Te mobile app Safe Trek is

free to KU students until this
Friday at midnight.
Student Body President
Marcus Tetwiler was contacted
by the creator of the app over
winter break, and was able to
make a negotiation that will
allow students free access to
this app. Safe Trek has recently
gained popularity in many SEC
schools, but the University will
be the frst Big 12 school to
have this opportunity.
“It’s a great way to use
technology and innovation
to improve campus safety,”
Tetwiler said.
Safe Trek provides students
with a proactive safety outlet
if they ever feel threatened by
their surroundings. Users can
hold down the safe button,
which will passively connect
them to the police.
If nothing happens, students
can release the button and
enter a PIN number to cancel
an alert to the police. If
something unexpected occurs,
the user can release the safe
button without entering the
PIN and the police will be
notifed to arrive at the scene.
Every time there is an alert
in a specifc location, Safe Trek
records the location and places
a blue dot on a GPS map and
coordinates it with other dots
from the area. Tis allows
campus and local police to
see which areas are the most
threatened and what they can
do to improve them.
Zach Beattie, co-creator
of the app, is a senior at the
University of Missouri. He
and his partner, Nick Droege,
created the app afer hearing
several students and parents
question the safety of the
campus.
“We wanted to do something
to make a diference in our
community,” said Beattie. “Tis
is something that has changed
my life, and something we
hope will change the lives of
the people in our community.”
Safe Trek was released for
iPhones about three months
ago, and was just recently
released for Android phones.
As of now, the app has more
than 5,000 downloads. Beattie
and his partner have shared
this app with several other
schools around them.
Tere were three university
shootings this week around
the country. Tese shootings
include one student who was
shot while sitting in his car
at Widener University on
Monday, a teaching assistant
who was killed at Purdue
University on Tuesday, and a
false alarm at the University of
Oklahoma yesterday.
— Edited by Blair Sheade
It seems as if 2009 Swine
Flu (H1N1) is back for more,
and this time it has brought
additional new fu strains.
Because of this, the State of
Kansas recommends everyone
six months of age and older get
a fu shot.
Last week, more than 5
percent of doctors’ visits
were because of infuenza-
like symptoms, the Kansas
Department of Health and
Environment reported. Tis
number was more than double
the occurrence for the same
week in 2012. Tere have been
892 cases of Swine Flu and 164
cases of Infuenza A reported
to the CDC in the nation’s west
north central region as of Jan.
10.
Infuenza, the eighth leading
cause of death in Kansas, is a
major concern for physicians
and major health organizations.
It’s estimated that 5 to 10
percent of Americans are sick
with the fu every year.
In 2013, 1,444 deaths were
reported. So far, there have
been three deaths statewide.
Last month, Lawrence
Memorial Hospital confrmed
more than 97 cases of fu in
a 12-day period. As a result,
physicians at Watkins Student
Health Center encourage
college students to get
vaccinated.
“Tis year we will be very
worried about [the fu] in
the college student,” said Dr.
Leah Luckeroth, a physician at
Watkins Student Health Center.
“I still highly recommend not
to share drinks or food.”
Te everyday activities
of college students make
them more susceptible to
illnesses, especially the fu,
said Luckeroth. In addition to
sharing food, college students
don’t prioritize sleep and
healthy eating habits, and
the 18-22 age group is less
likely to get immunized. Tis
susceptibility lead to especially
bad infuenza cases, like
freshman Taylor Cameron.
Cameron started of mildly
sick and ended up in the
hospital. Last November,
Cameron got a stomachache
that she attributed to too much
cofee. She realized it wasn’t just
a stomachache afer vomiting
multiple times.
“I was so weak,” she said. “I
defnitely knew I needed an IV.”
Cameron’s friends drove her
to the hospital and her nurse
told her she was going to have
surgery.
At frst, her illness was
mistaken for appendicitis.
Te second nurse, however,
stopped the surgery. Cameron
was put on an IV and bed rest.
She stayed in bed for three days
and missed an exam.
Before her illness, Cameron
wasn’t vaccinated.
“I’ve been against the fu
shot for a long time,” Cameron
said. “When I got [the shot] in
junior high, I got fu symptoms.
I knew a bunch of people who
got a shot and still got the fu.”
Cameron’s case isn’t unique;
other students are coming
down with potentially life-
threatening cases.
“Tere are people that
are young that are getting
hospitalized,” Luckeroth
said. Tese hospitalized
college students join the
more than 200,000 fu-related
hospitalizations nationwide,
according to Kansas
Department of Health and
Environment.
Knowing these preventative
measures can help classmates
and friends, Luckeroth said.
“If you have a friend and
they aren’t getting better and
they aren’t going to the doctor,
encourage them to do so
because we do not want a bad
outcome,” Luckeroth said.
— Edited by Blair Sheade
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2014 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 2B
CROSSWORD 5A
CRYPTOQUIPS 5A
OPINION 4A
SPORTS 1B
SUDOKU 5A
Sunny. Zero percent
chance of rain. Wind
NNW at 15 mph.
To swing by the Union at
3 p.m. for tea, courtesy of SUA.
Index Don’t
Forget
Today’s
Weather
Waking up in Kansas.
HI: 15
LO: 5
Volume 126 Issue 65 kansan.com Thursday, January 23, 2014
UDK
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
HEALTH
Changes in air circulation in the upper
atmosphere aid in transmission of the virus.
People spend more time inside
breathing each other’s air and germs.
The virus itself thrives in colder, dry air. Darkness, which leads to lack of Vitamin D
and melatonin, combines with winter cold to
weaken our immune systems.
Sep. 16, 2013
Dec. 18, 2013
December 2013
Dec. 19, 2013
Dec. 31, 2013
Dec., 2013, - Jan., 2014
MCKENNA HARFORD
news@kansan.com
Swine flu epidemic causes student hospitalizations

“This year we will be very worried about [the flu] in
the college student. I still highly recommend not to
share drinks or food.”
LEAH LUCKEROTH
Physician
SWINE FLU, ROUND TWO
EXCLUSIVE ONLINE CONTENT
Check out kansan.com for our first digitial Friday, which will feature exclusive multimedia content
including: Women’s Basketball, Student Opera, Matt Easton Performance.
TECHNOLOGY
Free safety app available to students
PAIGE STINGLEY
news@kansan.com
1. DOWNLOAD THE APP
Input your personal
information to create a
safety profile.
2. WHEN YOU FEEL
UNSAFE
Launch the application
and hold down on the
safe button.
3.WHEN YOU ARE SAFE
Type your four-digit pin
number to exit the app
and halt GPS tracking.
4. IN AN EMERGENCY
Release the safe button.
If you don’t enter your
pin after 10 seconds,
police will be notified.
HOW IT WORKS
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Safe Trek is a new mobile app that provides a proactive safety outlet for
students. The app is available for free download until Friday at midnight.
Offensive collapse leads to Kansas’ deafeat | PAGE 1B
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
INDIANAPOLIS —
A Purdue University
engineering student, who
police say fatally shot another
student in a basement
classroom, prepared to face a
judge as those who knew both
men struggled to make sense
of the violence Wednesday.
Cody Cousins, 23, was
scheduled to make an
initial court appearance
Tursday afernoon in a small
courtroom at the Tippecanoe
County Jail, Deputy
Prosecutor Kristen McVey
said in a statement.
Cousins, who has addresses
in Warsaw, Ind., and
Centerville, Ohio, is being
held without bond on a
preliminary charge of murder
in Tuesday’s shooting death of
21-year-old Andrew Boldt of
West Bend, Wis. Police have
said Cousins targeted Boldt
but they haven’t disclosed why
or how the two might have
known each other.
Conficting portraits are
emerging of Cousins. Former
high school classmates and
teachers say he excelled
academically. But some at
Purdue say he could be rude
and disliked being told he was
wrong.
Police have said both
Cousins and Boldt were
seniors, and they identifed
Boldt as a teaching assistant.
However, documents posted
on the engineering school’s
website also listed Cousins
as a teaching assistant. Both
he and Boldt worked under
Professor David Meyer for
separate classes, according to
the documents.
Purdue spokeswoman Liz
Evans would not comment
on Cousins’ status. A
woman who answered the
phone at Meyer’s home said
the professor would not
comment.
Cousins graduated from
Springboro High School
in southwestern Ohio,
about an hour outside of
Cincinnati, school district
spokeswoman Karen
DeRosa said.
“We know he excelled
academically and was very
strong in technology and
computer science,” DeRosa
said.
Greg Adams, who
graduated from Springboro
with Cousins, said the
two weren’t close friends
but that Cousins seemed
friendly.
“From what I saw he
was very outgoing,” said
Adams, 24, who still lives
in Springboro. “He had a
girlfriend. Afer school I’d see
him in the computer labs and
he’d be talking to his friends
and girlfriend.”
Former high school
classmate Matt Herman,
who works for WDTN-TV
in Dayton, Ohio, told the
station that Cousins was on an
academic team and part of the
skiing and snowboarding club
in high school.
“We were all really shocked
to hear this,” Herman said
of the allegations against
Cousins.
But Cousins may not have
fared as well at Purdue.
Ashley Eidsmore, a teaching
assistant in the engineering
school, told Te Associated
Press that Cousins was an
undergraduate member of
her research team working
through the Vertically
Integrated Projects course.
She said some of her lab mates
who worked closely with
Cousins complained that he
was a “just all-around rude
individual.”
Purdue Professor Tomas
Talavage, who worked with
Cousins, said he was intense
and aggressive about his
projects.
“He didn’t like to be told
he was wrong,” Talavage
said. “He tended to be more
aggressive in his debating and
tended to be more convinced
he was right.”
Talavage said the electrical
engineering students are
under tremendous pressure
and many don’t graduate from
the program even though
they were top students before
coming to Purdue.
Eidsmore, who was down
the hall when the shooting
occurred, said Boldt was a
“brilliant student” who “wrote
emails with exclamations of
excitement and wore shorts
all year long.”
“No one can comprehend
why this terrible event
occurred. I am just glad I was
able to tell him all the good
things I had heard about him
from the teaching staf,” she
told the AP in an email.
Te moods on the Purdue
campus in West Lafayette
— about 60 miles northwest
of Indianapolis — and
in Boldt’s hometown in
Wisconsin remained subdued
Wednesday. Purdue reopened
most of the electrical
engineering building where
the shooting occurred, but
students weren’t scheduled to
return to class until Tursday.
A billboard that appeared
Wednesday along Interstate
65 south simply featured the
word “Prayers” — the “P’’
from the Purdue logo.
About 150 people
gathered for a prayer service
Wednesday evening at the
church Boldt’s family attends
in West Bend, Wis., about 40
miles northwest of Milwaukee.
Te family was mostly absent
from the gathering because
they wanted to pray in private,
the Rev. Nathan Reesman
said.
“Like the rest of his family,
he was polite, reserved,
friendly and bright,” Reesman
said of Boldt.
Terry Gardon, Boldt’s
middle school math teacher,
remembered him as being a
quick thinker when it came to
understanding math concepts.
Gardon, who attended the
service, said Boldt would help
other students if they were
struggling.
“He was the kid that would
bring a whole group of kids
together. Tey’d all want to be
around him because he was
just so kind to everybody,”
Gardon said, her eyes
brimming with tears.
What: Art Cart: Express Yourself
When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Where: Spencer Museum of Art
About: Free hands-on art activities
for groups and families.
What: Kansas Food: What We Eat, Who
Produces It, Future Trends and Legal
Developments
When: 3 to 5 p.m.
Where: The Commons in Spooner Hall
About: Four local experts will speak
about current issues in agriculture.
What: Hallmark Symposium Lecture
Series
When: 6 to 8 p.m.
Where: 110 Budig Hall
About: Previous faculty member
Richard Downs will speak about his
experience with printmaking.
What: Philosophy Lecture: “Brutal
Propositions”
When: 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Where: Pine Room in Kansas Union
About: Ben Caplan, a professor from
Ohio State University, will speak. The
event is free to the public.
What: University Daily Kansan
presents Spring Tip-Off; Back to
School Party
When: 9 p.m
Where: The Cave
About: Ages 18-20: $7, 21 and older
$3.
NEWS MANAGEMENT
Editor-in-chief
Katie Kutsko
Managing editor – production
Allison Kohn
Managing editor – digital media
Lauren Armendariz
Associate production editor
Madison Schultz
Associate digital media editor
Will Webber
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT
Advertising director
Sean Powers
Sales manager
Kolby Botts
Digital media and sales manager
Mollie Pointer
NEWS SECTION EDITORS
News editor
Emma LeGault
Associate news editor
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Sports editor
Blake Schuster
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Entertainment editor
Christine Stanwood
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Dani Brady
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Tara Bryant
Copy chiefs
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Hayley Jozwiak
Paige Lytle
Design chiefs
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Designers
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Hayden Parks
Opinion editor
Anna Wenner
Photo editor
George Mullinix
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Michael Strickland
ADVISERS
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content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 PAGE 2A
CONTACT US
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The University Daily Kansan is the
student newspaper of the University
of Kansas. The first copy is paid
through the student activity fee.
Additional copies of The Kansan
are 50 cents. Subscriptions can
be purchased at the Kansan
business office, 2051A Dole Human
Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside
Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045.
The University Daily Kansan (ISSN
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Check out KUJH-TV on Knology of
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more on what you’ve read in today’s
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KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.
KJHK is the student voice in radio.
Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae,
sports or special events, KJHK 90.7
is for you.
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weather,
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What’s the
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SATURDAY
HI: 51
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Wind NNW at 19 mph.
Sun-kissed skin.
FRIDAY
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LO: 34
Partly cloudy. Zero
percent chance of rain.
Wind SW at 27 mph.
The sun that got away.
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HI: 58
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percent chance of rain.
Wind NW at 20 mph.
You’re hot and you’re cold.
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Purdue student killed in campus shooting
What: The Wonderful Wizard of Song:
The Music of Harold Arlen
When: 2 p.m.
Where: The Lied Center
About: A multimedia music review of
Wizard of Oz score composer Harold
Arlen’s hits. Tickets $25-$32 for
adults and $13-$16 for children and
students.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Police handcuff Cody Cousins, 23, after a deadly shooting on the Purdue University campus in West Lafayette,
Ind., on Tuesday. Cousins is being held on a preliminary charge of murder.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 PAGE 3A THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
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At the start of the new year,
Missouri and Colorado were
among 13 states to have their
minimum wage levels raised.
Missouri’s was raised from
$7.35 to $7.50 per hour while
Colorado’s increased from
$7.78 to $8 per hour. Accord-
ing to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, more than 139,000
workers combined will poten-
tially be afected.
AFFECTING STUDENTS
Maria Comerford, a soph-
omore from Bismarck, Mo.,
has worked several minimum
wage jobs in Missouri. Now
working seasonally at an AMC
movie theater in the state, she
feared losing her job due to the
recent increase.
“I was really nervous when
they started talking about rais-
ing minimum wage,” Comer-
ford said. “Te movie theater I
work at is only four screens, it’s
an AMC 4, so they kinda strug-
gle just to keep movies run-
ning. So when you talk about
raising minimum wage, the
frst thing that struggling busi-
nesses do is to fre employees
they don’t need. And since I’m
seasonal — since I go to school
here — obviously I would be
one of the frst to go.”
She further added, “What
good does 25 cents [more]
make if you’re not making any-
thing?”
Missouri’s state minimum
wage is the result of a 2006 vot-
er initiative that ties the rate of
the state’s minimum wage to
infation, but reverts to the fed-
eral level if it is higher.
Emily Hofman, a freshman
from Canon City, Colo., has
also worked several minimum
wage jobs, ranging from a host-
ess job to a cashier position.
She was happy the jobs paid
a higher minimum wage than
the national average.
“Who doesn’t like more mon-
ey?” Hofman said.
Colorado’s state minimum
wage is calculated based of of
a cost-of-living formula, but
also reverts to the federal level
if it is higher.
THE BIGGER PICTURE
Te minimum wage is de-
fned as the smallest amount
an employer can ofer an em-
ployee for work. Jobs that pay
the minimum wage vary from
food industry jobs to agricul-
tural jobs. According to the
U.S. Department of Labor, “en-
terprises” with sales of more
than $500,000, schools and
individuals that conduct busi-
ness between states are among
the ways employees gain cover-
age. Also, some jobs, like serv-
ers and pizza drivers, are paid
$2.19 instead of the federal lev-
el because they are expected to
make more than the minimum
wage due to tips.
Raising the minimum wage
is not a new issue. Initially es-
tablished at a rate of 25 cents as
a part of the Fair Labor Stan-
dards Act (FLSA) in 1938, it
has been raised gradually by
Congress more than 10 times.
Te federal rate has been $7.25
since July 2009.
Te Fair Minimum Wage Act
of 2013 is the most recent leg-
islation to attempt to raise the
limit. If passed, the bill would
raise the limit to $10.10 an
hour by 2015, tipped employ-
ees would see their $2.19 wage
increase, and the minimum
wage would be tied to auto-
matic increases based of of the
cost of living.
While the debate continues at
the federal level, prospects of
Kansas’ state wage rising seem
unlikely.
“Tere is a federal minimum
wage so they just pretty much
go along with what the federal
minimum wage is,” said Don
Haider-Markel, a professor of
political science at the Univer-
sity. “It’s not even an issue that
really makes it to debate on the
foor of the legislator.”
He notes however, that Kan-
sas state government hasn’t
historically sought more than
the federal level. “Even when
[Kathleen] Sebelius was gov-
ernor, it wasn’t an agenda item
she pushed,” Haider-Markel
said.
While the minimum wage is
more than 70 years old, econo-
mists are still split on its efect.
Some, like the Employment
Policies Institute, which is a
right-leaning think tank, be-
lieve raising the minimum
wage is bad for business. One
researcher at the institute
found that “for every 10 per-
cent increase in the minimum
wage, teen employment at
small business is estimated to
decrease by 4.6 to 9 percent.”
Others believe raising the
wage doesn’t hurt business,
but in fact helps increase their
income and the economy as
a whole. Increasing the wage
amount increases the level
of disposable income people
working those jobs have and
in theory would spend. Others
in the same line of thinking
believe raising the wage can
help lif some workers out of
poverty.
Te Brookings Institute, a
centrist research institute,
published an academic paper
last summer entitled, “Strate-
gies for Assisting Low Income
Families,” which assert house-
hold earnings, would increase
by 19 percent if the wage was
increased to $9. In a follow-up
article “Raising the Minimum
Wage: Will it Help?,” raising
the wage is advocated as part
of a solution to aid low-income
families with social mobility.
Professor Joshua Rosen-
bloom, an economics profes-
sor at the University, said both
models are constructed by the-
ories. As a result, conclusions
reached are not absolutely cer-
tain.
“I would say the evidence for
either side is less than conclu-
sive,” said Rosenbloom.
— Edited by Julie Etzler
Minimum wage increase affects students
MARK ARCE
news@kansan.com
EMPLOYMENT
MCCLATCHY TRIBUNE
Protesters chant outside the Wendy’s fast food restaurant on Aug. 29 in Rock Hill, Mo.

