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Jacksonville Review Page 2 February 2014
380 Pair-A-Dice Ranch Rd,
Jacksonville
$598,500
3 Bedrooms • 4 Baths
3176 Square Feet • 1.44 Acres
Private backyard w/Pool, garden shed,
bonus room/office/4th BR & BA upstairs
13585 Hwy 238, Jacksonville
$765,000
3 Bedrooms • 2.5 Baths
2581 Square Feet • 4.8 Acres
Prime Applegate River on 410' of river
frontage. Irrigated. Great for Horses.
Shop with studio above
6959 Pine Ridge Dr Medford
$1,200,000
4 Bedroom • 2F 2 H Baths
5153 Square Feet • 10.4 Acres
Skyhouse is at the top of Roxy Ann
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Cascades across to the Coast range.
4902 McLoughlin Dr, Central Point
$6,700,000
5 Bedrooms • 2 Bathrooms
10225 Square Feet • 99.56 Acres
3 Story, Hand Crafted Victorian.
Creeks, Bridges, Pool, Porches & Patios.
5 FP, Shop, Barn, 1950's Gas Station
2271 Johns Peak Rd, Central Point
$5,495,000
4 Bedrooms • 7.5 Baths
12711 Square Feet • 20.05 Acres
Paved & gated entry, 3 Master Suites,
Views, Pool with Spa, Gazebo, English
Gardens, 2 Kitchens, Theater Room.
2552 Thorn Oak Dr #57 Medford
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Doug Morse Jan 2014_Doug Morse SEPT 1/17/14 11:41 AM Page 1
Jacksonville Review Page 3 February 2014
Jacksonville Review Page 4 February 2014

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Open Thursday-Sunday 11:00-5:00p.m.

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JacksonvilleReview.com Page 5 February 2014
by Whitman Parker, Publisher My View
Publishers:
Whitman & Jo Parker
Print Layout & Design:
Andrea Yancey
Mail: PO Box 1114
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Visit: 220 E. California Street
(next to McCully House)
541-899-9500 Ofce
541-601-1878 Cell
whitman@jacksonvillereview.com
production@jacksonvillereview.com
Website & Kiosk: Jo Parker
jo@jacksonvillereview.com
Te Review is printed locally
by Valley Web Printing
Jacksonville Publishing LLC
JacksonvilleReview.com
Advertising available!
Contact us for rates
and options.
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rw_WH_Jacksonville_686x5.indd 1 2/19/13 2:31 PM
On Our Cover
Providence is here for your first heartbeat.
And every beat that follows.
Medford
Medical Center
Whether you’re getting a vascular
screening for early detection of
disease, or you require emergency
cardiac care, our cardiology specialists
provide the care your heart deserves.
The moment you require expert care,
we're here for you.
providence.org/medford
SPECIALIZING IN ADVANCED
RADIAL CATHETERIZATION
W
elcome to the Year of the Horse! As we’ve
been doing for nearly six years now, this
issue of the Review is packed with news and
information on what’s happening in our litle corner
of the world. And although everyone I know is tired
of the fog and cold weather, our lives are sunny and
warm when it comes to living in a delightful community
ofering so much.
As we kick-of Jacksonville’s Chinese New Year
celebration, I’d like to thank Jeresa Hren for making our
incredible cover possible. Jeresa has been close friends
with Yeh Fei Pai, a world-famous artist from Taiwan,
since their days together at National Cheng-Chi University,
in Taipei, Taiwan. When we discussed the concept for this
month’s cover back in October, Jeresa, a long-time board
member of SOCCA (Southern Oregon Chinese Cultural
Association) liked the idea and asked Yeh Fei Pai to paint
a never-before-seen piece of art… for our cover! We are
grateful to both of them for this very special honor and
encourage you to watch Yeh Fei Pai paint in-person during
this year’s celebration. You’ll fnd a complete event calendar
inside, including Yeh Fei Pai’s art demonstrations on page 35.
Speaking of the arts, Porscha Shiller of South Stage
Cellars and our friends at Brit Festivals have another
fantastic Rising Stars Music competition planned for this
year. On Saturday afternoons in February, South Stage
Cellars will be THE place to be to listen to the best local
musicians…all vying for this year’s title and a chance to
perform live on the Brit Stage! Please see the full Rising
Stars schedule on the back page of this issue and a full-
length article about Rising Stars on page 6. The Review
would like to thank our friends Graham Farran and
Gayle Pobuda at Expert Properties for generously giving
up their spot on the back cover of this issue for the Rising
Stars calendar. Please see the Expert Properties ad on page 3.
Finally, looking ahead, the 2014 political landscape
promises to be interesting with many challenges
and opportunities facing our community. Some of
the issues we’ll be following include the removal of
Jacksonville’s aging dam in the Forest Park, the proposed
redevelopment of the Courthouse property for city
ofces, the possible construction of a community center
complex, the May 2014 County-wide library tax levy and
other important maters impacting our Small Town with
Big Atmosphere!
This month, we are honored that world-famous
ink & brush artist Yeh Fei Pai created an exclusive
cover image for us to usher-in this year’s Chinese
New Year Celebration—celebrating the Year of the
Horse. Yeh’s painting, “Looking into the Year of the
Horse,” exudes an invigorating energy from head to
tail, detailed in every brushstroke, foreshadowing
the year ahead! In Chinese mythology, the horse is
thought of as a dragon, representing exaltedness
and prosperity. During this year’s CNY activities,
Yeh will be conducting an art demonstration of his
internationally-acclaimed Celestial Horses at the US
Hotel Ballroom in downtown Jacksonville. You can
read more about Yeh’s interesting and fascinating life
in our interview on page 34.
Jacksonville Review Page 6 February 2014
Rising Stars Competition Lights Up February
by Sara King Cole, Britt Festivals Marketing Director
News From Britt Hill
by Donna Briggs, Britt Executive Director
Comments or questions for Brit Festivals?
Email Donna at ed@britfest.org.
2014 Britt Classical Season
is Mixing it Up!
The third Rising Stars competition
returns to South Stage Cellars each
Saturday in February. With talented local
music acts, the opportunity to support
music education programs and great wine
and food, the series provides the perfect
winter pick-me-up.
Rising Stars was created by Porscha
Schiller, Marketing and Events Director
for South Stage Cellars, with the dual
purpose of supporting local musical
talent, and raising money for a local non-
proft organization. Through booking
entertainment for South Stage Cellars’
tasting room, Schiller knew there was an
abundance of local talent, and created
Rising Stars as an opportunity for those
musicians to gain exposure to new
audiences. Brit joined South Stage Cellars
as a co-presenter last year.
Here’s how it works: Each week during
the competition, three or four acts perform
at South Stage Cellars’ tasting room.
Audience members support their favorite
performers at $2 per vote. The act with the
most votes moves on to the fnal round of
competition. All of the voting proceeds go
to charity, and in 2014, they will beneft
Brit’s music education and engagement
programs. In two years, Rising Stars has
raised about $20,000 for charity.
In the course of the competition, four
acts will be selected to compete in the
fnals. The fnal night of the competition
takes place Saturday, March 1 in a special
evening on the Brit stage. The stage
doors will be closed, and the audience
will be seated on the stage along with
the performers, providing an intimate,
energetic evening of music. At the end of
the evening, the 2014 Rising Star will be
announced, decided by a combination of
public voting and a panel of judges. The
Rising Stars 2014 winner will perform
again on the main Brit stage this summer
as an opening act on the 2014 Brit
schedule (pending artist approval).
Rising Stars is truly a community event,
with the support of many necessary to
make it a success. Jeferson Public Radio
joined the project last year, and has been
an active partner from the very beginning
this year. The Rising Stars 2014 winner
will also receive a 30-minute live in-studio
performance/interview time on JPR.
Another important community partner
is Jacksonville’s own Of the Wall Music,
who is donating the sound system for the
competition rounds.
Schiller says, “I see Rising Stars as
an ideal model of community support:
people, businesses and gifted artists
coming together and backing each other.
In Southern Oregon, we happen to have
the amazing support of Brit to present an
entire package. This to me is the defnition
of success in a local community.”
The selection process was a difcult one
this year, because the number of acts was
narrowed- down from 24 in 2013 to just
13 in 2014. Those 13 acts were selected
from a strong pool of applicants, and the
lineup introduces some new exciting acts,
as well as wonderful returnees from last
year. The schedule of artists includes a
diverse mix of music, from folk to jazz to
bluegrass to R&B.
The benefciary of the voting
proceeds this year is Brit’s music and
education programs. Brit is a non-
proft organization, and since 1985, the
Brit Institute (Brit’s educational arm)
has educated and fostered community
through a variety of programs that
serve all ages and skill levels. The 2014
programs include four summer camps:
Brit Rock Camp, the Ukulele Getaway,
Summer Jazz Institute, and Project:
Beyond the Page, along with a one-day
Ukulele Kids program. Brit also brings
high-caliber artists into schools to work
with youth, connects our community
with world-class artists through master
classes and Q&A’s, provides family
concerts at afordable prices, supports an
outstanding internship program, brings
classical music into elementary schools
through our Music in the Mornings
listening program, and has a 25-year long
partnership with Jacksonville Elementary
School. In 2014 Brit is partnering with
the Medford School District to launch
a year-long high school internship for
underserved students.
Competition rounds listed below will
be at the South Stage Cellars tasting
room at 125 S. 3rd Street in Jacksonville.
Each night is open to the public, with
no cover charge. Competition rounds
begin at 5 p.m. each Saturday, with each
act performing for thirty minutes (with
time in between to change sets). South
Stage’s selection of wine and food are
available for purchase (no outside food or
beverages allowed).
O
ur 2014 Classical Festival
announcement in January was
an exciting one,
as our new Music Director
Teddy Abrams announced
the full lineup of programs
and guest artists for the
concerts this August.
This season is full of great
music, exciting soloists, and
fun events. It will include
beloved masterworks like Beethoven’s
Fifth Symphony, Dvorak’s “New World”
Symphony and Gershwin’s Rhapsody in
Blue. You’ll also fnd fresh music on the
lineup. Banjo virtuoso Bela Fleck will join
the Brit Orchestra on August 9 for the
Banjo Concerto he wrote. The wonderfully-
talented and charismatic vocalist Storm
Large (who you’ll remember from her
performance with Pink Martini last
summer) will join the orchestra for Kurt
Weill’s Seven Deadly Sins on August 15.
On August 8, we’ll see a return
appearance by violinist Augustin Hadelich,
who was one of our audience’s favorites
last summer. Augustin will perform the
beloved Sibelius Violin Concerto.
The popular Symphony Pops concert
returns on August 16. The innovative
trio Time for Three, who wowed Brit
audiences in 2010, will be featured
throughout the concert. The Symphony
Pops concert is a great night to bring a
group to Brit, as lawn tickets are just $5.
Also, while Time for Three is in town,
the group will join the community for a
four-day residency, full of performances,
workshops and more.
During the 2014 Classical Festival, we’re
also introducing a few new traditions.
The Champagne Picnic returns, but with
a fun new twist: the picnic will feature a
fresh menu from the Jacksonville Inn, and
we’re hosting a contest for patrons to show
of their most imaginative table seting
(including tableware, fowers, displays
and more). The winner will be chosen by a
panel of judges, including our new Music
Director, and the winner will receive a
Classical Festival lawn pass for 2015!
