical
and relevant applications.
According to the American
Geographical Society, many
rewarding career felds are
tied to geography, including
military strategy, transporta-
tion planning and emer-
gency management. Several
governmental agencies rely
on sound geography skills.
I’m proposing we all learn
more about the world we
live in this year. Even though
Earth is still carved up by
political boundaries, little
stops an idea from leaving
one country and entering
another, Cruz said. Te
Middle East, one of the most
strategically vital regions on
the planet, and its conficts
over religion, land, and
resources can be better un-
derstood with a solid grasp
of geography.
Learning more about
geography can help you
understand the news; it can
make you more politically
savvy, and help you see the
world through a clearer
lens. You may be able to
say something noteworthy
during your next water
cooler conversation. It might
even bolster your career and
education prospects. What
better reasons could you
have to brush up on it?
Anrenee Reasor is a
junior from Thayer studying
economics and East Asian
Languages and Cultures.
Service trip teaches meaning of living and surviving
CULTURE
Grade inflation encourages
underperformance in class
More than just a
spot on the map
ACADEMICS GEOGRAPHY
By Jesse Burbank
opinion@kansan.com By Anrenee Reasor
opinion@kansan.com
By Lyndsey Havens
opinion@kansan.com
Follow us on Twitter
@KansanOpinion. Tweet us your
opinions, and we just might
publish them.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Lyndsey Havens, a sophomore from Chicago, hands a flower to a
102-year-old resident of the Rosen Home in Bucharest, Romania, during
her winter break service trip.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
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PAGE 5
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 6
Develop a routine to make boring,
repetitive work more fun. Don't
travel just yet. If you must, allow
plenty of extra time; there's no
need to rush. Express appreciation
for your partner, and grow your
shared resources.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7
Take a bow after a solid perfor-
mance. Meet with important part-
ners. Accept a nice benefit. Share
love, not money (a tricky subject
today). Pay back a debt. Get the
best deal you can when shopping.
Listen carefully.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is an 8
A bonding moment transforms your
relationship. Believe in a partner
who believes in success. It's all
about great service. Repay a favor.
Provide comfort food. Get outside,
and play. Exercise and fresh air
revive your spirit.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 6
Increase efficiency at work. Use
your experience and skills to go
the extra mile. Postpone travel and
long distance calls. Get lost in a
creative project, adding beauty, art
and communication. Expand the
fun level.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 5
Invest in real estate or your home.
Discipline is required. Keep your
opinions to yourself, unless asked.
A fascinating conversation opens
new doors, but there's plenty still
hidden. Let documents simmer
overnight. Maintain self-control.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 6
Don't try a new trick yet. You need
time to think. Stand up for your
idea. Dig out some exotic facts. You
impress an elder. Listen carefully to
their view. Rest and reconnect with
an old friend.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is an 8
Exceed expectations with a stroke
of genius. Artistic coolness and
useful functionality could clash.
Work from home and increase
productivity. Friends help with
discipline. Talk and shop, but don't
buy yet. Keep asking interesting
questions. Follow through.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is an 8
Ask for a vacation day or get work
done early, so you can go play. Talk
about money another day. Postpone
a shopping trip. Romance is sweet.
Take the time to get it right. Relax
and enjoy.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 7
Apply your personal magic to
dispel old fears. The truth has been
revealed. Add an artistic touch.
Watch what you say. Set long-range
goals, and invest in them. Make
sure you're getting the best quality.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 7
Something doesn't compute. Inves-
tigate, for an amazing discovery.
Improve working conditions. Stick
to rules and regulations. Finish
up old business, to make room
for new. Friends, teammates and
partners are your secret ingredient
for success.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 7
Provide facts and great service.
Bargain for a sweet deal. Don't dip
too far into savings. Re-assess
your assets. Consider new options.
Negotiate with an authority for
a rise in status. Offer increased
value.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 7
Completion leads to opportunity.
Put in a correction. Sign or send a
document or application. Get an
elder's advice. Call in reinforce-
ments. Route some of your win-
nings to domestic improvements.
Improve your living conditions.
1. “Her”
Spike Jonze’s vision of the
near future speaks volumes
about how our society feels
more connected through
technology as we grow further
apart from each other, but
that’s not even the most pro-
found aspect of his romantic
dramedy “Her.” Te insight
into relationships, mainly
between Samantha (voiced
by Scarlett Johansson) and
Teodore (Joaquin Phoenix)
would strike a chord in any
flm. Since this is about a
mild-mannered man and his
new operating system with its
own consciousness falling in
love, it becomes a much more
thought-provoking medita-
tion in love and the human
experience. Tis concept feels
brilliantly, fully realized and
isn’t judgemental of Teodore,
giving it a touching sense of
wonder.
2. “The Wolf of Wall
Street”
At 71, who would’ve thought
Martin Scorsese had such an
insane dark comedy in him?
“Te Wolf of Wall Street”
follows the real-life exploits
of Jordan Belfort (Leonardo
DiCaprio) in his rise as a
notorious stockbroker who
brings debauchery to a new
level. Te amount of sex, drugs
and money in this flm has to
be seen to be believed, and that
it stays consistently funny for
two-and-a-half hours before
Belfort’s fall in the last 30
minutes is a resounding ac-
complishment. Te quaaludes
overdose scene alone between
DiCaprio and Jonah Hill
ensures this satire of wealth,
greed and excess will become a
comedy classic.
3. “Only God Forgives”
Many people hated Nicolas
Winding Refn’s follow-up to
“Drive,” and I can understand
why. It’s a thematically exis-
tential, luridly violent movie
about despicable people in the
neon-drenched underworld
of Bangkok, Tailand, told
with far more focus on visual
style than depth in character-
ization. However, it’s packed
with symbolism and deeper
meaning, most strikingly with
the sword-wielding police
lieutenant who acts as the
vengeful god of Bangkok.
