Works Cited Primary Sources Chadwick, James. “The Neutron and its Properties.” Nobel Lecture. 12 Dec.

1935. Lecture. <http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1935/chadwick-lecture.pdf> This source provided us with a transcript of James Chadwick’s Nobel lecture allowing us to see into the mind of one of the most influential physicists of the century. A quote from this source was used on the “Key Individuals” page. Hiroshima and Nagasaki. About.com. Web. 20 Jan. 2014. <http://history1900s.about.com/od/worldwarii/a/hiroshima_2.htm> This source provided us with the accounts of actual survivors of the Japan bombings and the horrors they were faced with as a result of the United States deciding to drop the bomb. Kyoko and Selden, Mark, eds. The Atomic Bomb. M.E Sharpe, Inc., 1989. Print. This collection of stories from survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing provided very beneficial insight on the aftermath of the bomb from a Japanese perspective. The Charters of Freedom. National Archives. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. <http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html> This website has a transcription of the original form of the constitution. The constitution was used to help us define the president’s rights and powers and was quoted on our rights and responsibilities page.

Tomosawa, Francis Mitsuo. Interview by Scholastic students. May 2000. This transcript from an interview with a survivor of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing allowed us to see how the bombing affected him as well as giving a Japanese point of view of the bombing.

Secondary Sources American Experience: People and Events: J. Robert Oppenheimer. PBS. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. <http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/bomb/peopleevents/pandeAMEX65.html> This source provided us with information and a picture of J Robert Oppenheimer, the scientific director of the atomic bomb program, and helped us understand his significant role in the development of the atomic bomb. American Experience: Truman. PBS. Web. 7 Jan. 2014. <http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/primary-resources/trumanhiroshima/>.

This website about one of PBS’s TV series had detailed information about the life and presidency of Harry S. Truman as well as several primary sources. Quotes were used on our website from two of these primary sources. Burr, William. The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II. The National Security Archive. 27 Apr. 2007. Web. 20 Jan. 2014. <http://www2.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB162/>

This website is a collection of primary sources, both pictures and documents, about the development and dropping of the atomic bomb. We used this site for general research and for pictures of the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki on our page about bomb development. Edward Teller Biography. Academy of Achievement. 11 Dec. 2013. Web. 20 Jan. 2014. <http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/tel0bio-1> This website provided us with information and a picture of Edward Teller, colloquially known as "The Father of the Hydrogen Bomb", who provided calculations that persuaded the scientists developing the atomic bomb to do so. "Enrico Fermi - Biographical". Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2013. Web. 20 Jan 2014. <http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1938/fermi-bio.html>. This source described Enrico Fermi's achievements and helped us understand how his research, which was based off of Chadwick's discoveries, contributed to the development of the atomic bomb as well as provided us with a picture of Fermi. Ferrell, Robert H. Harry S. Truman and the Bomb: A Documentary History. Worland: High Plains Publishing Company. 1996. Print. This book was a collection of primary documents regarding Truman with Ferrell’s commentary on the documents and proved to be one of our most helpful sources. It revealed what Truman’s advisors were telling him at the time and Truman’s personal thoughts, and many quotes on the site were taken from these primary documents.

"Hans Bethe - Biographical". Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2013. Web. 20 Jan 2014. <http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1967/bethe-bio.html> This source provided us with information on Hans Bethe, a German physicist who was enlisted to help in the development of the atomic bomb, as well as a picture of Bethe. Harry S. Truman. The White House. Web. 20 Jan. 2014. <http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/harrystruman> This website gave a brief overview of Truman’s presidency, but we primarily used it as a source for pictures of Truman on the page about him.

Hersey, John. Hiroshima. New York: Random House Inc, 1985. Print. This fictional story about six survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing allows the author to convey the feelings and thoughts of these survivors after the explosions as well as providing his own insight when he returns to Japan, forty years later. Hiroshima: Aftermath of the Atomic Bomb. Encyclopedia Britannica. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. <http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/media/87911/Aftermath-of-the-atomic-bombstrike-on-Hiroshima-Japan-August?topicId=41620> This site provided a picture of the wreckage at Hiroshima after the bombing. Hiroshima and Nagasaki Photo Gallery. History.com. Web. 20 Jan. 2014. <http://www.history.com/photos/hiroshima-and-nagasaki/photo2> This website provided us with visuals used on our site of the two towns that atomic bombs were dropped on.