Maestro Abrams also announced a new
tradition of an all-orchestral night (with
no soloist) on closing night. Now, Closing
Night will be a night to celebrate the
talents of our Brit Orchestra. The evening
(and the 2014 Classical Festival) closes
with Mahler’s grand First Symphony.
The Classical Festival remains the
heart of Brit. If you are already a fan
of Brit Classical, I look forward to
seeing you on the hill this summer. If
you are new to the Brit Orchestra, or to
Classical music in general, I encourage
you to make this year the time you give
it a try. There’s no beter place to enjoy
the sounds of a wonderful orchestra
than our scenic Brit hill. Check out the
full list of dates and programs on our
web site at www.britfest.org. Tickets
are available now to both members and
non-members.
We’re moving full steam ahead in
planning the summer. The full season
schedule will be announced the evening
of Wednesday, April 9.
Competition Rounds Schedule:
February 1st
5:00pm: Jef Ramsey
6:00pm: Brian Swan Group
7:00pm: Elias Deleault
8:00pm: The Evening Shades
February 8th
5:00pm: Not Two Shabby
6:00pm: Charles Guy & Linda
Powers
7:00pm: Sage Meadows & High
Country
February 15th
5:00pm: Em Harriss
6:00pm: Frankie Hernandez
and the Old Soul Parade
7:00pm: Glenn Justus
February 22nd
5:00pm: Ryan Vosika & His
Banditos Yanquis
6:00pm: The Tin Man Project
7:00pm: Cee Cee James
Rising Stars - Cont'd. on Pg. 32
David Pfrimmer
Principal Broker, Accredited Buyers Agent
Certified Residential Marketing Specialist
Cell: (541) 326-6262
pfrimmer@windermere.com
www.southernoregonhomes.org
Principal Broker
541.944.2700
Branscum@charter.net
Van Vleet Jacksonville • 505 N. 5th St, Jacksonville, OR 97530 • 541-899-2000
W
W
Wade Branscum
Search for properties at: WADE.withWRE.com
or call Wade at 541-944-2700
Van Vleet Jacksonville • 505 N. 5th St,
Jacksonville, OR 97530
541-899-2000
Search the ENTIRE MLS:
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JacksonvilleReview.com Page 7 February 2014
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_J
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On the evening of January 16, the
Applegate Valley Vintners Association
(AVOVA) held the frst in a series of
“tasting room tours” designed to educate
its membership about diferent wineries in
the organization. Inspired by Kara Olmo of
Wooldridge Creek Winery, the bi-monthly
tours will be held every other Thursday
from 5:00pm-7:00pm. Presently, there are
18-member wineries that comprise the
organization. AVOVA President Joe Ginet
liked Olmo’s idea so much that he took the
lead organizing the efort, hosting the frst
tour at his winery, Plaisance Ranch, on
Water Gap Road in Williams.
“My wife Suzi and I feel very strongly
about working together with all of the
AVOVA wineries…the best way for
us to learn about each other’s tasting
rooms and wine oferings is to spend
time together, learning about diferent
wineries on-site, directly from the winery
owners, winemakers and staf.” For the
frst tour, 35 wine industry employees
and winery owners showed-up, including
those from Wooldridge Creek, Troon,
Red Lily, Schmidt Family Vineyards,
Cowhorn, Soloro, Rosella’s, Devit, and
the Academy of Wine. All were treated
to a tour of Plaisance Ranch and a
scrumptious spread of cheeses, olives,
meats, soups and breads, paired with six
Plaisance Ranch wines.
For several atendees, the trip to
Plaisance Ranch was their frst visit,
during which Ginet led small group
tours, showing-of areas such as the
tasting room, barrel rooms and the
impressive grounds. The Ginet family
has been in the ranching and vineyard
business for generations. Joe and Suzi
bought their current property in 1979,
incorporating some of the Ginet family
farming and ranching traditions from the
original family homestead on Sterling
Creek. The name “Plaisance” is French
for “pleasure,” and “merriment.” Judging
from the group reaction to the tour, wine
and food, the name was a perfect ft.
Tamara Ilton, wine club manager at
Red Lily Vineyard noted, “I recommend
wineries to wine trail visitors all the
time… but being here to experience the
winery frst-hand instead of hearing about
it word-of-mouth makes a big diference
and will improve how I’ll be able to talk
about Plaisance going forward.” Red
Lily’s Tasting Room Manager Ragen
Atkinson noted, “We tend to get stuck in
our own tasting room bubbles…trying
other wines and learning about other
wineries is a fantastic way to build our
knowledge base of what the Applegate
Valley has to ofer our guests.”
Ilton says that during the tour she
discovered that Plaisance Ranch was once
a working dairy farm and that the Ginet
family now raises catle onsite and sells
its ranch-raised organic beef products
alongside their award-winning wines.
“And, I was really excited to learn they
make a Mourvdre, one of my favorite
reds that not many people make these
days.” Plaisance Ranch is well-known
and respected for its Merlot, Tempranillo,
Syrah, Cabernet Franc, Rose and Ranch
Red, tastings of which were ofered
to atendees alongside Suzi Ginet’s
delectable faire.
Joe Ginet is no stranger to helping
organize wine industry events and is a
major force behind the annual World
of Wine Festival, held each August in
Jacksonville. Ginet was pleased with
the turnout and is looking forward to
atending tours at the remaining 17
AVOVA wineries over the next year. “By
working and learning together, the future
looks really bright for all of our AVOVA-
member wineries.”
AVOVA Launches Industry Winery
& Tasting Room Tours
Free
Delivery minimum of $ 25.00 from sun - wed
( 5 pm - 8 pm) in Jacksonville (available in some areas.)
Thai House
Serving fresh, authentic Thai food.
www.thaihousejville.com
Call for Take-Out: 541-899-3585
Jacksonville Review Page 8 February 2014
In a heartwarming retirement send-of
ceremony, staf, parents and students
gathered in the Jacksonville Elementary
gymnasium on December 18, to honor
Vikki Dalton. After 11 years, Vikki is
retiring from her post as Ofce Manager,
a role Principal Rick Snyder said, “Creates
one of the most challenging hiring
decisions ever!” During his remarks in
the jam-packed gym, Snyder noted Vikki
has always been there for the students for
advice, a hug, support and friendship.
With barely a dry eye in the room,
staf and parents echoed the sentiment
including parent Amy Kranenburg who
has a 2nd and 5th grader at the school.
“Vikki Dalton was the frst voice we
heard when we were looking at moving
to Jacksonville…it was sweet and full
of joy…my family feels lucky to have
known her…she has created a zone of
love at this school.” Teacher and friend
Jim Finnegan said, “everyone who walks
through the doors of JVE is made to feel
welcome by Vikki and feels glad to be
here…Miss Vikki makes you feel that
you came to the right place… her leaving
will leave a big spot to fll in our world.”
Finnegan told the students that ten years
ago it was Dalton who was a dear friend
to him during a personal medical crisis.
He told the students that modeling their
lives after Miss Vikki was not a bad path
to take in life. Parent and PTO member
Sandy Metwally thanked Dalton for
“always being there for our family” and
for providing invaluable help with PTO
maters. Teacher Shelly Inman spoke on
behalf of all JVE teachers, saying that Miss
Vikki had a special touch with students,
and was someone the kids could count
on when they needed a litle extra love
and atention. At the conclusion of the
30-minutes assembly, a large group of
students focked toward Miss Vikki and
encircled her in an impromptu hugging
ring that lasted quite some time!
Celebrating Miss Vikki’s “Zone of Love”
It’s no secret to anyone in the Rogue
Valley that St. Mary’s School (SMS) is
full of bright, talented and community-
oriented students. A case in point
illustrating the student body commitment
to helping others took place recently
during their annual Winter Formal.
SMS Student Council President,
Junior Kylie Winger, and other students
organized their 2013 Winter Formal and
held the event at Bigham Knoll. Winger
explained, “Our frst decision to make
back in October was where to hold it. We
did research about possible venues in the
Rogue Valley, but none of the options were
aesthetically pleasing or cost-friendly.”
Thanks to advice from SMS teacher Ms.
Huizinga and her husband, Chase Frei, the
students connected with Brooke Ashland
of Jacksonville’s Bigham Knoll Campus
who then graciously ofered-up the
ballroom, free of charge.
Winger, who had helped organize
a previous food drive in October and
November for ACCESS, was encouraged
by Brooke Ashland to incorporate
ACCESS into the winter formal. “Having
just done a really big food drive earlier
in October,” Winger said, “we were
concerned about puting on too many
food drives in one year. Instead, the
Student Council decided to incorporate
food donations and funds into ticket
prices for the Winter Formal to raise
money for ACCESS that way!” A
percentage of ticket sales from the 160+
students atending the dance amounted to
$160 was donated to ACCESS on January
21 in addition to a signifcant number of
canned items donated during the weeks
dance tickets were being sold.
Winger notes, “The dance was successful,
both in regard to ticket sales and just having
fun. Even without decorations, the venue
was gorgeous…our Student Council was
able to bring the theme One Thousand and
One Arabian Nights to life with genie botles
and fabric hanging from the ceiling like
fying carpets.”
A very grateful Winger concluded,
“Everyone at Bigham Knoll was
unbelievably helpful and supportive
throughout this process. They never
hesitated to help us. The dance ran
smoothly in no small part thanks to the
help we received from Bigham Knoll, and
we look forward to working with them in
the future.”
St. Mary’s Students Give Back Again!
Please call
541-899-6825 for
more information
805 N. 5th St., Jacksonville, OR 97530 • www.PioneerVillageOregon.com
Tours
available
during this
event!
Sunday, February 16, 2014
11:00 am - 2:00 pm
Sweethearts
Champagne Brunch
Have You Been Married Since 1963 or Longer?
If so, please join
Pioneer Village as
we celebrate couples
married 50 years or
longer at a FREE
“Sweethearts
Champagne
Brunch”!
Please bring
your wedding
memorabilia
to share!
RSVP by 2-13-14
Hurry, Space is
Limited!
No purchase
necessary. Must
be present to win.
T
Pioneer Village
invites you to a...
Be our
Guest!
Enter to Win
a Romantic
Weekend!
Lodging &
Dinner!
(541) 899-2760
Jason Williams
Chiropractic Physician
License #3206
Devon Hutema
Therapeutic Massage
License #12769
Mira Wood
Certifed Rolfer
License #17480
Massage gift certifcates available
for the special people in your life.
580 Blackstone Alley
Jacksonville, Oregon
Give the Gift of
Massage this
Valentine s Day

JacksonvilleReview.com Page 9 February 2014
View Lots For Sale
Only 5 Lots Left!
1/2 mile to downtown Jacksonville
Prices Starting at $140,000
.40 to .61 Acre Lots
City Services
For more information please visit...
Take California St S. Oregon Applegate Granite Ridge
Jeanne Freel • 541-821-2938 • Ste. 200, 691 Murphy Rd. Medford, OR
www.Old Stage Real Estate.com
GRANITE RIDGE
Freel November 2012:Freel November 8/13/13 9:47 AM Page 1
The New Year brings new proprietors
for TouVelle House Bed & Breakfast
located at 455 North Oregon Street in
Jacksonville. Shawn and Jamie (Nave)
Kerr took possession of the property and
the business on December 30. They closed
the inn for a couple of weeks to setle-in
and make some minor modifcations, but
are open now for reservations.