“Only God Forgives” looks like
neo-Kubrick and unfolds with
the detached perspective and
intensive power of a surreal
dream. For those attuned to its
pulpy, arthouse wavelength,
it makes for a mesmerizing
experience.
4. “The Act of Killing”
How does committing mass
murder afect a man when he
is celebrated for it? One-of-a-
kind documentary “Te Act
of Killing” explores this topic
with former death squad lead-
ers of the Indonesian killings
of 1965-66. Because their side
took power in the country,
they were never charged for
their crimes, and are in-
stead revered as heroes. Te
main subject, Anwar Congo,
arguably the most interesting
character of the year, killed
about 1,000 people and yet is a
funny, smart, lively old guy – a
normal human being, not a
monster. He and his friends
re-enact and direct surreal
scenes of their killings in the
vein of their favorite movie
genres, giving this documenta-
ry a strange, transcendentally
refective power.
5. “The Spectacular Now”
“Te Spectacular Now”
feels decidedly more adult
than most flms centered on
a teenage couple. When a
lazy party boy (Miles Teller)
and a wounded dove nice girl
(Shailene Woodley) fnd each
other, the cutesy behavior,
brazen partying and realiza-
tions of true love found usually
found in teenage flm romance
are replaced with themes of al-
coholism, absentee parents and
moving on to the next stage of
life. Yet the detailed authentic-
ity of lackadaisical high school
lifestyle, acute struggles and
subdued emotion are precisely
what make it hit with such res-
onating efect. It’s also funny,
charming, painfully honest,
deeply relatable and Woodley’s
tender performance will break
your heart.
6. “Gravity”
“Gravity” reminded viewers
of cinema’s capacity for pure
visceral power. It made for a
technically brilliant, unprec-
edented experience that’s ex-
tremely simple from a story-
telling standpoint, yet creates
a fast-paced fght for survival
which imparts some of the
most efective intensity to ever
FILM
‘Her,’ ‘Wolf of Wall St.’
among top 2013 films
SEE FILMS PAGE 7
By Alex Lamb
entertain@kansan.com
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TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6
Around the last days of the year, we refect back on the days be-
hind us. Afer smiling during the good times and learning from
the bad times, we make our New Year’s resolutions with hopeful
hearts for the best year yet. With the stresses of school, work and
life, it’s sometimes hard to stick to those goals. Here are the top
ten ways to help make this your best semester yet.

1. Go to class
Te most important thing about being a college student is
school. Te best way to know what’s going on in class is to ac-
tually go to class. While it can be hard to wake up on a Mon-
day morning for an early class; do you really want to spend more
time reviewing what you missed later on only for an extra hour of
sleep? It’ll make your life easier to just go to class.

2. Study
Take the time to study notes and review a little bit each night. If
you have a big test coming up, don’t cram the night before. Tak-
ing the time to study will make your semester so much easier
when it comes to those difcult tests. Don’t stress yourself out by
procrastinating and telling yourself you have to study but never
actually do. Just spread everything out over a certain amount of
time instead of cramming it all in one night.

3. Do your homework
So, you went to class; that should be enough right? As much as
you don’t want to, do the homework. It will beneft you in the end.
Also, try to do it the day of your class so you don’t fall behind. Just
take a few hours out of the day, turn on some good study music,
and get that homework done.

4. Organize yourself
Everyone is diferent and has their own way of doing things.
Sometimes it helps to write yourself notes and put them up all
over your room so you never forget when you have a test or when
to call your mom. Te calendar app for the iPhone is my best
friend. No one will judge you for having an organized life, even
if that means carrying around a planner everyday and having to
secretly pencil them in.

5. Get involved around campus
Tere are so many diferent clubs and organizations at the Uni-
versity. Tere’s something for everyone. Joining a club is a great
way to meet new people, do fun things and get involved with the
school. You can fnd a list of University organizations online at
rockchalkcentral.ku.edu/organizations.
6. Adopt a hobby
Take up a fun hobby; something that you love to do. Scrapbook-
ing, learning an instrument, model making or anything that you
enjoy, make it your hobby. Find what speaks to you. Hobbies are a
good way to pass time when things get stressful in your life.

7. Show school spirit
We have some very talented individuals, who represent our
school. Get out there and show how much you love wearing that
crimson and blue because afer all, we do go to the best school in
the country.

8. Get some sleep
It really is the best thing to do sometimes. When you aren’t feel-
ing well, you’re stressed out, you’re feeling down or you’re just
exhausted from a long day or night of studying? Take a nap; it will
replenish you and give you the energy to get up and get on with
your day. Tere is an Irish Proverb that says, “A good laugh and a
long sleep are the two best cures.”

9. Find balance
Sometimes it is hard to fnd balance between work, school, fam-
ily, friends and activities. Tere may be a lot going on in your life
but do not stress yourself out about it. Your friends and family
will always be there, they aren’t going anywhere. Make sure to get
the most important things completed frst, of course. However,
if you have a busy life, don’t push things of until the very last
moment.

10. Make “you” time
Te most important thing to have a successful semester is to
make sure to make time for yourself. When things get stressful,
take an hour to do something that makes you happy. Put yourself
back in a good state of mind. Watch a movie, play your favorite
video game, take a nap, read a book, spend time with your friends
or just relax. It’s the best way to get your mind of the stressful
things in your life and enjoy the things that make you happy.
