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Ph o t o s h o p CS5 : Ba s i c

Instructors Edition

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Photoshop CS5: Basic
President, Axzo Press: Jon Winder
Vice President, Product Development: Charles G. Blum
Vice President, Operations: Josh Pincus
Director of Publishing Systems Development: Dan Quackenbush
Writer: Chris Hale
Copyeditor: Catherine Oliver
Keytester: Cliff Coryea


COPYRIGHT 2010 Axzo Press. All rights reserved.
No part of this work may be reproduced, transcribed, or used in any form or by any meansgraphic, electronic, or
mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, Web distribution, or information storage and retrieval
systemswithout the prior written permission of the publisher.
For more information, go to www.axzopress.com.
Trademarks
ILT Series is a trademark of Axzo Press.
Some of the product names and company names used in this book have been used for identification purposes only and
may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective manufacturers and sellers.
Disclaimer
We reserve the right to revise this publication and make changes from time to time in its content without notice.
ISBN 10: 1-4260-2184-4
ISBN 13: 978-1-4260-2184-8
Printed in the United States of America
1 2 3 4 5 GL 06 05 04 03
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Contents
Introduction iii
Topic A: About the manual............................................................................... iv
Topic B: Setting student expectations .............................................................. ix
Topic C: Classroom setup................................................................................ xiii
Topic D: Support...............................................................................................xv
Getting started 1-1
Topic A: Image copyrights .............................................................................. 1-2
Topic B: Digital images................................................................................... 1-4
Topic C: The Photoshop environment ............................................................. 1-9
Topic D: Getting help ..................................................................................... 1-29
Unit summary: Getting started ........................................................................ 1-31
Working with image selections 2-1
Topic A: Selection techniques ......................................................................... 2-2
Topic B: Modifying selections ....................................................................... 2-23
Unit summary: Working with image selections .............................................. 2-39
Working with layers 3-1
Topic A: Creating layers.................................................................................. 3-2
Topic B: Modifying layers.............................................................................. 3-12
Topic C: Using type layers ............................................................................. 3-19
Topic D: Using layer effects ........................................................................... 3-27
Unit summary: Working with layers ............................................................... 3-36
Adjusting images 4-1
Topic A: Image modes..................................................................................... 4-2
Topic B: Hue and saturation adjustments ........................................................ 4-7
Topic C: Levels adjustments........................................................................... 4-14
Unit summary: Adjusting images.................................................................... 4-20
Retouching images 5-1
Topic A: Repairing image defects ................................................................... 5-2
Topic B: Removing image areas..................................................................... 5-13
Topic C: Painting............................................................................................ 5-20
Topic D: Using filters ..................................................................................... 5-30
Unit summary: Retouching images ................................................................. 5-33
Resizing images 6-1
Topic A: Image resolution ............................................................................... 6-2
Topic B: Image canvas size ............................................................................ 6-10
Unit summary: Resizing images...................................................................... 6-16
Preparing finished images 7-1
Topic A: Images for Web use .......................................................................... 7-2
Topic B: Images for print use .......................................................................... 7-8
Topic C: Printing images ................................................................................ 7-12
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ii Photoshop CS5: Basic

Topic D: Importing images ............................................................................ 7-16
Unit summary: Preparing finished images...................................................... 7-21
Course summary S-1
Topic A: Course summary............................................................................... S-2
Topic B: Continued learning after class .......................................................... S-4
Glossary G-1
Index I-1


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iii

Introduction
After reading this introduction, you will know
how to:
A Use ILT Series manuals in general.
B Use prerequisites, a target student
description, course objectives, and a skills
inventory to properly set students
expectations for the course.
C Set up a classroom to teach this course.
D Get support for setting up and teaching this
course.
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iv Photoshop CS5: Basic

Topic A: About the manual
ILT Series philosophy
Our goal is to make you, the instructor, as successful as possible. To that end, our
manuals facilitate students learning by providing structured interaction with the
software itself. While we provide text to help you explain difficult concepts, the hands-
on activities are the focus of our courses. Leading the students through these activities
will teach the skills and concepts effectively.
We believe strongly in the instructor-led class. For many students, having a thinking,
feeling instructor in front of them will always be the most comfortable way to learn.
Because the students focus should be on you, our manuals are designed and written to
facilitate your interaction with the students, and not to call attention to manuals
themselves.
We believe in the basic approach of setting expectations, then teaching, and providing
summary and review afterwards. For this reason, lessons begin with objectives and end
with summaries. We also provide overall course objectives and a course summary to
provide both an introduction to and closure on the entire course.
Our goal is your success. We encourage your feedback in helping us to continually
improve our manuals to meet your needs.
Manual components
The manuals contain these major components:
Table of contents
Introduction
Units
Course summary
Glossary
Index
Each element is described below.
Table of contents
The table of contents acts as a learning roadmap for you and the students.
Introduction
The introduction contains information about our training philosophy and our manual
components, features, and conventions. It contains target student, prerequisite,
objective, and setup information for the specific course. Finally, the introduction
contains support information.
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Introduction v

Units
Units are the largest structural component of the actual course content. A unit begins
with a title page that lists objectives for each major subdivision, or topic, within the unit.
Within each topic, conceptual and explanatory information alternates with hands-on
activities. Units conclude with a summary comprising one paragraph for each topic, and
an independent practice activity that gives students an opportunity to practice the skills
theyve learned.
The conceptual information takes the form of text paragraphs, exhibits, lists, and tables.
The activities are structured in two columns, one telling students what to do, the other
providing explanations, descriptions, and graphics. Throughout a unit, instructor notes
are found in the left margin.
Course summary
This section provides a text summary of the entire course. It is useful for providing
closure at the end of the course. The course summary also indicates the next course in
this series, if there is one, and lists additional resources students might find useful as
they continue to learn about the software.
Glossary
The glossary provides definitions for all of the key terms used in this course.
Index
The index at the end of this manual makes it easy for you and your students to find
information about a particular software component, feature, or concept.
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vi Photoshop CS5: Basic

Manual conventions
Weve tried to keep the number of elements and the types of formatting to a minimum
in the manuals. We think this aids in clarity and makes the manuals more classically
elegant looking. But there are some conventions and icons you should know about.

Item Description
Instructor note/icon
Italic text In conceptual text, indicates a new term or feature.

Bold text In unit summaries, indicates a key term or concept. In
an independent practice activity, indicates an explicit
item that you select, choose, or type.

Code font Indicates code or syntax.

Longer strings of
code will look
like this.
In the hands-on activities, any code thats too long to fit
on a single line is divided into segments by one or more
continuation characters (). This code should be
entered as a continuous string of text.
Instructor notes.
In the left margin, provide tips, hints, and warnings for
the instructor.

Select bold item In the left column of hands-on activities, bold sans-serif
text indicates an explicit item that you select, choose,
or type.

