CTC TRAINING PROSPECTUS

TRAINING AND LEARNING Enhancing Capacity for Marine Conservation TURNING KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS INTO ON-THE-GROUND ACTION

MPA Design Training in Savu Sea National Marine Park © Wira Sanjaya/CTC

CORAL TRIANGLE CENTER
The Coral Triangle Center is a foundation based in Indonesia that trains marine resource managers and educates all groups that interact with coastlines and reefs within the Coral Triangle. Developed as the regional training arm of The Nature Conservancy, the CTC became an independent organization in 2011 and has conducted more than 100 training sessions, educating more than 2,000, in its 12 years of service. The CTC provides training and learning programs; supports marine-protected areas; coordinates a learning network for MPA practitioners; connects the public and private sector on coastal issues; and is developing a centre of excellence in marine conservation focused on the Coral Triangle.

TRAINING AND LEARNING
National and regional governments and NGOs agree that strong management is critical to establishing a resilient network of MPAs throughout the Coral Triangle. Unfortunately potential managers have little access to training, resources or guidance. Training that is available is often theoretical and not relevant to local conditions. Follow-up is minimal, opportunities for mentorship scarce. In order to develop a generation of educated and committed MPA managers and staff, as well as to educate other groups that interact with the coral reef, the CTC has made Training and Learning programs the foundation of its efforts. Working with established centers of learning, including international NGOs and universities, the CTC develops customized curriculums taught by experienced educators with practical MPA experience. Training and Learning programs cater to four constituencies: MPA managers and staff; other practitioners including tourism operators, NGOs, teachers and interested citizens; potential MPA trainers; and field-based students, those interested in learning on-site. Classroom work is supplemented by training at CTC learning sites. Alumni of CTC programs become members of our MPA learning network that connects them to marine resource practitioners throughout the Coral Triangle region. Additionally, Training and Learning educators advise the government of Indonesia in the development of its School for Marine Resource Conservation.

Cover photo credit: Savu Sea MPA Design © Wira Sanjaya/CTC, Reef Health Monitoring © Marthen Welly, Fishing exercise at the CTC © Wira Sanjaya/CTC, Coral reefs and fish © Robert Delfs.

1

Juveniles © Robert Delfs

TABLE CONTENT
Coral Triangle Center Training and Learning MPA Planning Cycle. Competence Needs, and Related Training Modules 1. Principles of Marine Protected Area Management 2. Training for Teachers on Marine Conservation 3. Marine Conservation Action Planning 4. Marine Protected Area Design 5. Marine Protected Area Management Effectiveness 6. Perception Monitoring 7. Dive Training and Introduction to Marine Biological Monitoring 8. Reef Health Monitoring 9. Marine Resource Use Monitoring 10. Spawning Aggregation Sites Monitoring 11. Training on Marine Biological Survey/Observation 12. Facilitation Techniques for MPA Public Consultation Fishing Exercise CTC Trainers (1) (1) (3) (4) (6) (8) (11) (13) (15) (17) (19) (21) (23) (25) [27] [29] [31]

Training for MPA Managers Training of Trainers

Site-based Training Training for Practitioners
2

Dive Training and Introduction to Marine Biological Monitoring 8. Marine Protected Area Design 5. Facilitation Techniques for Marine Protected Area Public Consultation TRAINING AND MPA. Referring to Indonesia Law on Marine Protected Area Management and Zoning Plan No. and 5-designing future MPA boundaries. Reef Health Monitoring (8). COMPETENCE NEEDS. Training on Marine Biological Survey/Observation (11). From CTC site-based experience. Perception Monitoring (6).5 years for proposing an area as future MPA. Marine Conservation Action Planning 4. 3 . Training for Teachers on Marine Conservation 3. The third and fourth step of MPA establishment process will require MPA managers to understand the current situation of the MPA and to engage with general public through public consultations. Spawning Aggregation Sites Monitoring 11. there are steps to assign an MPA which include 1-proposing an area for future MPA. Marine Resource Use Monitoring (9). Marine Protected Area Management Effectiveness 6. it takes 3 . Training on MPA Design (4). The Principles of Marine Protected Area (1) and Marine Conservation Planning (3) will support the first step of proposing an area as a potential MPA. 3-reserving future MPA. AND RELATED TRAINING MODULES TRAINING MODULES 1. and Facilitation Techniques for Marine Protected Area Public Consultation (12). 30/2010 and the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries Regulation on Small Islands Marine Protected Area No. Principles of Marine Protected Area Management 2. 17/2008. Marine Resource Use Monitoring 10. Perception Monitoring 7. Teachers Training (2). Training on Spawning Aggregation Site Monitoring (10) will be crucial for identifying resources in the proposed area. 2-identifying resources at the proposed MPA. Training on Marine Biological Survey/Observation 12. INDONESIA CONTEXT Twelve CTC training modules offer a support to every stage in MPA planning and management.MPA PLANNING CYCLE. These can be facilitated by enhancing MPA manager’s capacity through an in-depth training on Marine Protected Area Management Effectiveness (5). Reef Health Monitoring 9. Dive Training and Introduction to Marine Biological Monitoring (7). 4-assigning MPA.

case study. While the course uses examples from all over the world there is a strong focus on the Indonesian context. and management of MPA’s. video presentation. • Conservation practitioners of the government agencies. biodiversity. Day 2 Fisheries (Population dynamics. NGOs and other co-managing user groups. carrying capacity. To understand the concept of marine conservation. exercise. AGENDA Day 1 Introduction to marine conservation (marine protected areas. exercise. INTENDED AUDIENCE • This training is tailored to suit various target audience. To enhance interest and awareness on marine resources conservation. 4 . 4. exercise. sustainable fisheries and other sustainable uses of marine resources. Day 3 Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) Lecture.Encounter grouper © Robert Delfs 1 . Participants will learn the basics of population dynamics of exploited species. fishing exercise. Day 4 MPA Management Tools Lecture. To understand basic principles of MPA management. AIM To provide participants with a thorough background. preferably with basic knowledge of English. and up-to-date insights on the design. and how these dynamics relate to resource use. preferably Monday – Thursday. planning. LANGUAGE • The training will be given in Bahasa Indonesia and English (it can also be given in only Bahasa Indonesia) DURATIONS • Originally. video presentation. fishery management) Lecture. 2. 3. all the modules are prepared for four full days. MINIMUM REQUIREMENT • High school graduates or equivalent. To learn MPA as a tool for marine biodi-versity conservation. video presentation.Principles of Marine Protected Area Management OBJECTIVES 1. sustainable fisheries and threats) Lecture.