— Edited by Jack Feigh
TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7
Q
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The University of Kansas School of Business
PRESENTS
DEAN’S EXECUTIVE
LECTURE SERIES
CHET CADIEUX
Chairman,
President and CEO
QuikTrip Corporation
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Top 10 ways to make this the best semester
LIFE
CORRINE DORRIAN
entertainment@kansan.com
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
With temperatures dropping below 20 degrees, it can be easy to skip class, but going to class is the most important step to a great semester for
University students. Use lawrencetransit.org to find the nearest bus route.
hit the big screen. Dr. Ryan
Stone (Sandra Bullock) faces
one obstacle afer another in
the deep abyss of space, as di-
rector Alfonso Cuarón crafs
gripping tension around her
journey. In the vein of Cuarón’s
“Children of Men,” the flm
uses extraordinarily long sin-
gle-shot sequences that give an
unfinching perspective to the
action. Te reverberating score
captures the vast emptiness of
the environment and the main-
ly computer-generated visuals
look so real that you feel lost in
space yourself.
7. “12 Years a Slave”
What “Schindler’s List” did
in its depiction of the Jewish
Holocaust – translating the
terrible reality of that tragic
situation into a raw experience
that makes viewers confront it
as real, not just part of history
– “12 Years a Slave” does in its
accurate portrayal of slavery in
America, but through the eyes
of a victim. Free man Solomon
Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor)
is drugged and sold into slav-
ery in antebellum Louisiana,
where he lives in bondage for
12 years. It’s grueling, brutal
and depressing to sit through,
especially as his terrifying mas-
ter (Michael Fassbender) per-
sonifes man’s remarkable cru-
elty. Ultimately, it stands as an
artfully made testament to the
human spirit and is required
viewing for understanding the
horrors of slavery.
8. “Star Trek Into Darkness”
Te 2009 “Star Trek” reboot
is one of the most enjoyable
and rewatchable adventures
of recent years, and its sequel
proves just as entertaining and
exciting. Even better, it takes on
a darker tone, raises the stakes
with a much more cool villain
(Benedict Cumberbatch) and
actually elicits a few tears at its
emotional climax. J.J. Abrams is
a god of geekdom, appealing to
both Trekkies and mainstream
audiences, and he directs this
spectacular blockbuster with
visual panache, snappy and
smart character interaction and
a wild sense of fun. More than
all the titles from 2013, I’ll be
rewatching this one over and
over.
9. “Inside Llewyn Davis”
Te Coen brothers’ latest is
more subtle and soulful than
their usual work, a drame-
dy about a folk singer (Oscar
Isaac) navigating the music
scene of Greenwich Village
over a troubled week in 1961.
Llewyn has no home of his
own, has constant money
problems and is kind of a jerk.
Yet it’s hard not to feel for the
poor guy as, like many Coen
characters, he is punished with
one repercussion, hardship or
disappointment afer another.
Te Coens achieve a wonderful
balance with their wry, ironic
humor and oddball side char-
acters alongside a sense of mel-
ancholy that comforts through
its relatability and beautiful
soundtrack.
10. “Upstream Color”
Shane Carruth’s 2004 debut
“Primer” still stands in a class
of cerebral, hard sci-f all its
own. His long-awaited sopho-
more feature “Upstream Color”
proves he has one of the most
unique, complex voices in indie
flm. Te flm’s story has too
many moving parts to explain,
but it’s essentially a romance
rooted in low-key but fascinat-
ing science fction elements.
Tese elements work like pieces
in a puzzle, where the big pic-
ture is easy to see but putting it
together requires strict atten-
tion to detail. Carruth doesn’t
work on the regular level of
movie narrative, instead using
visual storytelling and montage
editing, resulting in highly in-
volved viewing.
— Edited by Austin Fisher
FILMS FROM PAGE 5
TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8
BASKETBALL
First Half
12:20 - Andrew Wiggins pulls up from three to tie the game. Kansas 13, Baylor 13
8:23 - Brady Heslip knocks down his fourth 3-pointer of the half. Baylor leads 22-20.
3:55 - Frank Mason finds Joel Embiid cutting to the rim in transition and feeds him for an easy ally-oop. Kansas leads 31-28.
Second Half
15:54 - Perry Ellis misses a 3-pointer but Andrew Wiggins barely gets a finger on the rebound to tip it in. Kansas leads 43-37.
12:32 - Perry Ellis knocks down a free throw after a steal and dunk. Kansas leads 51-44.
11:19 - Wayne Selden Jr. dives out of bounds to save a loose ball and knocks it perfectly to Joel Embiid who hits an easy jumper. Kansas leads
PRIME PLAYS
KANSAS
KANSAS STAT LEADERS
GAME TO REMEMBER
BAYLOR
KANSAS 37 41 78
35 33 68 BAYLOR
PLAYER PTS FG-FGA REBS A T0’s
Perry Ellis 18 6-8 5 1 1
Andrew Wiggins 17 3-7 7 0 4
Joel Embiid 12 4-7 4 1 3
Frank Mason 9 4-5 1 6 1
Wayne Selden Jr. 7 1-5 1 2 3
Naadir Tharpe 6 2-3 3 1 0
Jamari Traylor 4 0-0 6 0 2
Brannen Greene 3 1-2 1 0 1
Other Players 2 1-2 1 1 1
TOTAL 78 23-40 29 12 16
PLAYER PTS FG-FGA REBS A T0’s
Brady Heslip 19 6-10 3 1 1
Isaiah Austin 16 6-15 5 0 1
Cory Jefferson 16 6-10 6 1 3
Royce O’Neale 8 3-7 5 3 3
Rico Gathers 6 1-4 7 0 2
Kenny Chery 3 1-8 1 8 2
Taurean Prince 0 0-3 1 1 3
Gary Franklin 0 0-2 1 1 1
Other Players 0 0-0 2 0 0
TOTAL 68 23-59 31 15 16
Ellis
Wiggins Mason Ellis
Perry Ellis, forward
REBOUNDS ASSISTS POINTS
After scoring just three points, three rebounds in
the first half and zero free throw attempts, Perry
Ellis finished the game with 18 points on 6-8
shooting, five rebounds and 6-7 from the free
throw line. Perry sparked the team in the 2nd
half when he was fouled on a breakaway dunk.