Tim & Gary Balfour, owners from
November 2004 – December 2013 were
approached
by the Kerr’s
over one year
ago. Tim said,
“We received
a wonderful,
hand-writen,
three-
page leter
explaining who
they were and
why they were
interested in
purchasing
TouVelle
House and
becoming innkeepers. When you have
invested a great amount of time, money
as well as your heart & soul into a place
or business you want to be comfortable
that the next owners will also take care
of it. We have spent a good deal of time
with Shawn and Jamie and know they
will be great stewards for TouVelle
House and wonderful additions to the
Jacksonville community.”
Jamie and Shawn are new citizens to
Jacksonville, having just relocated from
Los Angeles. But they are not newcomers
to small town living.
Jamie grew up in Medford and
graduated from St. Mary’s school
in 1994. She received her Bachelor’s
Degree in Art History from Lewis &
Clark College, an Associate’s Degree
in Criminal Justice from Ventura
Community College and this month
graduated with an additional Associate’s
Degree in Culinary Arts from the
International Culinary School at the Art
Institute in Los Angeles. In between, she
was a librarian and a K-9 police ofcer in
Los Angeles.
Shawn grew up in Laramie, Wyoming.
He enlisted in the Navy out of high
school and served in several Gulf War
campaigns. After 10 years as a bomb
technician, Shawn retired and has been
working as a digital forensic analyst for a
private frm in Los Angeles.
Jamie and Shawn are both happy to
leave the hustle and bustle of big city life
in California with thier two dogs, Karlos
(Jamie’s former K9 partner) and Ella, a
10 year-old Weimaraner. They are happy
to be home and look forward to the easy
pace of Jacksonville.
Jamie notes, “We have worked in felds
where strife, struggle, confict resolution
and crisis management were common
occurrences between our breakfast and
lunch periods. Fortunately for us, we
were able to retire from those workloads
with sound
minds and
bodies. Now,
we just want
to get our
hands in the
garden and
our minds in
the kitchen
and connect
with people
through
hospitality
and food!”
Jamie
trained with
Gary for a full month before stepping
in as innkeeper this past October
and has been in that position since.
Gary commented, “Jamie has done a
wonderful job running the bed and
breakfast and we know she will do very
well as she moves into the proprietor
role. She has an easy rapport with
people, a great sense of humor and
brings a lot of talent in the kitchen.”
Tim and Gary plan on staying in
Jacksonville and will be taking some
time to travel and visit family. They will
stay somewhat involved with TouVelle
House introducing the Kerr’s to the local
community and assisting them as they get
setled in. You may see Tim doing yard
work since Shawn’s job requires him to be
out of town frequently. And Gary will fll
in as innkeeper periodically to give Jamie
some much-needed breaks.
TouVelle House was built by Judge
Frank and Elizabeth TouVelle in 1916 in
the Craftsman style. The construction
incorporated the 1870’s William Hofman
house which was part of a six-acre
orchard previously on the site. The home
has been a bed and breakfast for over 30
years. Under the Balfour’s management,
it has held Trip Advisor’s Certifcate
of Excellence as well as the #1 ranking
of bed and breakfasts in Jacksonville
for the past eight years. It was also
recently awarded the silver green leaders
designation for its commitment to
environmentally positive practices.
TouVelle House
Announces New Proprietors
And they lived
energy-efficiently ever after.
©

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From l-r: Tim and Gary Balfour, Jamie and Shawn Kerr
720 Sterling St, Jacksonville
$490,000
3 BR • 4 BA • 3642 SF
Large open floor plan, covered deck, 2 garages
w/room for 4+ cars, near downtown
40 Vintage Circle, Jacksonville
$325,000
3 BR • 2 BA • 1761 SF
Single story home in a wonderful neighborhood
with private yard and RV parking area.
210 Graham, Jacksonville
$449,000
Wonderful Vintage-style home near the heart of
Jacksonville, beautifully appointed, lovely yard
with two pergolas and an expansive deck area.
831 Juanita Dr, Jacksonville
$575,000
4 BR • 3 BA • 4645 SF • 5.01 Acres
Wonderful views. Fireplace, exercise room,
large open rooms & finished basement.
Private but close to downtown Jacksonville
110 Jackson Creek Dr, Jacksonville
$260,000
3BR • 2.5BA • 1457 SF
In downtown Jacksonville!
Close to everything in a nice neighborhood.
165 Hillview Dr. Murphy
JUST LISTED • 4 BR • 3400 SF
Beautifully updated home w/ hardwood floors,
granite counters & much more, on 5 level, view acres,
also includes a large artist studio w/ bath and
oversized RV storage building.
W
Van Vleet Jacksonville
505 N. 5th St • Jacksonville, OR 97530
541-899-2000
S
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Sally Jan 2014_Sally Sept 1/16/14 1:27 PM Page 1
Jacksonville Review Page 10 February 2014
The Unfettered Critic
by Paula Block Erdmann & Terry Erdmann
The Oscars–Ignoring Mister Banks
H
ere’s how it works.
In theory.
The Academy of Motion
Pictures Arts and Sciences mails Oscar
Nomination ballots to its 5000-plus
members—producers, directors, actors,
cinematographers, etc.—so they can
vote for the best productions ofered
throughout the year. There is, however, a
question as to whether all of those voters
actually see all of the qualifed movies.
There are, after all, a lot of movies in any
given year. The studios strive mightily to
make sure every eligible voter has access
to them, by ofering private screenings,
“screeners” (advance DVD copies), and
password-protected online viewing
opportunities.
Which means that, for Academy voters,
keeping up with the movies is very easy.
Marking one’s ballot should be a snap.
You see a movie, performance, wardrobe,
set decoration or production design that
you love, and you vote for it.
In theory.
There’s always a “but,” right?
Keep in mind that show business is
exactly that: show business. Many of the
eligible voters have a vested interest in
seeing that specifc movies win awards
(because award-winners typically boost
their box ofce profts after the awards are
publicized). We were witness to how this
afects voting during our time in the land
down under (under Oregon, that is). A
voter—a studio executive—
got together with two other
voters, both producers. The
three of them glanced over
the candidates and voted
for their own productions
frst. Then they voted for the
other productions from the
studio they were working
with. And then they voted
for a couple of their friends. When they
mailed in their ballots, all three had left
most of the categories unmarked, because
they didn’t care about them, hadn’t
bothered to see them, and certainly didn’t
want to give votes to competitors, no
mater the merit.
Not that there’s anything
unusual in that. We all do
it. Like in our local elections
when we get to the choices
for judges or school board
members. If we don’t
recognize the names, or
don’t care, we just leave the
category blank. Simple.
Some of that likely went on among
Oscar voters this year, because we see
some real head-scratchers among the
newly announced nominees. Or rather,
among the non-nominees—the folks who
seemed like shoo-ins just a few days
ago but didn’t wind up on the list. So
this year, rather than mentioning which
nominated flms were our faves, we’re
giving some love to the snubs.
August: Osage County is a dark tale
leavened with very sharp humor. Writer
Tracy Lets adapted his Puliter Prize-
winning play for the big screen, giving
Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts some of
the hardest hiting scenes and sauciest
dialogue of their careers. Streep and
Roberts justifably received nominations
(they’re terrifc in the flm), but Lets’
adapted screenplay inexplicably did not.
Inside Llewyn Davis is a darling of
the critics. And the Coen brothers,
who directed it, often fnd themselves
on the red carpet. Yet the flm did not
receive nominations in the expected
categories: directing, best picture—or
most surprisingly (seeing that it’s the
musical story of a folk singer, with an
excellent soundtrack produced by T-Bone
Burnet)—original song.
One of our top choices, and the movie
we recommend most readily, is Saving
Mr. Banks, a smoothed-around-the-
edges retelling of how Walt Disney
convinced author P.L. Travers to let him
take her classic children’s tale, Mary
Poppins, to the big screen. Saving Mister
Banks was lauded when it came out,
particularly Emma Thompson’s riveting
portrayal of the tightly wound Travers.
Yet nominations for this touching tale
were limited to one: Thomas Newman’s
original musical score.
Which brings us to the tale of Tom
Hanks. As you would expect for this
premier actor,
Hanks easily
managed to
transform himself
into Walt Disney
for Saving Mister
Banks. But it’s his
other performance
this year—as
kidnapped sea
commander Captain Phillips—that’s
noteworthy, and, yes, award worthy.
The real life Captain Phillips survived,
rescued by Navy SEALS. His thespian
counterpart, Hanks, on the other hand,
was MIA on Oscar nominations day.
Speaking of lost
at sea, 77-year-old
Robert Redford
was cast adrift by
Academy voters
despite his tour
de force feat of
acting—alone, wet
and silent—in All
is Lost. “I’m not
disturbed by it,” Redford said during a
press conference at his Sundance Institute
the same day the nominations were
revealed. “It’s a business.”
See, he gets it. That’s how it works.
Paula and Terry each have long impressive-
sounding resumes implying that they are
batle-scarred veterans of life within the
Hollywood studios. They’re now happily
relaxed into Jacksonville.
Saving Mr. Banks
Captain Phillips
All is Lost
For the month of November, the
Kiwanis Club of Jacksonville recently
honored Keli Winkler. Keli lives here in
Jacksonville with her parents, Brian and
Dana. Keli is a senior at South Medford
High School, and carries a 3.89 grade
point average.
The courses she has been taking are
mostly AP and Honors including U.S.
History, Chemistry, Biology, Psychology,
Digital Media, Pre-Calculus, Economics,
Government, Advanced Marketing and
Small Business.
She has participated in varsity
cheerleading, but has been involved in
DECA (Distributive Education Clubs of
America) for three years and is currently
Vice President. DECA is a club for future
business students who would like to get
a head start in the business world. She
has been a volunteer at the Jacksonville
Children’s Festival and a volunteer at the
Jackson County Animal Shelter for two
years. She loves animals.
When she has time, she loves to ski and
snowboard, and take hikes. She feels that
the person who has infuenced her most
during her time in high school is Mr. Don
Kunkel, her Business/Marketing instructor
as well as DECA advisor. He has agreed
to be her mentor for her senior project of
gaining sponsors for the SMHS DECA club.
She hopes to atend either University
of Oregon or Arizona State University,
and maintain her grade point average,
and to get an MBA. She wants to join the
business world after college.
The Kiwanis Club feels very gratifed
that they are able to honor these fne
students each month of the school year,
for they are the future of our country!
Kiwanis Honors Student of the Month
for November: Keli Winkler
Kiwanis' Dave Wilson & Keli Winkler
For further information, contact Dave Wilson
at 541- 899-1934, e-mail: elkhntr@charter.net.
If you’re looking for something really
fun and diferent to do for Valentine’s
Day, head to the Bigham Knoll Ballroom
for a dinner and dance featuring local
rhythm & blues band
the Rhythm Kings.
Local musician
David Pinsky and his
Rhythm Kings Band
are incredibly well-
known and popular.
This all-community
Dinner-Dance
Party will happen
in the Bigham
Knoll Ballroom
on February 14th!
Doors are open from
5:00pm-11:00pm, dress is swanky, and
the evening includes an elegant 4-course
candlelight meal created by Executive
Chef John Trapp and Head Baker Serena
Fult. The fare and deserts will dazzle the
most discerning connoisseurs!
This is the frst in a series of new music
performances to be held in the Bigham
Knoll Ballroom. The inspiration for this
new entertainment series came about after
several local bands were suddenly out
of work when Alex’s of Ashland closed
down in January.