“So when you talk about
raising minimum wage,
the first thing that strug-
gling businesses do is to
fire employees they don’t
need.”
MARIA COMERFORD
Sophomore from Bismarck, Mo.
Recycle
this
paper
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 PAGE 4A
MLK day is the beginning of Black
History Month. We all know it.
I love my peers. Casually eating
a jar of Nutella is now socially
acceptable.
That moment of panic when your
floss gets stuck between your teeth
and your mommy isn’t here to
help you.
If there are about to be vintage
FFAs, I hope I can remember what
I wrote!
College classes are kind of the
same as Dora the Explorer because
they both ask questions and then
wait five minutes for an answer.
My basketball camping group
needs a coup d’état.
I’m a senior mechanical engineer
swimming in a sea of freshman
gen ed electives.
Five days in and Mrs E’s still isn’t
using dishes. I wonder how many
hundreds of pounds of paper
plates/bowls/cups have been
wasted.
Sorry. I know school has started,
but winter has yet to leave which
means going out in the cold ain’t
happening.
If Obama did cocaine, it can’t be
that bad.
My politicss teacher just played
what I think was German death
metal. Well, this semester should
be interesting.
Knowing the clap is not enough!
Listen to the band! Stop rushing!
I suggest that next semester
on the first day of class every
classroom has its number written
on the board.
To all the new transfer students,
the cleanest bathrooms on campus
are in [redacted]
I wish they’d legalize weed just
so stoners would shut the hell up
about it.
Learn the clap. Know the clap. Be
the clap. But don’t get the clap.
All these kids whining about
homework assignments on the first
day of class have never taken an
Engineering course before.
“Uhh, my car knows how to pop,
lock, and drop it... Except the drop
it part. I wish it could do that.”
@collegefession is the best thing
to happen to twitter since
@fakejeffwithey
I’m a senior and the biggest regret
in my college career was getting
the clap
Send your FFA
submissions to
785-289-8351 or
kansan.com
HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
LETTER GUIDELINES
Send letters to opinion@kansan.com. Write
LETTER TO THE EDITOR in the e-mail subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the author’s name,
grade and hometown. Find our full letter to the
editor policy online at kansan.com/letters.
Katie Kutsko, editor-in-chief
kkutsko@kansan.com
Allison Kohn, managing editor
akohn@kansan.com
Lauren Armendariz, managing editor
larmendariz@kansan.com
Anna Wenner, opinion editor
awenner@kansan.com
Sean Powers, business manager
spowers@kansan.com
Kolby Botts, sales manager
kbotts@kansan.com
Brett Akagi, media director and content
strategest
bakagi@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board
are Katie Kutsko, Allison Kohn, Lauren
Armendariz, Anna Wenner, Sean Powers
and Kolby Botts.
@lanimaldmngz
@KansanOpinion “life skills: how
to rob a bank and pay back student
loans”
@jeffiedurbin
@KansanOpinion Stuff College Won’t
Prepare You For 728
@cocoa_kitt27
@KansanOpinion uh Home Ec. Cuz
who remembers how to balance a
check book or cook something beside
Ramen
If you could design the
perfect class, what would
it be called?


Decided I’m going
to take 12 hours
from here on out.
Some people say
I’ll graduate late,
I say I’m taking a
victory lap.
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
W
aking up in
the hospital
and feeling
like a train had hit me
was getting to be com-
monplace.
I’m lucky to have so
many great friends. Each
time I woke up in the
emergency room there
would inevitably be one
of them sitting there with
bloodshot eyes, waiting to
see if I woke up at all.
In a span of 14 months I
blacked out from drink-
ing an obscene number
of times. Te hospital
discussed setting aside a
room for me and I hurt
people I care about. But
these consequences don’t
even include the as-of-yet
unknown afer-efects I’ve
condemned myself to later
in life. Already I’m incapa-
ble of remembering things
like I used to. Studying
used to come so easy, but
not anymore.
It all started, as these
things sometimes do, with
tragedy. One of my best
friends unexpectedly died.
Tose close to him drank
in remembrance and also
to (ironically) forget. It was
easier to forget than it was
to face the stark realization
that we would never see
him again. One thing that
the D.A.R.E people and
Health Center pamphlets
don’t mention is that
alcohol helps in a way that
nothing else can.
Growing up I was told
that drinking would ensure
instant death. When the
fear mongering proved
to be false, I decided that
I was immune to any
negative efects. I felt I was
invincible and I ran with
that idea.
I would go YOLOing
around in an efort to
escape thinking about
anything that troubled me,
and I got quite good at it.
More than a year of my life
is now efectively meaning-
less because I did so much
damage to my memory. I
know that a time will come
where I would do anything
to have that year back, but
its too late.
Oscar Wilde once said,
“To live is the rarest thing
in the world. Most people
exist, that is all.” All I did
was exist. Each night I went
to sleep hoping I wouldn’t
wake up, and when I did
wake up, the cycle would
continue. Waking up sober
is the worst part of all. Ev-
erything I worked so hard
to forget came crashing
back down even more con-
spicuous than before.
Some studio portraits I
had taken would ultimately
save me. I sat and looked
at them and was brought
to tears. Te damage that I
had done to my body was,
in the picture, obvious and
unadulterated. I was wast-
ing my potential, my youth,
and my health because I
was afraid to face some-
thing conquerable. It is
almost humorous that afer
all I’d been through it was
a few photos that fnally
turned my life around.
Te point is that I implore
everyone to see that one
day the party will be over.
One day we will have to
look in the mirror, and we
will have to be able to live
with the person we see
there.
We are beautiful, unique
people with untold
amounts of potential. We
owe it to ourselves to try
to reach the apex of that
potential. Whatever it is
that is holding you back,
do what I didn’t do: attack
it. Overcome and give life
the efort it deserves. May-
be then you can look back
and see accomplishments
and conquered obstacles
instead of waking up alone,
used up, and wondering
where the time has gone.
Nick Jackson is a senior from
Lawrence studying chemical
engineering.
J
anuary is my least favorite
month of the year. With the
bitterly cold weather and
the stress of having to follow
through with that New Year’s
resolution, it can be really emo-
tionally draining. As a student,
January means it’s time to get
your rump of your parents’
couch and get back to being
responsibile.
I think I can speak for most
students here at the Universi-
ty when I say that we live for
the breaks. However, this past
winter break I couldn’t help but
notice how lethargic and lazy I
had become afer being out of
my busy routine for too long.
It’s the same every year.
Toward the end of the semester
I can’t wait for fnals to be over
so that I can take a break from
classes and college cooking. But
a week or so afer moving back
home, I begin to crave anything
that involves not staring at my
television or computer. Te
four weeks of break seem to
drag on and on until Lawrence
becomes this fairytale-like
destination that I can’t stop
dreaming about.
Four weeks, in my opinion, is
more than enough time to fall
into a sluggish state of mind.
Although there is nothing we
can do about this ungodly
amount of time we have been
given, we can still make the
best of it. We can come back to
Lawrence stronger and better
than ever. Our batteries have
been recharged and we are
ready for action.
Maybe we can even look back
on winter break and realize
how much it helped us in some
ways. One thing it has given me
is the motivation to get good
grades this semester so that I
can get a good job, that way I
don’t have to live at home with
my parents for the rest of my
life. Sorry Mom and Dad, but
winter break was long enough.
I’d like to thank winter break
for all the bad habits I’ve picked
up out of pure boredom, for the
unnecessary amount of money
I’ve wasted and, of course,
the unwanted love handles I
seem to have picked up along
the way. Not to mention, the
endless amount of time I got
to refect on all the things I
should’ve done with my life by
now. Who knew you could have
a mid-life crisis so young?
Even though it may be hard
to get back into your busy
schedule again, just remember
that you have your whole life
to be lazy. Take advantage of
your busy, spontaneous lifestyle
while you can because it won’t
last forever.

