Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Baseline Survey Report 2012

“The views expressed in this publication are those of the consultants and do not necessarily represent those of Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Fund” Copyright © 2012 Material in this publication is confidential and is restricted to review as advised by Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Fund only. It cannot be freely quoted or reprinted unless approved by Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Fund. Avicenna Consulting (Pvt) Ltd 18-B, Kaghan Road, F-8/4 Islamabad, Pakistan Tel: (92-51) 8432882, 8432884

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Acknowledgements
We are extremely grateful to Mr. Zaffar Pervaiz Sabri, Group Head Energy Infrastructure and Disaster Management, whose wise counsel and guidance in the design and conduct of the survey was invaluable. Our grateful thanks to Mr. Masood Khalid, General Manager Livelihood and Community Infrastructure Project of Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Fund, whose support and facilitation ensured access of field teams to project areas and timely completion of the baseline survey. We acknowledge with deep appreciation the field teams who collected the data in record time. Our especial gratitude to Mr. Shahzad Anwar who played a critical role as the Field Supervisor, Mr. Mohammad Bashir Khan for looking after all logistics, Mr. Jawaad Asghar for timely data entry, and Dr. Aliya Qadir Khan for database development and data analysis.

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Contents
List of Figures List of Tables Acronyms Executive Summary Background Methodology Findings
? Demographics ? Income and Livelihood ? Availability and Access ? Irrigation and Agriculture ? Environment ? Health ? Education ? Community Organization ? Disasters

03 04 06 07 11 13 17 19 20 23 24 25 28 30 33 34 35 39 41

Conclusions and Recommendations Bibliography Annexures

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List of Figures
Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 Fig 9 Fig 10 Fig 11 Fig 12 Fig 13 Fig 14 Fig 15 Fig 16 Fig 17 Fig 18 Fig 19 Fig 20 Fig 21 Fig 22 Fig 23 Fig 24 Fig 25 Fig 26 Fig 27 Fig 28 Fig 29 Fig 30 Fig 31 Fig 32 Fig 33 Fig 34 Fig 35 Fig 36 Fig 37 Fig 38 Fig 39 Fig 40 District map of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province Household size Age distribution Relationship to head of household Major sources of income Population dependency and sources of income Major trades Household assets Occupation Average monthly income of household Major sources of awareness Availability and access to public utilities and facilities Sources of irrigation water Major crops Irrigation and Cropping Available water sources Status of available water sources Sources of household water supply Sewerage system Sewerage water collection and drainage Status of household sanitation Solid waste management Status of household solid waste management Children 12-23 months with full immunization Person assisted delivery Outbreak of water-borne diseases Disability Type of Schools Status of Education Number of classrooms Number of school drop-outs in last one year Basic facilities in schools Classrooms infrastructure Years of education Type of local organization Status of local organization Types of disasters Flood rescue Flood relief Flood losses 13 19 19 19 20 20 21 21 21 22 23 23 24 24 24 25 25 25 26 26 26 27 27 28 28 29 29 30 30 30 30 31 31 31 33 33 34 34 34 34

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List of Tables
Table 1 Table 2 Table 3 Table 4 Table 5 Table 6 Table 7 Table 8 Table 9 Table 10 Table 11 Table 12 Table 13 Table 14 Table 15 Table 16 Table 17 Table 18 Table 19 Table 20 Table 21 Table 22 Table 23 Table 24 Table 25 Table 26 Table 27 Table 28 Table 29 Table 30 Table 31 Table 32 Table 33 Table 34 Table 35 Table 36 Table 37 Table 38 Table 39 Table 40 Sampling frame with list of villages Major Sources of Income Population Dependency by Major Sources of Income Major Crops Major Trades Major Languages Major Sources of Awareness Availability and Access to Major Public Facilities and Utilities Availability of Health Facilities Availability of Alternative Health Facilities Immunization Coverage Available Water Sources Status of Available Water Sources Sewerage System Sewerage Water Collection and Drainage Solid Waste Management Outbreak of Waterborne Disease Irrigation Water Irrigation and Cropping Local Organization and Committee Status of Local Organization Activities of Local Organization Types of Disasters Flood Rescue Flood Relief Flood Losses Types of Schools Status of Education Reasons for Non-Functionality of Schools Schools Locations and Ownership Schools Enrolment and Classrooms School Dropouts Basic Facilities in Schools Classroom Infrastructure Corporal Punishment Household Profile House Ownership Household Assets Sources of Household Water Supply Methods of Purification of Drinking Water 14 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81

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Table 41 Table 42 Table 43 Table 44 Table 45 Table 46 Table 47 Table 48 Table 49 Table 50 Table 51 Table 52 Table 53

Status of Household Sanitation Status of Household Solid Waste Management Average Monthly Income of Household Household Gender Distribution Age Distribution of Household Members Facilities used for Assisted Delivery Persons that Assisted Delivery Years of Education Marital Status Relationship to Head of Household Occupation Disability Number of Earners

82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94

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Acronyms
DPM HH HIES KfW KP PO PPAF PSLM UC Disaster Preparedness and Mitigation Household Household Integrated Economic Survey Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Partner Organization Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Fund Pakistan Social and Living Standards Measurement Survey Union Council

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Executive Summary
Background With the financial support of KfW, PPAF launched a “livelihood and community physical infrastructure development” initiative in five districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan (Chitral, Swabi, Buner, Charsadda and Dera Ismail Khan). The key objectives of the project are:
? Increased access to and sustainable

size of 7, a sample of 448 households (HHs) was drawn. Data collection tools were developed. Data cleaning and pooling was done. Data entry was done on databases developed in Epi Info. FINDINGS Demographics In more than half (52%) of the sample surveyed, the household ranged between 6 - 10 individuals. Over two fifths (45%) of sample surveyed were between >15 - 40 years of age. About 12% were children aged 0 – 5 years, children under 15 years accounted for about two fifths (39%). Income and Livelihood The commonest source of income encountered was agriculture in 87%, followed by daily wages in 73%. The survey results indicate that despite agriculture being a source of income in 26% of the sample, 60% of households had more than 50% dependency on it. The major trades found in the sample include livestock in 73%, skilled worker in 67% and street vendors in 27%. Women accounted for 6% of all earning members, which highlights their marginalization. About half (53%) the households surveyed were of (Katcha) type, a fourth (26%) were

utilization of social and economic infrastructure by the population of the project region ? Increased employment and income opportunities, especially for the poor ? Strengthening of the local civil society and enhanced participation of the population in the decision-making process including building the target community disaster preparedness and mitigation capacities Methodology A multi – stage stratified cluster random sampling approach was adopted for the baseline study. Based on the hypothesis of an estimated prevalence of 2%, with maximum error 0.49% and design effect of 1 for cluster sampling, the sample size calculated by Epi Info for five districts was 3134 subjects. With an average household

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(Pakka) type, while a fifth (21%) were of Mixed type. The survey revealed that 29% were not involved in any employment, 22% were housewives and 18.5% were students. The results indicate that twothirds (67%) of the households had an income of less than Rs 15,000. There was one earner per five persons. Availability and Access The main source of information was found to be the radio in 87%, followed by television in 80% and social gatherings in 53%. 93% indicated availability of electricity (although its actual availability was greatly affected by the energy crisis in the country), 80% of schools, 73% of drinking water and only 27% of sewerage system. Irrigation and Agriculture The two main sources of irrigation water were found to be canals in 67% and rainfed in 67%. Riverine and spring water accounted for 26%. The major crops found were wheat in 93%, maize/corn in 67% and vegetables in 40%. The results show that 40% of the villages surveyed were located at the tail end, whereas 27% were at the middle end and only 7% at the head of the command area. The villages surveyed indicated that four-fifths had a 100% cropping intensity, while only 13% were practicing a cropping intensity of 200%.