UNSUNG HERO
Traylor
Jamari Traylor, forward
Traylor stepped in for Ellis in the first half.
Traylor played 12 minutes, added four points
and six rebounds just in the first half. Traylor
could be a reason why Kansas was alive and
leading going into half.
GAME TO FORGET
Black
Tarik Black,forward
Black only played 13 minutes, but when on the
court Black wasn’t effective. Black was 1-2
from the field with only one rebound, and to
add insult to injury, Black rolled his ankle late
in the second half.

Kansas remains undefeated in Big 12
KANSAS 78
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Freshman center Joel Embiid denies sophomore Isaiah Austin’s shot for his only block of the game. Embiid finished the game with 12 points and three
rebounds.
BRIAN HILLIX
sports@kansan.com
Five games into the confer-
ence season, these Jayhawks
have seen it all.
Kansas (14-4, 5-0) has faced
the explosive ofense of the
shot-happy Sooners, the gritty
defense of the Wildcats, the
hostility of a tough road envi-
ronment at Iowa State and the
quickness of the undersized
Cowboys.
On Monday, the Jayhawks
took on the tall and physical
Baylor Bears (13-5, 1-4).
Having faced two small-
er teams in Iowa State and
Oklahoma State in its last
two games, Kansas faced a
new challenge on Monday in
Baylor center Isaiah Austin. At
7-foot-1, the sophomore ranks
just behind Joel Embiid in the
conference with 2.82 blocks
per game and also averages 10
points and six rebounds.
Austin managed 16 points
against Kansas but on just
6-15 from the foor to go with
fve rebounds. He did most of
his damage from beyond the
arc as 12 of his points came
from long-range.
“Coach Drew told us afer
last game we were passing up
too many shots,” Austin said.
Baylor came in averaging
26 defensive rebounds a
game but were held to just
11 against the Jayhawks. Te
Bears grabbed 20 rebounds
on the ofensive end but only
turned them into 15 sec-
ond-chance points.
“Normally we score more
efciently inside the arc,”
Baylor coach Scott Drew said.
“Teir length, size, contesting
bothered us.”
Te Jayhawks outscored the
Bears 26-16 in the paint and
made nine more trips to the
free-throw line. Kansas had
its best performance from the
charity stripe all season as the
team shot 90-percent, making
26 of its 29 attempts.
“Tat was probably the
diference in the game,” coach
Bill Self said.
Kansas came out strong in
the second half and were able
to push its lead to double
digits for the frst time. Te
Jayhawks outscored the Bears
41-33 as the game always
seemed to be in Kansas’
control.
Perry Ellis scored 16 of his
18 points in the second half
to lead Kansas while Wiggins
and Embiid added 17 and 12,
respectively.
Afer stumbling into the
conference slate with four
losses, Kansas stands at frst
in the conference and remains
undefeated in the Big 12 play.
“We came into the Big 12
with a new mindset, a new
season,” Wayne Selden said.
Kansas has taken advantage
of a frontloaded conference
schedule and looked primed
to earn a tenth consecutive
conference championship.
Te Jayhawks have now
faced every Big 12 team cur-
rently ranked in the Top 25 of
the Associated Press poll with
each team likely to make the
NCAA Tournament.
“Each and every night
you have the chance to play
against a great team,” Drew
said of the Big 12 conference.
While the schedule doesn’t
get any easier, this team has
shown it can handle anything
that comes its way.
Te only thing lef for
Kansas to prove is that it can
take every team, regardless
of ranking seriously. Te Jay-
hawks will get that opportuni-
ty on Saturday, Jan. 25, as they
take on the last-place Texas
Christian University Horned
Frogs at 8 p.m.
— Edited by Jack Feigh

“Each and every night you have the chance to play
against a great team.”
SCOTT DREW
Baylor coach
TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 9
KEY STATS
Baylor offensive rebounds
Baylor defensive rebounds
Kansas free throw percentage
Baylor free throw percentage
20
11
89.7
45
10/29/2013 Pittsburg State Lawrence 7 p.m. W/97/57
11/5/2013 Fort Hays State Lawrence 7 p.m. W/92/75
11/8/2013 Louisiana Monroe Lawrence 7 p.m. W/80/63
11/12/2013 Duke Chicago 8:30 p.m. W/94/83
11/19/2013 Iona Lawrence 7 p.m. W/86/66
11/22/2013 Towson Lawrence 7 p.m. W/88/55
11/28/2013 Wake Forest Bahamas 2:30 p.m. W/87/78
11/29/2013 Villanova or USC Bahamas 8:30 or 2:30 p.m. L/59/63
11/30/2013 UTEP Bahamas 7 p.m. W/67/63
12/7/2013 Colorado Boulder, Colo. 2:15 p.m. L/72/75
12/10/2013 Florida Gainesville, Fla. 6 p.m. L/61/67
12/14/2013 New Mexico Kansas City, Mo. 6 p.m. W/80/63
12/21/2013 Georgetown Lawrence 11 a.m. W/86/64
12/30/2013 Toledo Lawrence 7 p.m. W/93/83
1/5/2014 San Diego State Lawrence 3:30 p.m. L/57/61
1/8/2014 Oklahoma Norman, Okla. 6 p.m. W/90/83
1/11/2014 Kansas State Lawrence 1 p.m. W/96/60
1/13/2014 Iowa State Ames, Iowa 8 p.m. W/77/70
1/18/2014 Oklahoma State Lawrence 3 p.m. W/80/78
1/20/2014 Baylor Lawrence 8 p.m. W/78/68
1/25/2014 TCU Fort Worth, Texas 8 p.m.