Afterwards,
several local
bands approached
Bigham Knoll,
searching for a
venue to continue
their music
performances.
Bigham Knoll
loved the idea
and is puting
together a
detailed schedule.
The February 14 Valentines Dance is the
frst in the series. Please come out and
support local bands and KEEP THE
MUSIC PLAYING!
Dinner/Dance tickets are $45 plus gratuity
and $5 for the band. Please see the full dinner
menu online at www.bighamknkoll.com. Call
541 899-9665 for reservations. See ad page 4.
Rhythm Kings to Play Valentine's Day Dance
at Bigham Knoll Ballroom!
Find the
Perfect Gift
Cookware, Gadgets and
Gifts You Can’t Find
Anywhere Else.
WE SHARPEN KNIVES!
OPEN DAILY
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 11 February 2014
110 N. 5th Jacksonville 541-702-2170
www.eleglance.net
FURNITURE • ACCESSORIES • DESIGN
making your house your home
Up Close and Personal with Local Artist,
Gordon Peery
Twelfth in a series of artist profles by Randall Grealish
L
A

F I E
S
T
A
150 S. Oregon Street • In the Historic Orth Building
541-899-4450 • lafestajville.com
Classic Mexican Cuisine
Open
Tues-Sun
11:00am
During my brief
phone introduction,
I could tell
immediately that
I would be in for a
treat interviewing
artist Gordon Peery.
Later, when greeting
me at the door of his
home, I saw a dapper
man with a gleam in his eye and a warm
welcoming demeanor. Gordon exuded
a great deal of almost
childlike excitement
showing me around his
home that he’d spent
seven years building…
virtually on his own. It
was evident that he had a
great deal of pride in his
accomplishments as he
pointed out detail after
detail and explained the
reasons behind many
of the construction characteristics and
unique styling elements.
Gordon is not a traditional artist. He
never set out to be an artist but rather sees
himself as more of a Master Craftsman.
Gordon’s atention to detail, ability to
learn and ability to overcome any obstacle
is second to none. Once, for example,
while at a photo shoot where a banjo
player was present, Gordon became
interested in the banjo itself. He was
then challenged by the musician to make
one. With the challenge
accepted, Gordon
diligently fgured
out every part of the
process and in the end,
presented a fne looking,
playable and proper-
sounding instrument.
Gordon’s foray into
architecture would take a diferent path
than most after realizing early on that he
didn’t enjoy the “commitee” process of
designing a building. Over the years, he’d
fnd himself moving away from a drafting
table, drawn to his camera instead with
which he’d capture every aspect of the
construction process—from ground
breaking to ribbon cuting for hundreds
of buildings across the US, a majority of
them here in the Northwest.
Rather than emphasizing building
construction, his architectural design
discipline deals primarily with fow
of space (volume), mass, planes, line,
texture, color and light. These skills gave
Gordon a beter understanding and
appreciation of nature vs. the manmade
environment. They became vital lifetime
companions throughout his travels,
taking photos, crafting jewelry and even
in the design of an end table.
Refecting back, Gordon fondly recalled
selling his car and stereo in 1961 so he
could aford to sail to Europe on the
Queen Mary. Upon arrival, he headed
to Copenhagen and then hitchhiked his
way to Germany were he bought a bike
and continued
traveling down
the Rhine River.
He would visit
a number of
other countries
during his years
in Europe,
amassing quite
an impressive
collection of
photos along the
way. His fve years traveling throughout
Europe, his marriage of 49 years to
his lovely wife Angela, and four years
spent at Architectural school are what
he considers the “three keys and most
precious things in my life.”
In closing, Gordon refected, “The
design, construction, and crafting process
continue to be a stimulating challenge,
and a hugely rewarding companion. I
hope those who view or choose to own
something I've created will gain a share of
that reward.”
Please visit Gordon’s
website at www.gordonpeery-
photo.com. You may also
view some of his work in
Jacksonville at Essentielle
Skin Care in the Nunan
Square Commercial Center.
Peery Residence
Jacksonville Review Page 12 February 2014
Happy New Year from the Friends of
Jacksonville's Historic Cemetery
by Dirk J. Siedlecki, President – FOJHC
W
e’d like to take this
opportunity to thank
everyone who contributed
to our success in 2013, made a donation,
volunteered and/or atended one of our
events. Your continued support of this all-
volunteer, non-proft organization is very
much appreciated.
Plans for 2014 are well underway and
the year promises to be another great one
full of volunteer opportunities, tours and
special events.
Our Yearly Community Cemetery
Clean-up Days:
Saturday, March 8, 9:00am-12noon
Saturday, May 17, 8:00am-12noon
Saturday, October 4, 9:00am-12noon
Cemetery Marker Cleaning and
Workshops—Saturday, April 19 and then
the third Saturday of the month June 21,
July 19, August 16, and September 20.
All workshops start
at 9:00am and run
until 12noon. (There
will be no cleaning or
workshop in May.)
History Saturday
Programs—The season
kicks-of on Saturday,
May 10 and then
runs on the second
Saturday of the month, June 14, July 12,
August 9, and September 13. We look
forward to new and interesting topics that
will be presented. This marks our fourth
year of ofering these very popular and
well-atended programs.
Memorial Day Meet and Greet—
On Sunday, May 25 and Monday,
May 26 from 11:00am until 3:00pm,
our volunteers will be in the cemetery
grounds to greet families and friends
and assist them in locating the
gravesites of loved ones. Volunteers also
place fags at many of the gravesites of
350 Veterans who rest in Jacksonville's
Cemetery. Stop by and pay your
respects to these men and women who
proudly served their country.
Meet the Pioneers:
Our 9th-Annual Meet the Pioneers
program will be presented on Friday,
October 10 and Saturday, October 11. The
frst tour will depart
at 4:00pm and the
last tour will depart
at 7:30pm. Please
plan on joining us
for this very popular
Jacksonville event. A
promotional video for
Meet the Pioneers-2014,
produced by Bill Miller,
is available at: htp://www.youtube.com/watc
h?v=M373CkJizAI&feature=youtu.be.
Please visit our web site at www.
friendsjvillecemetery.org for complete
details on all these and other events
and activities. The Jacksonville Review
print editions and website at www.
JacksonvilleReview.com will also include
reminders and additional details for each
upcoming event and/or activity.
Thank you! We look forward to seeing
you at one or more of our upcoming
volunteer events or programs in 2014.
Pioneer Profles: The Fathers of Jacksonville
by Carolyn Kingsnorth
In the mid-1800s, the promise of gold and
free land lured fortune seekers and setlers
to the newly formed Oregon Territory. They
were soon followed by merchants who amassed
their own wealth selling supplies to the miners
and farmers. This ongoing series shares the
stories of these pioneers and their times.
Contrary to local lore, James Clugage
and James Pool did not make the initial
gold discovery in Southern Oregon.
However, they may well deserve credit
for triggering the Southern Oregon gold
rush of 1852, and they defnitely deserve
credit for staking claims to what proved
to be a diferent kind of gold mine—the
donation land claims that became the City
of Jacksonville.
As the 1849 California gold rush played
out and large mining corporations took
over the most productive sites, miners
migrated north looking for new gold
strikes in Southern Oregon. Territorial
Governor Joseph Lane explored the
Rogue River area in 1850 to assess
potential mineral resources. Several gold
discoveries were made in the Illinois
Valley area at Josephine and Canyon
creeks and Sailor’s Diggings before the
frst Rogue River Indian War broke out in
June of 1851 and miners temporarily left
their claims to join the confict.
With the cessation of warfare, Clugage
and Pool, two of the “packers” who supplied
the California mining camps with goods
and provisions from the Willamete Valley,
resumed operating their “mule ass freight.”
According to one story, during the winter
of 1851-52 Clugage and Pool spent a night
at the homestead of the local Indian agent,
Alonzo Skinner, near the Table Rocks. There
they learned that in the late summer or
early fall of 1851 Skinner’s son and one of
his employees, a Mr. Sykes, had struck gold
in Jackson Creek near the western edge of
Jacksonville’s current city limits.
When Clugage and Pool resumed
their journey the next day, they stopped
for lunch in the area near Skinner’s and
Sykes’ fnd. While watering their animals
in Daisy Creek, Pool, an experienced
miner, found “color” in the water—gold!
There are many variations to the
Clugage-Pool story, but whatever the
source of their gold discovery, they
continued their journey to Yreka,
then the region’s claim and assay
headquarters, where Clugage fled
Donation Land Claim #37 on 160.11 acres
covering virtually all the western half
of Jacksonville, and Pool fled a 306 acre
claim immediately to the east.
What Clugage did next was unusual:
he publicized the claim. In May of 1852,
Clugage wrote both The Shasta Courier and
John Flynn, who managed the Johnson stage
lines out of El Dorado County, that Clugage
and his two partners had a claim from which
they had taken an average of 70 ounces of gold
per day for 10 weeks! Flynn reported the news
to the Daily Alta California, a San Francisco
newspaper. By May 20, Indiana newspapers
were carrying the report of rich mines in the
Rogue River Valley.
Prospectors swarmed to the area.
Within a few months, over three
thousand miners started claiming and
excavating every creek bed in the region.
Tent cities sprang up everywhere. The
serene forest was transformed into a
burrow of restless activity.
At a time when most mining claims
were well kept secrets, why would
Clugage choose to share their discovery
with the world?
In a Historic Context Statement for
Jacksonville’s 1993 Historic and Cultural
Resource Inventory, George Kramer
surmises a reason for the incongruity:
“From their packing experience, both
Clugage and Pool were familiar with the
bounty of the lush Rogue River Valley
and probably…aware of its potential for
setlement. With the discovery of gold, one
or both likely realized the need for, and the
potential proft in, a permanent town in the
otherwise sparsely setled valley. Only a few
weeks before their…discovery, the region had
been formed into Jackson County, a county
in need of a seat that would beneft from the
infux of government monies. In this light,
Clugage’s immediate Donation Land Claim
application, coupled with his seemingly
strange desire to publicize the gold strike
at Rich Gulch, make sense and speak to his
business acumen rather directly.”
Kramer’s hypothesis is reinforced by the
fact that Clugage hired George Sherman
to survey and plat a township, paying
Sherman with a deed to the block of land
bounded by B (California) and C streets
and 4th and 5th streets. Clugage was later
the frst person in Southern Oregon to
obtain a U.S. patent (deed) recognizing his
donation land claim holdings.
Clugage named the town Table Rock
City. When it was named the county seat
in 1852, the town’s name was changed
to Jacksonville, and Clugage was one of
three ofcers appointed to oversee the
afairs of the new county.
Pool either became partners with or
sold his holdings to Henry Klippel. The
Pool and Klippel Addition became a
Jacksonville subdivision in 1868.
Author's notes: Cluggage fought in the
Rogue Indian Wars under General Lane.
He had been a renowned horse buyer in his
earlier days in Ohio and put this experience
to good stead, becoming partners with Drum
in the Union Livery Stable and establishing
a tri-weekly stage route to Crescent City in
1858. The Morning Oregonian reported in
its November 26, 1870 edition that Clugage
had been named Superintendent of the Oregon
stage lines. However, the 1870 U.S. Census
also lists him as a retired land speculator
living in Union County, Ohio. In 1872 a
James Glenn appears on the Jackson County
jury list as "representing James Clugage who
has moved from Oregon."