Environment The commonest sources of water available include covered dug well in 47%, open dug well in 33%, public tap water in 27% and public hand pump in 20%. Surface water accounts for 40% of sources of the water available. The survey found that the common sources of household water supply were tap water in premise (22.7%), hand-pump in premise (21.8%), public tap water (17.8%) motor-pump in premise (17.2%) and surface water (8.7%). The survey results revealed that about half (47%) of the villages did not have any sewerage system. Another 40% had Katchi-Pakki naaliyan. Most of the sewerage water was found to drain either into the canals (53%) or the irrigation channels (27%). The common forms of household sanitation were found to include own flush in 22.&%, public flush in 21.8%, shared flush in 17.8%, and shared non-flush in 17.2%. About 6% of households reported that they had no latrine. The survey results found that about half (47%) of the villages disposed their solid waste at a proper allocated site. Health About half (53%) the households surveyed indicated that >90% of children aged 12 – 23 months had received full immunization.

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The survey found that 85% of all deliveries took place at home, while 11% were at government facilities and 4% at private clinics/hospitals. The survey found that diarrhoea was the commonest waterborne disease encountered in 87% of villages surveyed, followed by typhoid and malaria in 53% each, and hepatitis in 33%. The estimated frequency (number of persons who are disabled) of disability was 2.2%, and two-thirds (67%) of all disability was reported as physical disability. Education The survey found that more than threefourths (77%) of the schools were government schools, while private and NGO schools accounted for a little over a fifth (22%). The results indicate that there are about a third each in the category of schools for boys (33%), girls (35%) and mixed (32%). 98% of schools which are functional. About two-fifths (42%) of schools have 3 – 5 classrooms, while a fourth (24%) have 6 – 10 classrooms. About a fifth (19%) have more than 10 classrooms. The survey found that at least 25% schools reported that they had 1 – 10 boys who dropped out of school in the last one year, while 23% schools reported 1 – 10 girl student drop-outs in the same period. The survey results reveal that in terms of

basic facilities, 92% of schools had a boundary wall, 85% had drinking water, 82% had a toilet, 83% had electricity, while only 15% had a playground. The household data indicates that a little over half (56%) the population has received no education, 12% has 1 – 5 years education, 7% more than 5 – 8 years, 8% has more than 8 – 10 years, and 13% more than 10 years. Community Organization The survey data shows that the commonest community organization is the village council in 43%, followed by community based organization in 36% and masjid committee in 14%. The common activities of local organizations encountered in the sample villages include improving health in 50% of villages, reduce social problems in 42%, reduce family or local disputes in 33%, while only 17% of villages had activities for education. Disasters About 87% of the villages surveyed reported that they had been affected by disasters in the last five years. The commonest disaster encountered was floods in more than half (53%), affected by earthquake in a third (33%), and erosion along the riverbed in a fifth (20%) of

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villages. The survey revealed that in 43% of cases, no flood relief reached the affected villages; however, 29% of affected villages were reached by the government, 21% assisted by fellow villagers, 14% by NGOs and 7% by the army. RECOMMENDATIONS Income and Livelihood Enhance the livelihood potential of the main trades through skill development, linkages development and financial support for productive enterprises, and broaden the scope of using livestock as income generation. Availability and Access Determine feasibility of mobile phone as an option to enhance awareness among the communities about social issues, income generation information and early warning system for emergencies, etc. Irrigation and Agriculture Emphasize off-farm interventions especially cleaning and improving

irrigation channels and exploring the use of modern irrigation tools like drip irrigation, etc, as this will enhance the cropping intensity in the project areas. Health and Environment Initiate an awareness programme among the communities to adopt safe health and hygiene practices including water treatment and hand washing practices. Community Organization Enhance social mobilization to increase coverage and representation of local households, as it is a key indicator of project success. Disaster Preparedness Strengthen capacities of local communities in disaster preparedness with reference to community based disaster risk reduction, etc. Incorporate village disaster preparedness plans in local community development plans prepared at village and union council levels.

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Background
With the financial support of KfW, PPAF launched a “livelihood and community physical infrastructure development” initiative in five districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) province of Pakistan. The districts include Chitral, Swabi, Buner, Charsadda and Dera Ismail Khan with an estimated population of four million people living in an area of 26,580 Sq. Km. The selected districts are prone to natural disasters in recent years and vulnerable to poverty due to small land holdings and exposure to poor economic opportunities. PPAF is working in partnership with local organizations, and activities under this initiative are synchronized with PPAF Phase III Programme except microcredit, which is not mandated under this special initiative. The programme has been designed with the purpose to improve the quality of life of the poor and needy population and an overall improvement in social services in the areas with a key focus on health, education, and livelihood. The financial layout of the project is €31.5 million over a period ending January 31, 2015 with an aim to target 600,000 people in five districts. The key objectives of the programme are:
? Increased access to and sustainable ? Increased employment and income

opportunities, especially for the poor
? Strengthening of the local civil society

and enhanced participation of the population in the decision-making process including building the target community disaster preparedness and mitigation capacities The project seeks to initiate 2,350 small community infrastructure schemes (conventional and innovative) along with livelihood support to the poor communities. PPAF holds valuable experience and technical expertise in the livelihood sector demonstrated through a number of well-targeted initiatives. An intervention in one village of Swabi District (Sher Afzal Banda) has already been started through retroactive financing by PPAF. There are certain challenges and expectations involved in setting up of livelihood interventions (7000 units) of such scale where effective implementation and control would be required by PPAF from its partners. Similarly Disaster Preparedness and Mitigation (DPM) has been added as a major focus to the project not only to mainstream DRR in the small community infrastructure schemes but also to enhance capacities of the communities to prepare for and cope with likely disasters. About fifteen Partner Organizations (POs) shall

utilization of social and economic infrastructure by the population of the project region

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be engaged to implement the project in 30 to 36 Union Councils of the five districts in KP. The POs have conducted a preliminary need assessment and have also done preliminary social mobilization of the target communities. However, PPAF has undertaken a detailed Baseline Survey of all the selected UCs that shall be helpful to develop both the implementation and result based monitoring indicators.

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Methodology
The Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Programme funded by KfW and PPAF is being implemented in 30 union councils of five districts. Method of Sampling A multi – stage stratified cluster random sampling approach was adopted. Based on the hypothesis of an estimated prevalence of 2%, with maximum error 0.49% and design effect of 1 for cluster sampling, the sample size calculated by Epi Info for five districts was 3134 subjects. With an average household size of 7, a sample of 448 households (HHs) was drawn. Selection of Villages Exclusion and Inclusion Criteria For random selection of villages in a district and giving the chance to everyone to be selected and form a representative sample of the target population, a random list of numbers (villages) was generated through Epi-Info, which finally formed the list of villages given below. Fig 1 – District map of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province All subjects of the households residing in the households for more than 6 months were included in the survey. All those subjects who were not residing in the households i.e. visitors, guests, residing in the household for limited time (less than 6 months) or migrants etc were excluded from the survey. Recall Period For retrospective information, a recall period of 6 months was given (a longer recall period is given in some questions). Clusters and Cluster Size The sample of 448 HHs was now divided equally into 30 HHs per village/UC purposively to give equal representation. This makes 3 clusters of 10 HHs. 2 clusters are added for confounders and biases in the cluster sampling. The total sample is 470 households. Selection of Households to Visit Every 10th HH that was visited was selected randomly by flipping a coin or spinning a bottle in the village. In case of non-response or a closed house, the next house was visited.