1/29/2014 Iowa State Lawrence 8 p.m.
2/1/2014 Texas Austin, Texas 3 p.m.
2/4/2014 Baylor Waco, Texas 6 p.m.
2/8/2014 West Virginia Lawrence 3 p.m.
2/10/2014 Kansas State Manhattan 8 p.m.
2/15/2014 TCU Lawrence 3 p.m.
2/18/2014 Texas Tech Lubbock, Texas 7 p.m.
2/22/2014 Texas Lawrence 6:30 p.m.
2/24/2014 Oklahoma Lawrence 8 p.m.
3/1/2014 Oklahoma State Stillwater, Okla. 8 p.m.
3/5/2014 Texas Tech Lawrence 7 p.m.
3/8/2014 West Virginia Morgantown, W. Va. 11 a.m.
SCHEDULE
REWIND
BAYLOR 68
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Freshman guard Frank Mason drives to the goal with a quick pass to sophomore forward Perry Ellis. The play
resulted in a dunk from Ellis. Mason had nine points, six assists and one steal.
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TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 10
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Central Florida QB could be top draft pick
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NFL
ORLANDO, Fla. — At the
start of the 2013 season, few
outside of Orlando knew
much about Central Florida
quarterback Blake Bortles.
Bortles has lost his anonym-
ity.
Afer leading the 10th-
ranked Knights to the best sea-
son in program history, a 12-1
campaign capped by a 52-42
win over Baylor in the Fiesta
Bowl, Bortles could provide
another stunning frst in the
34-year history of the Univer-
sity of Central Florida football
program: In early May, Bortles
could be the top overall pick in
the NFL draf.
It's not outside the realm of
possibility for the Oviedo, Fla.,
native, who opted to forgo his
fnal year of eligibility to enter
the professional ranks. Bortles
is one of the hottest names
in draf circles, shooting up
projection charts during the
season thanks to his numer-
ous clutch performances and
NFL-prototype size.
Te highest-drafed player
in UCF history is quarterback
Daunte Culpepper, who was
selected No. 11 overall in 1999.
While the hot trend from the
scouting world seems to be
pulling the reins back on Bor-
tles' draf hype, a quick glance
at teams selecting players early
in the draf shows he may very
well be a top-fve pick.
Of the top fve teams, four
likely rank quarterback as
their top need going into the
draf: Houston Texans (No. 1),
Jacksonville Jaguars (No. 3),
Cleveland Browns (No. 4) and
Oakland Raiders (No. 5).
Many have noted there is a
strong connection between
Houston's staf and UCF coach
George O'Leary.
Former Penn State coach Bill
O'Brien was recently hired
as the Texans' head coach.
O'Brien rose from graduate
assistant to ofensive coordi-
nator under O'Leary at Geor-
gia Tech from 1995-2001. Te
two coaches remain close, and
connections between the stafs
could give Houston a much
greater picture of Bortles as a
prospect and a person.
O'Brien also got a frst-hand
look at Bortles when the Nit-
tany Lions faced UCF earlier
this season. Bortles was a big
reason the Knights earned a
34-31 win at Penn State. He
was 20-of-27 passing for 288
yards, three touchdowns and
one interception.
O'Brien was very compli-
mentary of the quarterback
both before and afer the game.
"Anytime you have a quar-
terback like (Bortles), who is
accurate, has a strong arm, is
big and can stand in the pock-
et and can run, it is a difcult
challenge," O'Brien said in the
postgame press conference.
"He played a great game to-
night and all the credit to him.
I think he is a heck of a player.
I didn't get a chance to meet
him or say hello to him, but I
think he is a heck of a player."
Listed at 6-foot-4,
230-pounds, Bortles name has
been bounced around draf
projections ranging from the
top quarterback available to an
over-hyped prospect with a lot
of fundamental faws.
Te NFL combine will be a
huge opportunity for Bortles,
giving him a chance to display
his strengths.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Central Florida quarterback Blake Bortels runs from the Baylor defense during the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl at
University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Ariz., on Jan. 1, 2014.
came from sophomore Syd-
ney Conley in the long jump.
Te Fayetteville, Ark., native’s
winning leap of 6.18 meters
(20’3.5”) was a new indoor
personal record and the mark
moved her up to No. 5 in the
national long jump standings.
Redwine thought his team
put in a good performance in
Lincoln, but also admitted that
the meet revealed some areas
where the team can improve.
“I thought it was a good meet
overall, but it wasn’t a great
meet,” Redwine said. “We had
six victories and all of those
are extremely good…but we
need more quality depth.”
Because it is so early in the
season, Redwine realizes one
of the problem areas for the
team may be the young ath-
letes as they work through
their inexperience. According
to Redwine, the team must
remain patient as these young
athletes continue to learn and
grow.
“For some of our young peo-
ple, because they are young,
each meet can bring a diferent
circumstance for them [and] a
diferent challenge for them,”
Redwine said. “As coaches,
sometimes we want it now,
but we have to be patient and
remember to teach frst and as
we do that the team continues
to get better.”
— Edited by Casey Hutchins
TRACK FROM PAGE 12 COLUMN FROM PAGE 12
ofen scoring his points inside
the paint and using his length
to score around the rim, while
Austin uses his length to shoot
jump shots over defenders.
Austin fnished the game 6-15
from the feld and four of his
six makes were 3-point buckets.