Clugage apparently became insane. Beside
his name in a Methodist Church donors list
is "gone crazy." A good friend published a
tribute shortly after Clugage's death in 1886
at his home in Marysville, Ohio. He wrote
that "his mind became clouded, caused by
sufering exposure and freezing....Before that
he was one of the kindest hearted and most
liberal men I ever knew."
Clugage's name is sometimes spelled with
two"g's" but his ofcial donation land claim
and deed show only one.
The last known record of James Pool shows
him mining in Yamhill County in 1860.
Pool is sometimes shown being spelled as
Poole and in some things his name has been
changed from James R. to John R. James R.
Pool was the ofcial usage. It's thought that
Pool was illiterate and may not have been
aware of the discrepancies....
Join us in the Bella Saloon & Patio every Thursday for
free beer tastings & $1 BBQ Oysters!
February O + A
6: 21st Amendment
13: Red Hook
20: Deschutes
27: Goodlife
Valenti ne ’ s Day
Friday, February 14th
Wine & dine your Valentine!
Reservations taken for parties of 5 or more
Beatles Night
Saturday, March 1 • 7 - 10pm
Karaoke Contest ~ Drink Specials
Prizes for: Best Song, Best Costume,
Best Performance
Oysters & Ale
...& other good February things
Lunch Monday through Saturday % Sunday Brunch % Dinner & Cocktails Nightly
170 W. California St., Jacksonville % 541/ 899-1770
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JacksonvilleReview.com Page 13 February 2014
Focus on Hanley Farm
by Dr. Kerri Hecox, Hanley Farm Volunteer
I
n past years,
February was
a month that
saw litle activity at
Hanley Farm, but not so in 2014! Thanks
to the growing partnership between
the Southern Oregon Historical Society
(SOHS) and the Family Nurturing Center
(FNC), groups from the FNC are coming
to the farm on a weekly basis throughout
the winter. Through a program FNC
employee Doug Loftdahl has informally
christened the “Dad’s Farm Group,” fve
to seven men involved with the FNC
come to Hanley each week to do various
jobs in preparation for the upcoming
farming season.
The program is exciting on many levels.
The FNC is a nonproft organization
dedicated to preventing child abuse and
neglect, and all of the men involved in the
program are fathers actively parenting
their children. All of the men also have a
recent history of substance abuse and are
mandated to be in addiction treatment in
order to keep their children. Part of their
treatment through On Track Addictions
Recovery requires them to do 5 days
per week of group therapy, however an
exception was granted to allow the men to
substitute a work day at the farm for one of
the sessions. Farmer Nick Mahmood calls
the Hanley time “dirt therapy” and Doug
Loftdahl says the response he has seen in
this group of men has been amazing.
“It’s incredible to watch these tough,
street-smart guys come to the farm and
be thrilled to feed Bob the Peacock,”
says Loftdahl. “There’s a way that being
at the farm really breaks down barriers
and helps healthy bonds form.” Loftdahl
believes that the combination of the
beautiful environment and the physical
nature of working on the farm are helping
the men in their recovery in a way very
diferent from traditional alcohol and
drug treatment. “These guys are doing
work that will help provide for their
families, that’s really powerful.”
The goal of the men’s ongoing work
will be to create a farm share specifcally
for FNC families. Two acres of land
will be planted and tended, under
the guidance of Hanley farmers Nick
Mahmood and Elizabeth Worcester, and
the produce of the land will then go to
feeding families in the FNC. Rather than
paying money for a share, families will
use “sweat equity” for the food they
receive. Cooking classes during the year
will teach families how to use the fresh
produce. The added beneft of these low-
income families geting access to healthy,
nutritious food is a thrilling prospect for
everyone involved.
SOHS is pleased to use the resource
of Hanley Farm to enrich the lives of
families in our community. Healthy foods
creating healthy families is just the type of
“living history” we hope to create.
Jacksonville Garden Club 75th Anniversary
It's been an amazing journey going through
the Jacksonville Garden Club records and
looking back in time. Through the good years
and the lean years, there has been one constant
for 75 years: dedication and commitment to
protecting the beauty of our environment and
enriching our local community. Each month,
as we approach our 75th anniversary, we will
be highlighting major accomplishments and
some litle known history and how it relates to
today. Along with club members, Eloise Cady
and Mary Nelson, this has been a fascinating
journey that we are delighted to share with the
Review’s readers. In this issue, we’ll focus on the
1940’s and 1950’s and hope you enjoy learning
more about the Garden Club! ~Pat Dahl
1939—With help from the Medford
Garden Club, the
Jacksonville Garden
Club was organized
on April 7, 1939.
Fifteen members
became Charter
members. Mrs. Arthur
(Mollie) Kleinhammer
was elected president.
Dues were 25 cents.
The 1940's—Club
Flower: Lilac—In
the early 1940's, the
focus of the Garden Club was establishing
a place for trash and rubbish disposal,
making a recommendation to the City that
dogs be confned during growing season,
and the eradication of poison oak in the
cemetery. During WWII, the club promoted
cultivation of Victory Gardens. Members
rolled bandages and donated fowers and
shrubs to Camp White. This association
with Camp White, known by many names
over the years; the Domiciliary, the DOM
and now by the acronym SORCC, continues
to this day when club members provide
fower arrangements for the chapels one
month a year.
In 1946, Memorial Park, now Jacksonville
Veterans Park, was established. Three
varieties of cedars (Port Orford, cedar of
Lebanon, and cedar d' odora ) honoring
three Jacksonville young men who died
during WWII, were planted. Claire Hanley,
President of the Garden Club, acted as
Mistress of Ceremonies at the dedication.
Two of the cedars still thrive. The third, the
Port Orford, was stolen in 1949.
Through the years, Veterans Park
remained static. In 2000, it was redesigned
with handicapped walkways and paths. A
bronze statue, the “Universal Infantryman”
was dedicated as was a Blue Star By-Way
Marker honoring all veterans. The Blue
Star Marker program is a National Garden
project.
In 2002, a Douglas fr was planted to
replace the Port Orford cedar stolen in 1949.
Veteran's Park is located to the right of the
intersection of West Main and First Streets
behind La Fiesta Restaurant.
The 1950's—This decade is highlighted
by Club commitment to the history
of Jacksonville, the environment and
creativity. Club Special Projects were
maintenance of Memorial (Veterans) Park,
eradication of poison oak in the cemetery,
planting lilacs throughout town, providing
seasonal decorations for Camp White and
participation in
the Gold Rush
Jubilee parade.
In 1955, three
club members
were elected to
Oregon State
Federation of
Garden Clubs
(OSFGC)
positions: Claire
Hanley, President;
Elizabeth Heckert,
Corresponding Secretary; Thelma Luy,
Recording Secretary. (See photo.)
In 1959, Lois McKee Hardy, descendent
of the pioneer McKee family, hybridized a
new iris and registered it with the American
Iris Society. It was called, “Pioneer Lady.”
It had a light yellow bloom. Eforts to track
down availability of this iris have been less
than successful so far. Lois also hybridized
a second iris “Katherine.”
During this decade, Claire Hanley and
Elizabeth Heckert walked through the
Peter Brit gardens with Peter Brit's son,
Emil. Their report, titled, “A Visit to Some
of Jacksonville's Historical Gardens,” has
been incorporated into The Brit Garden:
A Cultural Landscape Report (5/2005)
which is being used today as the “bible” for
historically-accurate restoration of the Peter
Brit Gardens by the Jacksonville Boosters
Club, the Jacksonville Garden Club and the
City of Jacksonville.
The Club wholeheartedly endorsed the
State of Oregon’s “Don't Be a Literbug”
campaign. Elizabeth Heckert wrote a skit
which was used by clubs throughout the
state in support of this campaign. Oregon
was at the forefront of a nationwide efort to
eradicate roadside liter.
(l-r) Elizabeth Heckert, Thelma Luy
and Claire Hanley
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Jacksonville Review Page 14 February 2014
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City Snapshot
Editor’s Note: Since I was unable to atend
the 1/7/14 City Council meeting, the following
report was fled by Community Center board
member Jeanena Whitewilson concerning
recent developments about a proposed new
community center.
City Closer to New Community Center
Success! The audience who flled Old
City Hall on January 7 watched a slide
show about the community… a 5-minute
glimpse into Jacksonville events and
our happy daily life, geting a glimpse
of some of the volunteers working
together. It stressed the need for a local
gathering place for large and small
indoor events, club and organization
meetings, a commercial kitchen, activity
spaces for multi-generational residents of
Jacksonville and its environs.
This project has been the focus of two
non-proft organizations: Seniors, Inc.,
and Community Center, Inc. for several
years. Our tenacity and fnancial sound
planning have paid of. The Jacksonville
City Council unanimously voted ‘yes’ to
two requests: 1) Grant a 50 year lease at
$1 per year for the Sampson property to
the Community Center; and 2) adjust the
lot line between the Sampson and Miller
properties (also known as Community
Center and City Hall) for the eventual
construction of a community center to
be housed on one lot. The property will
remain in the ownership of the City of
Jacksonville. Both non-profts will continue
raising funds through the Senior Thrift
Store sales and the Community Center’s
annual Celebrate the Arts Festival.
These two funding sources should cover
annual utilities and general maintenance
expenses. The joint savings and the land
value will be sources for matching grants
and serve as a foundation for funding
building construction.
A local space for activities for
individuals and families is essential to
develop a deeper sense of community.
A goal is to build a multi-generational,
multi-use space that is energy-efcient
and technologically-inclusive.
Requests for meeting space and activity
space have come from young adults
and new parents, working parents who
desire after-school and holiday activities
for their children, older teens who want
tutoring classes, driver’s education,
babysiting certifcation classes, and
activity space for club competitions.
Mid-age through elderly residents
expressed interest in space for planning
and sharing trips/travel, business and
estate planning and more. Others requests
include space for minor-medical, frst-
aid and CPR training classes, space
for wedding receptions, business
meetings, workshops, art and skilled-
crafts workshops, meeting space for the
Veterans, Rotary, Woodlands, Friends
of Cemetery, Lions, Boosters, Quilters,
Garden Clubs and others.
Much of the needs analysis included
feedback presented to council at an April,
2013 study session on the mater. The
Community Center group presented facts
and fgures, future building plans and
fnancial sustainability options. The multi-
use and multi-generational possibilities
shown in that presentation were
developed from over 250 community
outreach responses from individuals,
organizations, and clubs.
You can view the January 7
presentation online at: htp://www.youtube.
com/user/CammyLeanneDavis under “cc
presentation.”
If you have questions or ideas, or
would like to become a member of the
Community Center or Seniors’ Club or,
desire to donate your volunteer time,
skill, or fnances, feel free to contact
Jeanena@charter.net and please note that
our Facebook page will be up in March.
Trail Runners
by Becka Kem
Highlighting the Halls of Manzanita
W
hen
asked
about
the most beautiful
hike of Jacksonville
Forest Park, an immediate “Anything that
includes the Halls of Manzanita,” is the
response. Whether you walk up through
the twisting labyrinth or down,
the efect is spectacular. The
contrast between the bright burnt
red trunks with stif twisting
branches and the delicate green
leaves is beautiful. Add in the
spectacular views and it is an
immediate favorite worth the hike.
The hike starts at the lower
Granite Trailhead. Start on the
Granite Trail, heading slightly
downhill. At the fork, go left.