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Table 1 – Sampling frame with list of villages
District Swabi Union Council Anbaar Assota Parmoli Charsadda Dhakay Assota sharif Ghulamai Kiramath shah korroona Mandani Hisara nehri Ghasb-e-koh Hisara nehri barani D I Khan Chuadwan Yaric Kurai Chitral Shishi Koh Oveer Chitral-11 Buner Makhranai Ghorghoshto Chinglai Shah alam Talgi Yarik Garra jamal Gauch gole Shangosh Singoor Makhranai Swawai Chinglai Village

enumerators had experience in data collection, were preferably from the local areas and knew the local language. The team leader was responsible for compilation of the village profile and review of households data collected from the villages. Training of Teams The team leader with their key enumerators were provided a one-day training in understanding the questions given in the questionnaires and how those questions would be probed and reported. The training involved interactive methodology where people were grouped to work as interviewer and interviewee to develop a better understanding about the questions. Later on, the team was sent to their areas and asked to test the questionnaires. The questionnaires received were reviewed and minor tweaking was done on basis of the feedback received from the enumerators. Data Collection The team prepared a visit plan of the villages by obtaining the maps and information from local sources. Support was sought from the local implementing partners of PPAF. 1-2 villages had a difference in name and these were clarified in consultation with the partners. The

30 HHs visited in each village (450 households), and 2 clusters (20 households added to 450 which gives a total of 470 HHs) added for biases and confounders. Selection of Data Collection Teams For each district, a team of two enumerators i.e. one male and one female led by a dedicated team leader was deployed. The team leaders and

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overall process was completed in one week's time while taking 35 working days across the districts by five teams. Daily reports were shared with the consultant on phone and questionnaires were sent by a courier company, while retaining a copy for record. DATA MANAGEMENT Database 4 database files were created in Epi-Info for villages, for schools, for households and for household members. Each file was provided with customized check and backup files to minimize the chance of error in data entry. Dummy tables were also created at this stage.

Data Pooling, Cleaning and Entry All data/questionnaires were pooled and classified according to union councils and then checked for any missing entries, double entries or anything that was not understandable so that it can be immediately checked with the data collectors. Data was then entered in the databases created in Epi-Info. Data Analysis Once entered, data was analyzed in EpiInfo and results were generated and presented in the form of tables, graphs, pie-charts, trend lines, bars where necessary.

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Findings

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Demographics
Household Size
In more than half (52%) of the sample surveyed, the household ranged between 6 - 10 individuals. The next commonest group was of 1 - 5 individuals in about a third (31%). The commonest household size found compares well with the national household size average of 6.38 (HIES, 2011). The average household size for KP in 2007 was 7.63, while in 2011 it decreased to 7.17 (HIES, 2011). were children aged 0 – 5 years, children under 15 years accounted for about two fifths (39%).
50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Age

0 to 5 >5 to 10yrs >10 to 15yrs >15 to 40yrs >40 to 50yrs >50yrs

Fig 3 – Age distribution

Marital Status
The survey found that 55% of persons were unmarried, while 44% were married.

Gender Distribution
The survey found a preponderance of males (54%) compared to females (46%) giving a male to female ratio of 1.17:1.
4% 4% 9% 31% 1 to 5 6 to 10 11 to 15 16 to 20 >20 52%

Relationship to Head of Household
A third (32%) of the respondents were sons, while the head of the household responded only in 15% of cases. The daughter was the respondent in 19% of cases, while the wife responded to the questions in 13%.
Other Employee/Domestic Worker Brother Sister Mother Father Niece Nephew Daughter-in-Law Son-in-Law Daughter Son Wife Head

Fig 2 – Household size

The male to female ratio for KP as estimated by the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Bureau of Statistics is 1.05 (KPK BS, 2011).

Age Distribution
Over two fifths (45%) of sample surveyed were between >15 - 40 years. About 12%

0%

5%

10%

15%

20% 25% 30% 35%

Fig 4 – Relationship to head of household

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Income and Livelihood
Major Sources of Income The commonest source of income encountered was agriculture in 87%, followed by daily wages in 73%. Remittances, government employment and livestock accounted for 40% each. Wages and government employment combined account for 34%. The Household Integrated and Economic Household Survey (HIES, 2011) found that the wages and salaries combined accounted for about 40% of income sources, while all type of remittances accounted for about 10%. Nationally, crops as a source of income in rural areas accounted for 20%. Women accounted for 6% of all earning members, which highlights their marginalization.
Percentage
Others Remittance Daily Wages Private employment Government employment Business Livestock Agriculture

26% of the sample, 60% of households had more than 50% dependency on it.

Others Remittance Daily Wages Private employment Government employment Business Livestock Agriculture 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%

<10% >10%-30% >30%-50% >50%

Fig 6 – Population dependency and sources of income

The data illustrates that the households surveyed had more than one source of income. This suggests that income diversification may be explored as a strategic option for livelihood development. Major Trades The major trades found in the sample include livestock in 73%, skilled worker in 67% and street vendors in 27%. Interestingly, handicrafts and other trades like auto workshops, shoe making, tailoring and hotel accounted for 7% each. Fruits and dry fruits as a trade accounted for 13%. The data suggests that the communities are dependent on 3 – 4 main trades, while there is underrepresentation of other

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Fig 5 – Major sources of income

Population Dependency and Sources of Income The survey results indicate that despite agriculture being a source of income in

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economically productive options. It seems prudent to enhance the livelihood potential of the main trades, while developing other options too.

Livestock Sewing machine Mobile Phone Land-line phone Motorcycle Bicycle Television Radio

Others Fruits/dry Fruits Animals/cattle Street vendors Auto workshops Skilled worker Shoe making Tailoring Hotel Handicrafts

Assets
0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

Households

Fig 8 – Household assets

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

Fig 7 – Major trades

House Ownership 85% of the households surveyed were selfownership, 4% were rented/tenant, while 11% were free. House Structure About half (53%) the households surveyed were of (Katcha) type, a fourth (26%) were (Pakka) type, while a fifth (21%) were of Mixed type. Household Assets The commonest assets found in households surveyed include mobile phone in 76%, livestock in 67%, television in 36% and sewing machine in 34%. Radio was found in 22% households.

Although about two-thirds (67%) of the households had livestock, only 12% were using them as a source of income. This suggests that the livestock are used mainly for house consumption and subsistence, with limited use for income generation. Occupation The survey revealed that 29% were not involved in any employment, 22% were housewives and 18.5% were students. The commonest occupations were labourer in 7.6%, employee (government or private) in 7.1% and daily wages in 4.6%. Average Monthly Income of Household The results indicate that two-thirds (67%)
Others Zakat/Usher Alms/Charity Domestic Labour Daily Wage Unemployed Private employee Government employee Business Labourer Student Housewife None

0.0%

5.0%

10.0%

15.0%

20.0%

25.0%

30.0%

35.0%

Fig 9 – Occupation

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of the households had an income of less than Rs 15,000. There was one earner per five persons. The average national monthly household income was found to be Rs 18,713 (HIES, 2011). These data suggest that 67% communities are surviving at less than 1 US$ per person per day, and 47% at about 0.5 US$.

15.9% 13.5%
<5000 5000 to 10000 >10000 to 15000 >15000 to 20000

9.2% 31.7% 19.0%

>20000 to 30000 >30000

Fig 10 – Average monthly income of household

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Availability and Access
Major Sources of Awareness The main source of information was found to be radio in 87%, followed by television in 80% and social gatherings in 53%. This presents an interesting parallel where even though only 22% households reported radio as an asset, it was the major source of information. Furthermore, television came second to radio as a source despite it being declared as an asset in 36% of households. There may be merit in exploring and enhancing the awareness potential found in social gatherings, religious rituals and cultural events. Availability and Access to Public Utilities and Facilities The survey results illustrate that there was variation in the types of major public utilities and facilities that were available in
Others Cultural events Social gathering Religious rituals Internet Radio Television Newspaper

the communities surveyed. For instance, only 93% indicated availability of electricity (although its actual availability was greatly affected by the energy crisis in country), 80% of schools, 73% of drinking water and only 27% of sewerage system.
Schools Private health facility Government health facility Internet Sewerage system Drinking water Public transport Mobile phone service Landline telephone service Medical store Post office Natural gas Electricity

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Fig 12 – Availability and access to public utilities and facilities

Health facilities were only available in 33% government and 7% private. Interestingly, availability of mobile phone services was noted in 87%, while mobile phone was found to be an asset in 76% of households. This suggests that communities place considerable importance on mobile phone as an essential technology.