Molly Smith is a sophomore from
Lenexa studying speech-language
The bottom of the bottle
HEALTH
Bounce back from
post-break blues
LIFE
By Molly Smith
opinion@kansan.com
By Nick Jackson
opinion@kansan.com
Follow us on Twitter
@KansanOpinion. Tweet
us your opinions, and we
just might publish them.
RICKY SMITH/KANSAN
FFA OF THE DAY
@tgatt 10
@KansanOpinion Common Sense
101
CHECK OUT PART TWO OF THE CARTOON ONLINE
http://bit.ly/1eeLfx6
Te 2014 Grammy Awards
are right around the corner,
and this year’s show looks like
it’s going to be great.
Last year was a huge year for
rap and it shows in this year’s
nominations. In fact, four of
the fve artists with the most
nominations are rap artists. Te
ffh is Justin Timberlake who,
while not a rap artist himself,
does have a strong hip-hop in-
fuence. Jay-Z leads all artists
with nine nominations and
Kendrick Lamar was close be-
hind with seven.
In 2013 Macklemore went
from a little-known indie
rapper to one of the most
recognizable names in all of
entertainment. He and his pro-
ducer Ryan Lewis received sev-
en nominations.
Surprisingly, one of the most
talented musicians in all of rap
Kanye West is only nominated
for two awards. He’s nominated
for “Best Rap Album” (“Yee-
zus”) and for “Best Rap Song”
(“New Slaves”).
It’s also worth noting that
Kendrick Lamar’s “Good Kid,
M.A.A.D City” is nominated
for “Album of the Year” and
only two other rap albums have
ever won “Album of the Year.”
If you haven’t been keeping up
with rap music, it’d be worth-
while to give those artists’ al-
bums a listen before the show.
Daf Punk also had a big year.
Tis past May, the French elec-
tronica duo released its fourth
studio album, “Random Ac-
cess Memories,” which includ-
ed one of 2013’s most popular
songs, “Get Lucky.” Along with
releasing an album, Daf Punk
also worked on the production
of Kanye West’s “Yeezus.” Te
duo also has one of the most
anticipated performances of
the night, where it will be per-
forming with legendary sing-
er-songwriter Stevie Wonder.
Over her illustrious career,
Taylor Swif has become a
Grammys staple. Tere’s no
surprise that she’s nominated
for four awards. Her 2012 al-
bum “Red” is nominated for
“Album of the Year.”
Lorde’s “Royals” was one
of the most popular songs of
2013, and is nominated in three
categories. “Royals” came from
seemingly nowhere and blew
up in such a short period of
time. It’s a great accomplish-
ment to be nominated for so
many awards. Lorde’s debut
album “Pure Heroine” is also
nominated for the “Best Pop
Vocal Album.”
Te 2014 Grammy Awards
will be hosted by LL Cool J and
will air on CBS on Jan. 26.
—Edited by Alec Weaver
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
entertainment
HOROSCOPES
CROSSWORD
Because the stars
know things we don’t.
SUDOKU
CRYPTOQUIP
CHECK OUT
THE ANSWERS
http://bit.ly/1ar8nxa
PAGE 5A
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The University of Kansas School of Business
PRESENTS
DEAN’S EXECUTIVE
LECTURE SERIES
CHET CADIEUX
Chairman,
President and CEO
QuikTrip Corporation
4
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Union.KU.edu
SAVE THE WORLD
One Cup at a Time
KU Dining Services has been
leading the charge in sustain-
ability for years. Tey compost,
they recycle, and they turn of
the lights when they leave a
room. Now, they are sharing
their passion for sustainability in
a very cool way.
KU Dining Services
introduced a new reusable
cup when classes started this
week. Because it’s made with
a “one-molding” process, our
beloved Jayhawk adorning it will
stand proud through the life of
the cup. (It won’t fade!) Te cup
is vacuum insulated to keep hot
drinks hot and cold drinks cold,
and the patented spill-proof lid
makes it very bus friendly. It is
also BPA free, microwave and
dishwasher safe and made in
the good old USA – and when
it does fnally give out, it is
recyclable.
KU Dining worked with
Capitol Cups, Inc. to create an
afordable reusable cup that you
would be proud to carry across
campus. You can pick up one of
these stylish and spirited cups
at any KU Dining retail location
for only $5.00 (while supplies
last). You can fll it with your
favorite fountain beverage or
your favorite favor of Roasterie
cofee free at the time of pur-
chase and then refll it as many
times as you like for only $1.00
per refll.
Let’s do the math. If you
purchase beverages daily on
campus, you can pay for your
cup within the frst few days of
ownership. If you bring in the
coupon from the College Cou-
pon book at the time of your
purchase (coupon books are
available at the KU Bookstores
and at all KU Dining locations),
you can save $2.50 on the cost
of your cup.
And just think--if you do
buy a beverage each day of
this semester alone, by using
a reusable cup, you can keep
nearly 75 cups, lids and straws
out of the landflls and preserve
the resources that would have
been used producing them. If
you visualize what that pile of
waste would look like, it’s pretty
signifcant.
Do your part for the envi-
ronment and look good doing
it. C’mon, KU. Let’s save the
world – one KU Dining Services
reusable cup at a time.
News from the U
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 7
Communication unlocks a door to
team prosperity. Make a financial
decision together. Exercise gets
your blood pumping into your
brain, for clear thinking. Imagine
the project completed, and posi-
tive results. Do the paperwork.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is an 8
Build partnerships today and
tomorrow. Use words more than
action. You’re gaining status.
Listen to feedback. Accept
encouragement. An efficient plan
grows your game faster. Logic
meets desire. It’s possible to
express both. Declare your love.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 7
Refocus on work today and to-
morrow. You can borrow what you
need. Have faith in your vision,
and don’t worry about details yet.
Get in action, and things line up.
Fix something before it breaks.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 7
Accept a fun challenge if it pays
well. Don’t jump to hasty con-
clusions. Increase efficiency by
reviewing the plan. Creativity and
passion come easily today and
tomorrow. Get a brilliant scholar
to help you see all the angles.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is an 8
Plan a home project with your
partner, then jump into action
today and tomorrow. Encourage
imagination. Consider ways to
re-purpose, or give things away
and free up space. The gentle
approach works best. Convey your
deepest feelings.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is an 8
Others ask your advice. You
can learn what you need today
and tomorrow. Read up on new
developments. Get a brilliant idea
in writing. Meditate before taking
action. Quick thinking is required
and available.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is an 8
Learn from a risk-taker. Push
to advance. Today and tomorrow
prove good for business, as you
use that silver tongue. There’s
money coming, but also going.
Send invoices. Accept an intellec-
tual challenge, and give it your
full attention.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is an 8
You’re extra hot today and
tomorrow. Stick to the budget. It’s
easy to push forward now. Listen
carefully, and follow a hunch. Use
your superpowers to create fun
and magic for your close people.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is an 8
Retreat from the world today and
tomorrow. Connect with people
remotely. Help make a decision.
Copy the itinerary. Ask for more,
please. Something new arrives in
the mail. Watch out for holes in
your pockets.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 9
Let yourself get drawn outside
your safety zone. It could get
intense. Check public opinion
today and tomorrow. Consult an
expert. Confess to the family. Fol-
low an enthusiastic suggestion.
Celebrate your accomplishments.
Accept congratulations.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is an 8
You’ll be tested for the next
couple of days. Focus on the job,
and respect authority. It comes
back to you. Share your news.
Don’t spend impulsively. Request
a favor from someone who owes
you.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is an 8
Coach your team to victory.
Take the bus and save today
and tomorrow. Get intensely
involved in your research. Shift a
household arrangement. It’s too
early to start a project. Wait for
your partner.
Grammy nominations
boast music juggernauts
MUSIC
RYAN WRIGHT
entertain@kansan.com
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 17, 2013, file photo, Thomas Bangalter, left, and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo, from the music
group, Daft Punk, pose for a portrait in Los Angeles. Daft Punk has five nominations at Sunday, Jan. 26, 2014
Grammy Awards.
Recycle
this
paper
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6A
“YOU WANTED TO GET TO
KNOW THE NEIGHBORS.”
STUDENT’S PREMIERE HOUSING SITE
“YO
RockChalkLiving.com
BEACUSE THIS ISN’T WHAT YOU HAD IN
MIND WHEN YOU SAID...
Afer perplexing us with
“Being John Malkovich”, bog-
gling our minds with “Adapta-
tion” and touching our hearts
with “Where the Wild Tings
Are,” Spike Jonze has com-
pletely outdone himself and
directed perhaps the most
important piece of modern
cinematic art of Generation Y.
“Her” is an ingenious — and
powerfully realistic — com-
mentary on the direction
modern man is headed, and
provides an entirely unique,
audacious glimpse into what
men’s perceptions of roman-
tic relationships are evolving
into.
It’s a movie for men, sending
a warning to those teetering
on the brink of technological
overstimulation about what
we may become. For those
already locked in the modern
tornado of porn, video games
and unfulflling internet
surfng, the flm’s conclusion
serves as a beacon of hope.
“Her” places audiences in the
mindset of a character that
many modern men already
know well: a post-hyperstim-
ulation soup of emotional
confusion, stifed social abili-
ties and desensitization to sex.
Jonze drops us in not-too-
distant-future Los Angeles: a
sof, metallic-chrome-colored
world — essentially what an
Apple “iCity” might look like
— where technology pervades
every aspect of human life.
We’re introduced to Teodore
Twombly (Joaquin Phoenix)
at his job where he writes love
letters for couples who aren’t
romantically creative enough
to write their own.
Overstimulated and wild-
ly desensitized to reality by
near-constant porn and video
game use, he searches fruit-
lessly for love, which he feels
will fll the hole in his life lef
empty afer his recent divorce
to Catherine (Rooney Mara).
Afer downloading a new
artifcially intelligent “OS”
sofware on his computer, he
begins to develop a relation-
ship with Samantha (Scarlett
Johansson), the sofware’s
voice. He becomes part of a
rising trend of OS-human re-
lationships as the sofware be-
comes more common among
the general populace of LA
(and probably the rest of the
world).
With him through it all is
ex-fing turned supportive
friend Amy (Amy Adams),
whose friendship with her
own OS serves as an example
of how bizarre the OS-human
interactions are outside Teo’s
head. Yet seeing Amy fall un-
der the OS spell is not enough
to deter him from “falling in
love” with Samantha. Teo’s
relationship with Samantha is
technically fake, but seems to
be emotionally tangible. Yet is
it? Does he truly have a rela-
tionship with this computer,
or an addiction to the gratif-
cation to his emotional needs
it provides?
Te flm, while brilliant-
ly written, artfully directed
and sprinkled with ingenious
camera work, contains a vi-
tally important overarching
message that rises above its
high level of raw cinematic
quality. Jonze opens the audi-
ence’s eyes to the debilitating
efects modern overstimula-
tion has on masculinity and
relationships. Afer expend-
ing much of his life’s energy
on fake realities, Teo is weak,
needy, insecure and hypersen-
sitive to the feelings of others.
Being surrounded by so
much advanced technology,
Teo — and presumably all
his modern male counter-
parts — is able to meet almost
all of his primal needs with
a simple voice command.
Want sex? He can fip on the
mega-screen porn TV or use
his hands-free phone sex app.
Need social interaction? He
becomes fast friends with an
interactive video game. A ro-
mantic relationship? Enter Sa-
mantha. Teodore is not nec-
essarily an inherently weak
man, but because his mind is
so used to taking the route of
instant technological gratif-
cation, he continually looks
for true fulfllment from forc-
es outside himself, terrifed to
stand on his own.
While it seems Samantha
provides an escape from his
woes, she really locks him
deeper inside his emotional
dungeon. She’s programmed
to cater perfectly to his every
relationship-related desire,
giving love and pulling back
exactly when he needs it.
She challenges him with her
own “emotional uncertain-
ties,” but never beyond what
he can handle. Samantha is
completely empathetic to his
lack of masculinity, thus spik-
ing his expectations of love to
wildly unrealistic levels and
prohibiting him from grow-
ing as a man, leaving him
completely vulnerable. Te
“love” she provides him with
is so easy that he is complete-
ly unmotivated to fnd a real
woman, whose real human
issues might prove difcult to
deal with.
Te movie poses an excel-
lent juxtaposition between
two important life questions:
Should we fee this mad dash
toward technological over-
stimulation, because the es-
cape from reality it provides
clearly damages human re-
lationships? Or is this the
inevitable direction humans
are headed, thus must we
look for ways to fnd fulfll-
ment during our drif away
from interpersonal intimacy?
Te question is brilliantly an-
swered at the conclusion.
Doubtlessly eager to jump
on the Phoenix-Adams band-
wagon afer Paul Tomas
Anderson’s “Te Master,”
Jonze utilizes the duo — and
the rest of the cast — to its
highest potential. Phoenix’s
performance is enlightening;
he’s able to perfectly encap-
sulate the angst Jonze wanted
to portray. Phoenix enables
you to fully experience the
confused suferings of a man-
turned-sensitive-boy by tech-
nology’s drug-like lure. Ad-
ams provides a strong, slightly
more intense representation
of today’s subculture of cof-
fee-guzzling, thesis-writing,
cynical urban women. Jo-
hansson’s playful sensuality
sparks just as much intrigue
as it does when she plays hu-
man characters.
With “Her” now on his re-
sume, Jonze now completely
owns his style, and secures his
place among the ranks of the
great modern independent
screenwriters and directors.
“Her” takes its spot alongside
— and rises above some of —
the innovative flms of Paul
Tomas Anderson, Joel and
Ethan Coen, Wes Anderson
and others. An new era begins
for Jonze with a flm that hits
close to home with our gener-
ation, and takes his reputation
from great director to modern
artist.
— Edited by Brook Barnes
By Andrew Hoskins
entertain@kansan.com
MOVIE REVIEW
Jonze’s ‘Her’ explores love
in an age of technology
Matt Easton was a creative
kid. Te kind of kid teachers
either adored or simply had
to put up with. He tended to
reach for the spotlight and al-
ways craved to be the center of
attention. He participated in
almost every talent show in el-
ementary and high school and
was asked to host many school
events. He is a big motown
music fan and has seen more
Broadway musicals than he
can name. He has always had
a close relationship with his
mom and a constant desire to
get approval from his dad.
In 2010 Easton started re-
leasing albums. Over the past
four years he has released six
albums. His most recent al-
bum, “Grey Area,” was released
in December. He travels about
once a month for shows and
has performed with bands such
as Timefies, Aer and G-Eazy.
Matt Easton, a 22-year-old se-
nior at the University, is usually
spotted in khakis, a hat and a
crew-neck sweatshirt. But what
he is best known for is being a
self-producing rapper who can
play the piano by ear. He has
heard more times than he can
count “What’s your real plan
afer college?” and “Do you
know how hard it is to make
it?” But that’s his fuel; it’s what
keeps him heading back to his
piano to keep writing.
Easton grew up in what his
mom Karen says was a strict
and disciplinary home in Lib-
ertyville, Ill. From his mom
playing music over the outdoor
speakers to listening to his dad
play jazzy, Ray Charles-esque
blues on the piano, Easton was
constantly surrounded by mu-
sic. Karen says she can remem-
ber her son enthusiastically
dancing to Michael Jackson in
the backyard when he was only
four.
As Easton got older his musi-
cal ability grew along with his
need to be in the spotlight.
His freshman year of high
school, Easton and a friend
started their own DJ business,
but the entertainment business
MUSIC
TRISTAN GRAMLING/KANSAN
Matt Easton, a senior from Libertyville, Ill., performs at the Granada where he opened for Radical Something on
Oct. 1, 2013.
KU student Matt Easton
releases sixth album
MAGGIE ROSSITER
entertain@kansan.com
SEE EASTON PAGE 7A