Keycaps like e Indicate a key on the keyboard you must press.
Warning icon.
Warnings prepare instructors for potential classroom
management problems.
Tip icon.
Tips give extra information the instructor can share
with students.
Setup icon.
Setup notes provide a realistic business context for
instructors to share with students, or indicate additional
setup steps required for the current activity.
Projector icon.
Projector notes indicate that there is a PowerPoint slide
for the adjacent content.

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Introduction vii

Hands-on activities
The hands-on activities are the most important parts of our manuals. They are divided
into two primary columns. The Heres how column gives short directions to the
students. The Heres why column provides explanations, graphics, and clarifications.
To the left, instructor notes provide tips, warnings, setups, and other information for the
instructor only. Heres a sample:
Do it! A-1: Creating a commission formula
Heres how Heres why
1 Open Sales This is an oversimplified sales compensation
worksheet. It shows sales totals, commissions,
and incentives for five sales reps.
Take the time to make
sure your students
understand this
worksheet. Well be here a
while.
2 Observe the contents of cell F4

The commission rate formulas use the name
C_Rate instead of a value for the commission
rate.

For these activities, we have provided a collection of data files designed to help students
learn each skill in a real-world business context. As students work through the activities,
they will modify and update these files. Of course, students might make a mistake and
therefore want to re-key the activity starting from scratch. To make it easy to start over,
students will rename each data file at the end of the first activity in which the file is
modified. Our convention for renaming files is to add the word My to the beginning
of the file name. In the above activity, for example, students are using a file called
Sales for the first time. At the end of this activity, they would save the file as My
sales, thus leaving the Sales file unchanged. If students make mistakes, they can start
over using the original Sales file.
In some activities, however, it might not be practical to rename the data file. Such
exceptions are indicated with an instructor note. If students want to retry one of these
activities, you will need to provide a fresh copy of the original data file.
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viii Photoshop CS5: Basic

PowerPoint presentations
Each unit in this course has an accompanying PowerPoint presentation. These slide
shows are designed to support your classroom instruction while providing students with
a visual focus. Each presentation begins with a list of unit objectives and ends with a
unit summary slide. We strongly recommend that you run these presentations from the
instructors station as you teach this course. A copy of PowerPoint Viewer is included,
so it is not necessary to have PowerPoint installed on your computer.
The ILT Series PowerPoint add-in
The CD also contains a PowerPoint add-in that enables you to do two things:
Create slide notes for the class
Display a control panel for the Flash movies embedded in the presentations
To load the PowerPoint add-in:
1 Copy the Course_ILT.ppa file to a convenient location on your hard drive.
2 Start PowerPoint.
3 Choose Tools, Macro, Security to open the Security dialog box. On the Security
Level tab, select Medium (if necessary), and then click OK.
4 Choose Tools, Add-Ins to open the Add-Ins dialog box. Then, click Add New.
5 Browse to and double-click the Course_ILT.ppa file, and then click OK. A
message box will appear, warning you that macros can contain viruses.
6 Click Enable Macros. The Course_ILT add-in should now appear in the
Available Add-Ins list (in the Add-Ins dialog box). The x in front of
Course_ILT indicates that the add-in is loaded.
7 Click Close to close the Add-Ins dialog box.
After you complete this procedure, a new toolbar will be available at the top of the
PowerPoint window. This toolbar contains a single button labeled Create SlideNotes.
Click this button to generate slide-notes files in both text (.txt) and Excel (.xls) format.
By default, these files will be saved to the folder that contains the presentation. If the
PowerPoint file is on a CD-ROM or in some other location to which the slide-notes files
cannot be saved, you will be prompted to save the presentation to your hard drive and
try again.
When you run a presentation and come to a slide that contains a Flash movie, you will
see a small control panel in the lower-left corner of the screen. You can use this panel to
start, stop, and rewind the movie, or to play it again.
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Introduction ix

Topic B: Setting student expectations
Properly setting students expectations is essential to your success. This topic will help
you do that by providing:
Prerequisites for this course
A description of the target student
A list of the objectives for the course
A skills assessment for the course
Course prerequisites
Students taking this course should be familiar with personal computers and the use of a
keyboard and a mouse. Furthermore, this course assumes that students have completed
the following courses or have equivalent experience:
Windows 7: Basic
Target student
The target student for this course is someone who is familiar with computers and who
wants to use Adobe Photoshop to create and modify digital images, such as digital-
camera images or scanned photographs or artwork. After completing this course, the
student will be able to use Photoshop CS5 to select part of an image, combine images,
adjust image color and contrast, retouch photographs, and prepare images for print and
Web media.
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x Photoshop CS5: Basic

Course objectives
You should share these overall course objectives with your students at the beginning of
the day. This will give the students an idea about what to expect, and it will help you
identify students who might be misplaced. Students are considered misplaced when they
lack the prerequisite knowledge or when they already know most of the subject matter
to be covered.
After completing this course, students will know how to:
Discuss issues related to image use and copyright; identify the attributes of raster
and vector graphics; customize the Photoshop environment; open and navigate
within images in Photoshop and Adobe Bridge; and use Photoshop Help.
Use several selection tools to select image areas; and modify and manipulate
selections.
Create, arrange, and transform layers; create type layers; and use opacity, layer
blending modes, and layer styles to apply effects to layer contents.
Switch among Photoshops image modes; adjust an images hue, saturation, and
vibrance; use the Adjustments panel to create adjustment layers; and use the
Levels command to adjust image contrast.
Repair image defects; erase complex background areas and use Content-Aware
Fill; paint in an image; and apply filters to a layer or selection.
Determine an images resolution and dimensions; resize images with and
without resampling; and use the Crop tool and the Canvas Size command to
change an images canvas size.
Use the Save for Web & Devices command to save a copy of an image
optimized for Web use; create a Web photo gallery; use the Save As command
to save a copy of an image in a format for print use; and use Photo Downloader
to import images from a camera or memory card.
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Introduction xi

Skills inventory
Use the following form to gauge students skill levels entering the class (students have
copies in the introductions of their student manuals). For each skill listed, have students
rate their familiarity from 1 to 5, with five being the most familiar. Emphasize that this
is not a test. Rather, it is intended to provide students with an idea of where theyre
starting from at the beginning of class. If a student is wholly unfamiliar with all the
skills, he or she might not be ready for the class. A student who seems to understand all
of the skills, on the other hand, might need to move on to the next course in the series.