5 . Only 25% of the world’s fish stocks have any additional capacity to support additional fishing.TRAINING SYLLABUS 1. fishery management) • Lecture: Population dynamics of exploited species • Lecture: Carrying capacity • Lecture: Fishery management • Lecture: Maximum Sustainable Yield .MPA Management Tools • Lecture: Overview on legal and technical processes • Lecture: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for MPA management • Exercise: Application of Geographic Information Systems • Lecture: Stakeholder involvement in MPA planning and management • Exercise: Stakeholder ranking to be involved in MPA planning and management • Exercise: Situational analysis – Setting priorities and identifi• cation of strategies • Lecture: Options for alternative development • Lecture: Monitoring and Evaluation – measures of a success • Case study: Review of a marine conservation program 5 .Video documentaries Evaluation Pre and post training test will be administered accordingly. feat. particularly pelagic marine species.Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) • Lecture: What is a Marine Protected Areas? • Lecture: Benefits of MPAs for sustainable fisheries and marine tourism • Lecture: Theory of MPAs • Lecture: Roadmap to an MPAs • Video presentation: Gladden Spit at the confluence of currents • Video presentation: PISCO – The science of marine reserves 4 .Theory • Exercise: Maximum Sustainable Yield and interpretation of fishery management advice • Exercise: Over-exploitation and tragedy of the commons • Video presentation: A destructive fishing practice • Video presentation: Deep Trouble 3 . 2006). but rather alarming. with a “collapse” defined as a decline in catch to less than 10% of the observed maximum catch. carrying capacity. A more recent analysis was published in the journal Science in 2006 (Worm et al. This analysis found that onethird of all fishing stocks worldwide have collapsed. bleaching • Lecture: Basics of marine conservation (III) – Local threats • Exercise: marine species vulnerable to over-exploitation • Video presentation: Coral Seas 2 .Fisheries (Population dynamics. Another 25% of the world’s fisheries are believed to be overfished. or are recovering from an overfished state. have crashed to commercial extinction.. Many of these were once among the most commercially important fisheries. Or. in other words.Introduction to marine conservation • Lecture: Marine biodiversity in Indonesia and Global • Lecture: Basics of marine conservation (I) – Ecosystems • Lecture: Basics of marine conservation (II) – A global and local threat. 50% are estimated to be fished at capacity. Green turtle© Robert Delfs Fisheries Crisis The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations estimated in 2004 that of all the world’s marine fishing stocks. one single species (humans) has actually managed to harness the reproductive potential of virtually all the fish in the sea. The FAO summarizes this situation as: “the maximum wild capture fishery potential of the world’s oceans has probably been reached” (FAO 2007). This is an impressive. meaning that any further increase in fishing effort will cause the fish population to crash.

By the end of the training it is expected that participants will be able to have a better comprehension on the basic marine conservation principles and how to align them into their teaching materials. and how these dynamic relate to resource use. AGENDA Day 1 • introduction to marine conservation (marine protected areas. To learn MPA as a tool for marine biodiversity conservation. 2. Also. monitoring and evaluation). there is a strong focus on the Indonesian situation. implementation. preferably with basic knowledge of English. 4. MINIMUM REQUIREMENT • High school graduates or equivalent.Nusa Lembongan fishing boat and chartered boat © Marthen Welly/CTC 2 . To understand the concept of marine conservation. LANGUAGE • The training will be given in Bahasa Indonesia and English (it can also be given in only Bahasa Indonesia) DURATIONS • Originally. To enhance interest and awareness on marine resources conservation.Introduction to Marine Conservation for Teachers OBJECTIVES 1. 6 . setting priorities and identification of strategy. participants will learn basics of population dynamics of exploited species. sustainable fisheries and threats) Day 2 • MPA ( why MPA. AIM This training is designed for teachers at various levels from elementary to high school. The training intends to share participants with recent insights on marine protected area management and design of marine protected areas. particularly teaching on biology and natural sciences. but can be extended as necessary (particularly an additional day for field session). To understand basic principles of MPA management. monitoring success • Synthesis of MPA management (design. Whereas the training will use examples from all over the world. planning. all the modules are prepared for three full days. how to design develop and manage MPA) Day 3 • Stakeholder involvement. 3. biodiversity. sustainable fisheries and other sustainable uses of marine resources. selecting priority areas for conservation. INTENDED AUDIENCE • This training is tailored to suit teachers at certain levels namely education particularly elementary to high school or those equal to.

At a certain intermediate population size. an increase in fishing effort results in greater catch . adding more boats or fisher people will cause a decrease in total catch. Many fisheries around the world are currently in this state. This is because fish are being removed from the population faster than they can reproduce.Introduction to marine conservation • Lecture: Marine biodiversity in Indonesia and Global • Lecture: Basics of marine conservation (I) – Ecosystems • Lecture: Basics of marine conservation (II) – A global and local threat.Theory • Exercise: Maximum Sustainable Yield and interpretation of fishery management advice • Exercise: Over-exploitation and tragedy of the commons • Video presentation: A destructive fishing practice • Video presentation: Deep Trouble 3 . more fish are caught. evaluation).Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) • Lecture: What is a Marine Protected Areas? • Lecture: Benefits of MPAs for sustainable fisheries and marine tourism • Lecture: Theory of MPAs • Lecture: Roadmap to an MPAs • Video presentation: Gladden Spit at the confluence of currents • Video presentation: PISCO – The science of marine reserves 4 .Fisheries (Population dynamics.TRAINING SYLLABUS 1. the stock cannot reproduce fast enough to replace the fish being killed.e.i. however. and the stock size will decline. Nusa Penida Coral Reefs© Marthen Welly/CTC Maximum Sustainable Yield A fish stock can tolerate a certain level of mortality. This process can accelerate so that a small increase in fishing effort causes a large decrease in catch. This state is called overfishing. Beyond this point.MPA Management Tools • Lecture: Overview on legal and technical processes • Lecture: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for MPA management • Exercise: Application of Geographic Information Systems • Lecture: Stakeholder involvement in MPA planning and management • Exercise: Stakeholder ranking to be involved in MPA planning and management • Exercise: Situational analysis – Setting priorities and identifi• cation of strategies • Lecture: Options for alternative development • Lecture: Monitoring and Evaluation – measures of a success • Case study: Review of a marine conservation program 5 . if more boats go out to sea. At low levels of fishing effort. At high levels of mortality. carrying capacity. designing practical exercises and simulation. fishery management) • Lecture: Population dynamics of exploited species • Lecture: Carrying capacity • Lecture: Fishery management • Lecture: Maximum Sustainable Yield . This is called the Maximum Sustainable Yield. or MSY.Aligning marine conservation into teaching materials (sharing ideas. assigning home work. This will continue up to a certain point. to the MSY. Evaluation Pre and post training test will be administered accordingly.. a maximum amount of fish can be removed without any adverse effects on the fish population. bleaching • Lecture: Basics of marine conservation (III) – Local threats • Exercise: marine species vulnerable to over-exploitation • Video presentation: Coral Seas 2 . if the mortality is balanced by reproduction and recruitment. 7 .