You will cross a bridge that
has an interpretive kiosk to
tell you about the cave and
creek. Shortly past the bridge,
take a right onto the new Cantrall
Trail. This is a new hiking-only
trail that parallels the Granite
Trail and Reservoir Road. What
makes this trail nice is its lushness.
There are green ferns, fuzzy moss,
smooth river rocks, the sounds of a
babbling creek and chirping birds.
It helps alleviate the ¾ mile uphill.
Cantrall Trail meets up with
the Granite Trail. Bear right and
continue up the Granite Trail. This
leads you to the Halls of Manzanita
section of trail. The hike uphill
is worth the experience traversing
down through the Halls of Manzanita.
One will fnd themself admiring the
uniqueness of the trail and trees. Be
sure to look up and take in the many
panoramic views of the valley.
Once through the Halls of Manzanita
you will be at the top of the Naversen
Family Loop. There are a couple of ways
to go, both lead to the Ridge View Trail.
The Ridge View Trail will take you back
to the bridge with the cave. This hike
is roughly 2 ½ miles long. Be sure to
pick up a trail map at the Kiosk at the
entrance of Jacksonville Forest Park.
You will want to explore the many other
ways to visit the Halls of Manzanita.
To get to the lower Granite Trail
trailhead, drive up Reservior Road
about 2 miles. There is a split in the
road. Left is Norling Creek, right is
Reservoir Road. Keep right. Shortly
there will be a large parking lot. The
Granite Trail trailhead is located at the
top of the parking lot on the left.
Trail Talk
by Tony Hess, Gary Sprague & Bob Budesa
Did You Know?
T
he
Woodlands
and the
Forest Park are
two of the largest
developed city parks in Oregon. The
largest city park in Oregon is the Forest
Park in Portland with 5,000 acres. The
second, coincidently with the same name,
is Jacksonville’s Forest Park at 1,080 acres.
Eugene has Alton Baker Park at 373 acres,
and the Woodlands is defnitely in the top
fve largest parks at 300 acres. So how can
and does the small village of Jacksonville
manage and protect these two treasures?
They are managed and protected by many
laws and agreements. The Woodlands
has 120 acres of BLM land. The BLM
has an agreement with the Jacksonville
Woodlands Association (JWA), the
city, and the Southern Oregon Land
Conservancy (SOLC) to protect that land
under the strict Jacksonville Woodlands
General Management Plan, which also
applies to the 180 acres of city-owned
land in the Woodlands. The city-owned
lands also have specifc conservation
agreements that dictate the uses. At 2005-
2006 Woodlands fuel reduction project
reduced fre hazards by clearing, cuting,
and removing brush and small trees. This
was done as part of a National Fire Plan
grant for $905,000 secured by the JWA
that also cleared another 1,100 acres of
private land surrounding Jacksonville to
reduce the chance of a wildfre reaching
the city. The city has received over
$300,000 in federal grants to do fuel
reduction in the watershed. Jacksonville
pays $8,000 per year to the Oregon
Department of Forestry as an insurance
payment to fght fres in the Woodlands
and the Watershed. The extensive trail
systems in the Woodlands and the Forest
Park also serve two fre-fghting purposes
other than being fun to hike upon. First,
they provide rapid access for fre crews,
and they are built just like the fre breaks
built during forest fres to prevent a
fre from moving along the ground. A
modifed Forest Park trails map with a
GPS coordinates grid has been provided
to the Jacksonville Fire and Police
Departments to aid them in responding
to a forest fre or a request for assistance
from a hiker on the trails.
All private forests in Oregon are
protected and managed by the Oregon
Forest Practices Act. The Forest Park and
the rest of the watershed are managed
under the 1995 Jacksonville Forest
Management Plan, which guides the city
on selective thinning of the watershed and
Forest Park to produce marketable timber
and remove underbrush and small trees,
leaving a healthy forest and providing
some funds to maintain the watershed.
On March 9,
four members of
the Jacksonville
Fire Department
will participate
in the annual
Scot Firefghter
Stairclimb—a
race up all 1311
stairs of the
Columbia Center
in downtown Seatle. The department
will be running up 69 fights of stairs
in full fre gear, including heavy, self-
contained air tanks. While welcoming
the challenge, the frefghters admit
they are participating to help in the
fght against blood cancers since all
event proceeds beneft The Leukemia &
Lymphoma Society.
Jacksonville Firefghter Jessica
Stanfeld, a veteran stair climber says,
“We would love Jacksonville residents
to support our department in this
fundraiser... all tax deductible donations
help in the fght against blood cancers…
every dollar counts when someone's life
depends on it!” Stanfeld has fnished the
race several times and has consistently
recorded one of the fastest times for
female frefghters. The Seatle event is
considered one of the most grueling races
of its kind and has raised millions of
dollars over the years.
To donate, please go to the
teams fundraising page online
at htp://www.llswa.org/site/TR/
Events/FirefghterStairclimb?team_
id=54673&pg=team&fr_id=1350 or stop-by
the fre department and make a donation
to this wonderful cause!
Team Jacksonville Preparing for Stairclimb
Jacksonville Firefghter, Jessica Stanfeld
at last year's Stairclimb
At their January 2, 2014 meeting,
Jacksonville Lions Lou Mayersky
and Club President, Bill Hanlan
(right) present a check for $150 to
Boy Scout Troop 7 Scoutmaster
Rick Moir and First-Class Scout
Landon Moir. Troop 7 Scouts
helped the Lions Club set up and
take down tables for the annual
Railroad Show at the Medford
Armory Thanksgiving weekend.
The Lions Club has several wood
tables they rent for public events
as a fundraiser.
Jacksonville Lions Club Presents Check
to Boy Scout Troop 7
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 15 February 2014
A Few Minutes with the Mayor
by Paul Becker
CITY OFFICE
Monday - Friday
8:30am - 4:00pm
(541) 899-1231
MUNICIPAL COURT CLERK
Monday - Friday: 9am - 4pm

PLANNING DEPARTMENT HOURS
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday
& Friday 8:30am - 2pm
Wednesday:
Closed to Public
Direct #: 541-899-6873
JACKSONVILLE OFFICE HOURS
CITY COUNCIL: Tuesday, February 4, 6:00pm (OCH)
PLANNING COMMISSION: Wednesday, February 12, 6:00pm (OCH)
CITY COUNCIL: Tuesday, February 18, 6:00pm (OCH)
HARC HEARING OFFICER: Wednesday, February 19, 10:00am (OCH)
HARC: Wednesday, February 26, 6pm (OCH)
City Offces 541-899-1231
www.jacksonvilleor.us
Location Key: CH - Old City Hall (S. Oregon & Main) CC - Community Center
(160 E. Main Street) NVR - Naversen Room (Jacksonville Library)
FH - Fire Hall(180 N. 3rd St. @ C) EOC - Emergency Ops Center at Police Station
JACKSONVILLE CITY SCHEDULE
POLICE BLOTTER
Jacksonville Police Department
A consolidated report based on type of calls & number of incidences
November 17, 2013 to January 20, 2014
Abandoned Vehicle - 1
Alarm - 6
Animal Complaint - 8
Assault - 2
Assist - Other Gov't/
Law Enforcement
Agencies - 93
Assist Public - 78
Burglary - 1
City Ordinance - 6
Civil - 4
Counterfeit/Forgery - 2
Custody-Detox - 2
Disorderly Conduct - 1
Disturbance/Noise - 3
Domestic Disturbance - 2
DWS - 1
DUII - 4
Fraud - 3
Larceny/Theft - 4
Missing Person/Adult - 1
Missing Person/Child - 1
Motor Vehicle Crash - 3
Other Crimes - 2
Property Found - 1
Property Lost - 2
Public Safety - 14
Subpoena Service - 1
Suicide Threats - 2
Suspicious - 17
Traffc Crime/Hit &
Run - 1
Traffc/Roads All - 27
Unsecure Premise - 1
Vehicle Recover - 1
Warrant - 3
Call Type – Total Calls
A New Year With Old Beginnings
Jacksonville Fire Department 2014 Community Class Schedule
February—Cold Weather Injuries
March—Hands On CPR
April—What Is CERT and How It Works
May—When to Go, When To Stay
Classes are held at the fre station on the 3rd Thursday of the month at 6:30pm (except
during fre season). For more information, please call 541-899-7246.
To help keep prescription medicines
away from children, out of landflls,
the water supply and waste treatment
systems, the Jacksonville Police
Department has a Prescription Drug
Deposit Box in the lobby of the police
station which is located at 225 S. Third
Street. The secure box enables residents to
drop-of items in a secure location.
The following items are accepted in the
prescription drug deposit box:
• Prescriptions
• Over-the-counter medications
• Vitamins
• Medication samples
• Medications for pets
• Ointments
• Lotions
• Liquid medication in glass or leak-
proof containers.
The following items WILL NOT be
accepted in the box.
• Needles (sharps)
• Thermometers
• Bloody or infectious waste
• Medications from businesses or
clinics
• Hydrogen peroxide
• Aerosol cans or inhalers
Items may be dropped of during
regular business hours.
For more information, please contact Chief
David Towe 541-899-7100.
Prescription Drug Deposit Box
N
ew Year’s Eve 2013 marked
the end of my third year as
mayor, an occupation which
seemed most improbable to me when
growing up—it was a diferent world
back then. This thought crossed my
mind while recently watching an old
Hopalong Cassidy flm. It was one of those
cowboy soap operas where the bad guy
was carrying sticks of dynamite and a
detonator to blow up a dam. Could Hoppy
stop him? Audiences of the day would lean
forward in their seats as the music reached
a crescendo, munch on their popcorn just
a litle faster, and hope for the best. Not to
worry! Hoppy winds up saving the dam. It
was a simple story for a simpler time.
Jacksonville is the sad possessor of
a dam… the one up in Forest Park.
Sad, because the dam is in deplorable
condition with silt deposits built-up
behind it where
water was once
stored. The dam
could be restored
but Jacksonville
gave-up all water
rights decades
ago. Now, the city
is spending sums
of money to, in
essence, “blow up
the dam.” In other
words, restore
the terrain so the water can resume its
pathway down the hill. It sounds simple,
but it isn’t.
When Hoppy made that movie, life
was simple… just blow up the dam and
walk away from it. All perfectly legal
then, but not today! With jurisdiction
over this dam, federal and state agencies
number an astounding number of
eleven, each with rules and regulations
that must be adhered to. What might
have been a simple task becomes an
engineering project. Fortunately, we
set aside money from the M.R.A. land
swap for this very purpose. However,
to be honest, this story isn’t about the
dam… it’s about bureaucracy, a form of
organized endeavor that afects us all, the
very antithesis of democracy. Yet, this far
into the 21st century, we fnd ourselves
embracing ever-larger bureaucratic
forms of government. The federal TSA,
which guards us in our airports, has
now grown to 67,000 people. It isn’t just
the cost of the screening agents… add
payroll clerks, accountants, ofce staf,
managers, legal help, and sundry other
people and materials… the sheer size of
it brings other problems.