Skill 1 2 3 4 5
Discussing copyright
Discussing digital imagery
Identifying attributes of raster and vector graphics
Organizing Photoshop panels
Magnifying and scrolling images
Managing files with Adobe Bridge
Using Photoshop Help
Selecting image areas by using various tools and commands
Saving and loading selections
Adding to and subtracting from a selection
Modifying a selection
Using the Refine Edge dialog box
Moving a selection
Creating layers and moving layers between images
Arranging and transforming layers
Creating type layers and formatting text
Adjusting layer opacity by using the Layers panel
Applying layer blending modes
Applying layer styles
Identifying Photoshop image mode attributes
Specifying the image mode
Creating adjustment layers by using the Adjustments panel
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xii Photoshop CS5: Basic


Skill 1 2 3 4 5
Adjusting hue, saturation, and color
Adjusting image contrast by using the Levels command
Fixing red eye
Cloning image areas by using the Clone Stamp tool and the Clone
Source panel

Repairing image defects by using the Healing Brush and Patch
tools

Removing complex backgrounds by using the Background Eraser
tool

Filling selections by using Content-Aware Fill
Specifying the foreground and background colors
Sampling colors with the Eyedropper tool
Painting in an image by using the Brush and Pen tools
Applying filters
Determining an images dimensions and resolution
Resizing and resampling images by using the Image Size command
Adjusting canvas size by using the Crop tool and the Canvas Size
command

Optimizing images for Web or print use
Creating a Web photo gallery
Importing images from a camera or memory card
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Introduction xiii

Topic C: Classroom setup
All our courses assume that each student has a personal computer to use during the
class. Our hands-on approach to learning requires that they do. This topic gives
information on how to set up the classroom to teach this course.
Hardware requirements
Each students personal computer should have:
A keyboard and a mouse
Intel Pentium 4 or AMD Athlon 64 Processor (or faster)
1GB RAM (or higher)
1 GB of available hard drive space after the operating system is installed
A monitor with at least 1280 960 resolution
A graphics display card chip (GPU) that supports OpenGL (Note: Activities will
still work without OpenGL support, but some features wont be enabled.)
Software requirements
You will need the following software:
Microsoft Windows 7
Adobe Photoshop CS5
The latest version of Adobe Flash Player
A printer driver (An actual printer is not required, but students will not be able to
complete the Printing an image activity in the unit titled Preparing finished
images unless a driver is installed.)
A display driver that supports OpenGL 2.0 and Shader Model 3.0 (Note:
Activities will still work without OpenGL support, but some features wont be
enabled.)
Network requirements
The following network components and connectivity are also required for this course:
Internet access, for the following purposes:
Downloading the latest critical updates and service packs
Downloading the Student Data files from www.axzopress.com
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xiv Photoshop CS5: Basic

Classroom setup instructions
Before you teach this course, you will need to perform the following steps to set up each
student computer.
1 Install Windows on an NTFS partition according to the software publishers
instructions. After installation is complete, if the student machines have Internet
access, use Windows Update to install any critical updates and Service Packs.
Note: You can also use Windows Vista or Windows XP, but the screen shots in
this course were taken in Windows 7, so students screens might look somewhat
different.
2 With flat-panel displays, we recommend using the panels native resolution for
best results. Color depth/quality should be set to High (24 bit) or higher.
3 Install Adobe Photoshop CS5 according to the software manufacturers
instructions. After installation, start Photoshop to complete the activation
process, and then close Photoshop.
4 Install a printer driver.
5 Install the latest version of Adobe Flash Player by browsing to
http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/ and following the onscreen instructions. Do
not install any bundled applications.
6 Install the latest version of Adobe Reader by browsing to
http://get.adobe.com/reader/ and following the onscreen instructions. Do not
install any bundled applications
7 Configure Photoshop CS5 on each student computer as follows:
a Start Photoshop.
b Choose Edit, Preferences, File Handling.
c Under File Compatibility, set Maximize PSD and PSB Compatibility to
Always. Click OK.
d Close Photoshop.
8 Download the Student Data files for the course:
a Connect to www.axzopress.com.
b Under Downloads, click Instructor-Led Training.
c Browse the subject categories to locate your course. Then click the course
title to display a list of available downloads. (You can also access these
downloads through our Catalog listings.)
d Click the link(s) for downloading the Student Data files. You can download
the files directly to student machines or to a central location on your own
network.
e Create a folder named Student Data on the desktop of each student
computer.
f Double-click the downloaded zip file(s) and drag the contents into the
Student Data folder.
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Introduction xv

Topic D: Support
Your success is our primary concern. If you need help setting up this class or teaching a
particular unit, topic, or activity, please dont hesitate to get in touch with us.
Contacting us
Please contact us through our Web site, www.axzopress.com. You will need to provide
the name of the course, and be as specific as possible about the kind of help you need.
Instructors tools
Our Web site provides several instructors tools for each course, including course
outlines and answers to frequently asked questions. To download these files, go to
www.axzopress.com. Then, under Downloads, click Instructor-Led Training and
browse our subject categories.
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xvi Photoshop CS5: Basic

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11

Un i t 1
Getting started
Unit time: 50 minutes
Complete this unit, and youll know how to:
A Discuss issues related to image use and
copyright.
B Identify the differences between vector and
raster graphics.
C Customize the Photoshop environment to
suit your preferences, open and magnify
images, and use Adobe Bridge to browse
and manage files.
D Use Photoshop Help to find information
about Photoshop.
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12 Photoshop CS5: Basic

Topic A: Image copyrights
Explanation The ready availability of images online makes it easier than ever to find the perfect
image for your project with a simple search. However, it also makes it easier than ever
to run afoul of copyright laws. Before using any image, make sure you understand
copyright restrictions and obtain permission to use the image.
Copyrighted works

Copyright is a kind of intellectual property, or a creation of the mind for which property
rights are recognized. (Other kinds of intellectual property include trademarks, patents,
and symbols.) Copyright law extends to a wide range of works, including books,
photographs, drawings, and motion pictures. In general, though, copyright is designed to
protect the expression of an idea (not the idea itself; just the particular expression of it).

A work that is copyrighted is protected by law from being copied and used without the
copyright holders permission, whether or not the work has been published. Although
copyrights laws vary from country to country, they generally protect a work for the
lifetime of the creator plus 50 or 70 years. In the United States, if the work was created
on or after January 1, 1978, then it is protected for the creators lifetime plus 70 years.

Before 1989, a work was protected by copyright law only if the creator had obtained a
copyright notice, indicated by the word copyright or the symbol followed by the
date of publication and the copyright owners name. Since 1989, copyright protection
has been extended automatically to the author of any work that has been created in a
fixed form. One exception is a work for hire; in that situation, the employer retains the
copyright.
Fair use and derivative works

Even though it seems like copyright law protects nearly every work, there are some
ways to avoid violating the law while making use of anothers work. The doctrine of
fair use extends to specific situations such as criticism, news reporting, teaching,
scholarship, and research and allows limited use of copyrighted material. The guidelines
are still vague, however, and it should be noted that fair use doesnt include using the
image as part of a profit-earning venture.
The doctrine of fair use has sometimes been used to defend situations involving
derivative works, or a work based on another work. Derivative works must be different
enough from the original to be regarded as a new work in their own right, or they
must contain a substantial amount of new material in addition to the original work. In
short, the derivative work must be copyrightable itself.
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Getting started 13

Copyright permission and model releases

Put simply, you should always attempt to obtain permission from the copyright holder
before using any image, except in clear cases of fair use. Youll also want to be sure that
the ownership is clearsometimes, as with works for hire, the creator of the image
might not be the copyright holder.
Another factor to consider is the use of recognizable people in images. If you publish an
image (even one youve taken) of a recognizable subject without his or her permission,
you could be subject to civil liability. The original photographer typically obtains
permission by having the subject sign a model release, a legal document granting
permission to publish someones image.
Do it! A-1: Discussing copyrights
Questions and answers
1 What legal protections extend to copyrighted works?
A work that is copyrighted is protected by law from being copied and used without the
copyright holders permission, whether or not the work has been published.

