You are on page 1of 9

Application Note

[AN-13004]

ClearType font usage on TX23D200VM0BAA


1. Objective
The purpose of this application note is to clarify the phenomenon that occurs due to TX23D200VM0BAAs B-G-R sub-pixel structure while using the ClearType setting in Microsoft/Linux Operating System. This application note also provides options to adjust the ClearType function to avoid colour-fringing and recommends a substitute display with R-GB sub-pixel ordering for customers choice.

2. Background
Owing to the discontinuation of the TX23D38VM0CAA and in order to be compatible with existing customers housing, the TX23D200VM0BAA has been designed to be 100% compatible with the outline dimensions of D38 and will therefore prevent the need for any hard tooling change at customers side. However the mechanical design of new glass cell is opposite to TX23D38VM0CAA, therefore we had to assemble the glass upside-down to fit into TX23D38VM0CAA outline.

3. What is ClearType
An LCD screen is composed of an array of pixels and each single pixel element is composed of 3 R-G-B sub-pixels, the combination of which, generate the colours we see. This technology takes the advantage of the restriction in the way the brain processes information. Our eyes have difficulty in identifying the closely spaced colours, eg. 0.163mm width, and will mix the three primary colours and combine them into the desired colour. Based on above principle, and in order to achieve a better visual experience, Operating System designers have developed a new algorithm, so-called ClearType. ClearType allows characters and text to be created with smoother edges by combining the 3 primary colours together with adjacent sub-pixels. In this way, we can reduce the jagged edges to one-third width and get achieve a smoother diagonal accordingly. (see Figure 1)
What you see on the screen Jagged edges reduced!

Whats actually being displayed

Reprogrammed to ClearType font

Use adjacent pixel to tune the smoothness

Figure 1. How ClearType works

October 2013

Page 1 of 9

Application Note

[AN-13004]

For a B-G-R ordering LCD, in order to cope with the R-G-B-oriented signal, we make the signal of R and B reversed to reach the same colour we expected.
R-G-B ordering sub-pixel

Data input Customers

R G B

Vision system

B-G-R ordering sub-pixel

Data input Customers Reverse B & R signal

B G R

Vision system

Figure 2. How B-G-R pixel reveals the same colour as R-G-B one

In most of the situation, these two displays formats achieve identical visual results without failure. However when you apply ClearType in a B-G-R pixel ordered LCD, youll see the colour-fringing phenomenon as described below. This is due to the fact that ClearType will delicately adjust subpixels instead of full pixels.
R-G-B ordering sub-pixel

Data input Customers (ClearType)

Vision system

B-G-R ordering sub-pixel Disorder block! Data input Customers (ClearType) Reverse B & R signal Vision system

Figure 3. Why B-G-R pixels colour-fringe while using ClearType


October 2013 Page 2 of 9

Application Note
4. Summary

[AN-13004]

This is what you may observe in your display when you apply ClearType in a B-G-R sub-pixel ordered display (see Figure 4).

Horizontally displacement

Figure 4. Colour-fringed digit

You can also check Microsoft website to get further information, it also states that the ClearType can have best effect while using the R-G-B, with R on the left, vertical stripes sub-pixel configuration (see reference 2). On the other hand, this technology is not suitable for pixel in delta arrangement or other arrangement except vertical stripe one. Here we provide several options for you to solve this problem: 1. Disable the ClearType font in your OS: You can tick off the option in Control Panel. Please refer to the instruction of your OS. 2. For the convenience of B-G-R user, Microsoft also developed the B-G-R version of ClearType, You can approach Microsoft website to download the revised Service Pack for your OS. 3. KOE also provide an alternative product, TX23D201VM0BAA, for customers choice. Here lists the relative data, front-view and back-view for your information.
Table 1. Product outline

Part Number Module Dimensions LCD Active Area Resolution Backlight Interface Viewing Direction Brightness Contrast Operating Temp. Storage Temp.

TX23D200VM0BAA 218(W) x 135(H) x 11.15(D) 196.8(W) x 118.08(H) 800 x 480 70Khrs LED LVDS; 1 channel; 20 pins Super Wide Version (IPS) 500 800 -30~80 degree C -40~90 degree C
October 2013

TX23D201VM0BAA 218(W) x 135(H) x 11.15(D) 196.8(W) x 118.08(H) 800 x 480 70Khrs LED LVDS; 1 channel; 20 pins Super Wide Version (IPS) 500 800 -30~80 degree C -40~90 degree C
Page 3 of 9

Application Note
Pin assignment of TX23D200VM0BAA

[AN-13004]

Pin assignment of TX23D201VM0BAA

Note: An extra function to adjust the scan direction for wide usage.
October 2013 Page 4 of 9

Application Note
Outline dimensions of TX23D200VM0BAA: (front view)

[AN-13004]

October 2013

Page 5 of 9

Application Note
Outline dimensions of TX23D200VM0BAA: (rear view)

[AN-13004]

October 2013

Page 6 of 9

Application Note
Outline dimensions of TX23D201VM0BAA: (front view)

[AN-13004]

October 2013

Page 7 of 9

Application Note
Outline dimensions of TX23D201VM0BAA: (rear view)

[AN-13004]

October 2013

Page 8 of 9

Application Note
5. Reference

[AN-13004]

1) https://www.grc.com/ctwhat.htm 2) http://www.microsoft.com/typography/links/news.aspx?NID=753
Microsoft issues ClearType technology release Presently, the optimal LCD configuration is one in which the RGB pixel alignment is orthogonal to the direction of reading; in other words, it is parallel to the main vertical stems of text. In simple terms, when reading English text (for example), the best configuration is to have the RGB "striping" run in vertical stripes down the screen (with the red sub-pixel of each RGB pixel on the left).

3) http://www.microsoft.com/typography/ClearTypeFAQ.mspx
Q. Will ClearType look OK if my screen's colour striping is BGR instead of RGB? A. It depends. Most LCD screens have a RGB striping order. A very small number have a striping order of BGR. The image below shows side-by-side examples of text rendered with RGB or BGR ordering. If the BGR example looks better on your screen, then your screen may be using a BGR striping order.

Support for BGR displays was added to Windows XP with Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1).

October 2013

Page 9 of 9