implementing and measuring success for conservation projects. Whereas the training will use examples from all over the world. Participants are asked to bring maps and any supporting documentation (existing management plans. with basic knowledge of English. reports. and gap analysis. CAP is a relatively simple. workplan. depend on the target audiences) and Fisheries Management. Participants are encouraged to team up in groups of 2 – 5 persons. NGOs and other comanaging user groups.) that they have available on their area of interest. Day 3 Setting up priorities and drafting report. LANGUAGE • The training will be given in Bahasa Indonesia and English (it can also be given in only Bahasa Indonesia) DURATIONS • Originally. straightforward and proven approach for planning. all the modules are prepared for three full days. To understand planning method for MPA.Marine Conservation Action Planning OBJECTIVES 1. AGENDA Day 1 Guidelines for ehancing MPA management effectiveness and role play. It has been tested and deployed successfully by hundreds of teams working to conserve species. MINIMUM REQUIREMENT • S1 (BSc) or equivalent. INTENDED AUDIENCE • Participants selected from conservation practitioners of the government agencies. sites. 8 . 2. Participants preferably to have basic knowledge on marine ecosystems (these requirements may change. but can be extended as necessary (particularly an additional day for further discussion to develop CAP document. publications etc. The methodology was developed by conservation practitioners working in real places.Small boats for community-based seaweed tour in Nusa Lembongan© Marhen Welly/CTC 3 . Day 2 Using MPA case study to review MPA management effectiveness. watersheds and seascapes across the globe. To enhance MPA managers ability in designing a project using supporting tool called Miradi. there is a strong focus on the Indonesian situation. AIM This training intends to share participants with recent insights on the planning method for marine protected areas called Conservation Action Planning (CAP). ecosystems. landscapes. Preparation Participants will be given the opportunity to design a marine protected area management plan for an area of their interest.

Defining your project • Project people • Project scope & focal target Using results to adapt & improve • Analyze actions & data • Learn from results • Adapt project • Share findings Conservation Action Planning Developing strategies & measures • Target viability • Critical threats • Situation analysis • Objective & actions • Measures Implementing strategies & measures • Develop workplans • Implement actions • Implement measures TRAINING SYLLABUS A. Assess Viability of Focal Conservation Targets (5S = Systems) • Selection of at least one key ecological attribute and measurable indicator for each focal target • Your assumption as to what constitutes an acceptable range of variation for each attribute • Determination of current and desired status of each attribute • Brief documentation of viability assessments and any potential research needs 9 . Identify People Involved in Your Project • Selection of core project team members and assignment of roles • Identification of other planning team members and advisors as needed • Identification of a process leader 2. Define Project Scope & Focal Conservation Targets (5S = Systems) • A brief text description and basic map of your project area or scope • A statement of the overall vision of your project • Selection of no more than 8 focal conservation targets and explanation of why they were chosen B. Defining Your Project 1. Developing Your Conservation Strategies and Measures 3.

for conservation practitioners.TRAINING SYLLABUS 4. and the potential strategies and actions that the projects can take to counter this threats. key threats. please log on to https://miradi. Develop Work Plans • Lists of major action steps and monitoring tasks • Assignments of steps and tasks to specific individual(s) and rough timeline • Brief summary of project capacity and a rough project budget • If necessary. critical threats. examples and multiple views make using Miradi like having an expert project manager guide you through planning. good objectives for all critical threats and degraded key ecological attributes that your project is taking action to address and if useful. objectives and strategic actions for obtaining sufficient project resources 8. Reflect & Adapt • Appropriate and scheduled analyses of your data • Updated viability and threat assessments • Modifications to objectives. and focal targets • At a minimum. Mirah also help the team to identify monitoring indicators needed to determine the effectiveness of these strategies. monitoring and reporting on your work. strategic actions. Implement • Action • Monitoring D. Develop Conservation Strategies (5S = Strategies) • A situation analysis that includes indirect threats/opportunities and associated stakeholders behind all critical threats and degraded attributes • A “picture” – either in narrative form or a simple diagram – of your hypothesized linkages between indirect threats and opportunities. Miradi makes it easy for anyone to create a world-class biodiversity conservation project. Implementing Your Conservation Strategies and Measures 7. After completing initial strategic and monitoring plans. MPA practitioners develop a work plan containing specific tasks required to implement the project together with budget requirements and needs for raising fund. Using Your Results to Adapt and Improve 9. Learn & Share • Identification of key audiences and appropriate communication products for each Miradi is an adaptive management software for conservation projects. Wizards. It was built as a tool to implement planning and measurement best practices adopted by the CMP (see below). To learn more about Miradi. Analyze.pdf Fish school and sun light© Robert Delfs Miradi Miradi is project management software designed by conservation practitioners.org/files/miradi_overview. Establish Measures (5S = Success) A list of indicators and methods to track the effectiveness of each conservation action A list of indicators and methods to assess status of selected targets and threats you are not currently working on. It is a free software. Miradi helps the team prioritize which actions and monitoring indicators they need to focus on. C. 10 . Identify Critical Threats (5S = Stresses & Sources) • Identification and rating of stresses affecting each focal target • Identification and rating of sources of stress for each focal target • Determination of critical threats 5. and work plans. As the project team develop specific “views’ of their project including conceptual models showing biodiversity targets. for other factors related to project success • One or more strategic actions for each conservation objective 6. as warranted • Regular updates of project documents 10.

INTENDED AUDIENCE This training is tailored to suit technical staff particularly from • Conservation practitioners of the government agencies. cost features and marine biodiversity. capture target from a conservation scenario and produce choices location where MPA should be placed. Skill using an automated reserve selection tool called MARXAN 3. • NGOs • Academic or University MINIMUM REQUIREMENT • S1 (BSc) or equivalent. configuration and management of conservation areas.) that they have available on their area of interest. During training participant will be introduced to the use of an automated reserve selection tool called MARXAN to help in incorporate data. MS Word AGENDA Day 1 introduction to MPA design. repeatable. principles of Geographic Information System (GIS) Day 2 Systematic Conservation Design software (MARXAN) Day 3 Self-exercise using participant’s MPA site data Preparation Participants are asked to bring notebook. • MPA 101 • Familiarity with computer skill. Using MARXAN to design MPA AIM This training provides participant with knowledge on designing MPA/ conservation planning based on mapped marine habitat features. reports. Participants are encouraged to team up in groups of 2 persons during the training. 11 .Divers and coral reefs © Robert Delfs 4 . digital maps and any supporting documentation (existing management plans. • Participants preferably to have basic • knowledge on Geographic Information System. This conservation planning are guides decisions about the location. preferably with basic knowledge of English. marine ecosystems and Fisheries Management. all the modules are prepared for three full days. preferably Monday – Wednesday. publications etc. particularly MS Excel. Provide knowledge on spatial approach on MPA design 2. LANGUAGE • The training will be given in Bahasa Indonesia and English (it can also be given in only Bahasa Indonesia) DURATIONS • Originally. transparent and equitable process for making conservation decisions.Marine Protected Area Design OBJECTIVES 1. The aims of conservation planning are to get efficient.

process and result • Exercise: • Map geo-reference and digitize • Input attributes data in tables • Query.Self practice using participant’s site data Evaluation Pre and post training test will be administered accordingly. Concept and Methods • MPA Design basic principles • Methods available for design • How to design an MPA based on certain requirements including present rules and regulations • Lecture : Understanding GIS Principles • Definitions of GIS • GIS Components and how GIS works • GIS functions. Marxan initially developed to suit the need of assigning potential area for conservation purpose. analyse. process. With the use of stochastic optimisation routines. Lots of options available which create a headache for MPA managers to assign specific area which has both biophysics potential and/or socio-economic features. it generates spatial reserve systems that achieve particular biodiversity representation goals with reasonable optimality. Geographic Information System It is a system to manage. 12 . and to display data related to earth’s surface. summary and calculation • Map layout 2 . Marxan provide the best possible solution based on available data to create the most effective and efficient scenarios.TRAINING SYLLABUS 1. The system requires hardware and software in which human plays important role to operate it. Critters© Robert Delfs Marxan It is software designed to aid systematic reserve design on conservation planning.Systematic Conservation Design • Lecture : Understanding Systematic Conservation Design software (MARXAN) • Brief history and development of MARXAN • Principle of MARXAN and how it works • Input data for MARXAN • Principle to design conservation goal with scenario • Exercise: • Prepare data for MARXAN • Create inputs data for MARXAN • Setting up MARXAN scenario • Run MARXAN and interpret the result • Document MARXAN setting and process 3 .Introduction to MPA design and principles of GIS • Lecture: MPA Design. MARXAN is a free software which provides decision support to range of conservation planning problems. store. including: the design of new reserve systems and reporting on the performance of existing reserve systems.