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60% 70%

80%

90% 100%

Fig 11 – Major sources of awareness

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Irrigation and Agriculture
Sources of Irrigation Water The two main sources of irrigation water were found to be canals in 67% and rainfed in 67%. Riverine and spring water accounted for 26%.
Other, 7% Lake, 0%
Spring, 13%

however, tobacco cultivation was found predominantly in Swabi. Irrigation Command Area The results show that 40% of villages surveyed were located at the tail end, whereas 27% were at the middle end and only 7% at the head of the command area. About a fifth (27%) were not located in any command area.
120% 100% 200% 150% 80% Villages 60% 40% 20% 0% 100% Mixed Single None Tail Middle Head

River, 13%

Canal, 67%

Refined, 67%

Tubewell, 7%

Fig 13 – Sources of irrigation water

A fifth (20%) of villages surveyed indicated that irrigation water was available and adequate, while 60% claimed that it was available but inadequate, and 20% said that they had no irrigation water. Major Crops The major crops found were wheat in 93%, maize/corn in 67% and vegetables in 40%. Tobacco featured prominently at 33%;
Rice, 20% Vegetable, 40% Wheat, 90%

Irrigation Command Area

Cropping Pattern

Cropping Intensity

Fig 15 – Irrigation and Cropping

Cropping Pattern A mixed cropping pattern was found in 60% of villages surveyed, while the remainder had a single cropping pattern. Cropping Intensity The villages surveyed indicated that fourfifths had a 100% cropping intensity, while only 13% were practicing a cropping intensity of 200%. The trends in cropping pattern and cropping intensity may be associated to the location of the villages to the irrigation command area.

Fruits/ Dry Fruits, 20%

Tobacco, 33% Maize/Com, 67% Sugarcane, 13%

Fig 14 – Major crops

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Environment
Available Water Sources The commonest sources of water available include covered dug well in 47%, open dug well in 33%, public tap water in 27% and public hand pump in 20%.
50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0%

About a tenth to two-fifths of all available water sources were either uncovered/open drains (40%), affected by rains (33%) or polluted due to open drainage (13%). This raises serious issues about the safety of available water sources for drinking and their high risk of contamination in disasters. Sources of Household Water Supply The survey found that the common sources of household water supply were tap water in premise (22.7%), hand-pump in premise (21.8%), public tap water (17.8%) motor-pump in premise (17.2%) and surface water (8.7%).

Public tap water

Public hand pump

Public motor pump

Covered Open dug dug well well

Surface water

Other

Fig 16 – Available water sources

Sources

Surface water accounts for 40% of source of water available. This is likely to have implications for quality of water available and water purification needs. Almost no household (99%) was using any water purification method. Status of Available Water Sources Only about half (47%) of available water sources were covered.
Polluted due to open drainage, 13% Others, 7%

Other Surface water Public open dug well Open dug well in premise Public covered dug well Covered dug well in premise Public motor pump Motor pump in premise public handpump Hand pump in premise Public tap water Tap water in premise 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0%

Fig 18 – Sources of household water supply

Covered, 47% Affected from rains, 33%

Uncovered/ Open, 40%

Fig 17 – Status of available water sources

KP data indicates tap water in premise at 41%, hand-pump in premise at 14% and motor-pump in premise at 9%. Source: (PSLM 2010-11) This suggests that there is a considerably higher use of hand-pump and water-pump in premise in the villages surveyed.

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Sewerage System The survey results revealed that about half (47%) of the villages did not have any sewerage system and another 40% had Katchi-Pakki naaliyan.
Properly covered sewerage lines, 0%

drain either into the canals (53%) or the irrigation channels (27%). About 20% of sewerage water drained into open standing ponds/pools, while only 13% drained into the main sewerage line. This drainage practice is likely to affect the population who uses surface water as a source. Status of Household Sanitation The common forms of household sanitation were found to include own flush in 22.&%, public flush in 21.8%, shared flush in 17.8%, and shared non-flush in 17.2%. About 6% of households reported that they had no latrine.

Other, 13% None, 47%

Katchi-Pakki naliyan, 40%

Pakki naliyan, 20%

Katchi naliyan, 13%

Fig 19 – Sewerage system

Katchi naaliyan were found in 13%. No village was found to have a properly covered sewerage system. Sewerage Water Collection and Drainage Most of the sewerage water was found to
0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% No latrine Sources Public non-flush Shared non-flush Own non-flush Public flush Shared flush Own flush

Do not know, 7% Main sewerage line, 13% Into irrigation channel, 27%

Fig 21 – Status of household sanitation

Open standing ponds/pools, 20%

Into canal, 53%

Fig 20 – Sewerage water collection and drainage

KP data indicates that 56% population has access to flush latrine, 23% to non-flush latrine, and 21% has no latrine. Source: (PSLM 2010-11) District data reveals that no latrine is found as follows – Chitral 3%, Swabi 26%, Buner 30%, DI Khan 31% and Charsadda 13%. Source: (PSLM 2010-11)

26

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Solid Waste Management The survey results found that about half (47%) of the villages disposed their solid waste at a proper allocated site. However, one-third (33%) of the villages dumped at any site, one-third (33%) dumped in the street, while only one-third (33%) used solid waste in organic manure. The practice to bury or burn solid waste was encountered in 7% for each. This highlights the need for community education on safe solid waste management practices. Status of Household Solid Waste Management At the household level, at least two-fifths (42%) disposed household solid waste at a proper allocated site. However, 32% disposed it in the street and
Use in organic manure Bury Burn Into canal Proper allocated site Dump at any site Dump in street 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50%

23% in the backyard. Only 21% used it for organic manure.
Use in organic manure 21.1% Burn, 2.3% Buy, 0.0% Other 0.2%

In the street, 32.2%

Paper allocated site, 42.2%

In the backyard, 23.2%

Fig 23 – Status of household solid waste management

Fig 22 – Solid waste management

27

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Health
Children 12 – 23 Months with Full Immunization About half (53%) the households surveyed indicated that >90% of children aged 12 – 23 months had received full immunization.
20%

Review of secondary data shows that for rural areas in the target districts, the lowest full immunization rates are found in Buner at 59%, followed by DI Khan at 70%, Swabi at 75%, and Charsadda and Chitral at 91% each. Source: (PSLM 2010-11) Assisted Delivery

>50%-75% >75%-90% >90% 53% 27%

The survey found that 85% of all deliveries took place at home, while 11% were at government facilities and 4% at private clinics/hospitals. Analysis of provincial data for KP shows that 66% of all deliveries in rural areas take place at home, while 14% are at government and 19% at private facilities. Source: (PSLM 2010-11) On analysis of persons who assisted delivery, it was found that a third (33%) were by family member or friend or neighbor, followed by trained dai in 29% and doctor in 20%. Similar trends are found in provincial rates for KP in which 41% are family member or friend or neighbor, followed by trained dai in 20% and doctor in 32%. Source: (PSLM 2010-11) The maternal mortality rate for KP province is about 275 per 100,000 live births. Source: (KPK HSSA, 2010)

Fig 24 – Children 12-23 months with full immunization

However, a little over a fourth (27%) indicated that >75% - 90% had achieved full immunization, while a fifth (20%) said that only >50% - 75% had completed their immunization. Provincial data for rural KP reveals that 77% of children aged 12 – 23 months were fully immunized. Source: (PSLM 2010-11)
35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0%
Person

Doctor Nurse Midwife TBA Trained Dai Family member/ friend/neighbor Other

Fig 25 – Person assisted delivery

28

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Outbreak of Water-borne Diseases The survey found that diarrhoea was the commonest water-borne disease encountered in 87% of villages surveyed, followed by typhoid and malaria in 53% each, and hepatitis in 33%.

2.2%, and two-thirds (67%) of all disability was reported as physical disability. The frequency and type of disability may be under-represented as the survey did not involve actual examination of the affected individuals or assessment of disability.