2 Does a work need to have a visible copyright symbol in order to be protected by
copyright law?
No. Copyright protection extends automatically to the author of any work that has been
created in a fixed form.

3 Can you cite the doctrine of fair use when reproducing an image you found online
for use in your companys advertising?
No. The doctrine of fair use extends to specific situations such as criticism, news reporting,
teaching, scholarship, and research.

4 Discuss what works might be considered derivative of a copyrighted work.
Students might discuss such things as translations, dramatizations or fictionalizations, a
motion picture based on a book, and others.

5 When do you need to obtain permission before using a copyrighted work?
Always, except in cases of fair use.

6 Youve obtained permission to use a photograph containing a family of four
people. What else should you obtain before you publish the image?
If the photograph contains recognizable people, you must obtain a model release before
publishing the image.

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14 Photoshop CS5: Basic

Topic B: Digital images
Explanation Photoshop is an image-editing program used to create and enhance digital images for
multiple uses, including print, online, and video. You might use Photoshop to enhance a
digital photo; to create a print ad that includes photos, text, and other graphic elements;
or to create original digital artwork. When you finish working with an image, you can
save it in an appropriate format.
Digital photography
Digital cameras have become standard for both amateur and professional photographers.
Those accustomed to film cameras will encounter many familiar terms and settings, but
digital cameras also introduce some new terms and capabilities that anyone wanting to
manipulate digital photos should become familiar with.
Megapixels

Digital images are composed of pixels, the smallest measurable units of an image on the
screen. Makers of digital cameras often emphasize their cameras megapixels, or a
number that expresses the camera sensors ability to capture image data. For example, a
six-megapixel (6 MP) camera can capture images that include about six million pixels.
The more megapixels a camera has, the higher the resolution of the images will be.
However, megapixels alone wont determine image quality. A five- or six-megapixel
camera is usually adequate for printing enlarged images up to 11" 14". But an out-of-
focus image or one using the incorrect aperture or shutter speed settings can look blurry
or dark regardless of the cameras megapixels.
Exposure controls

Many digital cameras include controls with which you can adjust an images exposure.
Exposure refers both to a finished image and to the amount and action of light used to
create the image. To control exposure, you can specify settings for ISO, aperture, and
shutter speed.
ISO denotes the sensitivityeither of film or of a digital sensorto light. For a film
camera, photographers are bound by the ISO of the film currently loaded in their
cameras. However, digital photographers can adjust ISO as necessary. Low ISO settings
(for example, 100 or 200) require more light to create an exposure but result in higher
image quality. Conversely, higher ISO settings (800 or 1600) require less light to create
an exposure but result in lower image quality. Typically, lower ISOs are used in
situations where a lot of natural light is available and subjects are relatively static.
Higher ISOs are used when less light is available and when subjects are moving
quickly. An ISO setting of 400 works well for a variety of situations.
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Getting started 15

The best images always result when youre using the lowest ISO. However, a low ISO
affects other exposure settings. Because more light is required, the cameras aperture
must be adjusted or the shutter must stay open longer to let in more light.
Aperture refers to the size of the opening in a camera lens and is expressed as an f-stop
number. For example, you might set the aperture on a digital camera to f/8.0 (or just
8.0) or f/22 (or just 22). Lower f-stops let in more light than do higher f-stops, which
means that 8.0 is actually a larger aperture opening than is 22. (This is because these
numbers are actually fractions: 8.0 is equivalent to
1

8
and 22 is equivalent to
1

22
.) So if
you were using a low ISO of, say, 200, then you might set the cameras aperture to 5.6
to let in more light.
The other setting controlling exposure is shutter speed, or the amount of time that a
cameras shutter opens to expose light to the sensor. As you might expect, lower shutter
speeds leave the shutter open longer and thus let in more light, while higher shutter
speeds let in less light. Because lower shutter speeds expose the cameras sensor for a
longer period of time, they can result in blurry images, even if you have a steady hand
and your subject isnt moving. But higher shutter speeds mean that youll need to adjust
the ISO and/or aperture to let in more light, and this could also lead to parts of your
exposure being out of focus.
Many digital cameras have settings that automatically specify ISO, aperture, and shutter
speed for a given situationfor example, indoors, scenery, or portrait. But the best
images might result when you manually change these settings to achieve the desired
result.
Metering

Most digital cameras, by default, have complex sensors that analyze multiple areas in
the frame to determine optimal exposure settings. This process, called matrix metering,
attempts to set the ISO, aperture, and shutter speed in order to properly expose all areas
of the image. If your subject includes different light intensities, however, the camera
might not give you the desired effect. For example, you might want your subject to
appear as a silhouette against a bright sunset, but your camera will likely try to expose
all areas in the frame so that theyre completely visiblein this case, leading to a darker
sunset and a lighter subject. To override matrix metering, set your camera to spot
metering, which determines exposure based on a single point in the image. (You can
often specify whether this point is the center of the frame, the top, the left, and so on.)
Focus and zoom

By focusing and zooming your camera, you control which objects or people appear as
the subjects of an image. One important component of focus is the aperture setting,
which controls depth of field, or how much of the foreground and/or background
appears in focus. For example, if you want foreground objects to appear in sharp focus
while background objects are blurred, use a large aperture setting, such as f/5.6. To keep
both foreground and background objects in focus, use a smaller aperture setting, such as
f/22.
By controlling your cameras zoom, you can bring subjects closer or include more
scenery in an image. A cameras lens controls the amount you can zoom, but many
digital cameras also have a digital zoom feature, which magnifies the pixels recorded by
the camera. Although digital zoom can be useful in some situations, it typically leads to
fuzzier images.
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16 Photoshop CS5: Basic

Do it! B-1: Discussing digital imagery
Questions and answers

1 Discuss why its important to know about pixels when evaluating digital cameras.
Students might discuss how cameras with more megapixels can capture more image data.
Students might also point out that most digital cameras available today are sufficient for
producing enlargements of up to 11" 14".

2 Discuss how a cameras ISO setting affects an exposure.
Low ISO settings (100 or 200) require more light to create an exposure but result in higher
image quality. Higher ISO settings (800 or 1600) require less light to create an exposure but
result in lower image quality.

3 When would you use a low ISO setting? When would you use a high one?
Typically, lower ISOs are used when a lot of natural light is available and subjects are
relatively static. Higher ISOs are used when less light is available and when subjects are
moving quickly. An ISO setting of 400 works well for a variety of situations.