It is not designed for judging the right and wrong in managing marine resources. To introduce a tool for measuring MPA management effectiveness 2. all the modules are prepared for three full days.Marine Protected Area Management Effectiveness OBJECTIVES 1. publications etc. MS Word AGENDA Day 1 Introductionto MPA Management Effectiveness indicator and guidelines Day 2 Database development and role play Day 3 Assessing Management Effectiveness of each MPA Preparation Participants are asked to bring notebook. Through the training. marine ecosystems and Fisheries Management. discuss achievement with colleagues and partners. Participants will work in a group of 6 for role playing.) that they have available on their area of interest. preferably Monday – Wednesday. MPA managers and stakeholders will be able to thoroughly assess success indicators. • NGOs • Academic or University MINIMUM REQUIREMENT • S1 (BSc) or equivalent. To raise awareness on the status of MPA AIM This training specifically designed for MPA managers and stakeholders to give sense of conservation management achievement from both biophysics and socio-economics. MPA Management Effectiveness is a learning tool. To give exposures to MPA managers on various evaluation indicators 3. INTENDED AUDIENCE This training is tailored to suit technical staff particularly from • Conservation practitioners of the government agencies. and assign the status of their MPAs. • MPA 101 • Familiarity with computer skill. 13 . preferably with basic knowledge of English. LANGUAGE • The training will be given in Bahasa Indonesia and English (it can also be given in only Bahasa Indonesia) DURATIONS • Originally. The standard effectiveness will be assigned based on consensus between stakeholders. digital maps and any supporting documentation (existing management plans. particularly MS Excel. reports.Shark and divers © Robert Delfs 5 . • Participants preferably to have basic • knowledge on Geographic Information System.

C..Introduction to MPA Management Effectivenes • Lecture: MPA establishment and management • Lecture: Effectiveness concept • MPA Effectiveness. This easy to use self-assessment checklist.d’A.Develop report on MPA Effectiveness evaluation and management plan. D.TRAINING SYLLABUS 1. J. based on the best practice guide. the guidelines • Exercise: • Role play and data entry • Gap analysis • Discussion on MPA Management Effectiveness scoring 2 . Nusa Lembongan tourism development © Marthen Welly/CTC Self-assessment checklist for building networks of MPAs Day. 2006.Management Effectivenes Database • Lecture: Developing a marine protected area database • Exercise: • Incroporate background information on Excel datasheet • Assign baseline data • Assign priorities for increase effectiveness level 3 . 14 . is designed to enable those engaged in designing or managing MPA networks and will assist national and regional authorities to determine progress towards the establishment of effective MPA networks. & Laffoley.

filtering data. all the modules are prepared for four full days. and behaviour 2. preferably with basic knowledge of English. preferably Monday – Thursday (possible for another day field exercise) 15 . To learn one social survey method to measure attitude. data compilation. By participating in this training MPA managers and practitioners will be able to design questionnaire. INTENDED AUDIENCE This training is tailored to suit technical staff particularly from • Conservation practitioners of the government agencies. • Participants preferably to have basic • knowledge on Geographic Information System. • NGOs • Academic or University AGENDA Day 1 Social survey. MPA managers need to get a feedback from community living inside and surrounding area of the MPA for adaptive management. knowledge. conduct a survey. data analysis and interpretation Preparation A list of current household information should be prepared prior to training. and adapt outreach and awareness strategy for future work. Participants should familiarize themselves with survey questionnaires which will be distributed in advance. AIM Perception monitoring was originally designed as a tool to measure local communities’ perception toward MPA establishment and management. • MPA 101 • Familiarity with computer skill. marine ecosystems and Fisheries Management. analyse and interpret survey result.Sanur fishermen © Robert Delfs 6 . To experience administering survey questions and interpret the result. particularly MS Excel.Perception Monitoring OBJECTIVES 1. introduction to MPA. MINIMUM REQUIREMENT • S1 (BSc) or equivalent. data analysis Day 3 Field exercise Day 4 Data input. survey ethics Day 2 Conducting a survey. MS Word LANGUAGE • The training will be given in Bahasa Indonesia and English (it can also be given in only Bahasa Indonesia) DURATIONS • Originally.

Basic Socio-Economic Monitoring • Understanding the concept of knowledge. 2003). and of their impact on the environment.TRAINING SYLLABUS 1 .g. • Gender issues. cultural and religious beliefs. Children and the boat © Robert Delfs Socio-Economic Monitoring in Marine Protected Area The most commonly socio-economic indicators used are as follows (Bunce et al. household characteristics (such as age. activities on which people depend for food and income (particularly those associated with marine resources) and their location. use rights. literacy. perceptions of other stakeholders. gender. willingness to cooperate.Data entry • Introduction to Excel Data Sheet • Entering and filtering your data • Basic data interpretation Evaluation Quizzes and exercises will be given in every session to allow participants learn better. and they should be carefully selected to reflect MPA objectives: • Resource use patterns . • Organisation and resource governance e. administrative and political arrangements at community and governmental levels. timing and seasonality.g.g. • Community services and facilities • Market attributes for extractive uses • Market attributes for non-extractive uses 16 . • Stakeholder characteristics . property rights. incomes).e. education level.e. perceptions and level of understanding of MPA management. religion.g. • Stakeholder perceptions . food consumption.e. Note that not all of these are relevant to every MPA. • Traditional knowledge. management efforts. attitude and behavior survey • Principles of MPA Design and Management • Running a social survey • Objectives and benefit for MPA Managers and community • Methods • Sample selections • Perception monitoring over the time • Logistic preparations and enumerator selection 2 ..Questionnaire Design and Exercise • Review household and individual questionnaires • Interviewing your target audience (in class exercise) 3 .Interviewing target audience – field exercise • Selecting individual samples from household list • Verbal consent and interview process • Reporting back and evaluation 4 .