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Cholera Diarrhoea Typhoid Hepatitis Malaria Dengue Fever Other

Fig 26 – Outbreak of water-borne diseases

About 11% of rural children under 5 years were found to be suffering from diarrhoea in the past 30 days with a high rate of 16% for DI Khan. Source: (PSLM 2010-11) Disability The estimated frequency (number of persons who are disabled) of disability was
Physical Vision Mental/Behavioural Hearing and Speech 0% 9% 5% 14% 19% 67% 5% Intellectual/Slow learner Other

Fig 27 – Disability

29

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Education
Type of Schools The survey found that more than threefourths (77%) of the schools were government schools, while private and NGO schools accounted for a little over a fifth (22%). In terms of grading, about two-thirds (63%) are primary schools, 15% middle and 22% high schools. School Ownership The majority of the schools are government owned (70%), about 13% are community owned, and 10% are rented premises. Number of Classrooms
15%

Schools

Religious/Madrassa Private/NGO Government

19%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

1 to 2 3 to 5 6 to 10

Fig 28 – Type of Schools
24% 42$

>10

Status of Education The results indicate that there are about a third each in the category of schools for boys (33%), girls (35%) and mixed (32%). Further analysis shows that 98% of schools are functional.
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% For Status Grading High Middle

Fig 30 – Number of classrooms

About two-fifths (42%) of schools have 3 – 5 classrooms, while a fourth (24%) have 6 – 10 classrooms. About a fifth (19%) have more than 10 classrooms.
35 30 25 Schools 20 Girls 15 10 5 0 None 1 to 10 11 to 20 21 to 30 31 to 40 41 to 50 >50 Boys

Primary Non-functional/closed Functional Mixed/Co-education Girls Boys

Fig 29 – Status of Education

Fig 31 – Number of school drop-outs in last one year

30

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Basic Facilities in Schools The survey results reveal that in terms of basic facilities, 92% of schools had a boundary wall, 85% had drinking water, 82% had a toilet, 83% had electricity, while only 15% had a playground.
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Shelter Boundary wall Drinking water Toilet Electricity Playground No Yes

Corporal Punishment An analysis of corporal punishment meted out at schools in the sample surveyed indicates that half (50%) the schools have caning, about a fourth (23%) have slapping, a fifth (20%) have keep standing, and 28% have murgha making. Years of Education The household data indicates that a little over half (56%) the population has received no education, 12% has 1 – 5 years education, 7% more than 5 – 8 years, 8% has more than 8 – 10 years, and 13% more than 10 years.
60%

Fig 32 – Basic facilities in schools

Classrooms Infrastructure The classrooms infrastructure analysis indicates that 100% of schools in the sample villages have rooms, 72% have desks, 82% have chairs, 98% have blackboards, and 80% have fans.
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Rooms Desks Chairs Blackboard Fan No Yes

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% None 0 to 1 yr >1 to 5yrs >5 to 7yrs >8 to 10yrs >10yrs Education

Fig 34 – Years of education

The survey results compare well with provincial data which shows that only 50% of the rural population has ever attended school. Buner and DI Khan stand out with low ever attended school rates of 37% and 31% respectively. Source: (PSLM 2010-11) The Net Enrolment Rate (NER) of children

Fig 33 – Classrooms infrastructure

31

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

aged 6 – 10 years for primary education in rural KP is 63% with 54% for females. DI Khan has a NER of 43% with 28% for females. The overall literacy for rural KP is 48% with 29% for females. Buner and DI Khan stand out with low rural literacy rates of 32% and 29% respectively, and 14% each for females. Source: (PSLM 2010-11) Education Statistics There was a preponderance of males in school with a male to female ratio of 1.43:1. The male teacher to boys ratio was 1:50, while female teacher to girls was 1:61, suggesting a shortage of teachers as a whole and female teachers in particular.

32

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Community Organization
Type of Local Organization The survey data shows that the commonest community organization is the village council in 43%, followed by community based organization in 36% and masjid committee in 14%. Attendance of village representatives at meetings was reported at about 83%. However, at household level, only 17% households indicated that they were members of any community organization suggesting that there was considerable need for community mobilization. Activities of Local Organization
14% 36% CBO Panchayat/Jirga Village Council Masjid Committee 43% 7%

Fig 35 – Type of local organization

The common activities of local organizations encountered in the sample villages include improving health in 50% of villages, reduce social problems in 42%, reduce family or local disputes in 33%, while only 17% of villages had activities for education. Resolution of social problems and local disputes seemed to be a major activity of local organizations.

Status of Local Organization About half (50%) of the local organization had been in existence for more than 1 – 5 years, while a third (33%) had been working for over 10 years. Over half (58%) reported they had more than 20 members.
120% 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% How long is organization working Number of Members Attendance at Meetings No Yes >20 11 to 20 6 to 10 1 to 5 >10 years >5-10 years 1-5 years <1year

Fig 36 – Status of local organization

33

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Disasters
Types of Disasters About 87% of villages surveyed reported that they had been affected by disasters in the last five years.
180% 160% 140% 120% 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Disaster in Last 5 years Types of Disasters 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% None Fellow villagers NGO Army Govt. Other Other Erosion along riverbed Landslide Earthquake Flood No Yes

rescued by fellow villagers, while in 29% of cases there was no one to rescue them. Flood Relief The survey revealed that in 43% of cases, no flood relief reached the affected village; however, 29% of affected villages were reached by the government, 21% assisted by fellow villagers, 14% by NGOs and 7% by the army.

Fig 37 – Types of Disasters

The commonest disaster encountered was floods in more than half (53%), affected by earthquake in a third (33%), and erosion along the riverbed in a fifth (20%) of villages. Flood Rescue Less than a fourth (23%) of villages indicated that they were informed before the floods. In half (50%) the cases, the villagers rescued themselves, 14% were
120% 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% How long is organization working Attendance at Meetings Others Fellow villagers Self None No Yes

15% 10% 5% 0% Flood relief during and after flood

Fig 39 – Flood relief

Flood Losses The common losses encountered during floods include crops in 64% of cases, livestock in 36%, houses in 43%, roads in 36% and water sources in 29%.
70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Losses during floods None Deaths Injuries Crops Livestock Houses Organizational buildings Roads Water sources

Fig 38 – Flood rescue

Fig 40 – Flood losses

34

Conclusions & Recommendations

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Conclusions and Recommendations
Income and Livelihood The results indicate that two-thirds (67%) of the households had an income of less than Rs 15,000. The average national monthly household income was found to be Rs 18,713 (HIES, 2011). The household data collected showed that the communities were dependent on 3 – 4 main trades, while there is underrepresentation of other economically productive options. It seems prudent to enhance the livelihood potential of the main trades through skill development, linkages development and financial support for productive enterprises. Moreover, the scope of using livestock as income generation should be given a priority as two-thirds of the households had livestock Availability and Access Nearly 76% of the households indicated that they had a mobile phone, while the main source of information was found to be the radio and television, which has been affected by the recent energy crisis. There is merit in exploring the use of the mobile phone as an option to enhance awareness among the communities about social issues, income generation information and early warning system for emergencies, etc. Irrigation and Agriculture More than four-fifths of the villages face challenges in accessing irrigation water for their agricultural needs. This becomes more complicated when two-fifths are at the tail end and one-third are without any command area. This highlights the need for off-farm interventions especially cleaning and improving irrigation channels and exploring the use of modern irrigation tools like drip irrigation etc., as this will enhance the cropping intensity in the project areas. Health and Environment The survey found that diarrhoea was the commonest water-borne disease encountered in 87% of villages surveyed, followed by typhoid and malaria in 53% each, and hepatitis is 33%. Surface water accounts for 40% of source of water available and this is likely to have implications for quality of water available and water purification needs. Almost no household (99%) was using any water purification method. This indicates the need for initiating an awareness programme among the communities to adopt safe health and hygiene practices including water treatment and hand washing practices.

37

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Community Organization Attendance of village representatives at meetings was reported at about 83%. However, only 17% of the households indicated that they were a member of any local community organization. This implies that four-fifths of the households in the villages are not part of the local community organizations. There is therefore a pressing need to underpin social mobilization to increase coverage and representation of local households, as it is a key indicator of project success. Disaster Preparedness Less than a fourth (23%) of villages indicated that they were informed before the floods. Further, majority of the people rescued themselves or their fellow villagers. The selected target areas are disaster prone especially to floods and landslides because of their locations. There is need to strengthen the capacities of local communities in disaster preparedness with reference to community based disaster risk reduction, etc. The village disaster preparedness plans should be part of the local community development plans prepared at the village and union council levels.