“We started making songs
about getting high, drink-
ing, and girls... stupid
stuff.”
MATT EASTON
Student artist
While pulling an all-nighter
can result in more studying,
it can also result in brain
damage.
A study recently published
in the journal “SLEEP” found
that even just one night of
sleep deprivation leads to
immediate loss of brain tissue.
Brain tissue is essential to
brain health and keeping the
brain working. Lack of sleep
not only kills brain tissue, but
also causes various adverse
efects on one’s health.
Te study showed higher
blood concentrations of two
brain molecules, NSE and
S-100B, in patients who stayed
up all night. NSE, a neuronal
enzyme, and S-100B, a
protein in the central nervous
system, are necessary for brain
detoxifcation while humans
sleep.
“My hours to study have to be
during the nighttime because I
have class the majority of the
day,” said Anastasia Rujevcan,
a sophomore from Overland
Park. “If I have an exam the
next day there’s a pretty big
chance of me staying up all
night to study the information.”
According to a study by the
Harvard Medical School, only
11 percent of college students
get the recommended seven to
eight hours of sleep.
KU Counseling and
Psychological Services
recommend having a routine
to follow as much as possible
during the week. If students
fall asleep and wake up around
the same time every day, their
emotional resilience and mood
are positively impacted.
“It’s a poor learning
strategy for students,” KU
Associate Professor of Clinical
Psychology Nancy Hamilton
said about all-nighters. “Not
only do I think this, but data
clearly proves this. Students
will learn 40 percent more if
they actually slept between the
times when they learned the
information and tested on it.”
Sleep-deprivation has a
negative impact on how
people look, found a clinical
trial commissioned by
Esteé Lauder. Chronic sleep
deprivation has been linked
to skin aging as students grow
older.
A study from the University
of Pennsylvania said that
students who didn’t sleep well
gained more weight from late
night snacking and increased
stress.
Losing sleep also afects
fertility. A study published
in the American Journal of
Epidemiology said that men
who don’t get enough sleep
have a lower concentration of
sperm in their semen.
With sleep-deprivation
negatively impacting
student’s physical, emotional,
psychological and sexual
health, staying up all night
should start becoming a thing
of the past.
“I always make sure I get
enough sleep at night because
I can’t function the next day
without a full night’s rest,”
said Hannah Liberman, a
sophomore from Liberty,
Ill. “It doesn’t seem human
to make yourself study for a
certain amount of nights with
no sleep.”
— Edited by Krista Montgomery
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7A
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The University of Kansas School of Business
PRESENTS
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HEALTH
Study finds all-nighters kill brain tissue
LOGAN SCHLOSSBERG
news@kansan.com
1. Have a routine
2. Sleep only when you
are tired
3. Only use your bed for
sleeping
4. Exercise on a regular
basis
5. Avoid taking naps
SLEEP journal study
found brain tissue loss
after one all-nighter
Losing sleep affects
fertility and sperm
count in men

