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Different man-overboard manoeuvres may be required, depending upon the situation prevailing and the type of ship involved.

There are three basic situations: 1. "Immediate action" situation: asualty is noticed on the bridge and action is initiated immediately! ". "Delayed action" situation: asualty is reported to the bridge by an eye #itness and action is initiated #ith some delay! $. "%erson missing" situation: %erson is reported to the bridge as "missing". &hen a ship ma'es full speed ahead, the follo#ing three standard manoeuvres are used: 1. (ingle turn )"*+, manoeuvre-: .udder hard over )in an "immediate action" situation, only to the side of the casualty-! after deviation from the original course by "/+,, rudder to midship position and stopping manoeuvre to be initiated.

". &illiamson turn: rudder hard over )in an "immediate action" situation, only to the side of the casualty-! after deviation from the original course by 0+,, rudder hard over to the opposite side! #hen heading "+, short of opposite course, rudder to midship position and ship to be turned to opposite course.

$. (charno# turn )not to be used in an "immediate action" situation.-: rudder hard over! after deviation from the original course by "1+,, rudder hard over to the opposite side! #hen heading "+, short of opposite course, rudder to midship position so that ship #ill turn to opposite course.

2o#adays these manoeuvrers are not used any more on board modern ships: 3%( and electronic charts have a "man overboard button" #hich records the ship4s position and give the navigator the bearing and the distance from the point #here the person fell. )courtesy of .yndam-