38

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Bibliography
HIES, 2011. Household Integrated and Economic Survey. Pakistan Bureau of Statistics KPBS, 2011. Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Bureau of Statistics – http://www.khyberpakhtunkhwa.gov.pk/De partments/BOS/KP-in-Fingures.php accessed 27 July 2012 KP HSSA, 2011. Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Health Sector Situation Analysis PPAF, 2012. Documentation of Disability. Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Fund Source: PSLM, 2010-2011. Pakistan Social and Living Standards Measurement survey 2010-2011

39

Annexures

Annexure
Major sources of income Agriculture 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 13 6 4 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 11 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 Livestock Business Government employment Daily wages Remittance Private employment Others 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2

Table 2 – Major Sources of Income

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

43

44
Baseline Survey Report 2012
% of population dependent on major sources of income >10-20% 2 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 4 6 1 0 0 9 13 >20-30% >30-40% >40-50% >50% Total 1 2 2 1 13 4 3 4 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 12 2 11 6 2 50

Table 3 – Population Dependency by Major Sources of Income

Sources of income

<10%

Agriculture

1

Livestock

4

Business

1

Government

3

employment

Private employment

0

Daily wages

2

Remittance

0

Others

1

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

11

Table 4 – Major Crops

Districts Wheat 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 14 2 10 0 0 0 5 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 6 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 1 1 0 Sugarcane Maize /corn Tobacco Fruits /dry fruits Vegetables Rice

Union Councils

Major crops Others 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

0

45

46
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Major trades Skilled Handicr afts Hotels making mason etc) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 11 (carpenter, workshops vendors attle Tailoring Shoe workers Auto Street Animals/c /dry fruits 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 5 Fruits Others

Table 5 – Major Trades

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 6 – Major Languages

Districts Pashto 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 13 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 Hindko Urdu Chitrali Saraiki Others

Union Councils

Major languages

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

0

47

48
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Major means/channels/sources of awareness None 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 12 13 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 8 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 Newspaper TV Radio Internet Religious rituals Social gathering Cultural events 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 Others 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

Table 7 – Major Sources of Awareness

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 8 – Availability and Access to Major Public Facilities and Utilities

Districts None Post office Mobile phone service Govt health facility Natural gas Private health facility Medical store Public transport Drinking water Electricity Landline telephone service Sewerage system Internet

Union Councils

Availability and access to major public facilities/utilities Schools Others 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 4 13 0 1 9 1 1 1 1 1 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Chitral 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 1 2 6 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0

Shishi Koh

0

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

49

None

THQ

Non functional BHU

Functional BHU

Functional RHC

Non functional RHC

NGO health facility

Government Dispensary

Private doctor/clinic

Chitral 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Shishi Koh

MNCH Centre

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Dispenser/ Compounder

0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Hakeem/ Homeopath

0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Other

50
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Availability of health facility 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Table 9 – Availability of Health Facilities

Districts

Union Council

Table 10 – Availability of Alternative Health Facilities

Districts

Union Council

If not available in village, nearby health facility

THQ

Non functional BHU

Functional BHU

Functional RHC

Non functional RHC

NGO health facility

Government Dispensary

Private doctor/clinic

Chitral 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Shishi Koh

MNCH Centre

Dispenser/ Compounder

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Oveer

Chitral II

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

Hakeem/ Homeopath

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Other

51

52
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Distance of health facility from village <1 km 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 >1-2 km >2-5 km >5 km <25% >25-50% >50-75% >75-90% % of children 12-23 months full immunization >90% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 8

Table 11 – Immunization Coverage

Districts

Union Council

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 12 – Available Water Sources

Districts Public tap water pump 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 3 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 6 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 pump 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 hand dug well well water motor Other Public Covered Open dug Surface Public

Union Council

Available water sources

None

Chitral 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

53

54
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Status of available water sources Covered 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 7 6 0 0 5 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Uncovered/open Affected from rains Others Polluted due to open drainage/leaking sewerage lines

Table 13 – Status of Available Water Sources

Districts

Union Council

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 14 – Sewerage System

Districts Properly covered sewerage lines 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 Other

Union Council

Sewerage system in village

None

Katchi naliyan

Pakki naliyan

Katchi + pakki naliyan 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0

Chitral 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 7 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

55

56
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Sewerage water collection/drainage Into irrigation channels Into canal 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 3 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 Main sewerage line Do not know 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 Open standing ponds/pools

Table 15 – Sewerage Water Collection and Drainage

Districts

Union Council

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 16 – Solid Waste Management

Districts

Union council

Solid waste management

Dump in street

Dump at any site Canal Burn Bury 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 7 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

Proper allocated site

Use in organic manure

Other

Chitral 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 5

Shishi Koh

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

57

58
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Outbreak of waterborne diseases in last 1 year None 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 13 8 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 8 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Cholera Diarrhea Typhoid Hepatitis Malaria Dengue fever Do not know Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 3

Table 17 – Outbreak of Waterborne Disease

Districts

Union council

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 18 – Irrigation Water

Districts these sources Spring 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 9 Other None Available but inadequate

Union council

Sources of irrigation water

Existing availability of irrigation water from

Canal 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 10 1 10 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0

Tube well River Lake

Rain fed

Available and adequate 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

59

60
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Irrigation command area Head 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 6 4 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 6 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 9 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 12 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Middle Tail None Single Mixed 100% 150% Cropping pattern Cropping intensity 200% 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

Table 19 – Irrigation and Cropping

Districts

Union council

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 20 – Local Organization and Committee

Districts

Union council

Local organization/c ommittee existence Type of organization/committee

Yes

No

CBO

Panchayat/ Jirga

Masjid committee

Health committee/ organization

Education committee/ organization

Child rights protection organization

Chitral 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 3 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 6 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

Shishi Koh

Village Council

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Women rights protection organization

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

11

Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

61

62
Baseline Survey Report 2012
How long organization is working <1 year >10 years 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 10 1-5 6-10 11-20 >20 Yes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 6 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 >1-5 years >5-10 years Number of members Attendance of meetings No 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 Never 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Table 21 – Status of Local Organization

Districts

Union council

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 22 – Activities of Local Organization

Districts Reduce None disputes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 5 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 6 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 problems health 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 education rights status family/local social Improve Improve Improve child rights status Reduce Improve women

Union council

Type of major positive initiatives take by organization/committee Do not know 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

Other

Chitral

Shishi Koh

1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

63

64
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Disaster in last 5 years Types of disaster Yes No Flood Earth Quake Drought Land sliding Erosion along riverbed 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Erosion along dam/water reservoir Famine Do not know Other 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 13 2 8 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 6

Table 23 – Types of Disasters

Districts

Union council

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 24 – Flood Rescue

Districts

Union council

Informed before flood Rescue during flood Yes 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 10 4 7 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 No None Self Fellow villagers NGO Army Govt Others

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

65

66
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Relief during and after flood None 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 6 3 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 Fellow villagers NGO Army Govt Philanthropists Other

Table 25 – Flood Relief

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 26 – Flood Losses

Districts None 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 1 2 9 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 Deaths Injuries Crops Livestock Houses Organizational buildings Roads

Union Councils

Losses during floods Water sources 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

67

68
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Number of schools Types of schools Govt 1 2 9 5 4 6 4 6 5 2 2 2 1 10 1 60 46 13 1 0 4 6 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 4 1 0 0 6 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Private/ NGO Non-formal Religious/ Madrassa Special education institute Others 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Table 27 – Types of Schools