Oscar Wilde said, “Bureaucracy
expands to meet the needs of the
expanding bureaucracy.” Even more
cynical is the quote from an anonymous
source, “Any sufciently advanced
bureaucracy is indistinguishable from
molasses.” There was a time when most
Americans seemed to understand that
simply because something grows larger
doesn’t mean it operates beter or more
efciently. I’m not so sure they feel that
way today. When something becomes
“too big to fail” is it then an asset or
a liability? What I do know is that all
bureaucracies develop a maze of rules
and regulations supposedly designed to
support the service they provide. There
are rules for this
and rules for
that. The rules
become a bible…
one that seldom
adjusts to the
changes in the
world around it.
When the
city acquired
the courthouse,
I understood
we would have
to do a seismic study of the building
before we actually moved any ofces
into it. Imagine my astonishment when
I learned that using the building for
government operations and not for
public access meant that no seismic
study was necessary!
Let the building collapse on the mayor,
administrator, and city staf… well… that’s
OK. Ah, the logic of bureaucratic minds!
Now don’t get me wrong. I understand
that with the huge and ever-growing
size of the federal government, there is
no escape from the elephant in the room,
the bureaucratic nightmare which larger
government brings. Knowing this only
makes me appreciate all the more our
small town that provides the antidote
against home-grown bureaucratic
ills. Here, one can make inquiries and
actually talk to someone in charge. Here,
we are ready to talk to any citizen who
needs information or has suggestions
to improve our service. And that’s the
reason we exist… to serve our citizens.
Planning Department News
New Location—The Planning and
Building Departments have a new
location. Come see our new space and
enjoy some refreshments at an Open
House Friday February 7th from 2:00-
4:00pm. You will fnd our ofces at 206
N. Fifth Street on the County Courthouse
Grounds in the single-story yellow
building, commonly known as the
Hanley Building, on the corner of C and
6th Streets.
First and Main Street Sidewalk Project—
Construction has begun on the new sidewalk
up to the Brit Festival entrance.
The new sidewalk will start at the corner
of S. Oregon
and W.
Main Street,
continue
up W. Main
Street and
cross to S.
First Street
past the Brit
Gardens to
the entrance
of the Brit
Festival and
terminate at
the corner
of S. First and
Fir Streets.
The project is a joint venture with the City,
ODOT and the Brit Festival. The City
received a Transportation Enhancement
Grant in the amount of $800,000 towards
the project. The estimated completion date
is March 14, 2014, however the project must
be completed by April 30, 2014. Expect
temporary road closures and delays during
this time.
Chinese Artifacts—As many of you are
aware, during preparation for the work
on the First and Main sidewalk project,
Chelsea Rose, Staf Archaeologist of
Southern Oregon University Laboratory
of Anthropology, uncovered a wealth
of Chinese artifacts in the designated
test hole sites. Many of the artifacts
are now on display in the Jacksonville
Library. Chelsea will give a talk on her
fndings during the Chinese New Year
Celebration on Saturday, February 8th
from 12:30-1:30pm at the Library.
Intern From SOU—The Planning
Department welcomes an intern from
SOU. Chris Seaman, a senior, majoring
in Environmental Studies and Land Use
Planning, will be gaining some work
experience in the Planning feld while
working on
a few special
projects. He
will be in
the ofce on
Mondays and
Wednesdays
until the
month of May.
Historic
Preservation
Fund Grant
Program—
Postcards
will be sent in
March for the
annual Historic
Preservation Fund Grant program. Funds
were made available through the generous
donations of the estates of Vern Beebe and
Linda Scoville to the City of Jacksonville for
historic preservation. If you are an owner
of a historic structure and need fnancial
assistance for repairs you may be eligible
to receive a 50/50 matching grant. The
annual grant is competitive and requires an
application and three separate bids for the
proposed work. Applications will be made
available in March and will be due in April.
by Amy Stevenson, Planning Director, City of Jacksonville
First & Main Street Sidewalk Construction Project
Jacksonville Review Page 16 February 2014
Let's Talk Real Estate
by Graham Farran, Expert Properties
Graham Farran is a broker with Expert
Properties, located at 620 N. 5th Street in
Jacksonville. Please see their ad on page 3 and
contact them at 541-899-2030 or online at
www.expertprops.com.
2014 looks to be the year of the “repeat
home buyer,” as interest rates rise
and home prices increase—worsening
afordability will discourage some frst
time home buyers. These won’t be the
only changes as foreclosures slow,
inventory stabilizes and the process of
geting a mortgage becomes less hectic.
Barring any economic
crises, the housing market
should continue to
normalize. Here are 5 ways
the 2014 housing market will
be diferent from 2013:
Home Prices Will
Rise, Afordability Will
Worsen—Buying a home
will be more expensive in
2014. The median price of
a home in Jackson County
increased by 18.2% in 2013, bringing it up
to around $195,000. Although this is still
far below the 2005 median of $271,500,
it’s a nice increase. Mortgage rates will
also be higher in 2014, thanks both to the
strengthening economy and to Federal
Reserve tapering. We are still looking at
an incredibly low 4.5% interest rate, but
this is up from the 3.5% interest rate of a
year ago. As of September 2013, Trulia has
reported that buying was 35% cheaper
than renting nationally. Buying also beat
renting in all of the 100 largest metro
areas surveyed.
Home Buying Process Improves and
Inventories Increase—Home buyers
in 2014 might kick themselves for not
buying in 2013 or 2012, when mortgage
rates and prices were lower, but inventory
will be increasing and lenders will be
less preoccupied. There will be more
inventory on the market later this
year, partly due to new construction,
but primarily because higher prices
will encourage more homeowners to
sell—including those who are no longer
underwater in their mortgages. Finally,
mortgage approvals should be easier to
get because higher rates have slashed
refnancing activity and pushed some
banks to ramp-up their purchase lending.
New mortgage rules coming into efect
in 2014 will change which types of
loans are more competitive. It seems
like government-backed loans will soon
be less competitive to those ofered by
commercial banks, hopefully making
them more willing to loan. All in all, more
inventory, less competition, and more
mortgage credit should combine to make
the buying process easier in 2014—for
those who can aford to buy.
The Year of the Repeat Buyer—2013
was the year of the frst time home buyer,
but 2014 will be the year of the repeat
home buyer. Investors will still be a factor
in 2014 but higher prices mean that the
return on investment falls. Repeat buyers
selling their current homes which have
risen in value, and either relocating or
upgrading, will make up the majority
market segment this year. The amount
of “Escapees” from nearby states will
continue to increase as Oregon has the
largest percentage of people moving
into the state vs. people moving out
of the state nationally. We will see a
heavy increase in the number of retirees
as they have been waiting through six
years of recession to fnally see their
stock portfolios rebound and their home
equity swell to make retirement possible.
Retirees will fnd Southern Oregon
and our unique combination of nature,
culture, afordability and great health care
to be a suitable place to retire.
Foreclosure Activity Will Slow—
Foreclosure sales are likely to play a
minimal role in the housing market in
2014. They are not gone but they are less
important. Foreclosure inventory has
dropped in the U.S. to multi-year lows,
down nearly 33% since the end of 2012.
The numbers of new foreclosures was
down 39% in the third quarter of 2013
to the lowest levels since the second
quarter of 2006. In 2013, foreclosures
amounted to only 7.1% of the homes
sold in Jackson County.
Rental Market Continues to be
Strong—Throughout the recession,
investors bought homes and rented
them out, sometimes to people who’d
lost a home to foreclosure. Going into
2014, we will see fewer families losing
their homes and fewer investors buying
single family homes, preferring instead
multi-unit complexes with higher returns.
Increasing prices of both homes and
mortgages will make it more difcult for
renters to buy their frst home. Ironically,
the economic recovery means the overall
homeownership rate will probably
decline as young adults move out of
their parents' homes to form their own
households. This will add to the amount
of renters, not buyers. In 2014, we will
continue to see an increase in demand
for single family homes for rent but a
decrease in supply.
So, hang on! 2014 will be another
year of great recovery for the housing
market. We'll see increasing equity for
homeowners, continuing low interest rates
and increasing market inventory. Welcome
to “The year of the repeat buyer!”
2014 Real Estate Market: The Year
of the Repeat Buyer

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...at the BLUEDOOR
GREAT YEAR!
Thanks to all for your support...
2013 was a GREAT YEAR!
A new garden year is beginning
and NEW shipments are IN with
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541.899.3242 • 155 north 3rd street • jacksonville
Everyone likes a party, and on
December 9, eighty members the
Jacksonville Boosters Club broke from
their civic activities for their annual
Holiday celebration. Braving the ice
and snow, they relaxed at the US Hotel
Ballroom for a dinner catered by The
Jacksonville Inn, with wine from Daisy
Creek Winery.
Among the evening’s festivities, the
Club presented its 2013 awards. The
“Director’s Award” went to Bruce
and Kathy Garret of Archive-CD, the
“President’s Award” to Terry Erdmann,
and the “Booster of the Year Award” to
co-winners Vivienne Grant and Tony
Hess. All were honored for their service
and dedication in support of the group’s
mission statement: “We engage the
community by preserving Jacksonville’s
history and enhancing it’s livability.”
For information on joining or volunteering
with the of Jacksonville Boosters, visit www.
jacksonvilleboosters.org, or contact Lori Buerk
at 541-261-0328.
Jacksonville Boosters Celebrate
Annual Holiday Party
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 17 February 2014 Page 17
355 W. Oak St, Jacksonville
Just Listed. Charming home on
a great .35 acre lot close to Britt. 2 bedrooms
plus a den. Approx. 1118 square feet. New floor-
ing, gas heat, new kitchen, covered porch and
patio, RV parking.
$229,900
Fairfield Drive, Jacksonville
Country living in the city limits of
Jacksonville. Rare opportunity to own a level one
acre lot. Wonderful views, city water available,
standard septic approval, paved road and no
CC&Rs. A serene setting in a well established
neighborhood. Views of mountains, trees and
blue sky. A pefect location for building your
dream home.
$199,900
455 Coachman,
Jacksonville
Just listed! Incredible Stagecoach Hills
home with 4 bedrooms and 2.5 baths
and over 3100 sq. ft plus a bonus room.
Master bedroom on the main level,
spacious deck for entertaining, peaceful,
natural setting. Great location.
$459,000
Upper Applegate Rd
5 acres
Jacksonville
Close to Applegate Lake.
Includes fractional interest in recre-
ational lot on the river. Wonderful
Views!
$149,900
570 N. Oregon,
Jacksonville
Make your own history on this beauti-
ful .34 acre home site. Lovely setting
with mature trees. Gas, water, and
sewer to the property.
$152,500
Daisy Creek Road,
Jacksonville
Beautiful 1.74 acre parcel of land
just outside the city limits,
Daisy Creek frontage,
septic approval, well. Close to town
but in a wonderful
country setting.
$149,000
1100 and 1104 S. Third St.,
Jacksonville
Beautiful 1.06 acre in city
limits. Includes 2 separate
tax lots with utilities.
Get both lots for...
$159,900
Placer Hill Drive
5 acres -
Jacksonville
Nestled above Jacksonville in Vista
Wood Ranch.
Underground utilities, paved road,
fabulous
mountain and city views.
$249,000
Blue Door Garden Store.
Jacksonville boutique store carries garden
paraphernalia such as gifts, pots, gloves, high end
tools & organic products. Lines of local and
Northwest artists garden art and increased
inventory of garden stakes, hooks, chimes,
statuary and bird baths, all designed for local and
visiting gardeners and for year round appeal.
Business only $50,000. Inventory sold separately.