“If I have an exam the next day there’s a pretty
big chance of me staying up all night to study the
information.”
ANASTASIA RUJEVCAN
Overland Park sophomore
HEALTHY SLEEP TIPS
EASTON FROM PAGE 6A
didn’t stop at DJing. Easton and
three of his friends started a rap
group called “Te Lville Tugs”
in high school. He laughs when
he thinks back on the group as
they produced three albums,
complete with handmade al-
bum covers, which they hand-
ed out at school.
Te “Lville Tugs” died once
Easton got to college. He de-
cided to major in business but
knew he wanted to pursue a
career in music. It wasn’t long
into his freshman year that
Easton and friends Brandon
Luna and Brian Taylor started
making beats in their dorm.
“We started making songs
about getting high, drinking,
girls… stupid stuf,” Easton
said. “I guess you could call it
‘Frat Rap.’”
Afer realizing this “Frat Rap”
wasn’t going to get recognized,
Easton decided his sophomore
year that he needed to take his
music more seriously. He be-
gan to produce his own beats
and add piano.
“I had to get away from those
lyrics because I wanted to be
respected as an artist and that
is not respectable,” Easton said.
Afer breaking away from
“Frat Rap,” Easton’s songs be-
gan to mature as he released
songs like “She Will Not Fall”
— a song about a young girl
who uses dance as an escape
from the hardships in her life.
Easton says he wanted more
lyrical substance in order to
break away from his former
“college scene” lyrics.
His lyrics not only matured
but the music itself did, too.
Easton stopped layering beats
from other songs with his own
and began to discover his own
sound— creating songs from
scratch.
When he plays the piano he
can hear his father’s infuence.
Rich also can play the piano
by ear, although he says his
talent is no match to his son’s.
Matt can listen to a song once
or twice and be able to play it.
Easton never played the piano
with his father but as a kid he
would always go into the room
and listen to his father play.
“I always had his rhythm on
the piano, and he always says
he can see the similarities,”
Easton said.
Rich remembers the frst time
Easton came home his fresh-
man year of college. He sat
down at the piano and started
playing, something he hadn’t
done before. “I looked at my
wife and said ‘What the heck?
Where did this come from?’”
Rich said. “I guess he had a lit-
tle bit of free time his freshman
year.” Tis free time allowed
Easton to begin his career.
His frst show in North Car-
olina lef him on a huge stage
performing for a scattered
audience of 15 people in the
rain. But Easton didn’t care. To
him, the show was still “sick”
because it was his frst real per-
formance. His YouTube chan-
nel has received more than two
million views and has more
than 7,000 subscribers. “Kryp-
tonite” has more than 290,000
views and “Live Life,” which
was released two years ago, has
more than 785,000 views.
Along with producing his
own albums, Easton is also
writing the score for a docu-
mentary called “One” by Sue
Vicory that will be entered in
the 2014 Sundance Film Fes-
tival. Vicory graduated from
KU and afer seeing Easton’s
“RockChalk” music video, a
song he wrote about being a
Jayhawk fan and student, Vi-
cory asked him to write the
score. Easton is producing nu-
merous piano pieces as well as
a hip-hop songs to accompany
the documentary. According
to Vicory’s YouTube channel,
“One” is about global humanity
and the impact individuals can
make within it. Easton started
working on the project in Feb-
ruary 2013 and the flm will be
fnished next semester.
For Easton, creating new mu-
sic doesn’t come easily or fast,
plus he is a self-proclaimed
perfectionist.
“I listen to the songs I’m
working on all the time,”
Easton said. “I listen to them
on my way to class, in my car.
Sometimes I get so sick of lis-
tening to them over and over
again and pointing out what is
wrong.”
Brian Taylor, KU graduate
and Easton’s friend since third
grade, has played a huge part in
Easton’s music. Acting as man-
ager to Easton and co-writer of
many of Easton’s songs, Taylor
knows when Easton has made
a song he loves.
“I’ll notice that he’ll kind of
dance to it to himself and he’ll
listen and nod his head,” Taylor
said. “Ten he’ll stand up and
say ‘Yeah, that’s it. I got it. I got
it.’”
Easton says that his biggest
supporters are the “founding
fathers,” which include Taylor
and his other manager, Andrew
Rabin, who works with venues
and manages the money.
Even with the support of the
Taylor and Rabin, Easton says
he would love to be able to say
that his parents are his biggest
fans, but he feels his pragmatic
father isn’t his biggest promot-
er.
“My dad is skeptical about
the future of the music busi-
ness, but in the end my parents
are going to support anything
because I’m their kid,” Easton
said.
However, Easton’s dad isn’t as
skeptical as he may think.
“My biggest concern is sim-
ple— there are more failed mu-
sicians than successful,” Rich
Easton said. “But what puts me
at ease is that he has this un-
dying passion to be successful.
Matt is a happy kid just looking
for the perfect song.”
His parents may worry
about Easton’s future, but the
two look forward to hearing
Easton’s new music and are
avid followers of Easton’s Twit-
ter page. Karen says she listens
to his music all the time and
rarely critiques the songs un-
less she thinks her son has said
something a mother wouldn’t
like.
“Te songs I favor may not
be the ones that talk about par-
tying,” Karen said. “‘She Will
Not Fall’ is a good story. I like
the ones that go a little deeper,
but the funny thing is that my
favorite is ‘Spaceship Bachelor
Pad’ because it has a great beat
to it.”
Even with the support of his
family and friends, Easton said
he knows that there are people
who don’t believe he will make
it, but what others say doesn’t
matter to him. Te haters just
make him try even harder.
Easton channeled this atti-
tude into his “Me” logo, which
was designed by friend John
Reynolds. Easton says that
the logo has a lot of diferent
meanings outside of the selfsh
idea of “it’s all about me.” Te
logo is a play on his initials,
but, most importantly, it rep-
resents the idea that you can’t
depend on others to get where
you’re going.
Easton said he knows that the
next three years afer gradua-
tion are going to be tough. He
plans to make the transition
from college to Chicago and
forbids himself to move back
home with his parents because
he knows his dad will make
him look for a “real” job.
Easton said that no matter
what, he will be involved in
something musical, whether
it’s producing, performing or
working in the business side of
the music industry.
“I’ve always wanted the ball
in my hands at the end of the
game,” Easton said. “Bring it
on.”
— Edited by Katie Gilbaugh
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MENS’S BASKETBALL GAME AGAINST TCU
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8A
On a night where the Jay-
hawks lived and died by the
three ball, their 1-9 line from
beyond the arc in the second
half tells you all that you need
to know.
“Tey did a really good job
in the second half of just pres-
suring the ball,” junior guard
Natalie Knight said. “Halfway
through the second half they
turned their defense up a notch,
we should have done the same
thing.”
Oklahoma State defeated
Kansas 64-56 in Allen Field-
house Wednesday night, helped
in part by Kansas’ massive of-
fensive collapse over the game’s
fnal 10 minutes.
Afer going 5-11 from three
on their way to a six-point half-
time lead, the Jayhawks were
ice cold in the second, shooting
a dreadful 23 percent from the
feld.
“Ofensively we just had
poor poise, composure and
discipline,” coach Bonnie Hen-
rickson said. “Terrible shot se-
lection which turned into tran-
sition opportunities for them.”
Tings looked dandy for Kan-
sas in the frst half, as the possi-
bility of a second-straight upset
over a top-10 squad loomed
in the minds of the 1,784 fans
gathered in the Allen Field-
house.
Te Jayhawks seemed to be
totally unfazed by Oklahoma
State’s much-praised defense,
registering 34 points on 41
percent shooting. Freshman
guard Dakota Gonzalez was a
surprise contributor in the frst
half, fnishing with eight points
and sinking both of her 3-point
attempts. She also drained a
long two as the halfime buzzer
sounded to swing the momen-
tum Kansas’ way as both teams
entered the locker room.
But Kansas was unable to hold
onto that momentum afer the
intermission. Te Cowgirls’
Naadir Tarpe knew he didn’t
have a choice. As the most ex-
perienced player in a Kansas
jersey, and with his team cling-
ing to a three-point lead in the
second half against Oklahoma
State, Tarpe dribbled right up
to Marcus Smart and looked
to fght of the reigning Big 12
Player of the Year.
Except Tarpe couldn’t get
past Smart. As he tried to
crossover, Tarpe got tangled
with his defender and nearly
froze as Smart took the ball out
of his hands. Rather than panic
or give up on the play, Tarpe
watched as Smart tried des-
perately to corral the ball and
promptly swiped it back. Two
dribbles later Tarpe knocked
down a long 3-pointer to give
Kansas a little breathing room.
If his attitude on that pos-
session wasn’t indicative of his
refned focus, his comments
following the Jayhawks 80-78
victory certainly were.
“I have to be the leader,”
Tarpe said, his chest still
pounding from a 21-point,
six assist performance. “Tese
guys haven’t played in these
games. I watched Tyshawn
(Taylor) and Elijah (Johnson)
and I have to lead out there.”
It seemed he had all but for-
gotten nearly two months ago
the Kansas ofense had no one
to run it.
During Bill Self ’s boot camp
we were told that Frank Ma-
son would steal starting time
away from Naadir Tarpe, and
whether it was a legitimate
threat or wishful thinking,
by the time December rolled
around Self had to try some-
thing.
Trough his frst seven games
Tarpe averaged 6.6 points, 4.6
assists and 1.7 turnovers. It
wasn’t so much that Tarpe’s
play was hurting the Jayhawks
as it was them needing some-
one who could get the ofense
into a rhythm.
Mason got his chance to start
on December 7 in a loss to Col-
orado. On the fnal play of the
game, Mason let his man get
to the side of him and heave
a game-winning three at the
buzzer. Tree nights later the
Jayhawks committed 24 turn-
overs in a road loss to Florida
with Mason starting again. Self
returned to Tarpe the follow-
ing game against New Mexico.
“Tat position in particular
is a tricky one,” ESPN col-
lege basketball reporter Dana
O’Neil said. “You’re viewed as a
leader and when you’re not in
there the obvious inference is
that you’re not leading.”
Te worst part was that most
of the other pieces were start-
ing to excel. Andrew Wiggins
displayed unconscious shoot-
ing at Florida, Joel Embiid was
starting to force Tarik Black to
the bench and Perry Ellis had
scored in double-digits near-
ly every game. All the ofense
needed was a consistent point
guard.
Tat’s when Tarpe started to
channel his inner Tyshawn and
Elijah, in a good way.
“Te combination of lead-
ing the team in position and
personality had to come from
somewhere,” O’Neil said. “Te
position he plays, coupled with
the fact that comparatively he’s
older and has a little more ex-
perience I do think he’s criti-
cal.”
Against New Mexico Tarpe
put up 21 points and grabbed
nine rebounds. Two games
later against Toledo he scored
21 points with 11 rebounds
and since conference play be-
gan Tarpe has averaged 13.2
points.
Without his performances,
Kansas likely wouldn’t have
taken down four consecutive
ranked teams – the frst time
any college basketball team has
accomplished the feat since
North Carolina in 1996-97. On
Tuesday, Tarpe was named
the Oscar Robertson National
Player of the Week.
“I never thought Naadir
Tarpe would win any nation-
al player of the week honors
when we recruited him,” Self
told the Scott Van Pelt Show
on Wednesday. “What he did
in those two tough games last
week, he’s been really good for
us.”
But Tarpe isn’t the only
Kansas point guard to grow
from his experiences. Afer
Asika Booker nailed his long
3-pointer over Frank Mason
to help Colorado beat Kan-
sas, Mason was faced with the
same situation against Oklaho-
ma State.
Guarding a two-point lead
with fve seconds lef, Mason
stuck himself on Le’Bryan
Nash as he dribbled down
the court. With Mason taking
away all his breathing room,
Nash never had a chance to get
a look at the rim, let alone take
a shot.
“Te biggest thing with
both Naadir and Frank is that
they’re playing with much
more confdence,” O’Neil said
afer attending Kansas’ last two
games. “Tey’re more asser-
tive, more aggressive, but not
careless. I think they’ve found
that line.”
— Edited by Blair Sheade
BLAKE SCHUSTER
sports@kansan.com
Volume 126 Issue 65 kansan.com Thursday, January 23, 2014
By Mike Vernon
sports@kansan.com
COMMENTARY
Hype doesn’t help
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
S
Let’s not allow this to happen
again.
Let’s be reasonable this time
around, please. It’s easy to get
excited, but next year, let’s
keep it realistic for the kid who
could be ranked No. 1 in his
class.
On Monday, Clif Alexan-
der’s Curie High School beat
the No. 1 team in the nation,
Monteverde Academy, on na-
tional television. Alexander —
who will be playing for Kansas
next season — scored 30
points, grabbed 12 rebounds,
and blocked fve shots.
Afer Monday’s game against
Baylor, Self indirectly men-
tioned Alexander, and his big
game that aired on ESPNU.
“A kid has a good game and
they’re comparing him to Am-
are (Stoudemire),” Self said.
“It’s just a diferent world that
these kids are entering school
with the hype.”
Self went on to give an an-
swer about Andrew Wiggins,
even using the words “no-
win” to describe the absurd
expectations placed on KU’s
18-year-old freshman.
Next summer, it will be Al-
exander who will travel from
Chicago to Lawrence, bringing
the hype with him. Students
will daydream of Alexander
dunks, ESPN highlights and
25-point games. Tey’ll talk
about how good he’ll be, even
though Alexander will be
just another college freshman
having to adjust to a game
with higher speed, intensity,
physicality and complexity.
In August, seeing Wiggins
on campus would invoke text
messages to their friends about
seeing their fellow classmate
go to class. Next August, it
will surely be the same for
Alexander.
It’s natural to be excited, but
let’s not overdo it. Expecta-
tions can weigh on a player,
and while pressure is a normal
symptom of playing for Kan-
sas, it doesn’t have to be unfair.
Te Jayhawks have had a
few players enter school with
weight of being a top-ranked
high school player. Xavier
Henry averaged 13.4 points
a game for Kansas and didn’t
quench all expectations for
him. Josh Selby also under-
whelmed fans in a somewhat
notorious fashion, because he
averaged 7.4 points as a Kansas
freshman.
It looks like the Jayhawks will
be gifed with another top-tier
athlete and basketball player in
2014. Alexander has become
known for his eye-popping
numbers, and he did it again,
on one of the biggest stages
for high school basketball.
As the numbers and national
attention swells, the hype goes
along with it.
CBSSports’ Jef Borzello’s
column Tuesday morning ran
with a headline “Is Clif Alex-
ander No. 1. In 2014?”
Borzello wrote: “And coming
out of this past weekend’s
event, the biggest talking point
was about Clif Alexander. As
in, is the Chicago big man the
No. 1 player in the country?”
Now, Borzello didn’t pump
Alexander up in any unfair
fashion.
Jayhawk Invitational set for Friday | PAGE 6B
TRACK AND FIELD
MEN’S BASKETBALL
LEADERSHIP PREVAILS
Naadir Tharpe’s recent play kickstarts current 4-0 Big 12 winning streak
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Freshman guard Frank Mason reaches for junior guard Naadir Tharpe’s hand after a timeout was called during
Kansas’ victory against Toledo on Dec. 30, 2013.
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Oklahoma State senior guard Tiffany Bias attempts to drive in a goal through a dense Kansas defense.
Kansas fell to the Cowgirls 64-56 on Jan. 22 in Allen Fieldhouse.
Cowgirls defeat
Jayhawks 64-56
KYLE PAPPAS
sports@kansan.com
SEE COLUMN PAGE 4B
SEE WOMEN’S PAGE 4B
Not unlike many professional sports,
there was a time when the National
Hockey League couldn’t do one thing
right.
Tat time was about 13 months ago,
but that’s not the point.
Aided by successful big market
teams like Chicago, Boston and
both squads in southern California,
the NHL continues to see a spike in
demand and popularity.
As Comcast Sportsnet in Chicago
reported earlier this month, more
NHL teams are selling out games
than those in the NBA. Yes, afer
two lockouts in the same decade,
more and more fans are flling seats
at hockey arenas. Not to mention
the TV ratings that have consistently
increased since the league signed a
national deal with NBC, and with the
Olympics coming up in a few short
weeks, you can bet the interest to
watch some puck will only grow.
And kudos to the league for trying
to capitalize on it. If 105,000 fans
will pack Michigan Stadium for an
outdoor game in the middle of winter,
it’s only right to dip back into the
think tank. Judging by the festivities
taking place at Dodger Stadium this
Saturday, every option has been
thoroughly considered.
Tis weekend marks the second
matchup in the NHL’s newly minted
Stadium Series, a set of fve outdoor
games, which includes the annual
Winter Classic. Yet, hosting an
outdoor game in Los Angeles isn’t as
ambitious as everything else Dodger
Stadium will ofer while the Kings
and Ducks – the top two teams in the
Pacifc division – battle for two points.
From the L.A. Times: A rendering
provided to Te Times shows many
wondrous sights that will
be constructed on the feld
— an avenue of palm trees
separating a beach volleyball
court in lef feld from a
performance stage in right
feld, an inline skating rink
near home plate, and the
rink stretching across the
infeld.
During intermissions Kiss
and Five For Fighting will be
playing on the feld.
You might call it cliché,
but of course the league
went “Hollywood,” why wouldn’t it?
Te point of the outdoor games is
not to appeal to the common fan,
rather to attract new ones. In doing
so there is no reason why the league
shouldn’t make every efort to provide
as unique an experience as possible.
Te last time the league threw a
changeup like this it switched the All-
Star game format to a fantasy draf, a
concept that has since made its way
over to the NFL’s Pro Bowl.
Tat’s not to say the NHL needs
gimmicks
to draw
fans. Te
league has
prospered,
more or
less, since
its inception.
But can you
name one other
league that is
constantly pushing
itself to create a
better experience
for fans and doing so
with such drastic cultural
changes?
Beach volleyball at a hockey game
would likely have sent Don Cherry
into a rage had it not helped the
league sell 50,000 tickets to a regular
season contest in January.
It’s truly amazing what can happen
in 13 months.
— Edited by Julie Etzler

“No one wanted to see some prefab
winter wonderland that makes a
shopping mall Santa’s workspace look
like a NatGeo photo of the Arctic Circle
by comparison. We wanted something
that evoked the unique juxtaposition
of ice hockey and beach life, and this
captures it.”

— Greg Wyshynski of Yahoo! Sports
on the set up at Dodger Stadium.
?
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
!
FACT OF THE DAY
Hockey is not the first winter event
to take place at Dodger Stadium. Ski
jumping was was held at the park in
October of 1963.
— USA Today
Q: When did the NHL play its first
regular season outdoor game?
A: 2003. The Montreal Canadiens
defeated the Edmonton Oilers 4-3
in the Heritage Classic at Common-
wealth Stadium in Edmonton.

— NHL
NHL fanbase grows after lockouts, NBC deal
QUOTE OF THE DAY
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 PAGE 2B THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Blake Schuster
sports@kansan.com
Naismith Hall
Resident Advisor
Our RA search process has begun!
We are a privately owned, co-ed
residence hall located at 1800 Nai-
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tion skills, demonstrated leadership
skills, and good time management.
Renumeration includes free single
room and meal plan. Application
materials may be picked up at the
front desk of Naismith Hall. Applica-
tions should be completed and
turned in by Jan. 24, 2014. Feel
free to email a resume to info@nai-
smithhall.com or call 785-843-8559
with questions.
“Positions Open-Make a difference
as a Student Fundraiser for KU!
Fundraising positions at KU Endow-
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Email Ethan at erempel@kuendow-
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this opportunity to develop career
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while building a greater KU.”
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8 p.m.
Fort Worth, Texas
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NCAA
Minnesota upsets No.9 Wisconsin on home court
MINNEAPOLIS —
DeAndre Mathieu and Mo
Walker each scored 18 points,
an outside-inside combination
that pushed Minnesota to
an 81-68 victory Wednesday
night over No. 9 Wisconsin,
the Badgers’ third straight loss.
Malik Smith added 14 points,
including the exclamatory,
shot-clock beating 3-pointer
with 39 seconds lef. Austin
Hollins had 11 points and four
steals for the Golden Gophers
(15-5, 4-3 Big Ten). Walker
grabbed nine rebounds, and
Mathieu went 8 for 13 from
the foor.
Sam Dekker led the Badgers
(16-3, 3-3) with 20 points and
six rebounds. Nigel Hayes
added 12 points, and Frank
Kaminsky and Josh Gasser had
nine points apiece.
Te fastest player on the
court, Mathieu can make up
for his 5-foot-9 frame with a
defly efective, foating, mid-
range jump shot. He fipped in
two of them on back-to-back
possessions, the second one
with one hand, sandwiched
around a steal by the Gophers
to push their lead to 61-49.
A few minutes later, the old
arena rocked as loudly as it had
all season when Hollins soared
over the defense to drop in
a one-handed slam from the
baseline and draw a foul with
5:54 lef. Te three-point play
put Minnesota in front 66-54.
Te conference’s leading
3-point shooting team looked
defeated down the stretch,
unable to get that perimeter
game going. Te Badgers
fnished 5 for 20 from behind
the arc, and they didn’t fare
any better around the basket.
Letting the Gophers do
almost whatever they wanted
inside, whether throwback
post moves or drive-and-
dish layups, the Badgers were
outscored 48-24 in the paint.
Minnesota was dealt a
potentially devastating setback
only 16 seconds into the game
when Andre Hollins rolled
his lef ankle on the landing
afer swishing a jumper on
the opening possession. Te
junior shooting guard, who
was averaging 16.2 points, did
not return.
Te early equalizer for
Minnesota was two quick
fouls on the 7-foot Kaminsky,
whose absence lef Wisconsin
at a serious size disadvantage
underneath. With just 2:32
elapsed, Kaminsky, the team’s
second-leading scorer and
the conference’s top 3-point
shooter at 46.8 percent coming
into the game, was on the
bench.
Walker took full advantage,
powering his way past Hayes,
Vitto Brown or anyone else
assigned to stop the 6-foot-
10, 250-pound junior. Walker,
who lost more than 20 percent
of that weight over the spring
and summer so he could keep
up with coach Richard Pitino’s
fast-break style and stay on
the team, surpassed his career
high in scoring less than 10
minutes into the frst half. Tat
all came on dunks, layups and
spin moves.
Te Badgers didn’t shoot
nearly as well as they have all
season, but they made enough
of their open opportunities to
stay within striking distance.
Freshman Bronson Koenig
knocked down a 3-pointer
from the corner to cut
Minnesota’s lead to 30-28 late
in the frst half before a slam
by Walker and a hook shot by
Joey King gave the Gophers a
bigger cushion at the break.
Last season, these teams
split the series, scoring a mere
200 points combined in 85
minutes. Minnesota won in
overtime at home 58-53, and
Wisconsin won 45-44 on its
own court. Tis is a diferent
Badgers team, though, by far
the most productive ofense
of coach Bo Ryan’s 13 stellar
seasons.
ASSOCIATED PRESS


Naadir Tharpe, Guard
Even with Mason starting in Colorado, Naadir Tharpe
still played 28 minutes so it’s not as if one player is
getting thrown aside. Mason’s aggressiveness was key
during the Jayhawks’ late run as he barreled into traf-
fic resulting mostly in a tough layup or a trip to the line.
In 34 minutes he registered 11 points and four assists
with two turnovers.