2. turtle. PREPARATION • Filling-up medical history and liability form • Swimsuit for pool and open water practices • Bringing +/. mangrove. Also. 2 days Open water practices. invertebrate – habitat and population) AIM This training intends to share participants with recent insights on marine protected area management and design of marine protected areas. there is a strong focus on the Indonesian situation. Diving skill equivalent to Open Water (certified) and environmentally friendly diving practices.glasses for mask as needed • Signing training consent to attend the whole process of training INTENDED AUDIENCE • • • • • • Government officers NGO Local community University Marine research centers Related stakeholders MINIMUM REQUIREMENT • • • • • Minimum High-School education background Healthy with doctor letter/recommendation Swimming skill ( at least 200 meters on the water and 5 meters underwater) No claustrophobia No others sickness that prohibited for diving activity AGENDA • • • • Introduction of Diving Academic – class theory. all the modules are prepared for four full days. cetacean. Whereas the training will use examples from all over the world. To learn basic knowledge and skills on marine biological survey/observation (seagrass.DIving in Nusa Lembongan © Marthen Welly/CTC 7-Dive Training and Introduction to Marine Biological Monitoring OBJECTIVES 1. 1 day Swimming pool practices. and how these dynamic relate to resource use. fish. participants will learn basics of population dynamics of exploited species. preferably Monday – Thursday (possible for another day field exercise) 17 . 2 days Introduction to biological monitoring practices (Manta Tow and Underwater demo on Reef Health monitoring) LANGUAGE • The training will be given in Bahasa Indonesia and English (it can also be given in only Bahasa Indonesia) DURATIONS • Originally. at least 4 dives.

and post training test will be given to measure participants’ skill and competency. tuck and duck dive) • Scuba Diving (diving preparation. and level of diving Physic of Diving • • Health of Diving • Dive Table • Diving Codes Introduction to dive gear and setting up gears • • Diving technique Introduction to marine biological monitoring • Module 2. The training will enable participant to assess marine biological indicators of MPA management. participants will dive at least twice a day with buddy system. A dive regulator doesn’t breathe for you. 09:00 – 17:00) • Coastal and marine ecosystem • Overview. fin swimming. buddy breathing. That is. A wetsuit doesn’t make heat. • Skin Diving (entry. CTC’s dive training introduce you to basic knowledge and skills required as MPA managers and practitioners.TRAINING SYLLABUS Module 1. entry. a mask doesn’t see for you. safety-stop). Open water (LPT) (2 days. diving gear set-up. Field Experience of biological monitoring (introduction: using Manta Tow and Underwater demo on Reef Health monitoring). neutral buoyancy. diving codes. entry. Napoleon wrasse © Robert Delfs Dive Intro Scuba diving equipment adapts you to the underwater world and makes you part of it. neutral buoyancy. mask and regulator clearing. mask and regulator clearing. A dive instructor will guide maximum 2 participants while diving. fin swimming. phyllosophy. You do the diving. 08:00 – 16:00) • During open water. but allows you to breathe underwater. diving gear set-up. but your scuba gear makes it possible. buddy breathing. 08:00 – 16:00) • Skin Diving (entry. Module 4. Modul 3. mask and snorkel clearing. Introduction of Diving Academic (1day. ascent technique. mask and snorkle clearing. tuck and duck dive) • Scuba Diving (diving preparation. diving codes. Swimming pool practice (LKK) (2 day. but allows a body to more effectively retain its own heat. 18 . Dive training modules are designed to specifically strengthen participants’ ability to monitor coastal and marine ecosystems for further development of MPA design and management. but allows you to see underwater. Evaluation Pre. ascent technique.

analysis and interpretation AIM Reef health monitoring is one of biological monitoring tool to inform the MPA managers and decision makers on coral reef and fish condition. preferably Monday – Thursday (possible for another day field exercise) 19 . A monitoring person should have diving skills as well as coral and fish identification skills to conduct a reef health monitoring.Fish schools over coral reefs © Robert Delfs 8-Reef Health Monitoring OBJECTIVES 1. The reef health monitoring is needed as scientific input on MPA management. PREPARATION • Filling-up medical history and liability form • Reading about coral reef and fish reference • Reading about coral reef and fish monitoring protocol INTENDED AUDIENCE • • • • • • Government officers NGO Local community University Marine research centers Related stakeholders MINIMUM REQUIREMENT • • • • MPA 101 Diving skill at least advance level or has at least 25 dive logs. To enhance participants’ skill on coral reef and fish identification 2. To enable participants to implement coral reefs and fish survey and monitoring 3. The reef health monitoring will use point intercept transect (PIT) for coral and visual sensus and time swimming for fish. To strengthen participants skill on data management. all the modules are prepared for four full days. Minimum High-School education background Healthy with doctor letter/recommendation AGENDA • • • • • Coral reefs and fish identification theory (half day) Coral reefs and fish monitoring protocol (half day) Coral reefs and fish monitoring method simulation (half day) Data collection and management simulation (half day) Underwater simulation on coral reef and fish monitoring protocol (2 day) LANGUAGE • The training will be given in Bahasa Indonesia and English (it can also be given in only Bahasa Indonesia) DURATIONS • Originally.

09:00 – 17:00) • Introduction on coral reef ecosystem • Coral and fish identification Reef health protocol • • Datasheet • Data management.TRAINING SYLLABUS Module 1. TNC-IMP. Underwater simulation on coral reef and fish monitoring (2 days. Instructors and resource persons CTC. 08:00 – 16:00). 08:00 – 16:00) Reef health monitoring preparation • • Selection of monitoring location and set-up PIT • Reef health monitoring and data collection Data management • Modul 3. Land simulation on coral reef and fish monitoring (1 day. Class theory ( 1 day. LIPI and partners. Moray eel fish© Marthen Welly/CTC Fish Species Observed • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Scarini Acanthuridae Siganidae Haemulidae Lutjanidae Lethrinidae Serranidae Labridae – Cheilinus undulatus Carangidae Scombridae Carcharhinidae Hemigaleidae Sphyraenidae Dasyatidae Mobulidae Myliobatidae 20 . MMAF. • Reef health monitoring preparation Selection of location of monitoring and set-up PIT • • Reef health monitoring and data collection Data management • Evaluation Pre and post training test will be be administered accordingly. collecting and analysis Module 2.

The resource use monitoring is conducted to monitor different types of activities related utilize of marine resources within MPA. The data from monitoring will be useful to inform MPA managers and decision makers about developing a MPA management plan and improve MPA management implementation. PREPARATION • Learn about marine resources use pattern and socio-economic activity in their area • Having read about resources use monitoring protocol INTENDED AUDIENCE • • • • • • Government officers NGO Local community University Marine research centers Related stakeholders MINIMUM REQUIREMENT • MPA 101 • Minimum High-School education background • Able to operate GPS and camera • Communication skill to interview AGENDA • Introduction. area of interest (one day) • Resource availability (one day) • Data and survey preparation (one day) • Field Survey simulation (one day) • Survey evaluation and Data analysis (one day) LANGUAGE • The training will be given in Bahasa Indonesia and English (it can also be given in only Bahasa Indonesia) DURATIONS • Originally. specification of monitoring objectives. To provide participants with guidance to compile a protocol for longterm in situ monitoring of natural resources use by humans inside their own MPAs AIM Resource use monitoring is one of tool on socio-economic monitoring related MPA management. preferably Monday – Friday (possible for another day field exercise) 21 . all the modules are prepared for five full days.Manta rays © Robert Delfs 9-Marine Resource Use Monitoring OBJECTIVES 1. marine biodiversity.