Austin was 4-8 in the second
half and two of those feld goals
were 3-point shots. Austin
made both of his inside baskets
while Embiid was sitting on the
bench.
Embiid’s ofensive perfor-
mance can be told by two plays.
First, Embiid swished a turn-
around jump shot from four-
feet away, where Austin guard-
ed him. Tat shot was difcult,
but Embiid made it look easy.
Second, an alley-oop
two-handed slam assisted by
freshman guard Frank Mason.
Embiid used his athleticism to
move up the court faster than
most big men which got him in
position to make the alley-oop
play.
Both were key plays. Te turn-
around jumper gave Kansas a
29-28 lead and the alley-oop
slam energized the crowd late
in the frst half.
Embiid will have his hands
full again with 3-point shooting
centers in Georges Niang when
Kansas hosts Iowa State on Jan.
29.
— Edited by Austin Fisher
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A
fer months of proving worth
each and every Sunday, the
countdown begins for the
2014 Super Bowl. Hundreds of mil-
lions of people tune in to the biggest
sporting event in America. Te lights
shine bright. Childhood dreams are
just 60 minutes from being realized.
Some years a dark horse emerges and
steals the show. Some years the match-
up is one-sided and lacks intrigue.
Tis year, the NFL got it just right. Te
stage is set, and the two best teams
will be performing front and center.
Te two teams are elite, but for very
diferent reasons.
Having met 52 times as former
rivals of the AFC West, the Denver
Broncos and Seattle Seahawks will
meet in MetLife Stadium, N.Y., for the
2014 Super Bowl on Feb. 2. Te game
presents a clash of styles. Te Broncos
want to get up and go, while the Sea-
hawks prefer to grind out games and
rely on their defense to make big plays,
which begs the question: who will set
the tone? Te Broncos’ record-setting
ofense led by Peyton Manning and his
quartet of prolifc pass-catchers will
meet the meanest and toughest de-
fense in the league head-on. While the
Seattle Seahawks, led by All-Pro cor-
nerback Richard Sherman, one of the
few players who can back up his trash
talk with his play on the feld which
emphasizes the ferce nature of Seattles
defence. Te game is riddled with sto-
rylines, but I would be remiss to turn
a blind eye to Sherman’s proclamation
that he was the “best cornerback in the
league,” following the Seahawks 23-17
victory over the 49ers in the NFC
Championship game.
On the Broncos side, Manning has
set records for passing yards and
passing touchdowns with 5,477 yards
and 55 touchdowns. What you may
not know is that Denver has also set
the record for having the most players
with at least 10 touchdowns, with fve.
Pro Bowl Wide Receiver Demaryius
Tomas (14), former 1st round pick,
Knowshon Moreno (13 total Touch-
downs, 10 rushing touchdowns),
former Portland State basketball player
tight end Julius Tomas (12), Wide
Receiver, Eric Decker (11) and former
All-Pro Wide Receiver Wes Welker
(10), give the surgeon a lot of tools at
his disposal.
Te Seahawks defense is equally fan-
tastic. Coined the “Legion of Boom,”
the unit boasts the top passing
defense in the league. Mainly be-
cause of their three All-Pro mem-
bers: Cornerback Richard Sher-
man, who leads the league with
8 interceptions; S Earl Tomas,
who many experts believe could
be the Defensive Player of the
Year; and S Kam Chancellor. Te
rest of the defense is no slouch
either. Tis may be the best 4-3
front 7 in the league with LB Bobby
Wagner, who leads the team with
120 total tackles, and Defensive End’s
Michael Bennett and Clif Avril, who
have 8.5 and 8 sacks respectively.
Te matchup to watch will be be-
tween cornerbacks-other-than-Rich-
ard-Sherman, who also boasts the best
opposing quarterback rating of any
cornerback in the league (47.9), and
the amount of receivers for the Denver
Broncos. It will be interesting to see
the coverage and how the CBs Jeremy
Lane and Byron Maxwell play at the
line of scrimmage against Decker and
Welker.
Te matchup that won’t be talk-
ed about enough is the Seahawks
punishing running attack led by Pro
Bowl Running Back Marshawn Lynch
against the Broncos run defense, and
that could be the deciding factor. Even
though the Broncos defense has been
their Achilles heel, Denver has the
7th best defense against the run. Tey
stopped
the Patriots
10th best
rushing
attack with
interior
pressure from
unheralded De-
fensive Tackle’s
Terrence “Pot
Roast” Knighton,
Malik Jackson,
and Mitch Unrein. Tey held Running
Back LeGarrette Blount to 6 yards on
four carries between the tackles afer
he averaged 18.3 interior rushes for
130.0 yards per game since Week 16
(courtesy of ESPN.com). Te caveat,
though, is that this will be without a
doubt the most physical ofensive line
the Broncos have faced. Te Seahawks
have the 4th best rushing ofense
with Lynch tied for league-leading 12
Rushing TDs, and Lynch has made a
habit out of playing his best football in
the playofs.
It is not ofen that we see the two best
teams in the league with the unstop-
pable force meeting the immovable
object. As a football fan, this is all
anyone can ask for. Tis could be one
for the ages.
— Edited by Jack Feigh

“Everyone knows what the Masters
is, even if you’re a non-golfer. People
know what Wimbledon is. They know
what the Super Bowl is. There are
certain events that people just know
about.”
— Tiger Woods
Brainy Quote
This week in athletics
?
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
Q: How much was the average cost
of a 30-second advertisement at
Super Bowl XLVII in 2013?
A: $4 million
— ESPN
!
FACT OF THE DAY
Super Bowl 46 was the most-
watched television event in
American history. 111.3 million
people tuned in.