4 Discuss how you might use the aperture setting to compensate for available light.
If you have less light available, you might use a lower f-stop (i.e., a larger aperture opening).
If more light is available, you might use a higher f-stop (i.e., a smaller aperture setting).
Students might also discuss how aperture affects depth of field.

5 Discuss the other exposure settings that are affected by using either a high or low
shutter speed.
Shutter speed determines how long the cameras sensors are exposed to light. Slow shutter
speeds let in more light, so a lower ISO and a higher aperture setting (for a smaller opening)
could be used. Fast shutter speeds let in less light, so you might need a higher ISO and a
lower aperture setting (for a larger opening).

6 Discuss the difference between matrix metering and spot metering.
With matrix metering, a camera attempts to correctly expose multiple areas of an image. With
spot metering, the camera adjusts exposure settings based on a single area of an image.

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Getting started 17

Raster and vector graphics
Explanation

A digital image made up of a grid (or raster) of pixels is known as a bitmap or raster
graphic. Examples of raster graphics include digital photos and scanned material. You
can use Photoshop to select and manipulate pixels to change a raster images appearance
either subtly or completely.
By contrast, illustration programs such as Adobe Illustrator create and manipulate vector
graphics, which are defined by mathematical formulas that generate geometric shapes.
Vector graphics are used to create logos and other types of artwork that include discrete
geometric objects, rather than photographic images that contain subtle gradations of
shades and color.
Vector graphics sometimes resemble raster graphics, but because vector graphics are
defined as a series of mathematical instructions (not as a group of pixels), different
principles control their appearance and behavior. If you increase the size of a vector
graphic, it will still look smooth on screen or in print, as shown in Exhibit 1-1.


A vector graphic
of a DVD
A copy of the
vector graphic
resized 500%

Exhibit 1-1: A vector graphic shown at two sizes
However, because a raster graphic contains a specific, fixed number of pixels,
increasing its size generally results in increasing the size of its component pixels. This
can result in a jagged appearance on screen and in print, as shown in Exhibit 1-2.



A raster graphic
of a DVD
A copy of the
raster graphic
resized 500%

Exhibit 1-2: A raster graphic shown at two sizes
Although Photoshop images can include both vector and raster components,
Photoshops environment is designed primarily for manipulating raster components.
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18 Photoshop CS5: Basic

Do it! B-2: Identifying attributes of raster and vector graphics
Question Answer

1 True or false? Raster graphics are created from a grid of
pixels.
True

2 True or false? Photographic images are usually made up of
vectors.
False

3 True or false? A Photoshop file can contain both raster and
vector components.
True

4 True or false? A raster image will always print cleanly when
scaled to any size.
False

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Getting started 19

Topic C: The Photoshop environment
Explanation Photoshops environment provides great flexibility for viewing and editing images. You
can use the applications components in their default arrangement, or you can customize
them to suit your specific needs.
Components of Photoshop

The Photoshop environment includes a window to display each open image, the Tools
panel, a menu bar, the options bar, the application bar, more panels, and other elements,
as shown in Exhibit 1-3.



Tools
panel
Workplace
switcher
Document
tabs
Options
bar
Panel
dock
Application
bar

Exhibit 1-3: The Photoshop window
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110 Photoshop CS5: Basic

The following table describes the components of the Photoshop window.

Component Function
Tools panel Contains tools to select, draw, paint, edit, and view images. You can
also choose foreground and background colors, create quick masks, and
rotate, move, and zoom the image.
Document tabs Display the name of the file youre working on, the current
magnification, and the documents color mode. Also allow you to
switch to other open files.
Options bar Displays the various options and settings for a selected tool. The
options vary depending on the active tool.
Application bar Contains tools to launch Adobe Bridge and Mini Bridge; to show
guides, grids, and rulers; and to select an image magnification. Also
contains the Hand, Zoom, and Rotate tools, and menus used to arrange
documents and change screen modes.
Panel dock Contains panel groups, which display options and commands you can
use to modify images. Panels can be docked or floating.
Workplace switcher Contains options for displaying panels related to specific operations,
such as design, painting, or photography. Essentials is the initial
selection. Preset options are available, or you can save custom layouts.
Document statistics
box
(At the bottom of the document window.) Displays data about the open
image. Click the arrow next to the Document statistics box and select
an option to choose the type of file data you want to show. You can
show data such as the document size and profile.

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Getting started 111

Photoshop display options

While youre working with an image, you might want to temporarily hide panels or
other Photoshop elements so you can focus on the image. You can do so by using the
Screen Mode button, shown in Exhibit 1-4, to display a menu. The Screen Mode button
is located at the top of the Photoshop window. There are also some keyboard shortcuts
you can use to change the display.
To hide and show window elements, use the techniques explained in the following
table.

Technique Used to

From the Screen Mode menu,
choose Standard Screen Mode
View the image in a document window and display the
Tools panel and the panel dock.
From the Screen Mode menu,
choose Full Screen Mode With
Menu Bar
Expand the document window to fill the workspace, and
make Photoshop occupy the full screen. The panels are
still displayed.
From the Screen Mode menu,
choose Full Screen Mode
Hide everything except the image, which is displayed on a
black background. Press Esc to return to Standard Screen
Mode.
Press Tab Hide or show all panels, including the options bar.
Press Shift+Tab Hide or show all panels except the options bar and the
Tools panel.
Press Ctrl+Tab Switch between different open documents.




Exhibit 1-4: The Screen Mode button
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112 Photoshop CS5: Basic

Do it! C-1: Exploring the Photoshop window
The files for this activity are in Student Data folder Unit 1\Topic C.
Heres how Heres why
1 Click Start and choose
All Programs,
Adobe Photoshop CS5
To start Adobe Photoshop CS5. A folder
containing Photoshop CS5 might be present if
the program was installed as a part of a suite of
Adobe products.
2 Choose File, Open To display the Open dialog box.
A folder containing
Photoshop CS5 may be
present if the program
was installed as a part of
a suite of Adobe products.
Tell students they
can also press Ctrl+O.
Select Open book In the current topic folder.
Tell students they
can also double-click the
file to open it.
Click Open To open the image file named Open book.

3 On the application bar, click

(The Screen Mode button.) To display a menu.
Choose Full Screen Mode
With Menu Bar
To maximize the Photoshop window and make
the image window fill the workspace.
Tell students they
can also press F to
change the screen mode.
4 Click the Screen Mode button and
choose Full Screen Mode
A message box appears.

Click Full Screen To hide everything but the image.

5 Press F
To change to Standard Screen Mode.

6 Press t
To hide the panels and the options bar.

Press t again
To show the panels and the options bar.

Press s + t
To hide the panel dock.

Press s + t again
To show all of the panels.

7 Choose File, Open

Select Fire alarm and click
Open
To display another image in a tabbed window.
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8 Choose File, Save As To open the Save As dialog box.