(4) inform resource users. field) • Preparation (spreadsheet. class) • Drawing survey route on map • List of variable Estimation of survey area • • Data sheet Module 4. sunglasses. Making use marine resources © Robert Delfs Monitoring Resource Use The goals and objectives to conduct a monitoring resource use are to (1) provide information for adaptive management of the marine protected area. and frequency of survey) • Briefing for monitoring team • Simulation to handle illegal case Simulation to handle legal but need tolerance case • Module 5. persons.TRAINING SYLLABUS Module 1. equipment Module 3. handheld GPS and extra batteries. pencil sharpeners. (2) measure management performance. digital camera. marine biota reference books. Instructors and resource persons CTC. schedule. sunblock). pens. boat. (3) gather data on the use of marine resources particularly extractive use (fisheries) and non-extractive use (tourism. binoculars. Field survey simulation (1 day. TNC-IMP. Data and survey preparation ( 1 day. pencils. MMAF and partners. Survey evaluation and data analysis ( 1 day. Data acquired from the field is entered into a database using Microsoft Excel. (5) increase interactions with marine reosurce users in the area where conservation work occurs. 22 . map. class) • Initial valuation on survey area • Mapping and setting up data variable • Target area assessment • Time. personal gear (hat. food and drinking water. Introduction ( 1 day. erasers. Resources availability ( 1 day . Using the statistical facilities of this program. the data are then further processed and interpreted. class) • Introduction • Marine Biodiversity • Introduction to various fishing method • Specification of monitoring objective • Area of interest Module 2. the types and spatial and temporal patterns of marine resource use which may impacting their catch. class) • Evaluate and revise Resource Use Monitoring (RUM) protocol Implementation of long-term monitoring • Evaluation Pre and post training test will be administered accordingly. and (6) provide MPA managers with information which can be use for developing MPA marine resource conservation planning and management. There are basic equipment needed for the activity including paper.

To give participants skill on SPAGs identification and monitoring 3.Schooling fish © Robert Delfs 10-Spawning Aggregation Sites Monitoring OBJECTIVES 1. Data collected from SPAGs monitoring will inform MPA managers and decision makers to protect certain area as SPAGs. paper-fish. analysis and interpretation AIM Spawning aggregation site (SPAGs) monitoring is to monitor suspected and confirmed sites for fish spawn. all the modules are prepared for three full days. To give participants skill on data management. and computer simulation • Land and underwater simulation • Data management. collecting and analysis • MPA 101 • Diving skill at least advance level or has at least 25 dive log • Minimum High-School education background • Healthy with doctor letter/recommendation MINIMUM REQUIREMENT LANGUAGE • The training will be given in Bahasa Indonesia and English (it can also be given in only Bahasa Indonesia) DURATIONS • Originally. preferably Monday – Wednesday (possible for another day field exercise) 23 . To give participants understanding about SPAGs definition and function on MPA 2. PREPARATION • Filling-up medical history and liability form • Reading about fish reference • Reading about SPAGs monitoring protocol INTENDED AUDIENCE • • • • • • Government officers NGO Local community University Marine research centers Related stakeholders AGENDA • Class theory with presentation. Monitoring will focus on population of broodstock on SPAGs. Mostly spawning occurs during full-moon or dead moon.

MMAF and partners. (http://www. There are two classes of spawning aggregation.TRAINING SYLLABUS Module 1. but many surgeonfish. Land simulation ( 08. class) • Introduction on reef fish • Identification on reef fish target • Paper-Fish Module 2. For instance. Reflection over the reefs © Robert Delfs Fish Aggregation A reef fish spawning aggregation is a grouping of a single species of reef fish that has gathered together in greater densities than normal with the specific purpose of reproducing. class) • SPAGs method and protocol • Category and fish target species • Simulation on fish identification and fish group estimation (computer) • Simulation on fish identification and fish length estimation (paper fish and computer) • Preparation and logistic on SPAGs monitoring • Data management Module 3. spawning aggregations of some small wrasses may consist of just ten individuals spawning close to their normal home range on the reef. Instructors and resource persons CTC. rabbitfish. Underwater simulation (1.org) 24 .00 – 12. wrasse also aggregate to spawn.scrfa. There is a great deal of variability among different species in the dynamics of aggregation formation. TNC-IMP.00) • Preparation and logistic on SPAGs monitoring • Estimation on fish length and speceies (wood fish) • Data collection based on SPAGs protocol Module 4. parrotfish. The best-known examples are certain species of grouper and snapper. ‘resident’ and ‘transient’. Introduction on SPAGs method and protocol ( 2 hours. while those of some large groupers consist of tens of thousands of fish that may have travelled over one hundred kilometres to an aggregation site on a particular reef. Introduction on reef fish ( 2 hours. Both occur at predictable and regular sites and times.5 day) • Preparation and logistic on SPAGs • Data collection and analysis • Data management Evaluation Pre and post training test will be be administered accordingly. typically such aggregations form at the same place at approximately the same times each year.

PREPARATION • Health certificate • Willingness to actively and fully participate INTENDED AUDIENCE • MPA management officials and practitioners • Coastal community • Marine tourism operators • Universities AGENDA • Day 1 – introduction to mangrove ecosystem and surveying techniques • Day 2 – introduction to sea-grass ecosystem and surveying techniques • Day 3 – introduction to marine turtle ecology. Also. Provide knowledge and skills on Marine Biological Survey/Observation (Seagrass. all the modules are prepared for three full days. preferably Monday – Wednesday (possible for another day field exercise) 25 . Turtle. participants will learn basics of population dynamics of exploited species. • MPA 101 • Diving skill at least advance level or has at least 25 dive log • Minimum High-School education background • Healthy with doctor letter/recommendation MINIMUM REQUIREMENT LANGUAGE • The training will be given in Bahasa Indonesia and English (it can also be given in only Bahasa Indonesia) DURATIONS • Originally. Whereas the training will use examples from all over the world.Cetacean observation © Robert Delfs 11-Marine Biological Survey Observation Monitoring OBJECTIVES 1. and how these dynamic relate to resource use. Ivertebrate – Habitat and Population) 2. Mangrove. Compile and interpret data for inputing MPA design and management AIM This training intends to share participants with recent insights on marine protected area management and design of marine protected areas. Fish. there is a strong focus on the Indonesian situation. observation and population management techniques • Day 4 – introduction to invertebrate ecology and surveying techniques • Day 5 – introduction to cetacean ecology and observation tecniques. Cetacean.