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 28 – Status of Education

Districts For Girls co-education 1 2 5 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 6 0 19 59 1 10 1 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 0 6 0 3 1 6 0 4 0 3 4 2 4 3 2 2 2 1 2 1 38 5 0 4 9 0 6 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 functional/closed 0 0 3 1 1 4 2 2 2 0 1 1 1 2 0 20 21 1 2 0 1 1 0 2 4 2 2 2 3 1 0 0 Boys Mixed/ Functional Primary Middle NonStatus Grading

Union Councils

Education

High 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 13

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

69

70
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Reason for non-functional/closed school Nonavailability of teachers 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 disputes interference extremism of children infrastructure Local Political Religious Less number No/poor Do not know 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Table 29 – Reasons for Non-Functionality of Schools

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 30 – Schools Locations and Ownership

Districts <1 km >1-2 km >2-5 km >5 km Govt Community Rental Do not know 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 3 1 42 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 8 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 6 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Union Councils

If no school in village, distance of nearby school

School building ownership Other

Chitral

Shishi Koh

0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

71

72
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Strength Number of boys teachers 0 0 27 4 10 15 8 8 6 2 1 2 3 50 0 136 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 0 1 0 4 0 1 0 1 0 0 3 1 0 3 3 5 4 1 1 2 1 0 1 25 0 1 1 3 2 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 14 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 11 70 215 322 795 1270 1000 260 2331 460 85 100 65 0 4750 120 11843 8310 238 0 4 3410 74 20 0 70 3 60 3 38 5 334 11 1300 39 270 4 1490 20 345 19 180 30 553 14 70 11 170 1 of girls male teachers female None 1-2 3-5 Number Number of Number of 6-10 >10 Number of classrooms in schools

Table 31 – Schools Enrolment and Classrooms

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 32 – School Dropouts

Districts None 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 1 11 15 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 0 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 1 7 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1-10 11-20 21-30 31-40 41-50 >50 None 1-10 11-20 21-30 31-40 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

Union Councils

Number of boys dropout in last 1 year

Number of girls dropout in last 1 year 41-50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 >50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Total

Baseline Survey Report 2012

73

74
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Basic facilities Shelter Yes 1 2 9 5 4 6 4 6 5 2 2 2 1 10 1 60 0 55 5 51 0 1 0 1 0 10 0 10 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 9 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 0 1 10 1 49 0 5 0 3 2 3 0 6 0 5 1 4 2 2 0 2 2 0 0 0 11 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 0 6 0 6 0 5 1 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 6 4 5 4 2 0 2 1 10 1 50 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 9 0 9 0 9 0 5 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Boundary wall Drinking water Toilet Electricity Playground Yes 0 2 0 3 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 No 1 0 9 2 3 5 3 6 5 1 2 2 1 10 1 51

Table 33 – Basic Facilities in Schools

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 34 – Classroom Infrastructure

Districts Rooms Yes 1 2 9 5 4 6 4 6 5 2 2 2 1 10 1 60 0 43 17 0 0 1 0 49 0 10 0 10 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 1 11 0 0 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 4 1 4 1 0 6 0 6 0 6 4 2 2 2 1 10 1 59 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 6 0 6 0 6 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 0 2 7 3 6 9 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 5 5 4 6 4 6 4 2 0 0 0 10 1 48 No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes Desks Chairs Blackboard Fan

Union Councils

Classroom infrastructure

No 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 1 0 0 12

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

75

76
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Corporal punishment Caning 1 2 0 5 1 5 3 6 5 0 0 2 0 0 0 30 14 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 2 5 3 1 3 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 8 1 17 4 2 2 0 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 7 Slapping Keep standing Scolding Murgha making Others

Table 35 – Corporal Punishment

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 36 – Household Profile

Districts

Union Councils

Member of community organization Size of Household House structure No 6 13 24 29 27 30 15 28 34 25 32 30 29 29 29 380 150 248 44 17 11 17 2 0 12 15 3 0 0 0 6 12 16 2 0 0 21 9 0 0 0 30 30 30 30 465 19 14 0 0 0 33 19 12 0 0 0 31 2 20 5 7 2 36 14 21 28 15 18 21 6 250 7 14 5 3 0 29 14 0 19 8 5 1 33 28 8 20 2 1 1 32 6 22 3 8 13 3 4 5 7 2 18 120 8 18 4 0 0 30 6 21 5 25 4 1 2 37 8 14 12 13 6 0 0 31 9 0 22 16 3 4 2 7 9 7 1 10 5 7 6 99 7 12 3 0 0 22 25 0 0 7 24 0 0 0 31 31 0 0 1-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 >20 Total Kacha Pakka Mixed Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Yes

Total 31 25 31 38 30 32 33 29 36 31 33 30 30 30 30 469

Chitral

Shishi Koh

25

Oveer

11

Chitral II

7

Swabi

Parmoli

8

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Asota

3

Anbaar

2

Buner

Mukhranai

17

Chinghalai

1

Ghorghoshto

2

DI Khan

Korai

0

Yarik

1

Chuadhwan

0

Charsadda

Dhakay

0

Mandani

0

Hisara Nehri

1

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

78

77

78
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Ownership Own 31 23 31 34 28 30 6 24 35 30 33 27 21 16 28 397 18 50 0 1 2 12 0 8 1 0 1 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 4 1 0 29 36 31 33 30 30 30 30 468 0 26 0 32 1 1 0 32 2 0 0 30 4 0 0 38 0 0 0 31 1 0 1 25 0 0 0 31 Rented/tenant Free Other Total

Table 37 – House Ownership

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 38 – Household Assets

Districts Radio 9 12 12 0 3 6 3 2 5 16 17 16 1 0 1 103 167 105 84 13 5 3 1 37 7 2 3 1 10 7 4 2 18 16 7 0 21 21 15 1 27 24 27 29 29 358 22 20 14 0 26 3 0 10 2 30 1 0 4 1 26 6 6 3 2 35 17 13 7 4 24 17 10 7 3 28 15 18 13 8 21 15 10 9 2 1 1 157 13 3 5 2 30 10 18 0 2 6 19 23 1 0 0 12 2 5 0 0 0 0 2 6 34 26 21 37 14 20 15 9 15 12 13 16 25 28 29 314 TV Bicycle Motorcycle Landline phone Mobile phone Sewing machine Livestock

Union Councils

Assets

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Total

Baseline Survey Report 2012

79

80
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Sources of water supply in household Tap water in premise premise 0 0 0 6 0 3 4 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 0 81 0 0 0 0 0 0 29 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 5 0 0 well premise 0 15 30 0 0 0 28 9 17 8 0 0 0 0 0 107 84 103 18 2 23 0 2 21 5 5 1 21 2 4 4 2 10 13 17 0 0 1 0 17 7 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 24 0 0 9 0 20 0 0 18 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 0 21 0 0 0 0 water premise pump premise motor pump well in dug well in tap pump in hand pump in dug covered dug open dug well 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 1 0 0 0 0 7 17 0 0 1 4 0 1 41 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Public Hand Public Motor Public Covered Public Open Public Surface water Other

Table 39 – Sources of Household Water Supply

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 40 – Methods of Purification of Drinking Water

Districts None 30 25 31 38 29 31 32 21 33 32 33 30 30 30 30 455 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Boiling Filtration Chlorination Purifying tablets Do not know

Union Councils

Methods of purification of drinking water Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

0

81

82
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Latrine facility in household Own flush flush 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24 4 162 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 flush 2 0 2 22 28 25 8 27 21 3 27 4 15 6 23 213 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 25 0 0 6 0 0 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 2 0 0 14 0 0 29 0 0 23 0 0 8 Shared flush Public flush Own non-flush Shared nonPublic nonNo latrine 21 2 0 2 0 0 25 2 15 16 0 0 5 0 2 90

Table 41 – Status of Household Sanitation

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 42 – Status of Household Solid Waste Management

Districts In the street backyard 31 2 27 1 2 2 2 0 1 8 16 16 0 0 1 109 198 28 30 29 1 0 0 11 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 29 0 0 28 0 0 0 0 31 28 36 0 0 0 1 0 0 99 35 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 16 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 site manure 0 5 3 2 0 1 29 29 35 15 17 13 1 0 1 151 In the Burn Bury Use in organic 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Proper allocated Other