— ESPN
Unstoppable force meets immovable object in Super Bowl XLVIII
QUOTE OF THE DAY
Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Thursday Friday
Women’s Basketball
Oklahoma State
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Lawrence
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Wednesday
No Events Track
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All Day
Lawrence
Women’s Basketball
Kansas State
1 p.m.
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Swimming and Diving
UALR
10 a.m.
Lawrence
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TCU
8 p.m.
Fort Worth, Texas
No Events No Events
TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014 PAGE 11 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
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Te Big Ten was impressive
recently with three ranked
teams in the top fve.
But the Big 12 is on the move
and could be the strongest
conference overall, even with
only one team in the top 10.
Te conference placed six
teams in this week’s Associated
Press Top 25 with No. 8 Kansas
surging and looking like a na-
tional championship contend-
er afer all.
Kansas’ four wins against
ranked teams (before facing
Baylor on Monday night) was
the most by any in the AP Top
25.
It may be Kansas’ conference
to lose, but the Big 12 looks
like a conference that could go
far in March.
Player of the week: Joel Em-
biid, Kansas.
He wasn’t the freshman
everyone was talking about
nationally in the preseason,
not even on his own team as
Andrew Wiggins commanded
attention. But Embiid will be
the player everyone is talking
about this week, and maybe for
the rest of the season.
Te 7-foot center has de-
veloped rapidly, showing his
skills with 16 points and nine
rebounds in a victory over
Iowa State and 13 points and
11 rebounds against Oklaho-
ma State.
Team of the week: Michigan.
Te Wolverines were pretty
much written of as Michigan
State, Wisconsin and Ohio
State sat in the top fve na-
tionally. But now, even with-
out injured Mitch McGary,
the Wolverines are inserting
themselves into the race for
Big Ten title.
Michigan joins the Spartans
as the only teams unbeaten in
conference play afer Satur-
day’s 77-70 takedown of Wis-
consin on the road.
Games to watch:Wednesday:
Iowa at Michigan, 8 p.m. EST,
BTN. Don’t forget about the
Hawkeyes either. Tey sit just
a half-game behind Michigan
in third place.
Tursday: Colorado at Ar-
izona, 10 p.m., ESPN2. Te
Bufaloes have upsets in them.
Tey already have defeated
Kansas and then-No. 10 Or-
egon. Can No. 1 Arizona be
next?
Saturday: Kansas State at
Iowa State, 2:45 p.m., ESPN3.
Te Cyclones are trying to
bounce back from consecutive
losses. Kansas State enters feel-
ing good afer beating Okla-
homa. Both are looking up at
Kansas in the Big 12 standings.
Embiid, Big 12 conference notable in NCAA play
BASKETBALL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
By Daniel Harmsen
sports@kansan.com
Volume 126 Issue 64 kansan.com Tuesday, January 21, 2014
By Blair Sheade
sports@kansan.com
COMMENTARY
Defense takes
center stage
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
S
Senior sprinter Diamond
Dixon entered the 2014 sea-
son with a slew of accolades
already under her belt. She
has claimed fve Big 12 cham-
pionships, eight All-American
honors, a national champi-
onship and even an Olympic
gold medal. Although it’s ear-
ly in the season Dixon showed
that she plans to add to the
list. At the Holiday Inn Invi-
tational in Lincoln, Neb., Fri-
day and Saturday, she brought
home victories in the 60-me-
ter and the 4x400-meter relay
and notched a personal record
of 7.48 in the 60-meter.
“[Dixon] is on track to doing
great things; I believe it’s go-
ing to be really special for us,”
coach Stanley Redwine said.
“For someone of her talent to
be PR’ing this early in the sea-
son is something special.”
Also putting in an impres-
sive performance at the meet
in Lincoln was senior Natalie
Becker. Like Dixon, Becker
was also responsible for two
of the Jayhawks’ six total vic-
tories at the meet, helping the
distance medley relay team
grab the win on Saturday af-
ter she ran away from the feld
on Friday in the 3,000-meter,
posting a personal best time
of 9:40.86 that was more than
30 seconds faster than the sec-
ond place fnisher. Her per-
formance in the 3,000-meter
not only gave her the victory,
but it moved her up to No. 10
on the national leaderboard
in the event according to the
latest NCAA rankings.
“[Becker] was outstanding
to say the least,” Redwine
said. “To run the 3,000 that
she did was a really good per-
formance and made the feld
look pretty average.”
Junior Lindsay Vollmer did
her best at the meet to prove
herself worthy of her selection
to the preseason Bowerman
Watch List, setting two new
personal records in the shot
put and the 60-meter hurdles.
Her personal best time of 8.45
in the 60-meter hurdles not
only gave her the victory in
the event, but it moved her
up to No. 14 in the national
rankings.
Te Jayhawks’ other victory
Women continue success in Nebraska
BEN BURCH
sports@kansan.com
TRACK AND FIELD
LEAD KICKER
BEAR TRAP
Kansas defeats Baylor for fourth consecutive victory against ranked team
BLAKE SCHUSTER
sports@kansan.com
If you wanted a sign that No.
8 Kansas could make the quick
turnaround and move past an
emotional victory over Oklaho-
ma State, it’s best that you didn’t
watch the frst half against Bay-
lor.
Not that Kansas wasn’t per-
forming well — actually the
team hit 60 percent of its shots
and limited Baylor to 4-18 in-
side the arc. It’s just when your
opponent hits 80 percent of its
3-pointers, the lines of good and
poor play become a little blurred,
especially when Brady Heslip,
the savior of Baylor basketball in
Lawrence on Monday, seemingly
never took a shot he didn’t like.
Well, maybe that’s not true for
the second half.
