Pappenheimer Bodies / Siderotic Cells

Peripheral smear from a patient with a history of sickle cell anemia. The arrows indicate hypochromic erythrocytes containing clusters of small irregular granules around the periphery of the red blood cell. These granules, composed of ferric iron, are called siderotic granules and appear as dark-blue granules in Wright stain. To verify that the red cell inclusions contain iron, it is necessary to use an iron stain such as Prussian blue.

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O'Connor .A Color Atlas and Instruction Manual of Peripheral Blood Cell Morphology By Barbara H.

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12 exams will be on Monday. . Oct.Exams for Oct 11 PM will be moved to Oct 16 AM schedule changes is as follows: 2:00 pm to 7:30 am 4:00 pm to 9:30 am 6:00 pm to 11:30 am In case there will be suspension tomorrow (saturday). Please disseminate. 14.KASAMA/SSC Execom . Original schedule will be followed. 2013. Oct.

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The explanation for the difference in terminology is that Romanowsky stains visualize Pappenheimer bodies by staining the protein matrix of the granule. whereas Prussian blue stain is responsible for staining the iron portion of the granule. as if they have been gently placed on the red cell membrane.Pappenheimer bodies (siderotic granules) are small. they are designated differently depending on the stain used. resulting from an excess of available iron throughout the body. when seen in a Wright—stained smear and siderotic granules when seen in Prussian blue or other kinds of iron stain. Once the presence of siderotic granules has been confirmed by iron stains. Sideroblasts exhibiting numerous siderotic granules . Even though Pappenheimer bodies and siderotic granules are the same inclusion. irregular magenta inclusions seen along (he periphery of red cells. The inclusions are termed Pappenheimer bodies. These bodies/granules in RBCs are nonheme iron. However. the Prussian blue stain is the confirmatory test for determining the presence of these inclusions. Siderocytes containing a nucleus are described as sideroblasts and are commonly seen in sideroblastic anemias. the cells in which they are found are termed siderocytes. Their presence on a Wright’s or a supravital stained peripheral smear is presumptive evidence for the presence of iron. They usually appear in clusters.

.found within the mitochondria forming a ring around at least one-third of the nucleus. Siderocytes are seen in any condition in which there is iron overloading such as hemochromatosis or hemosiderosis.. They may also be seen in the hemoglobinopathies (e. are labeled as pathologic ringed sideroblasts. sickle cell anemia and thalassemia) and in patients following splenectomy.g.