Keyes, Ralph. The Wit and Wisdom of Harry Truman. New York: Harper Collins. 1995. Print. This collection of quotes and stories told by and about Truman gives an insight into his thought process and also provides chronological anecdotes that highlight parts of his life. These casual stories show how much responsibility Truman had as just an ordinary person. Quotes by Truman were used from this book on the Truman pages. Kuznick, Peter J. Defending the Indefensible: A Meditation on the Life of Hiroshima Pilot Paul Tibbets, Jr. Japan Focus. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. < http://www.japanfocus.org/-Peter_J_Kuznick/2642> This site was a detailed story and analysis of the life of Paul Tibbets Jr., the Enola Gay pilot. It provided us with information about the bombing mission as well as pictures of the attack. Lackadasia, Prince. Remembering Nagasaki: 9 August 1945. Wordpress.com. 9 Aug. 2007. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. < http://faithjustice.wordpress.com/2007/08/09/remembering-nagasaki-9august-1945/> This source provided us with a visual for our website showing a cathedral in Nagasaki after the bombing. Long, Tony. Feb. 27, 1932: Neutron Discovered; A-Bomb on the Way. Wired. 27 Feb. 2007. Web. 20 Jan. 2014. <http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/news/2009/02/dayintech_0227>

This source helped us understand James Chadwick's contribution to the development of the atomic bomb and his relevance in the nuclear arms race as well as provided us with a picture of Chadwick. Never Forget: The Bombing of Hiroshima, 64 Years Ago Today. Andy Worthington. 6 Aug. 2009. Web. 20 Jan. 2014. < http://www.andyworthington.co.uk/2009/08/06/never-forgetthe-bombing-of-hiroshima-64-years-ago-today/> This source had gruesome pictures depicted the horror of the bomb that we used on our website. Pearl Harbor Remembered. Encyclopedia Britannica Blog. 7 Dec. 2007. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. <http://www.britannica.com/blogs/2007/12/pearl-harbor-remembered/> This website has a collection of photos and videos that gave insight into the devastating blow given by the Japan at Pearl Harbor. Several of these photos were used on our site on the historical context page. A Photo-Essay on the Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Modern American Poetry. Web. 18 Jan. 2014. < http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/g_l/levine/bombing.htm> This source provided pictures that we used on our site as well as insight into how devastating the bombs were. Pictures of World War II. National Archives. Web. 18 Jan. 2014. <http://www.archives.gov/research/military/ww2/photos/> This Website had numerous pictures from around the world of WWII and a picture of Truman speaking to the press was used on our “Historical Context” page.

President as Commander-in-Chief. Bill of Rights Institute. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. <http://billofrightsinstitute.org/resources/educator-resources/americapedia/americapediaconstitution-text/commander-in-chief/ This website helps put Article II: Section II of the U.S. constitution, which defines the president’s powers and role as Commander-in-Chief, in simpler, more modern terms. SGIVideosOnline. “Nagasaki survivor, Aiko Kori.” Online Video Clip. Youtube. Youtube, 6 Jul. 2011. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQ-dQook-DA> This youtube video is of an atomic bobm survivor from Nagasaki sharing her story and is posted on our website. SGIVideosOnline. “Nagasaki survivor, Sueko Takada.” Online Video Clip. Youtube. Youtube, 6 Jul. 2011. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjh9kFRfsj8> This youtube video is of an atomic bomb survivor from Nagasaki sharing her story and is posted on our website.

“The Atomic Bomb.” History Learning Site. History Learning Site, n.d. 3 January 2014. Web. <http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/atomic_bomb.htm> This webpage provides insight on the history of the atomic bomb, as well as a description on the sheer amount of power it provided.

The Effects of the Atomic Bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. HyperWar Foundation. Web. 20 Jan. 2014. <http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/AAF/USSBS/AtomicEffects/AtomicEffects-2.html> This website gave detailed information about the atomic bombings including the attack, the magnitude of the destruction, and effects on the areas that were bombed. Pictures were used on several pages to show the before and after effects of the bomb. Walker, Gregory. Trinity Atomic Website. Virginia Tech. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. <http://www.cddc.vt.edu/host/atomic/trinity/tr_test.html> This website gives detailed information about the test of the atomic bomb at the Trinity Site. It contains many quotes by men involved, a video of the explosion from a distance, and many pictures of the bomb, site, and explosion. One of the pictures was used on our page titled “The Decision.” “Why Truman Dropped The Bomb.” The Weekly Standard 8 August 2005. Web. <http://www.weeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/005/894mnyyl.asp> This magazine article details the decisions that led to the United States dropping the bomb on Japan, as well as several perspectives on whether or not the bombing was necessary or not.

< http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USMC/V/img/USMC-V-p504a.jpg> This link is to a picture used on our site of the destruction left behind by the bombing.