Navigate to the current topic
folder


Edit the File name box to read
My fire alarm


Click Save The JPEG Options dialog box appears.

Click OK To save the file with the default settings.

9 Observe the document tab It shows the documents name, the
magnification setting, and image mode
information.

10 Choose Image,
Image Rotation, 90 CW
To rotate the image to its proper orientation.

11 Press c + S
To update the image.

12 Click as shown (The document tab.) To select the first image.



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114 Photoshop CS5: Basic

Photoshop panels
Explanation

You probably wont need to use all of Photoshops panels for any single image. You can
open, close, and rearrange panels to best meet your needs. Open a panel by choosing it
from the Window menu, and close a panel by clicking its menu button and choosing
Close or Close Tab Group. Panels are placed by default in the panel dock, shown in
Exhibit 1-5, on the right side of the application window.


Collapse to Icons
button
Panel tabs
Panel group
Panel menu
Title
bar

Exhibit 1-5: Docked panels
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Getting started 115

When a panel dock is collapsed, it displays icons for the available panels. To collapse
the entire dock, click the Collapse to Icons button in the top-right corner of the dock.
Alternatively, you can click individual icons to show only the desired panels (as well as
any others contained in the panel group), as shown in Exhibit 1-6.
You can drag a panels tab away from the panel group to remove the panel from the
group and make it a floating panel. And you can drag a panels tab next to the other tabs
in a panel group to add that panel to the group. In addition, you can drag panel tabs to
and from the docks, or you can create a new dock and add the panels you want to it. To
do so, drag a panels tab to the side of an existing dock until a blue line appears around
the group; then release the mouse button.


Exhibit 1-6: A collapsed panel dock with a panel group expanded
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116 Photoshop CS5: Basic

Workspaces

If you regularly rearrange the panels for various workflows, you can save time by
saving a particular arrangement of panels as a workspace. You can then load that
workspace to automatically return to that panel arrangement.
To save a workspace:

1 Arrange the panels the way you want them.
2 On the application bar, click the Workspace switcher button (the button) and
choose New Workspace to open the New Workspace dialog box, shown in
Exhibit 1-7.
3 Edit the Name box to identify the workspace.
4 Under Capture, specify the components you want to save as part of the
workspace.
5 Click Save.
With the new Live Workspace feature, you can make adjustments to the workspace and
Photoshop will save them automatically. Then, if you switch to another workspace and
then switch back, the panels will be configured as you left them previously.


Exhibit 1-7: The New Workspace dialog box
To load a workspace, choose it from the Workspace switcher menu. To return a
workspace to its default settings, choose Window, Workspace, Reset [Workspace name]
or choose Reset [Workspace name] from the Workspace switcher menu.
To delete a workspace, choose Delete Workspace from the Workspace switcher menu.
In the Delete Workspace dialog box, select the workspace you want to delete from the
list, and click Delete. (Note, however, that you cant delete the active workspace.)
In addition to creating your own workspaces, you can use one of the default workspaces
provided in Photoshop. To do so, click the Workspace switcher button and select one of
the preset workspaces. The workspace options are also available in the Window,
Workspace submenu.
The Tools panel

The Tools panel provides various tools used to select, paint, view, and edit images.
Some tools are visible and some are hidden. A small triangle in the lower-right corner of
a tools button indicates that hidden tools are available. To display them, either click and
hold the tool until a tool list appears, or right-click the tool. In the list, the selected tool
is marked with a black square. You can select another tool by clicking its name in the
list.

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Getting started 117

Customizing shortcuts and menus

Photoshop provides keyboard shortcuts that you can use to quickly select a tool, menu,
or operation. For instance, to undo a change, you can press Ctrl+Z rather than choosing
Edit, Undo.
You can change shortcuts and create shortcuts by using the Keyboard Shortcuts and
Menus dialog box. To create a shortcut:
1 Choose Edit, Keyboard Shortcuts.
2 From the Shortcuts For list, select the appropriate category. Choices include
Application Menus, Panel Menus, and Tools.
3 Expand the categories and select the desired command. Then enter or change the
key combination and click Accept. If the combination is already assigned, you
are offered two options:
Click Accept and Go To Conflict to specify a new shortcut for the current
command and then to choose a new shortcut for the command that the
shortcut was previously used for.
Click Undo Changes to cancel the new shortcut. You can then try a
different key combination.
4 Save the changes as a new set of shortcuts. From the Set list, you can select your
custom set or select Photoshop Defaults. Before saving a set, you can discard
any changes by clicking Cancel.
You can customize the display of menus by using the Menus tab in the Keyboard
Shortcuts and Menus dialog box. Many, though not all, menu items can be hidden in
order to simplify menus and display only commands you commonly use. You can apply
colors to commands to make them stand out or to enable color-coded instructions.
To customize menus:
1 Choose Edit, Menus.
2 From the Menu For list, select either Application Menus or Panel Menus.
3 Expand the menu categories.
4 Click the button in the Visibility column to hide an item.
5 In the Color column, click None and select a color.
6 Save the customized menus as a new set.
There are two ways to display hidden menu items:
Press Ctrl before you click the menu.
Choose Show All Menu Items at the bottom of the menu.
You can turn off the menu colors by clearing Show Menu Colors in the Interface section
of the Preferences dialog box.
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118 Photoshop CS5: Basic

Custom panels

As you work with Photoshop, you might find that youre frequently using the same tools
from several panels, or you might find that some of the panels arent organized ideally
for your workflow. Using an application called Adobe Configurator, you can create your
own custom panels and import them into Photoshop. To do so, navigate to
http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/configurator/ and download Configurator. Creating a
panel is as easy as dragging and dropping tools and commands into a new panel. When
youre finished, export your panel to Photoshop and then open or restart Photoshop;
your new panel will appear in the Window, Extension submenu.
In addition to using custom panels to organize tools and commands, you can use them to
load images and video. For example, to view images, you could create a panel that
contains the SWF or Image Loader widget, with which you can load GIF, JPEG, PNG,
and SWF files. You could also use the Movie Player widget to load FLV (Flash) or
MOV movie files.
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Getting started 119

Do it! C-2: Organizing Photoshop panels
Heres how Heres why

1 Click the Channels panel tab (In the Layers panel group.) Youll undock
Channels to make it a floating panel.

Drag the Channels panel tab to the
left as shown

Until the Channel panel separates from the dock.

Drag the Channels panel into the
document window
So that it doesnt overlap the panel dock.

2 Choose Window, History To display the History panel. In the default
Essentials workspace, the History panel is in the
panel dock.
Tell students to drag to
where they can see a blue
line completely
surrounding the Channels
panel.
3 Drag the History panel tab to the
Channels panel

To remove the History panel from the dock and
create a new panel group.
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120 Photoshop CS5: Basic


Make sure students
drag the panel group by
the title bar, rather than by
the tab.
4 Drag the Color panel groups title
bar, as shown, into the document
window

To undock the panels.