★★★★✩

Wayne Selden, Guard
For a short while it seemed like Selden had finally
found his groove. He opened up conference play with
two consecutive 20-point performances and seemed to
take much better care of the ball. But a lackluster
performance against Baylor (1-5 FG, 3 turnovers) after
a 2-9 night against Oklahoma State has shown that
Selden is still figuring things out. However Selden has
been much more active recently which is a large im-
provement from the beginning of the year.
★★★★★
Andrew Wiggins, Guard
The pessimist is quick to point out Andrew Wiggins has
averaged 35 percent from the field over the last three
games. The optimist says he’s still scored 37 points
during that stretch, not to mention his 28 rebounds.
The truth is somewhere in the middle. Wiggins isn’t
what many expected when he first set foot on campus,
but that doesn’t mean he’s played poorly. Even Kansas
coach Bill Self pointed out that Wiggins is in a no-win
situation. He’s still growing and learning and should
not have to apologize for his current production.

★★★★★
Perry Ellis, Forward
In a span of 30 seconds on Monday night, Ellis scored
five points and essentially killed Baylor’s shot at a win
in Lawrence. For everything that’s said about how quiet
the sophomore is, his game speaks louder than any-
thing. Ellis remains one of Self’s more trusted tools on
the floor and always seems to make the timely play.
There aren’t many reasons why that should change.
★★★★✩
Joel Embiid, Center
More than likely, teams all over the country are as-
signing coaches to figure out how to stop Kansas’ big
man. And that’s not limited to the college game, either.
Whether Embiid will go to the draft is still up in the air.
Bill Self notoriously doesn’t discuss such things with
his players until after the season. The fact is no one in
college basketball leaves more people in awe than Em-
biid right now and he only gets better with every game.
★★★★★
STARTERS
?
The last time Kansas took
a trip out to TCU it invoked
comparisons to the Topeka
YMCA and the worst loss the
Jayhawks have ever suffered.
You can check motivation off
the list of things the team
is packing for Texas. The
Jayhawks are the last remain-
ing undefeated team in the
Big 12 while every other school
has at least two losses. With a
long break between games you
wouldn’t think this would be a
trap. Then again, that’s what
we thought last year.
Wayne Selden

Not that Selden has been in
much of a slump, but it’s clear
he’s not playing at the same
level he was even a week ago.
If he can become more efficient
on offense again he gives the
Jayhawks a scoring threat from
every spot on the floor. Look for
him to keep driving the lane. If
nothing else, he’ll fight his way
to the line.
Can Naadir Tharpe keep up his
stellar play?
Ever since the conference open-
er Tharpe has near flawlessly
conducted the Kansas offense
and the result was four straight
wins against ranked opponents.
Elijah Johnson once quipped
that he, as a point guard, felt
it was his job to drive the car.
Tharpe is on cruise control right
now and the Jayhawks have
never looked more energized.

6.4
Kansas blocks per game
4
Kansas is 4th in the nation in field
goal percentage (50.6)

15.2
Andrew Wiggins scoring average
which leads all Jayhawks

Kansas runs TCU out of its own
gym. Don’t think that Perry
Ellis and Naadir Tharpe have
forgotten about what happened
last year. This is just as much
of a revenge game as Okla-
homa State at the Fieldhouse
and Kansas fans are every bit
as angry.

— Edited by Brook Barnes
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 3B
?
TCU (9-8, 0-5) remains winless
in the Big 12 and stands alone
in last place. The Horned Frogs
squandered one of their best
chances to earn a conference
win after falling to eighth-
place Texas Tech at home on
Saturday, Jan. 18. In their
five conference games, the
Horned Frogs have struggled
to score as they rank last in
the Big 12 averaging just 55
points a game. Perhaps more
concerning is that three of
those five games came against
teams with a losing confer-
ence record. The Horned Frogs
will need a repeat of Kansas’
dreadful shooting performance
in Fort Worth last year to
have even a remote chance of
winning this year.
Kyan Anderson
The lone bright spot for TCU,
the junior point guard ranks
among the Big 12 leaders in
points (11th), assists (6th) and
steals (3rd). After averaging
21 points a game in the month
of December, Anderson has
tapered off a bit and has com-
bined to score just 16 points in
his last two games.
How will TCU compensate for
its lack of depth?
TCU heavily relies on its
starters as each player logged
at least 34 minutes against
Texas Tech with only three
players coming off the bench.
Against a deep Kansas team,
the Horned Frogs may struggle
to sustain a high level of play
throughout the entire game
due to fatigue.
18
Average margin of victory for
TCU’s conference opponents

35
TCU field goal percentage in
conference play, last in the
Big 12
10
Made field goals against Texas
Tech on Jan. 18
The game is close. This game
has all the makings of a
blowout in a battle between
the first- and last-place teams
in the Big 12. If TCU hangs
around, especially in the sec-
ond half, flashbacks from last
year will begin to resurface.
— Edited by Alec Weaver
STARTERS
Kyan Anderson, Guard
A Fort Worth native, Anderson leads the Horned Frogs in
points, assists, steals and field goal percentage. Like most
of his teammates, Anderson has struggled lately and has
shot 3-20 from the field in his last two games. He has
scored 20-plus in four games this season but has yet to hit
that mark in conference.
★★✩✩✩
Jarvis Ray, Guard
The lone senior in the starting five averaged 15 points
in the first five games of the season but has been quiet
as of late. After scoring 15 points against Alaska An-
chorage, he has reached double-digits only three times
in his last 12 games. He has averaged six points in
conference play.

★★✩✩✩
Karviar Shepherd, Center
The team’s biggest post-presence earned a career-high
15 points against Texas Tech. He also recorded seven
rebounds, three blocks and went a perfect 9-9 from
the free throw line. TCU coach Trent Johnson said the
freshman is beginning to figure things out and is going
to get better with time.
★★★✩✩
Amric Fields, Forward
Coming off knee and hand injuries, Fields has excelled
in Big 12 play and leads TCU in scoring in those games
averaging 14 points a game. He made eight of his 10
free throws against Texas Tech and tied with Karviar
Shepherd for a game-high 15 points.
★★✩✩✩
Brandon Parrish, Forward
This freshman has been inconsistent in Big 12 play.
He scored 18 against West Virginia and 16 at Baylor
but has scored just eight points in his last two games.
Almost half of his points this season have come from
long-range, where he leads the Horned Frogs in 3-point
percentage and 3-pointers made.

★★★✩✩
KANSAS VS. TCU
JAN. 25, 8 P.M., DANIEL MEYER COLISEUM, FORTH WORTH, TEXAS
KANSAS
TIPOFF
TCU
TIPOFF
BASKETBALL GAMEDAY
Jayhawks look to avenge their road loss after last season,
motivated to return to their court with a victory
Prediction: Kansas 89, TCU 63
BLAKE SCHUSTER
bschuster@kansan.com
BRIAN HILLIX
bhillix@kansan.com
AT A GLANCE AT A GLANCE
PLAYER TO WATCH
PLAYER TO WATCH
QUESTION MARKS QUESTION MARKS
BY THE NUMBERS BY THE NUMBERS
BABY JAY WILL CHEER IF BABY JAY WILL CRY IF

No. 8 KANSAS
(14-4, 5-0 Big 12)

TCU
(9-9, 0-6 Big 12)
defense fnally began to
kick into gear, making life
difcult for the Jayhawks,
especially down low. Junior
forward Chelsea Gardner
began to see tighter cover-
age afer returning from a
minor ankle injury sufered
late in the frst half.
“Tey were dropping
guards in from the oppo-
site side,” Gardner said. “I
couldn’t get the right hand
shot, it kind of frustrated
me at the end.”
Oklahoma State’s ofense
found life in the second half.
Senior guard Tifany Bias
took over down the stretch,
recording 10 points and two
assists afer the half. Bias
was simply too quick for the
Kansas defense, driving the
length of the court to score
on more than one occasion.
Junior forward Liz Dono-
hoe added a double-double
(12 pts, 10 reb) and was
a presence down low for
the Cowgirls all night. She
scored eight points and
collected six rebounds
during Oklahoma State’s
crucial second half run.
For Kansas, Garnder led
the way once again, fnish-
ing with her second straight
double-double (15 pts,
11 reb). She was Kansas’
only presence in the post
for much of the night and
played extremely physical-
ly, usually drawing a foul
when she couldn’t convert
the bucket.
Tough Kansas wasn’t able
to secure a second consec-
utive upset, the Jayhawks
have now played compet-
itively against two quality
teams this week. Senior
guard CeCe Harper thinks
there’s something to be said
for that.
“I think even though we
lost, it’s still given us con-
fdence, because we know
we can play with those top
teams,” Harper said. “We
just know we have to be bet-
ter at the end.”
— Edited by Blair Sheade
With the clock winding down
in the frst half, CeCe Harper
had the ball at the top of the key.
When it reached fve seconds,
she drove into the lane, only
to be cut of by two Oklahoma
State defenders.
She passed to freshman guard
Dakota Gonzalez on the wing,
who took two dribbles and
heaved a shot up as the buzzer
sounded.
Swish.
Gonzalez turned towards the
Kansas bench with a look of de-
termination on her face as her
teammates jumped on her to
celebrate the acrobatic shot.
Te deep jumper gave the
Jayhawks all the momentum
and a 34-28 halfime lead, and
it looked as though they were
primed for another upset of a
top-10 opponent at home on
Wednesday night.
“I just felt like if I drove and
sucked someone in I could get
[Dakota] open,” Harper said.
“Tat’s what I did, and she
knocked it down.”
However, there would be no
celebration in the second half
for the Jayhawks.
Fading down the stretch, Kan-
sas relinquished its lead with
9:19 lef in the second half, and
lost to No. 9 Oklahoma State
64-56.
“I think they did a really
good job in the second half of
just pressuring the ball,” ju-
nior guard Natalie Knight said.
“About halfway through the
second half they turned their
defense up a notch.”
Kansas coach Bonnie Hen-
rickson credited the Oklahoma
State defense, but was more
concerned with the lack of ag-
gressive play on ofense down
the stretch in the second half.
“Ofensively we were much
more aggressive in the frst half
than we were in the second
half,” Henrickson said. “We
were just absolutely out of sorts
afer the 10 minute mark.”
Kansas tried to maintain the
momentum it gained afer
Gonzalez’s buzzer-beater, but
the shots would not fall for the
Jayhawks, even when they were
getting stops on the defensive
end of the foor.
“We knew if we continued to
get stops that it was okay for us
to miss shots,” Knight said. “We
struggled a little bit too long on
the ofensive end and [Oklaho-
ma State] capitalized on that.”
Kansas shot 7-for-30 from the
feld in the second half and just
1-for-9 on 3-pointers. Junior
forward Chelsea Gardner, who
led the Jayhawks with 28 points
in their upset win over No. 7
Baylor on Sunday, could only
manage 15 points on 5-for-13
shooting. Oklahoma State ha-
rassed Gardner all night, mak-
ing her work for every shot she
took.
“It kind of frustrated me at the
beginning [of the game] and I
knew I had to [try to] adjust to
it,” Gardner said.
Henrickson said she was
proud of the team’s maturity
so far this season, and sees this
game as a step in the right direc-
tion for the team.
Harper echoed her senti-
ments.
“Even though we lost, I think
it’s still given us confdence
to know that we can play with
those top teams,” Harper said.
“We just know we have to be
better at the end to be able to
pull it out.”
— Edited by Brook Barnes
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 4B
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
But if what Borzello alluded
to becomes true, and Alex-
ander is ranked as the No. 1
player in the country, let’s keep
the expectations and hype in a
realistic place. Alexander will
have to grow, become stronger
and adjust to the speed of the
game in a very short period of
time.
Let’s not piggyback of this
year’s unfair situation for
Wiggins. Not every top-ranked
player is great or even good
right away. Tey don’t always
meet expectations immedi-
ately.
It takes time. So, please, let’s
not let this happen again.
— Edited by Alec Weaver
COLUMN FROM PAGE 1B
Follow
@KansanSports
on Twitter
WANT SPORTS UPDATES ALL DAY LONG?
Halftime buzzer beater
ends in Jayhawk letdown
EVAN DUNBAR
sports@kansan.com