species diversity. test and participant’s evaluation and video presentations) are not included here. smaller marine animals. the plants produce flowers and transfer pollen from the male flower to the ovary of the female flower. Cetacean observation • Lecture: introduction to cetacean ecology and observation techniques. as they must emerge to the surface to reproduce. Marine turtle observation • Lecture: introduction to marine turtle ecology. in that all but one genus can live entirely immersed in seawater. 4. calculating abundance. They are the main diet of dugongs and green turtles and provide a habitat for many. 1. Exercise: species identification. 3. • Exercise: species identification. Rhizopora © Robert Delfs Seagrass Seagrasses live in the coastal waters of most of the worlds’ continents. calculating abundance index. helping to keep the water clear. 2. species diversity. assessing mangrove population. like prawns and fish. The order in which the modules are pre sented may differ between sessions. The discussion is stimulated by quizzes that must be answered with colorcards. Adaptation to a marine environment imposes major constraints on morphology and structure. • • • Invertebrate observation Lecture: introduction to invertebrate ecology and surveying techniques. field observation. Enhalus plants are the exception. observationand population management techniques. Furthermore the training is frequently updated so that some modules may be replaced whereas other may be expanded. all others can flower and be pollinated under water. All lectures include ample opportunity for asking questions. • Exercise: species identification. some of which. abundance. 26 . Introductory and concluding materials (opening. They also absorb nutrients from coastal run-off and stabilise sediment. 5. • Exercise: species identification. so there are separate male and female plants. Most seagrass species produce flowers of a single sex on each individual. species identification. Seagrasses are unique amongst flowering plants. introduction to the training. The restriction of seagrasses to seawater has obviously influenced their geographic distribution and speciation. Seagrass ecosystem and surveying techniques • Lecture: seagrass ecosystem.TRAINING SYLLABUS Modules are listed below. species monitoring. species identification. Mangrove ecosystem and surveying techniques • Lecture: mangrove ecosystem. are commercially important. introduction to CTC. • Exercise: species identification. Seagrass can reproduce through sexual or asexual methods. In sexual reproduction.

Facilitating discussion in Savu Sea © Wira Sanjaya/CTC 12-Facilitation Techniques for MPA Public Consultation OBJECTIVES 1. exploring some of the knowledge and skills needed by a facilitator to effectively in lead group discussions. It is a basic training for learning the core of facilitation. all the modules are prepared for four full days. experiencing the process Day 3: Facilitation Phase-2. To understand the principles and basic attitude required to be a facilitator 2. which are useful for groups discussion. including to cope with difficult situation during group facilitation. learning from real experience. PREPARATION • Read the Principles of Marine Protected Area management handout • Get ready for role play and real exercise INTENDED AUDIENCE • This training is tailored to suit the community organizers and other key stakeholders when facilitating a public discussion and consultation on marine protected area. To experience processes of group facilitation 3. MINIMUM REQUIREMENT AGENDA Day 1: Preparing yourself as a facilitator Day 2: Facilitation Phase-1. LANGUAGE • The training will be given in Bahasa Indonesia and English (it can also be given in only Bahasa Indonesia) DURATIONS • Originally. AIM To build and develop community representatives and other key stakeholders’ skill and capacity to facilitate series of discussions and consultation processes related to marine protected area establishment and management. This module provides a basic introduction to techniques and tips for facilitation on the context of marine protected area. To learn how to handle group discussions. preferably Monday – Thursday (possible for another day field exercise) 27 . learn the techniques Day 4: On-the-ground facilitation. • High school graduates or equivalent.

facilitate means. some of which include: Focus groups. Facilitation Phase-1 • Presentation and discussion: Experience the process. Anemone fish and the anemone © Marthen Welly/CTC Facilitator and Facilitation When leading various types of groups. it is one of the crucial aspects to providing a quality experience. understanding the different facilitation techniques and which style works best with both you and your audience is important. “to make easier. To be a great facilitator • Presentation. board development. Facilitation Phase-2 • Presentation and Discussion: How to handle discussions • Techniques for leading and directing • Stimulating dialogue • What is active listening? • Handling challenging situation • Closing up the process Module 4. Module 3. Experiencing real facilitation on-the-ground • Facilitating community group • Reflections and self assessment Evaluation Pre and post training test will be administered accordingly. manage the process of decision making which involving a group.TRAINING SYLLABUS Module 1. set up momentum. facilitating online groups. setting up. meetings. help build small agreements. maintin focus on the task. discussion and exercise: Basic principles of facilitation and facilitator.” A good facilitator will encourage participation. • Simulation and Discussion: Facilitator Dos and Don’ts Module 2. 28 . and working as part of a team. Facilitation may take role in an educational session and/or in a working meeting. Technically. negotiation and conflict management. • Simulation: building confidence • Presentation and exercise: designing the process. In fact. Facilitation techniques are demonstrated in a variety of settings. interviewing.

To give experience and increase understanding on overfishing concept. and to assess conventional fisheries management system related to sustainable catch fisheries. Flying fish.FISHING EXERCISE: OBJECTIVES overfishing and tragedy of the common 1. • Fishing effort will be done in 15 trips (each trip last for 3 minutes. the rest should be released back to the pool. total catch time 35 minutes). • Fishing mortality reduce fish population. there are 100 fish. • Participant is only allowed to catch maximum 1 fish per effort.000. Dolphin and Tuna) • In each group participants should assign one person as fishing master. all fishing masters may compete to catch fish from the pool. there will be additional 10% of origin number of fish per trip. 1. DURATION • 35 minutes fishing exercise • 15 minutes group discussion • 10 minutes presentation Fishing exercise briefing © TNC-IMP TRAINING STEP-BY-STEP GROUP PREPARATION • Participants will be divided into five groups. Each group will be named by marine species (Groupers. GROUP ASSIGNMENT • In a pool of imaginary marine area. To illustrate tragedy of the common occurs in marine resources management. If more than one fish caught. Fishing exercise and fishing master © Wira Sanjaya/CTC 29 . • Each group will get one fishing rod with three hooks and a bucket for storing fish. This exercise allows participant to comprehend the dynamic of Catch per Unit Effort (CpUE) based on fish population size dynamic. 2. Seabass. • At the end of each trip (after each 3 minutes).00. • In the case of limited number of fish available in the pool. natality rate is increasing by 10% from the origin population per trip (due to reproduction and growth). Along the way. to evaluate assumption made from Schaefer model. • Each participant will be allowed to catch maximum 5 fish for 3 minutes trip. • Each fish which caught by each group will be priced as Rp.

SAMPLE WORKSHEET Trip 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Total Catch Total Fish 100 100 Group catch (number of fish caught 1|Grouper 0 2|Seabass 0 3|Flying fish 0 4|Dolphin 0 5|Tuna 0 Total Catch If fishers fish faster than emigration rate. No more fish to catch 30 . then fisher will not get anything.