Afer going 4-4 from behind
the arc in the frst frame, the
ffh-year senior tapered of a
bit, right around the time Kansas
started to pull away and seal a
78-68 victory.
“We didn’t do what we had pre-
pared to do,” Kansas coach Bill
Self said of the frst half. “It was
the fact that they scored 35 that
was disappointing to me.”
But that sign, the one showing
that the Jayhawks had all but for-
gotten about Saturday’s war with
the Cowboys, that didn’t come
until midway through the sec-
ond half.
Kansas already had the lead, a
decent handle of the game and
had shut down the Bears from
three — 5-17 in the second half
— it just needed something to
fuel it to the fnish.
A 30-second span from Perry
Ellis, who led Kansas’ scorers
with 18 points, was all it took,
starting with a jumper from just
inside the arc with 13 minutes
remaining. Te shot gave Kansas
a four-point lead. Ellis stormed
back down the foor, catching
Baylor’s Taurean Prince of guard
and allowing him to steal the ball
back and run down for an easy
dunk that drew a Cory Jeferson
foul.
“Tat gave us the energy to
keep us going,” freshman guard
Wayne Selden Jr. said.
One free throw later, Kan-
sas took a quick seven-point
lead and the gap was more than
enough.
“Tat’s what’s tough about
playing up here,” Baylor coach
Scott Drew said. “You can’t let
them get separation.”
It was the hustle plays such as
Ellis’ steal and score that doomed
the Bears. Particularly, it was
Selden’s dive four rows deep into
the crowd to save a loose ball that
took away any momentum Bay-
lor could have mustered with its
timeout afer Ellis’ run.
Selden’s no-look pass falling
onto the wood bleachers at Allen
Fieldhouse fell perfectly into the
hands of Joel Embiid, who had
12 points and four rebounds, for
a quick jumper. It was Embiid’s
only feld goal attempted in the
second half.
Selden gave “the eyes in the
back of my head” credit for the
save.
And with Baylor’s ofense
struggling to fnd away around
the re-energized Jayhawks, there
wasn’t much the Bears could sal-
vage.
“Kansas’ defense, especially in-
side the arc, was efective.” Drew
said.
Te victory gave Kansas its
fourth consecutive win over a
ranked opponent, making Kan-
sas the frst team to accomplish
the feat since North Carolina in
the 1996-97 season.
Since putting up just 57 points
in a loss to San Diego State, Kan-
sas hasn’t scored less than 77
points in its previous fve games.
“Tree of our wins are at
home,” Self said, as if it took
away any validation. “It’s a nice
accomplishment, but it’s just the
way the schedule fell.”
— Edited by Tara Bryant
On the frst Baylor pos-
session, sophomore center
Isaiah Austin took a 3-point
attempt. Nothing too special
or unusual, but Austin was
guarded by freshmen defen-
sive standout Joel Embiid.
Austin missed the shot, but
the attempt was wide open.
“Coach Drew told us afer
last game that we passed up
too many shots and he knows
that we have confdence in
making them,” Austin said.
“Tat’s what we did tonight,
but we fell short.”
Embiid is used to playing
against centers inside the
paint and not having to con-
test 3-point shots. Embiid’s
shot blocking ability had to
take a back seat when defend-
ing Austin on the perimeter
during the 78-68 Kansas
victory over Baylor last night.
Austin ended the frst half
2-3 from 3-point range due
to Embiid’s lack of success
guarding him. Baylor shot 80
percent from beyond the arc.
“We had some really good
frst-shot defensive posses-
sions in the second half,”
coach Bill Self said. “In the
frst half, we weren’t turned
up enough to get to their
players.”
In the frst half, Austin
didn’t have any success inside
against Embiid. Austin was
0-5 in the paint, including a
huge block by Embiid.
Austin was bothered by
Embiid’s knack for guarding
the rim, and forced Austin to
settle for outside shots, which
was the reason for Embiid’s
single blocked shot Monday
night.
Embiid hasn’t faced a center
quite like Austin since playing
Iowa State’s Georges Niang.
Niang was 0-9 from three
on Jan. 14 against the Jay-
hawks, but still forced Embiid
out of his comfort zone.
Why was Austin’s 3-point
shooting ability so tough for
Embiid?
Austin’s mixture of athlet-
icism and length makes his
shot hard to defend. Austin
is a true seven-foot center,
which makes the ability to
block his jump shot more
difcult.
Niang has trouble shooting
against Embiid because Niang
is only 6-foot-7. Embiid wins
the size advantage there.
Embiid’s inexperience
guarding players who succeed
from the three-point range
showed mostly in the second
half. Troughout the game,
Embiid would lose track of
Austin and Austin would
have a wide-open three-point
look.
Embiid didn’t have a bad
game defensively; He was a
force on the inside, guarded
the paint well and picked up
four rebounds. When Baylor
took Embiid outside of his
comfort zone, he had trouble
guarding the perimeter.
Te Embiid-Austin match-
up took size to a completely
diferent level.
Te ofensive comparison
between Embiid and Austin
is night and day. Embiid is
TARA BRYANT/KANSAN FILE PHOTO
Senior sprinter Paris Daniels finishes the final leg of the women’s 4x400
relay to wrap up the women’s events on the last day of the 2013 Kansas
relays.
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Freshman center Joel Embiid and sophomore forward Jamari Traylor guard the Bears’ Cory Jefferson.
Embiid had 12 points, one assist, one block and one steal. The Jayhawks beat the Baylor Bears 78-68.
SEE TRACK PAGE 10 SEE COLUMN PAGE 10
BASKETBALL
Check out highlights from Monday’s game PAGE 8-9
KANSAS 78 — BAYLOR 68

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