“We just have to be better
at the end to be able to
pull it out.”
CECE HARPER
Senior guard
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
An Oklahoma State defender takes away a rebound from freshman guard Dakota Gonzalez. Gonzalez racked up
two rebounds total in Wednesday’s matchup, but Kansas fell to Oklahoma State 64-56 in Allen Fieldhouse.
WOMEN’S FROM PAGE 1B
Te Kansas women’s basket-
ball team (9-9, 2-4 Big 12) will
head to Manhattan on Satur-
day to face the Kansas State
Wildcats (8-9, 2-4 Big 12) in
this season’s frst Sunfower
Showdown. Te two appear to
be fairly evenly-matched, with
both struggling early in Big 12
play, but showing signs of life
recently.
For the Jayhawks, that life
came in the form of a sea-
son-defning win against Bay-
lor earlier this week. Kansas’
ironclad defense proved too
much pressure for Odyssey
Sims and the potent Bears’
ofense. It was likely the best
game the Jayhawks have
played this entire season and
it couldn’t have occurred at a
better time.
Kansas was only 1-4 in the
Big 12 entering their contest
against Baylor, and a loss may
have put the Jayhawks in too
deep of a hole to dig them-
selves out of. Instead, the
Jayhawks won handily, limit-
ing the nation’s third-highest
scoring ofense to a measly 60
points.
Te Jayhawks will look for
more of the same in Manhat-
tan on Sunday. Junior forward
Chelsea Gardner (16.3 ppg,
7.6 rpg) has emerged as a key
ingredient in Kansas’ game-
plan on both ofense and de-
fense. At 6-foot-3, Gardner
is the Jayhawks’ tallest starter
and provides their most seri-
ous threat in the paint. Expect
Gardner to block more than
a couple Wildcat shots before
this one is over.
Kansas State has won its last
two conference games afer an
0-4 start in Big 12 competi-
tion. Te Wildcats have been
clicking on ofense, registering
over 70 points in each of these
contests. Still, the Wildcats are
averaging only 61.5 ppg with-
in the Big 12, while allowing
opponents to score 69.5.
Te Kansas State ofense has
shown it’s quite vulnerable
thus far into the season, being
dominated by an unranked
UTEP squad 39-84 earlier in
the year. Te Wildcats are led
by freshman guard Leticia
Romero, who’s top 10 in the
Big 12 in both points and as-
sists. Romero has been one of
the most impressive freshmen
in the conference this season,
leading Kansas State in points
(14.6 ppg), assists (4.6 apg)
and rebounds (5.9 rpg). She’s
started all 17 games for the
Wildcats and is routinely a
threat to score from anywhere
on the court.
Te last time these two met
in Manhattan, the Jayhawks
pulled of an 89-80 over-
time victory behind former
Jayhawk Carolyn Davis’ 29
points. Kansas also defeated
the Wildcats in Allen Field-
house earlier that season to
sweep the season series, 2-0.
— Edited by Julie Etzler
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
Jayhawks look to improve
before KSU game Saturday
KYLE PAPPAS
sports@kansan.com
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Kansas junior forward Chelsea Gardner attempts to circumnavigate an
Oklahoma State defender in Wednesday’s game.
Recycle
this
paper
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 5B
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Te Kansas women’s basket-
ball team (9-9, 2-4 Big 12) will
head to Manhattan on Satur-
day to face the Kansas State
Wildcats (8-9, 2-4 Big 12) in
this season’s frst Sunfower
Showdown. Te two appear to
be fairly evenly-matched, with
both struggling early in Big 12
play, but showing signs of life
recently.
For the Jayhawks, that life
came in the form of a sea-
son-defning win against Bay-
lor earlier this week. Kansas’
ironclad defense proved too
much pressure for Odyssey
Sims and the potent Bears’
ofense. It was likely the best
game the Jayhawks have
played this entire season, and
it couldn’t have occurred at a
better time.
Kansas was only 1-4 in the
Big 12 entering their contest
against Baylor, and a loss may
have put the Jayhawks in too
deep of a hole to dig themselves
out of. Instead, the Jayhawks
won handily, limiting the na-
tion’s third-highest scoring of-
fense to a measly 60 points.
Te Jayhawks will look for
more of the same in Manhat-
tan on Sunday. Junior forward
Chelsea Gardner (16.3 ppg, 7.6
rpg) has emerged as a key in-
gredient in Kansas’ game plan
on both ofense and defense.
At 6-foot-3, Gardner is the Jay-
hawks’ tallest starter and pro-
vides their most serious threat
in the paint. Expect Gardner
to block more than a couple
Wildcat shots before this one
is over.
Kansas State has won its last
two conference games afer
an 0-4 start in Big 12 compe-
tition. Te Wildcats have been
clicking on ofense, registering
over 70 points in each of these
contests. Still, the Wildcats are
averaging only 61.5 ppg within
the Big 12, while allowing op-
ponents to score 69.5.
Te Kansas State ofense has
shown it’s quite vulnerable
thus far into the season, being
dominated by an unranked
UTEP squad 39-84 earlier in
the year. Te Wildcats are led
by freshman guard Leticia
Romero, who’s top 10 in the
Big 12 in both points and as-
sists. Romero has been one of
the most impressive freshmen
in the conference this season,
leading Kansas State in points
(14.6 ppg), assists (4.6 apg) and
rebounds (5.9 rpg). She’s start-
ed all 17 games for the Wild-
cats and is routinely a threat
to score from anywhere on the
court.
Te last time these two met
in Manhattan, the Jayhawks
pulled of an 89-80 overtime
victory behind former Jayhawk
Carolyn Davis’ 29 points. Kan-
sas also defeated the Wildcats
in Allen Fieldhouse earlier that
season to sweep the season se-
ries, 2-0.
— Edited by Julie Etzler
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
Jayhawks prepare for Sunflower Showdown
KYLE PAPPAS
sports@kansan.com
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Junior guard Asia Boyd makes her way down the court during the Jan. 19 game against Baylor. Boyd logged four free throws, contributing to Kansas’ 76-60 upset of the No. 7 Bears.
NFL
DALLAS — Former Dallas
Cowboys player Josh Brent was
convicted of intoxication man-
slaughter Wednesday for a fery
wreck that killed his teammate
and close friend, Jerry Brown.
He faces up to 20 years in
prison for a December 2012
wreck afer a night of partying
with fellow Cowboys players.
He could also get probation.
Jurors took about nine hours
over two days to convict Brent,
who was led from the court-
room in handcufs as family
members sitting in the front
row of the gallery sobbed.
Among those sitting with
Brent’s family was Stacey Jack-
son, Brown’s mother. Jackson
did not respond to questions
as she lef the courtroom
Wednesday with Brent’s family,
but she has said in interviews
that she’s forgiven Brent and
could testify in support of a
lighter sentence for him when
that phase of the trial begins
Tursday.
Attorneys from both sides
remain under a gag order that
prevented them from com-
menting afer the proceedings.
Prosecutors say Brent, a de-
fensive tackle, was drunk when
he crashed his Mercedes on a
suburban Dallas highway in
December 2012, killing Brown,
a linebacker on the Cowboys
practice squad who had also
been Brent’s teammate at the
University of Illinois. Ofcers
who arrived on scene saw
Brent trying to pull Brown’s
body from the wreckage.
Police say Brent’s blood al-
cohol level was tested shortly
afer the crash at 0.18 percent,
more than twice the legal limit
for drivers in Texas. Prosecu-
tors last week argued that the
burly, 320-pound defensive
tackle had as many as 17 drinks
that night of the crash.
Brent’s attorneys argued the
blood tests used by police were
faulty and that Brent could not
have drank nearly that much.
Attorney George Milner said
his client was “guilty of being
stupid behind the wheel of a
car,” not drinking beforehand.
Brent retired from the NFL
last year, but his ties to the
Cowboys were prominent at
trial. Two current players, Bar-
ry Church and Danny McCray,
testifed about hanging out
with Brent and Brown, frst
playing video games, then hav-
ing dinner and going to Privae,
a Dallas nightclub.
Sean Lee, a Cowboys line-
backer, attended part of the
trial to show support for Brent,
and Cowboys owner Jerry
Jones said this week that he was
closely watching for a verdict.
“Certainly it’s tragic. We’ve
all, to some degree, have been
a part of this,” Jones said on
Tuesday, according to the
Cowboys’ website. “We sup-
port Josh. Tis has been just
a terrible experience for the
families who lost a loved one
and for Josh who loved Jerry
as well.”
Ex-Cowboy convicted of
intoxication manslaughter
ASSOCIATED PRESS
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6B
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Afer a fantastic outing in
Lincoln, Neb., at the Holiday
Inn Invitational, the Kansas
track team returns to action
on Friday, Jan. 24, at home
for the Jayhawk Invitational.
Te meet is expected to go
from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Te meet
features lower-level programs,
but is a great opportunity to
scout out some up and coming
talent in addition to seeing the
Jayhawks’ last home meet of
the indoor season.
Teams competing include
Allen County CC, Barton
County CC, Benedictine,
Butler County CC, Cofeyville
CC, Hutch CC, Missouri
Southern University,
Pittsburg State University,
Texas Southern University,
University of Missouri-Kansas
City and William Jewell.
Runners from the two-year
programs, such as Allen
County CC or Hutch CC
will use the meet as a chance
to impress coaches at larger
programs such as Kansas, for
the possibility of transferring
afer graduating from a two-
year program. Currently the
Jayhawks have 10 transfers on
the men’s and women’s teams
combined, with seven of
them coming from junior and
community colleges.
A few athletes to be on the
lookout for this meet include
the usual key players, such
as senior Michael Stigler
in the hurdles, who is still
trying to beat 49 seconds in
the 400-meter hurdles. Also
on the men’s side, look for
sophomore Daniel Koech,
who has bettered himself
two straight weeks in the
1,000-meter race. His time of
2:29.10 resulted in him taking
fourth place last weekend
in Lincoln. Additionally,
freshman Caleb Cowling will
be looking to build of of his
fourth place fnish in the long
jump last weekend in Lincoln.
On the women’s side of the
meet, as always, be alert when
Diamond Dixon and Lindsay
Vollmer are anywhere near
an event. Dixon notched two
more victories last weekend
in Lincoln, while Vollmer
had career bests in the shot
put and the 60-meter hurdles.
Dixon won the 60-meter dash,
with three Jayhawks following
close behind.
Sydney Conley is also
racking up points for the
Jayhawks. Last weekend,
she captured the long jump
with a personal best on day
one of the meet, and on the
second day, Conley took
third in the 60-meter dash.
Be on the lookout for senior
Natalie Becker as well on the
track. Becker is coming of of
a dominating performance
in the 3,000-meter race,
where she led the entire time.
Becker won the race by over
30 seconds, and is now the
owner of the tenth best time
in the NCAA this season.
Becker also took of on day
two, when she anchored the
distance medley relay, which
was another Jayhawk victory.
Te meet promises to be an
exciting one, and a great way to
scout out some younger talent
that might one day make it up
to the larger programs and
cause some waves. So come
cheer on the competing teams
as Kansas hosts their last meet
of the indoor season.
— Edited by Brook Barnes
Universities recruit
from 2-year colleges
JOEY ANGUIANO
sports@kansan.com
Te Kansas swimming
and diving team escaped the
midwest weather this winter
break by participating in a
training camp in Puerto Rico.
“Te team really embraced
the work,” Kansas swim coach
Clark Campbell said. “Tey
were challenged in a number
of diferent ways while we were
there and they were pushed
to their limits. Tere were
triumphs and failures. “
Now that they’re back from
a long stint in the warmer
weather, the Jayhawks will host
the University of Arkansas at
Little Rock (UALR) Trojans
on Saturday at 10 a.m. in
Robinson Natatorium. Tis is
the Jayhawks’ last home meet
of the season.
UALR will bring competition
for Kansas because of the
several talented athletes the
Trojans have on their team.
Trojan freestylers senior Kara
Raney and sophomore Valeriya
Teplova have both swam sub-
25 second 50-yard freestyles.
Te Jayhawks have six athletes
who have accomplished that
feat this season: senior Morgan
Sharp, freshman Lea Wissocq,
sophomore Haley Molden,
freshman Pia Pavlic, freshman
Leah Pftzer and senior Sofia
Filatova.
“Kara [Raney] has set
the standard for our sprint
program,” UALR coach Amy
Burgess said.
Raney holds the school
record for both the 100-yard
backstroke and the 50-yard
freestyle. UALR will bring
another record holder, Holly
Myers, to the meet. Myers, a
senior backstroke and freestyle
swimmer, holds the school
records in backstroke events,
middle distance freestyle
events and relays.
In the 100- and
200-breaststroke events,
Jayhawks sophomore Bryce
Hinde and senior Alison Lusk
could face freshman Erin
Trumbach, the Trojans’ leading
breaststroker. Trumbach has
put up comparable times to
both Hinde and Lusk in each of
the events.
For diving, UALR brings
lone diver sophomore Megan
Scott. Scott excels at both the
one-meter and three-meter
diving events. Te Jayhawks
leading divers, sophomore
Meredith Brownell and senior
Alyssa Golden, will face
steep competition with Scott
coming to town. Scott’s best
performance in the one-meter
dive is very close to Golden’s
best performance. Scott’s
premiere efort in the three-
meter dive bests what both
Golden and Brownell have put
up over the season.
Both Kansas and UALR have
two more duals or triangular
meets afer Saturday before
the conference championships
are underway. As the regular
season starts to come to a close,
swimmers and divers have very
few things on their minds: to
do their best, to surpass their
personal records and to leave
everything in the pool.
— Edited by Katie Gilbaugh
Jayhawks gear up for last
home meet of the season
AMIE JUST
sports@kansan.com
TARA BRYANT/KANSAN
Sophomore hurdler Michael Stigler jumps over the last hurdle, ahead of 2012 champion Bershawn “Batman”
Jackson, in the invitational 400m hurdle event at the Kansas Relays. on April 20, 2013.
JOEY ANGUIANO
sports@kansan.com
TRACK AND FIELD
BUDAPEST, Hungary —
Treats to a string of European
Olympic ofces are reviving
a question that has haunted
preparations for the Winter
Games next month: Is it safe to
go to Sochi?
European Olympic
authorities, whose countries
have faced terrorist threats
and attacks in the past, largely
shrugged of the new menacing
messages as a hoax, a marginal
phenomenon that security
experts say is common ahead of
big events.
Some members of the U.S.
Congress aren’t so sure. Tey
say Russia isn’t doing enough
to assure that athletes will
be protected at the Feb. 7-23
games, happening not far from
an Islamic insurgency that
Russia’s huge security apparatus
has struggled for two decades
to quell.
Russia may run greater risks
in towns outside the tightly
controlled Olympic zone.
Suicide bombs last month a
few hundred kilometers (miles)
away have increased concerns,
and an Islamic warlord has
urged his followers to attack
the Sochi Olympics, Russian
President Vladimir Putin’s pet
project.
Te threats reported
Wednesday appeared to be
more anodyne.
Tey were frst revealed by
Hungarian sports ofcials, who
announced they had received
an email in Russian and English
threatening Hungarian athletes
with terrorist attacks.
Te International Olympic
Committee insisted it takes
credible threats seriously, but
“in this case it seems like the
email sent to the Hungarian
Olympic Committee contains
no threat and appears to be
a random message from a
member of the public.”
International Olympic
Committee President Tomas
Bach said he remains confdent
in Russia’s Olympic organizers.
Talking to reporters in Rio de
Janeiro on Wednesday, he said:
“Security is always a matter
of concern, not only in the
Olympic Games but at every
big event, whether it’s sport or
any other. Tat is unfortunately
the world we are living in.
“But we are very confdent
and we know the Russian
authorities together with their
many partners internationally
are doing everything to
organize the games in a safe and
secure way.”
Te Hungarian Olympic
Committee said it had received
a message from the organizers
of the Sochi Games saying:
“Treat described in the email
sent to your address is not real.”
It turned out that Olympic
committees from several other
European countries, including
Britain, Germany, Italy and
Austria, had received similar
messages but hadn’t publicly
reported them.
Wolfgang Eichler, spokesman
for the Austrian National
Olympic Committee, said the
email was a hoax that ofcials
had seen before.
“It’s a fake mail from a sender
in Israel who has been active
with various threats for a few
years,” Eichler told Austrian
news agency APA. “It’s been
checked out because it also
arrived two years ago.”
Germany’s national Olympic
association, the DOSB, also said
it had received “several times
the same mail with unspecifc,
general warnings” and it had
sent it onto security ofcials.
“We are not aware of any
threats that have been deemed
as credible being directed
toward our delegation,”
British Olympic Association
spokesman Darryl Seibel
told the AP. “Organizations
such as ours receive email
correspondence all the time —
some of which seem to lack in
credibility.”
A spokeswoman for
Switzerland’s Olympic
committee said similar threats
were common so close to the
Winter Games and athletes and
ofcials would base their travel
plans instead on the assessment
of security ofcials — not on
threats.
Across the Atlantic, some are
viewing the Sochi Games with
more trepidation. Members
of Congress expressed serious
concerns Sunday about the
safety of Americans at next
month’s Olympics in Russia
and said Moscow needs to
cooperate more.
While FBI Director James
Comey said earlier in January
that the Russian government
“understands the threat and
is devoting the resources to
address it,” the U.S. has ofered
air and naval support to the
Russian government as it
conducts security preparations
for the Olympics.
Congress concerned about
American safety in Sochi
OLYMPICS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SWIMMING AND DIVING