Union Councils

Solid waste management in household

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

83

84
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Average monthly income of the household <5,000 10,000 13 5 9 10 6 6 7 2 9 10 18 21 9 6 14 145 87 5 2 6 4 2 2 4 0 42 6 3 5 0 9 3 6 6 7 10 2 4 2 2 1 3 62 10 5 6 7 9 6 7 0 7 5 1 2 5 7 2 3 2 5 5 2 0 5 3 2 49 8 2 5 5 2 1 4 2 5 4 1 1 15,000 20,000 30,000 6 11 2 14 3 2 1 6 0 1 0 1 6 14 6 73 >5,000>30,000 >10,000>15,000>20,000-

Table 43 – Average Monthly Income of Household

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 44 – Household Gender Distribution

Districts Male 102 71 115 110 106 84 188 156 126 80 88 76 100 81 107 1589 90 1352 67 76 70 65 83 132 118 149 69 99 81 191 205 153 337 274 258 163 153 146 176 148 197 2941 103 218 58 129 91 193 Female Total

Union Councils

Gender

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Total

Baseline Survey Report 2012

85

86
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Age 0-5 years 17 17 27 23 17 9 44 37 40 23 8 17 26 22 18 345 443 349 40 21 25 13 24 22 76 67 98 1310 25 40 45 26 32 59 43 27 48 49 27 113 24 23 134 23 14 18 22 14 18 11 15 216 66 32 150 16 10 13 91 17 20 25 99 21 22 20 84 10 22 20 107 4 38 32 23 13 29 33 15 4 6 5 10 10 5 278 12 11 61 3 25 35 23 78 10 30 >5-10 years >10-15 years >15-40 years >40-50 years >50 years Total 193 129 218 191 205 153 337 274 258 163 153 146 176 148 197 2941

Table 45 – Age Distribution of Household Members

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 46 – Facilities used for Assisted Delivery

Districts Home 20 16 21 19 9 2 109 11 11 5 14 7 18 15 17 294 38 0 8 3 1 0 4 5 4 0 0 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 5 0 5 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Government hospital/RHC Private hospital/clinic Other

Union Councils

<5 years children delivery Total 20 16 28 22 14 7 115 11 11 5 18 13 25 23 17

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

345

87

88
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Person that assisted delivery of <5 years children Family Doctor member/friend/ neighbor 2 1 4 0 2 2 9 0 3 12 4 6 9 7 0 61 24 27 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 8 13 16 90 0 14 0 0 1 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 34 39 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 1 101 4 0 0 1 1 5 0 0 3 1 3 0 0 15 3 8 1 0 0 14 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 0 0 18 0 20 17 27 21 14 8 82 0 3 18 18 13 25 23 17 306 Nurse Midwife TBA Trained Dai Other Total

Table 47 – Persons that Assisted Delivery

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 48 – Years of Education

Districts None 102 81 82 120 74 68 177 112 137 116 86 102 125 97 141 1620 113 335 214 4 19 8 8 19 11 3 17 6 8 21 4 1 3 5 13 219 3 5 17 11 3 4 15 6 10 38 25 18 9 35 29 34 28 46 35 21 4 16 14 28 22 17 40 13 17 31 7 21 8 12 385 3 24 22 21 61 9 21 11 11 20 7 19 4 31 75 0 12 7 6 21 14 39 6 10 20 191 127 218 192 205 152 324 259 241 161 153 143 175 148 197 2886 0-1 yrs >1-5 yrs >5-8 yrs >8-10 yrs >10 yrs Total

Union Councils

Years of Education

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

89

90
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Marital status Married 91 54 92 86 83 74 142 128 100 65 62 65 71 58 81 1252 1562 40 114 1 87 2 105 0 80 1 0 0 0 0 0 85 6 0 94 4 0 115 1 0 109 3 0 179 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 76 3 0 0 116 6 0 0 104 2 0 0 122 4 0 0 75 0 0 0 10 1 0 0 193 129 218 192 205 153 327 240 216 163 153 146 176 147 197 2855 Unmarried Widow/widower Divorced Separated Total

Table 49 – Marital Status

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Table 50 – Relationship to Head of Household

Districts

Union Councils

Relationship to the head of the household

Wife

Son

Niece

Sister

Head

Father

Son-inlaw

Mother

Daughter

Nephew

Brother

Chitral 30 19 29 25 28 21 35 32 25 29 31 30 32 25 30 421 389 916 536 2 29 69 46 0 9 159 23 45 31 0 2 30 63 40 0 2 33 47 35 0 0 0 0 5 1 55 29 53 23 0 2 0 28 52 49 0 1 0 0 7 0 0 2 0 21 22 75 38 0 22 0 0 27 78 25 0 29 11 0 31 96 57 0 22 25 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 19 41 19 0 14 5 6 0 21 65 45 1 13 0 1 0 5 3 5 4 1 1 3 1 0 4 2 39 22 64 24 0 15 3 3 0 4 28 66 41 1 12 0 0 1 5 17 40 22 0 6 1 0 0 1 1 2 4 5 3 0 0 1 0 2 0 2 3 4 29 30 62 41 0 10 4 0 0 0 2

Shishi Koh

Daughterin-law

4 6 9 4 6 13 11 5 3 0 3 0 1 4 3 72

Employee /domestic worker

0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

10 9 24 24 15 9 49 47 48 2 0 0 4 4 4 249

Other

193 122 218 192 205 153 334 260 235 163 153 146 174 148 197 2893

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

Total

91

None

Daily wage

Labour

Student

Business

Govt employee

Private employee

Chitral 78 12 4 0 0 13 7 46 15 31 13 17 23 9 4 1 195 48 7 3 1 7 116 1 6 1 1 5 11 4 1 1 2 2 66 4 9 1 2 3 1 4 7 1 12 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 31 4 12 8 9 6 9 4 0 1 0 2 0 2 2 1 3 16 15 117 2 17 12 2 0 3 8 4 0 7 2 15 17 0 19 0 3 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 8 0 5 6 0 17 0 4 5 2 1 32 0 56 66 62 43 51 31 2 0 66 35 53 76 56 77 752 564 472 37 36 29 28 32 23 30 27 42 28 35 22 40 13 48 33 66 51 30 21 40 61 40 36 36 63 25 14 34 16

Shishi Koh

Housewife

Unemployed

Domestic labour

Alms/ charity

1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Zakat/ Usher

1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

Other

1 0 0 27 10 16 18 25 16 4 9 9 23 9 14 181

187 128 218 190 203 145 246 152 113 156 153 146 176 148 197 2558

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Total

92
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Occupation

Table 51 – Occupation

Districts

Union Councils

Table 52 – Disability

Districts None 186 69 62 184 198 151 303 225 211 161 151 143 175 144 196 2559 39 5 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 3 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 6 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 8 1 0 0 0 0 4 2 0 2 2 4 2 0 0 2 Physical Mental/ behavioral Vision Intellectual/ slow learner Hearing and Speech Other 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Union Councils

Disability Total 194 79 63 192 205 153 307 228 213 163 153 146 176 148 197

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Baseline Survey Report 2012

Total

2617

93

94
Baseline Survey Report 2012
Number of earners Yes 61 32 51 49 56 41 59 39 37 33 37 33 43 35 47 653 221 130 116 113 133 113 150 2290 236 278 112 149 143 167 97 132 No Total 193 129 218 192 205 153 337 275 258 163 153 146 176 148 197 2943

Table 53 – Number of Earners

Districts

Union Councils

Chitral

Shishi Koh

Oveer

Chitral II

Swabi

Parmoli

Asota

Anbaar

Buner

Mukhranai

Chinghalai

Ghorghoshto

DI Khan

Korai

Yarik

Chuadhwan

Charsadda

Dhakay

Mandani

Hisara Nehri

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Total

Livelihood and Community Physical Infrastructure Project

Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Fund 1 - Hill View Road, Banigala Islamabad, Pakistan Web: www.ppaf.org.pk