drafting Nusa Penida and Raja Ampat MPA zoning plan as well as facilitating various trainings on GIS and marine spatial planning. Before hand. government staffs. Participatory community planning. marine resource use monitoring. He has a bachelor degree on Marine Biology from Diponegoro University. occasional observations. and Telapak.Faculty of Geography. He is now an active member of Green Indonesia Club – Bogor. NGOs.000 divinghours in most of Indonesia water. He worked on marine protected area zoning design using GIS and Marxan. He is a certified Integrated Coastal Zone Management trainer of The Broad-based Coastal Management Training Program in the Philippines. Nusa Karimun Wisata Selam in Semarang as Operation Manager (1997). Boy involves in various leadership program organized by Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise based in Washington. Micronesia and Andaman Sea. He is CMAS Scuba Diving Instructor since 2006 and certified over 70 divers from local communities. Savu Sea Marine National Park management plan. DC. In 2010.CTC Trainers Andreas Hari Muljadi Andreas has worked in marine biological monitoring for 13 years.. Andreas has done more than 10. and also trained partners on monitoring skills. He previously worked on a wide range of marine spatial planning assignments including developing the Lesser Sunda MPA Network Design. Mapak Alam Pasundan University. He joined The Nature Conservancy (TNC) Komodo Field Office since 1998 as Monitoring Officer and moved to TNC Raja Ampat Program in 2003 as Monitoring Coordinator. Indonesia Network for Coastal Management (INCoM). community-based information. Arief Darmawan Arief is currently Conservation Information System Coordinator. Yogyakarta with majoring on Cartography and Remote Sensing. 31 . Arief provided GIS support to the Forest Fire Prevention Management Project Phase II(FFPMP Phase II) at NOAA-AVHRR satelite station at Manggala Wanabakti Building in Jakarta and as research assistant in PUSPICS . the Caribbean. He has experience in PT. conflict resolution and strategic planning are amongst sets of Boy’s competencies. His work focused on marine biological monitoring protocols such as reef health monitoring. Since 1990. His involvement at regional level proved through development of the Coral Triangle Support Program (CTSP) Map of Priority Geographies showing sites where CTSP works in the Coral Triangle. Starting with facilitation the training for environmental awareness education for children and youth. USA. Andreas started to work as Conservation Coordinator for TNC Nusa Penida Program. Boy is also a founding member of Center for the Betterment of Education. Arief developed a Fire Risk Map of Ministry of Forestry and Japan Internation Co-operation Agency (JICA) based on NOAA Satellite imagery hotspot. He has conducted more than 80 training session in all over Indonesia. and also studies on sea temperature. fish spawning aggregation site monitoring. Heobtained his Bachelor of Science degree (S. then develop facilitation expertise to developing organizational and human capacities through the use of participatory and adult learning approach.Si) in 2004 from the Faculty of Geography of Gadjah Mada University. Deny Boy Mochran Boy has been focusing his work as a professional trainer since 1990.

CTC Trainers Dewa Gede Raka Wiadnya Pak Gede advises the CTC on the development and implementation of fisheries and marine protected area curricula. and published and advised on Indonesia’s fisheries. he worked at the Environmental Education Center (PPLH) Bali as the Marine Division Coordinator. He came to the CTC with extensive experience in on-site conservation as a government official. establishing the Nusa Penida Marine Protected Area. TNC. he developed course modules. He was the Chief of Komodo National Park (1993 – 1996). At TNC. Working with TNC Indonesia since 2002. Mr. He has conducted more than 100 training sessions in the Coral Triangle. he played a major role in drafting policy on sustainable coral reef management in Indonesia. Prior to joining TNC. He joined the Coral Triangle Center of The Nature Conservancy in 2000 as the Komodo Project Leader and Senior Policy Advisor. Marthen Welly Marthen is the marine protected area learning sites manager for the Coral Triangle Center. He was most recently employed with The Nature Conservancy (TNC). and member of the Instructor Council for Association Diving School (ADS) Indonesia. the Outreach Program Officer. 32 . His MS in fisheries is from Wageningen Agricultural University in the Netherlands. Prior to joining TNC. He served as the Training Manager for the Marine Program of The Nature Conservancy (TNC) in Indonesia from 2002 to 2010. supervised training implementation. In cooperation with WWF. and the Indonesian Institute for Sciences. Johannes Subijanto Pak Bi serves as the Director for Training and Learning for the Coral Triangle Center. facilitated training sessions. he was the national coordinator for Jaring Pela – an Indonesian network of 127 NGOs focused on coastal and marine issues. Marthen is co-founder for Yayasan Bahtera Nusantara in Bali. Indonesia. He obtained a BS from the Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Science of the Bogor Institute of Agriculture (IPB). Raka Wiadnya was a senior lecturer on fisheries science at Brawijaya University in Malang. and as a Communication & Outreach Specialist. on the Board of Advisors for Yayasan Taka in Karimunjawa-Semarang. Indonesia and consulted on marine fisheries with government agencies and the Asia Development Bank COFISH project. Wakatobi. He has more than 10 years of experience in marine conservation and the establishment and management of marine protected areas. he has also served as the NGO Liaison Program Officer for the Marine Program. the Ministry of Environment. Pak Bi has an MS degree in biology and wildlife management from University of Maine in the United States and S1(BS) degree in biology from the University of Gadjah Mada. Derawan and Savu Sea Marine National Park and manages Lesser Sunda’s Marine Protected Area network. Sub Director for Species Conservation under the Directorate General of Forest Protection and Nature Conservation in Jakarta (1996 – 2000) and intensively involved in the coral reef conservation policy and planning. In 2000. Since 2005 he has overseen marine portfolio sites in Komodo.

Abdul Ghofar is an independent fisheries advisor to the Coral Triangle Center providing expertise and training in sustainable fisheries managment. faculty of State Administration. 33 . in 1985. Amongst his project interests were the development of Elephant School in Way Kambas National Park and Javan Rhino conservation in Ujung Kulon National Park. U. Mr. Bandar Lampung. She was appointed the TNC Coral Triangle Program Director in 2009 and has worked closely with the Conservancy to launch the CTC as an independent regionally-based non-profit. Indonesia.K in 1989. From 1989-1993. U. She has worked for over 20 years in conservation nonprofits to improve the management of marine protected areas and reduce the use of unsustainable fishing practices. He obtained his BS from the Diponegoro University.D. in 1986 and Ph. She is currently enrolled in a Ph.D.K. He began his career with the Indonesia Department of Forestry in 1969 as the District Head for Nature Conservation in Bogor/Jakarta. He works as a Consultant and Senior Lecturer in Fisheries Management. Rili Djohani serves as Executive Director of the Coral Triangle Center. Marine Conservation. Widodo Ramono is a key advisor to the Coral Triangle Center on biodiversity and natural resources management. Ms. in Marine Biology from the University of Wales. TNC’s Coral Triangle Center in Bali was opened in 2000. He held various additional posts before becoming the Director of Conservation of Biodiversity in 2003.CTC Trainers Abdul Ghofar Mr. Djohani holds a Master of Science degree in tropical marine ecology from the University of Leiden in the Netherlands and a Master of Science in tropical coastal zone management from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne.K. climate change. Widodo joined The Nature Conservancy as Director of Policy for Indonesia from 2005-2009. She then served as TNC’s Country Director for Indonesia from 2004-2008. Widodo Ramono Mr. she developed the marine conservation portfolio for WWF Indonesia. He earned a degree from the Institute of Social Politics. MS in Fisheries Biology and Management from the University of Wales. Following 41 years of service with the Department of Forestry. U. Ramono is currently the Executive Director of the Rhino Foundation of Indonesia. Under her direction. He focuses on global and national fisheries issues. marine ecosystem conservation. Rili Djohani Ms. and fisheries and agricultural trade with reference to WTO & UNEP. diploma on fisheries management from Humberside College. program (environmental policy and law) with the University of Leiden. Policy and Institutional Development. Indonesia in 1980. then joined The Nature Conservancy (TNC).

For further information.coraltrianglecenter.org w | www. Bali 80228 INDONESIA t/f | +62 361 289 338 e | info@coraltrianglecenter.org . contact us Coral Triangle Center Jalan Danau Tamblingan No. 78 Sanur.