“Securtiy is always a
matter of concern, not
only in the Olympic
Games but at every big
event.”
THOMAS BACH
International Olympic Committee pres.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7B
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Spangler helps No. 25
Oklahoma hold off TCU
NCAA
NORMAN, Okla. — Ryan
Spangler scored all 13 of his
points in the second half
and grabbed a career-high
16 rebounds to help No. 25
Oklahoma hold of Texas
Christian 77-69 on Wednesday
night.
Buddy Hield had 16 points
and Cameron Clark added
15 for the Sooners (15-4, 4-2
Big 12), who moved into a tie
for second place in the Big 12
despite struggling against the
last-place team in the league.
Te Sooners struggled to
score for much of the night but
made up for it by playing one
of their best defensive games.
Oklahoma held TCU to 43
percent shooting and forced 16
turnovers.
Kyan Anderson scored
23 points and Amric Fields
added 15 for TCU (9-9, 0-6),
which lost its previous four
conference games by an
average of 22 points. Karviar
Shepherd added 12 points and
11 rebounds for the Horned
Frogs.
Texas Christian trailed 43-
42 in the opening minutes of
the second half before Isaiah
Cousins made a jumper, then a
steal by Clark led to a dunk by
Hield to give Oklahoma a 47-
42 lead and caused TCU to call
a timeout.
TCU scored the next fve
points to tie the score at 47 with
about 13 minutes to play.
Spangler made his frst basket
of the game, was fouled and
made the free throw to give
Oklahoma the lead again. A
3-pointer by Clark pushed
Oklahoma’s advantage to 57-
49 with just under 11 minutes
remaining. A steal and layup
by Clark bumped the Sooners’
lead to 10.
Fields made a 3-pointer, then
Oklahoma turned the ball over
and Anderson hit a 3 to trim
OU’s lead to 59-55. Fields tied
the score at 66 on a layup with
3:46 remaining, but Oklahoma
held the Horned Frogs without
a feld goal the rest of the way.
Spangler hit a 3-pointer with
33 seconds remaining, just his
third of the season, to give the
Sooners a 77-67 lead.
NORMAL, Ill. — Illinois
State was thinking about a big
upset for a while.
Afer a dominant second
half by No. 5 Wichita State at
Redbird Arena on Wednesday
night, Illinois State was
just thinking about how it
couldn't stop Cleanthony
Early.
Early, Wichita's 6-foot-
8 senior All-America
candidate, scored 23 points
and added 10 rebounds as the
Shockers wiped out a three-
point halfime defcit and
rolled Illinois State 70-55.
Wichita State (20-0, 7-0
Missouri Valley Conference)
is one of three remaining
unbeaten in the country,
along with No. 1 Arizona and
No. 2 Syracuse.
Illinois State (11-8, 4-3) had
won 10 of 13 coming, and
is now tied for third in the
Valley.
"To beat a team like that, you
have to play 40 solid minutes,
and we didn't," Illinois State
coach Dan Muller said. "We
didn't get any loose balls and
rebounds in the second half,
like we had in the frst."
Wichita State becomes the
second MVC team to open
a season 20-0, joining Larry
Bird's Indiana State squad of
1978-79 that reached 33-0
before losing the national
championship game to
Michigan State.
"I think it's a pretty big
accomplishment," WSU's
Ryan Baker said, "considering
the other team to do it was
Indiana State — and who was
on that team. I'm assuming it
was Larry Bird, right?"
Illinois State led throughout
most of the frst half. Te
Redbirds took a 28-25 lead
into intermission on Bobby
Hunter's buzzer-beating
layup of a full-court set play.
Marshall was asked if he
knew his team would come
out more aggressive in the
second half.
"I hoped," he said. "We
haven't had consecutive bad
halves all year, knock on
wood.
"Te biggest thing was, we
didn't turn it over against
their extended 2-3 zone. In
the frst half, we didn't score
against it. In the second half,
we made some plays going to
the basket."
None better than the last
of Tekele Cotton's 12 points,
a thunderous, baseline dunk
with 2:55 lef that had his
teammates searching for
superlatives.
"It was indescribable," said
Baker, who scored 15 despite
3-of-12 shooting. "I thought
they were just going to end
the game right there."
"Tat," Marshall said, "was
quite a play by a tremendous,
tremendous athlete. It
seemed like he never stopped
rising. Tat was just a throw, a
throwdown into the rim."
ISU was led by Daishon
Knight, who scored eight
of his 12 at the line. Te
Redbirds starters combined
for just 11 feld goals.
ISU shot 32.2 percent
overall (19 of 59).
"I felt we were getting solid
shots, with a few forced ones,"
Muller said.
Te Shockers made 11 of 27
from 3-point range compared
to just 1 of 25 for Illinois
State.
"He's the one who shot
well," WSU coach Gregg
Marshall said of Early. "Te
others just shot OK. Six for
nine for him is tremendous."
Marshall said he recently
moved the 6-foot-8 Early to
the wing more on ofense,
with the shorter Baker
operating in the lane against
ISU's 2-3 zone.
Te defense gave Wichita
trouble early.
"We had four or fve
turnovers in the frst four-
minute segment," Marshall
said, "and 11 in the frst
half, which is more than we
average for a game. If we
played the second half like
we had the frst, we wouldn't
have won the game."
Tey did nothing of the
kind. Wichita State had two
second-half turnovers and
scored 45 points.
"We started playing our
brand of basketball," said
sophomore point guard Fred
Van Vleet, whose six assists
and one turnover will keep
him second in the NCAA in
assist-to-turnover ratio. "In
the frst half, we sometimes
over-passed."
Te Shockers beat ISU
66-47 two weeks earlier at
Wichita.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oklahoma guard Buddy Hield (24) shoots in front of TCU forward Amric Fields during the first half of an NCAA
college basketball game in Norman, Okla., Wednesday night.
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NCAA
Early and No. 5 Wichita
St beat Illinois St, 70-55
ASSOCIATED PRESS

“To beat a team like that,
you have to play 40 solid
minutes, and we didn’t,”
DAN MULLER
Illinois State coach
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8B
SAN ANTONIO — Kevin
Durant had 36 points to ofset
Tony Parker’s season-high
37, and the Oklahoma City
Tunder survived a testy
111-105 victory over the San
Antonio Spurs on Wednesday
night, their third win this season
over the defending Western
Conference champions.
Reggie Jackson had 27 points
and Serge Ibaka added 14 points
for Oklahoma City (33-10),
which reclaimed the West’s best
record.
Tim Duncan and Boris Diaw
scored 14 points each, Marco
Belinelli had 13 points and
Manu Ginobili added 10 points.
Duncan added 13 rebounds, but
San Antonio (32-10) struggled
to overcome the loss of their
top defensive stopper, Kawhi
Leonard.
Durant fnished 12 for 22,
but struggled to get his shot of
against the snug defense of the
6-foot-7 Leonard, who has a
7-4 wingspan. Leonard lef the
game late in the frst half afer
sustaining a non-displaced
fracture in his right hand. His
status is unknown, but a similar
injury is expected to sideline
Danny Green for a month.
Durant scored 24 points afer
Leonard lef the game with 3
minutes lef in the frst half.
Te Spurs used a physical
defense against Durant with
Leonard out, especially when
Ginobili drew the assignment.
Te physical play angered
Durant, who twice lowered his
shoulder and dropped Ginobili.
Both plays resulted in non-calls,
which incensed Gregg Popovich.
Te Spurs coach screamed at
ofcials while Durant appeared
to yell at Popovich. Popovich
was assessed a technical foul,
which Durant angrily sank with
1:12 to give Oklahoma City a
55-51 lead with 1:19 lef in the
frst half.
A fght nearly broke out
between Derek Fisher and Patty
Mills at midcourt in the fnal
minute when the two became
entangled on the foor battling
for a loose ball. Te two had to
be separated by teammates afer
rising from the pile.
Tere were four lead changes
and six ties in the third quarter,
but Oklahoma City never trailed
in the fourth.
Durant bounced up and down
excitedly afer his 3-pointer
gave Oklahoma City a 108-98
lead with just over a minute
remaining.
Jackson averages 13.2 points,
but has scored 23.7 points
against the Spurs this season.
Jackson had 11 consecutive
points early in the fourth
quarter, blowing past Parker for
layups to give Oklahoma City a
94-89 lead with 8 minutes lef.
NOTES: Spurs C Tiago Splitter
(sprained right shoulder) and W
Danny Green (broken lef index
fnger) both missed the game. .
Oklahoma City is 10-4 in back-
to-back games, including a 4-3
record on the second night.
Tey have swept three back-to-
backs this season. San Antonio
has a 54-22 record at home over
Oklahoma City. . Fun-loving
Spurs forward Matt Bonner is
playing along with the ribbing
he is getting about the mask he
must wear to protect the broken
nose he sustained Friday against
the Portland Trail Blazers.
Duncan, who owns a vehicle
customization shop, ofered a
custom-paint job for the clear
mask and Parker joked that
Bonner could “scare Durant”
with it. Jef McDonald of the San
Antonio Express-News jokingly
asked if the injury ends Bonner’s
hopes of a modeling career once
his NBA days are over. “I can
still be a hand model,” Bonner
said.
NBA
Oklahoma City skates by the Spurs to victory
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oklahoma City Thunder’s Kevin Durant (35) drives to the basket as San Antonio Spurs’ Boris Diaw (33), of France, defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game Wednesday in San
Antonio.

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