5 Click the Collapse to Icons button,
as shown
To collapse the dock.
Now that you have the workspace arranged in a
particular way, you will save it so that you can
use it at any time.

6 On the application bar, click
(The Workplace switcher button.) To show a
menu of workplace options.

Choose New Workspace To open the New Workspace dialog box.

Edit the Name box to read
My workspace


Click Save To save the workspace.

7 Drag the Color panel group to the
right side of the document
window

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Getting started 121



8 Drag the History panel group
below the Color panel group, as
shown

Photoshops Live Workspace feature will retain
the positions of the panels.

9 Click the Workspace switcher
button and choose Essentials
To return to the Essentials workspace. The live
workspace feature has remembered the positions
the panels were in before you saved the new
workspace.
To demonstrate the
live workspace feature,
have students switch to
My workspace and
rearrange the panels.
Then have them switch
between Essentials and
My workspace. Have them
switch to the Essentials
workspace when finished.
10 Click the Workspace switcher
button and choose
Reset Essentials
To return the workspace to its default settings.

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122 Photoshop CS5: Basic

Image magnification and scrolling techniques
Explanation

When youre working with an image, youll often need to zoom in closely to see and
adjust small details. Youll then need to zoom back out to see the entire image.
The following table describes techniques for changing image magnification.

Technique/tool Description
Zoom tool Select the Zoom tool; then click the image to zoom in, or drag over
part of an image to zoom in on that area. Press Alt and click to zoom
out. As you adjust the magnification, the document windows size
remains unchanged. To adjust the window size as you zoom, check
Resize Windows To Fit on the options bar.
Temporarily accessing
the Zoom tool
When youre using any tool, press Ctrl+Spacebar to access the
Zoom tool, or press Alt+Spacebar to access the Zoom Out tool.
View commands From the View menu, choose commands to zoom in, zoom out, fit
the image in the available space, view the image at 100%, or view
the image at the approximate print size. Most of these commands
have corresponding keyboard shortcuts, shown in the menu.
Navigator panel At the bottom of the Navigator panel, click the Zoom In or Zoom
Out buttons, drag the Zoom slider, or enter a value in the Zoom box.
Zoom box (At the bottom of the document window.) Edit the value to change
the images magnification.

When you display an image at 100% magnification, one screen pixel is used to display
one image pixel, giving you the most accurate view of the image. At 200%
magnification, two screen pixels re-create each image pixel; and at 50% magnification,
one screen pixel is forced to display two image pixels. In either case, the image is
somewhat distorted. To display an image at 100% magnification, choose View, Actual
Pixels. To view an image at the size at which it will print, choose View, Print Size.
In order to better support panning and zooming in very large or three-dimensional
images, Photoshop can work with your computers GPU (graphics processing unit) to
improve the speed and quality of renderings. This works only if the GPU supports the
OpenGL standard. Older hardware might not support this function. To see if your
system does, choose Edit, Preferences, Performance. If the settings in the GPU Settings
panel are grayed out, your system doesnt support OpenGL.
Scrolling an image

When you zoom in on an image, you might need to scroll to see different parts of it.
You can drag the windows scrollbars, but a more intuitive method is to pan by using
the Hand tool to drag the image. You can select the Hand tool from the Tools panel, or
you can select it temporarily by pressing Spacebar. In addition, in the Navigator panel,
you can drag the proxy preview area, shown in Exhibit 1-8, to pan the image.
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Zoom
Out
Proxy preview
area
Zoom
box
Zoom
slider
Zoom
In

Exhibit 1-8: The Navigator panel
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124 Photoshop CS5: Basic

Do it! C-3: Magnifying and scrolling images
Heres how Heres why

1 Verify that the Open book
document window is active
Click its tab, if necessary.
Tell students to keep
these keys pressed until
instructed to release them.
Press and hold
c + q
To temporarily access the Zoom tool. (Continue
pressing and holding Ctrl+Spacebar throughout
this step.)
Click the document To zoom in one level of magnification.
Click the right lens of the
glasses, then drag right
(Drag until that lens fills the document window.)
The Scrubby Zoom feature enables you to zoom
in a freeform manner. Dragging left would zoom
out again.
Tell students they
can press Ctrl++ (Ctrl +
plus sign) to zoom in.
If students computers
dont support OpenGL,
then they will see a
marquee when they drag.
Release c + q
To return to the selected tool.
Tell students they
can also press Ctrl+ (Ctrl
+ minus sign) to zoom out.
2 Press and hold
a + q and click
anywhere in the image
To zoom out one level of magnification.

Release a + q


3 In the Tools panel, click
To select the Zoom tool.

Press and hold a, and click
five times
To zoom out, decreasing image magnification.

Release a, and click twice
To zoom in again.
Tell students they
can also press Ctrl+0.
4 Choose View, Fit on Screen The image is slightly distorted, and the
magnification percentage (displayed in the
bottom-left corner of the image window) is not a
whole number.

5 Zoom in to 200% magnification When youre viewing a magnified image, you
often cant see the entire image in the window.
Although you can use scrollbars, its often easier
to use the Hand tool to pan the image.
As with the Zoom tool, you can access the Hand
tool temporarily.
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6 Press and hold q
To temporarily access the Hand tool.

Drag from the center of the image
to the right
(Continue to press the Spacebar while dragging.)
To view the image area that was previously
beyond the left edge of the window.

When the mouse pointer is at the
right edge of the window, release
the mouse button and then
release q
The image is not distorted, but it is slightly
jagged because each image pixel is now
represented by a 2 pixel 2 pixel block.
Because youve zoomed in so closely, its
sometimes difficult to know what part of the
image youre looking at. You can use the
Navigator panel to see the whole image.

7 Choose Window, Navigator To open the Navigator panel group.

Click once as shown

To zoom out to 100%.

In the Navigator panel, drag the
proxy preview area

To pan to different parts of the image.

In the Navigator panel, click To hide the panel.
8 Close Open book Choose File, Close.
Tell students that
they can also press
Ctrl+W.
Click as shown

To close My fire alarm.

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126 Photoshop CS5: Basic

Adobe Bridge and Mini Bridge
Explanation

If you use other applications in the Adobe Creative Suite, then youll likely reuse
images you create in Photoshop in other programs, such as InDesign and Illustrator. To
manage files used in various CS5 applications, you can use Adobe Bridge, shown in
Exhibit 1-9. A new feature in CS5 is Mini Bridge, a panel you can use to browse and
manage images in Photoshop, InDesign, and InCopy. Adobe Bridge and Mini Bridge
communicate with one another to keep your assets up to date.



Folders tab Thumbnails
Thumbnail slider View buttons
Workspace
menu button

Exhibit 1-9: Adobe Bridge, displaying images in a folder
To manage files with Adobe Bridge:

1 On the application bar in Photoshop, click the Launch Bridge icon.
2 Click the Folders tab.
3 Navigate to the desired file folder by using the tree view.
4 Select a workspace option. A few options are displayed on the application bar,
as shown in Exhibit 1-9; others are accessed through the Workspace menu. You
can access the same options from the Window menu.
5 If you want to enlarge or shrink the thumbnails, drag the Thumbnail slider.
6 In Essentials view, click a thumbnail to display a preview and metadata
(additional information about the file, such as its kind, modification date,
dimensions, and resolution).
7 Click a view button to select display options.
8 To open a file, either double-click its thumbnail to open it in the default Adobe
Creative Suite application for that file type; or right-click it, choose Open With,
and choose an application.
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Mini Bridge

You can manage assets that you want to share between Creative Suite applications from
within Photoshop by using Mini Bridge, shown in Exhibit 1-10. Mini Bridge is a panel
that appears, minimized in the panel dock, in the default Essentials workspace. When
you open the Mini Bridge panel, youll see the Navigation pod and the Content pod. Use
the Navigation pod to find the files you want to manage, which will be shown in the
Content pod. As with Adobe Bridge, Mini Bridge has buttons you can use to navigate
and to change the view of the selected files.


Navigation pod
Content pod

Exhibit 1-10: The Mini Bridge panel
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128 Photoshop CS5: Basic

Do it! C-4: Managing files with Adobe Bridge
The files for this activity are in Student Data folder Unit 1\Topic C.
Heres how Heres why
If students are asked
whether to start Bridge at
login, tell them to click No.
1 On the options bar, click
(The Launch Bridge button.) To start Adobe
Bridge from within Photoshop. Youll examine
the images in the current topic folder.

2 Click the Folders tab

3 Navigate to the current topic
folder
To display thumbnails for the files in this folder.

4 In the bottom-right corner of the
Bridge window, click
(The View content as details button.) To
display information about each image.

Click
(The View content as thumbnails button.) To
return to the initial view.

5 Drag the Thumbnail slider To resize the image thumbnails.

6 Click My Fire alarm.jpg To display its preview and metadata.
Examine the files preview and
metadata
In the panes on the right side of the window.
7 Double-click My fire
alarm.jpg
To open it in Photoshop.
Tell students they
can enlarge the right-hand
panes by dragging the
separator bar between the
panes and the main
content area.
8 Close My fire alarm Press Ctrl+W.

9 Switch to Adobe Bridge

Close Adobe Bridge

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Getting started 129

Topic D: Getting help
Explanation You can use the Photoshop Help menu to learn about Photoshop features, tools, and
commands. You can also get information on plug-ins and access the Photoshop Support
Center.
Photoshop help
To access help information, choose Help, Photoshop Help or press F1. This will open
Adobe Community Help in a new window, shown in Exhibit 1-11. Adobe Community
Help incorporates customer feedback into a continually evolving documentation project.
Adobe Community Help features a search box with which you can search the database.
There is a link to download the printable PDF version, and there are links for the
Photoshop Help and Support Web site, the Learn Photoshop CS5 Web site, a user
forum, and information on CS Live.
When you first use Adobe Community Help, youll be asked to specify preferences. To
do so, click Set your preferences now or choose Edit, Preferences. When you do so,
you can choose whether to have help files available for offline use, how to handle
updates, and other settings.



Exhibit 1-11: Adobe Community Help
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130 Photoshop CS5: Basic

Do it! D-1: Using Photoshop Help
Heres how Heres why
1 Choose Help,
Photoshop Help
To open Adobe Community Help in a new
window.
Adobe Community
Help is constantly
updated. If students are
asked to download an
update, have them do so.
2 Observe the top of the window

You are asked to set your preferences for Adobe
Community Help.

Click Set your preferences
now
To open the Preferences dialog box.

3 In the Download Preferences
section, verify that Photoshop
CS5 is checked


Click Done To remove the message about preferences.
4 Click
(If necessary.) To display the Home screen. If students dont see the
list of Photoshop topics,
have them click the home
icon and then click the
Photoshop CS5 icon.
Click
(If necessary.) To access Photoshop help.

Click the plus sign to the left of
Opening and importing images

To expand the topic.

Click Image essentials To display the subtopics.

Click Bit depth To display the help topic.

5 In the Search box, type
puppet warp
(The Search box is in the left pane.) Youll
search for help based on the search word.

Press e
The window below the search box displays a list
of search results.

Click the first search result To display the help topic on Puppet Warp.

6 Close Adobe Community Help

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Getting started 131

Unit summary: Getting started
Topic A In this topic, you learned about issues related to copyrights and image use.
Topic B In this topic, you learned about digital photography, and you learned how to identify
the attributes of vector and raster graphics.
Topic C In this topic, you learned about the Photoshop environment, and you learned how to
switch screen modes. You also arranged panels and saved a panel arrangement as a
workspace. In addition, you learned how to magnify an image and scroll to view
different parts of an image. Finally, you learned how to browse and manage files by
using Adobe Bridge.
Topic D In this topic, you opened Adobe Community Help and displayed help topics.
Independent practice activity
In this activity, youll open an image, adjust magnification, scroll, and save a custom
workspace. Finally, youll look up information by using the Help feature.
The files for this activity are in Student Data folder Unit 1\Unit summary.
1 Open the Fire alarm 90CW image.
2 Zoom in to 200% on the letter D in the word DOWN.
3 Fit the image on the screen.
4 Use Scrubby Zoom to zoom in on the letter I in FIRE.
5 Use the Navigator panel to pan to the letter E in FIRE.
6 Create an arrangement of panels that you like, and create a new dock.
7 Save the arrangement as My practice workspace.
8 Switch to the Essentials workspace. Then reset the workspace.
9 Delete all custom workspaces.
10 Use the Help feature to look up information about vector graphics. Close the Adobe
Community Help window.
11 Close the image.
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132 Photoshop CS5: Basic

Review questions
1 What legal protections extend to copyrighted works?
A work that is copyrighted is protected by law from being copied and used without the copyright
holders permission, whether or not the work has been published.
2 When do you need to obtain permission before using a copyrighted work?
Always, except in cases of fair use.
3 Which type of graphic can you enlarge significantly without it appearing jagged
when printed: vector or raster?
Vector
4 When you zoom to 100% magnification, you see:
A The image at the size it will be when printed
B The image at a size that fills the monitor
C One image pixel for each monitor pixel
D The image at a size that fills its window
5 Youve opened several panels and have arranged them in a way that works best for
your workflow. How can you save this arrangement?
From the Workspace switcher menu, choose New Workspace. Name the workspace and click
Save.
6 What key or key combination can you use to temporarily access the Zoom tool?
A Ctrl+Spacebar
B Alt+Spacebar
C Spacebar
D Ctrl+Alt+Spacebar
7 What key or key combination can you use to temporarily access the Hand tool?
A Ctrl+Spacebar
B Alt+Spacebar
C Spacebar
D Ctrl+Alt+Spacebar
8 True or false? In addition to browsing Help topics by title, you can type a search
term and click Search to display topics containing the term.
True
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