1235 Shafer Lane, Medford
Quality Mahar built home on
a lovely cul-de-sac in Southwest Medford. 3 bed-
rooms and 2 baths, built in 2003, this home is
in immaculate condition. Vaulted ceilings, gas
fireplace, covered patio.
$209,900
240 Stagecoach, Jacksonville
4 BR, 3 BA home with views in
Stagecoach Hills. 2 FP, bonus room & fantastic
kitchen w/granite counters and SS appliances.
There is an oversized garage, a large landscaped
lot with a fenced back yard and lots of decking
for outdoor entertaining.
$349,000
Coachman Drive Lots
2 adjacent lots for sale in lovely
Stagecoach Hills, surrounded by
beautiful homes.
$89,900
for each of them
W
Van Vleet, Jacksonville
505 N. 5th St, Jacksonville, OR 97530
541-899-2000
3667 Livingston Rd.
English Manor style home on 2.98 acres. 5188
sq.ft. home with 5 BR, 5 1/2 BA w/a private
guest wing. Dramatic entry, formal
dining, incredible kitchen, 3 FP, master suit on
the main level, an inground pool & shop.
$875,000.
Adjoining 2.69 acre lot is also available for sale
for $249,000.
S
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Kathy H Jan 2014_Kathy H September 2013 1/16/14 9:22 AM Page 1
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RAY’S JACKSONVILLE • 401 NORTH 5TH STREET • (541) 899-1262 • STORE HOURS: 6AM - 9PM • www.gorays.com
16995 N. Applegate Rd., Grants Pass
541-846-1039
bridgeviewwine.com
1665 Eastside Road, Jacksonville
541-899-6876
cowhornwine.com
2131 Little Applegate Rd, Jacksonville
541-899-7264
crickethillwinery.com
11412 Highway 238, Jacksonville
541-899-7511
devittwinery.com
8035 Hwy 238, Ruch
541-846-3022
fiascowinery.com
1425 Humbug Creek Rd., Applegate
541-846-0810
johnmichaelwinery.com
8555 Highway 238, Jacksonville
541-899-1746
longswordvineyard.com
11777 Hwy 238, Jacksonville
541-846-6800
redlilyvineyards.com
184 Missouri Flat Rd., Grants Pass
541-846-6372
rosellasvineyard.com
330 Kubli Rd., Grants Pass
541-846-9985
sfvineyards.com
222 Missouri Flat Rd., Grants Pass
541-846-9223
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9110 N. Applegate Rd.
541-862-2693
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16955 Water Gap Rd.
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1475 Kubli Rd., Grants Pass
541846-9900
troonvineyard.com
1000 Upper Applegate Rd., J’ville
541-899-8468
valleyviewwinery.com
8200 Highway 238, Grants Pass
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818 Slagle Creek Rd, Grants Pass
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wcwinery.com
4550 Little Applegate Rd, J’ville
541-899-1565
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Wine Tasting
Tours
Outdoor Seating
Gift Shop
Entertainment/Events
Private Event Facility
Wine Club
Food/Snacks
“Wine Country the way it should be.”
– Sunset Magazine
www.applegatewinetrail.com
Tasting Room
Hours:
Please note that we
will be closed through
February 28
Join us for our Grand
Re-opening on Saturday,
March 1



Our Tasting Room Hours
will be Thursday–Sunday
12–7
Tasting Room
Wood Fired Pizza

Espresso Bar
4554 South Stage Road
(one mile east of downtown Jacksonville)
www.dancinvineyards.com 541-245-1133
Corporate and Group Rates
541-899-2050 | 830 5th St
Bistro • Wine Bar
www.dejavubistrowinebar.com
541-899-1942
Déjà Vu
Tour 14 Local Wineries with our
Exclusive Wine Package
The McCully House Inn
240 E. California St. | 541.899.2050
A Part of Country House Inns Jacksonville | www.countryhouseinnsjacksonville.com
Home of:
Jacksonville Review Page 20 February 2014
♥ Saturday, February 1, 8, 15 & 22, 5:30pm: RISING
STARS COMPETITION, South Stage Cellars.
See article on page 6 and ad on back page.
♥ Friday, February 7, 2:00-4:00pm: PLANNING
DEPARTMENT OPEN HOUSE, Hanley
Building, corner of C & 6th streets, Courthouse
Grounds. See article on page 15.
♥ Thursday, February 13, 8:30am: CHAMBER
MONTHLY MEETING, second Thursday each
month, Old City Hall.
♥ Friday, February 14: SCHMIDT FAMILY
VINEYARD VALENTINE'S DAY DINNER.
See ad on page 4.
♥ Friday, February 14, 5:00-11:00pm: VALENTINE'S
DAY DINNER & DANCE, Bigham Knoll
Ballroom. See article on page 10 & ad on page 4.
♥ Saturday, February 15: PTEROSAUR SEMINARS,
Crater Rock Museum. See article on page 29.
♥ Sunday, February 16, 11:00am-2:00pm:
SWEETHEARTS CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH,
Pioneer Village. See ad on page 8.
♥ Wednesday, February 19, 4:00-6:00pm: A SPECIAL
EVENING AT WILLOWCREEK. See ad on page 4.
♥ Thursday, February 20, 5:30-7:00pm: FIRE
DEPARTMENT COMMUNITY CLASSES,
December: "Cold Weather Injuries." See schedule on page 15.
♥ Thursday, February 20, 6:00-8:00pm: SCHMIDT
FAMILY VINEYARD CIGAR & WINE
NIGHT. See ad on page 4.
♥ Friday, February 21, 7:00pm: MOVIE NIGHT AT
OLD CITY HALL, Double Feature, British Intelligence
& Charlie Chan at the Opera. See article this page.
♥ Sunday, February 23, 3:00-5:00pm: APPLEGATER
BENEFIT CONCERT, Applegate River Lodge.
See article on page 27.
♥ Sunday, February 23, 4:00pm: SOUND
HEALING, JoyFull Yoga. RSVP. See ad on page 27.
♥ Tuesday, February 25, 6:30-8:00pm:
JACKSONVILLE ELEMENTARY TALENT
SHOW. See article on page 24.
EVENTS CALENDAR ♥FEBRUARY 2014
J a c k s o n v i l l e A r t E v e n t s
F e b r u a r y 2 0 1 4
“Luvvv / Year of the Horse”
Art Presence Art Center
February 7 - 23: This month we
present member art works of
calligraphy and abstract colors in
all mediums, including oil, wat-
ercolor, acrylic, & photography
depicting Valentine’s Day themes
in our main gallery. We will be
open every Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 11 to 5.
Meet the artists and show them YOUR love! Join us for
an artists reception on February 14th from 5 to 7pm.
Chinese New Year, Feb 8 from 11:30 - 12:30pm: Art
Presence will host a talk on Feng Shui by Sugeet Posey,
Master and owner of Creative Vision, in conjunction with
Jacksonville’s celebration of the Year of the Horse.
February 15, 1 - 3pm: Rick Patsche will present "The
Other Side of Life,” a memory of make believe and
beyond told through music. The presentation is free, and
CDs and books will be available.
See More Art Presence Curated Exhibits:
Jacksonville Library:
Naversen Room, Now through April 14:
Art Presence member Eva Thiemann will show her oil
paintings of Alaskan brown bears featuring colorful
abstract and cubist Arctic landscapes. Not to be missed!
Front Entrance Display Case
Jan 2 - Feb 17: “Remembering Jacksonville’s Chinese
Quarter” Exhibit of several fine artifacts from a house in
the Chinese Quarter that burned in the fall of 1888.
Feb 17 - March 31: Artistic enhanced photography by
Kathleen Hoevet.
Medford Library:
Now – April 21: Photography by Jacie Gray.
The Art Presence Art Center is a nonprofit organization
located at 206 North Fifth Street, on the grounds of
Jacksonville’s historic courthouse. Our gallery is open
every Friday through Sunday from 11am-5pm.
Visit us online at art-presence.org
GoodBean Coffee Company
Feb 1 - 28: Crystal Pyren
After painting theatrical scenery for
ten years, Crystal began teaching
drawing and painting classes to
children. She recently moved to
Southern Oregon with her husband to
start a lavender farm in Williams. She
is most passionate about drawing and
painting nature scenes en plein air and
creating imaginary scenes inspired by
real-life images. She is inspired by
colors found in nature, which she enhances in her work.
Working recently with her grandfather’s vintage water-
colors has added a personal, sentimental quality to her
artwork. We are excited to present an exhibit of Crystal’s
new works, many created for this show!
South Stage Cellars
Now - March 31: Metal Work by
Cheryl D. Garcia
South Stage Cellars will showcase
metal artwork by resident artist Cheryl
D. Garcia during the Rising Stars
Competition. Cheryl's art explores the
subtleties of the natural world through
her special treatments of a variety of
metals and finishes, with wall art &
small sculptural pieces for interior
decor & large outdoor pieces.

www.soartists.com ~ soar@soartists.com
Website & Art Event Calendar by
Hannah West Design, LLC ~ 541.899.2012
Ruch Branch
7919 Highway 238
541-899-7438
Storytime - Tuesday: 11:30am
Hours Open
Tuesday : 11-5
Thursday: 1–7
Saturday: Noon-4
Jacksonville Branch
340 W. “C” Street
541-899-1665
Storytime - Wednesday: 11am
Hours Open
Monday: Noon-5
Wednesday: 10-5
Thursday: 2-6
Saturday:10-2
For more library information, please visit www.jcls.org
Applegate Branch
18485 N. Applegate Rd.
541-846-7346
Hours Open
Tuesday: 2-6
Friday: 2-6
Saturday: 10-2
P U B L I C L I B R A R Y H O U R S & L O C A T I O N S
SIDE POCKET
ROGUE SUSPECTS TRIO
L.E.F.T.
BUDDY PRICE
THE JASON JOHNSTON BAND
DAVID PINSKY&BROADWAY PHIL
THE RHYTHM KINGS
RYAN VOSIKA
T.B.A.
BEATLES KARAOKE NIGHT
THIS MONTH AT
THE BELLA
1
6
7 & 8
13
14 & 15
20
21 & 22
27
2 8
Mar. 1
170 WEST CALIFORNIA STREET, JACKSONVILLE • 899-1770
FEBRUARY
nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn
n
Free concert talk with
Martin Majkut one hour
before each performance
Tickets Online
rvsymphony.org
Phone 541-552-6398
Martin
Majkut
CONDUCTOR
7:30pm Friday, February 28
SOU Music Recital Hall, Ashland
7:30pm Saturday, March 1
Craterian Theater, Medford
3:00pm Sunday, March 2
GP Performing Arts Center,
Grants Pass
$20–$50
Limited $10 seats in Medford
and Grants Pass
Students $5, all concerts all season
Alexander
Tutunov
piano
Tchaikovsky
Piano Concerto No.1
Schubert, Symphony No. 3
Stravinsky, Symphonies of
Wind Instruments
175 E. California Street, Jacksonville
A February
Sweetheart Special!
Celebrate an
Anniversary,
Birthday,
or just to say
“I Love You!”
CALL 899-1900 and ask for the
“Sweetheart Special.”
Book a reservation now for JACKSONVILLE INN’s HONEYMOON
COTTAGE–TWO NIGHT’S LODGING FOR THE PRICE OF ONE!
Full-Service Gourmet Breakfast included– Enjoy the HD-TV with
DVD, CD player, Fireplace, and Wireless Internet access.
www.JacksonvilleInn.com
For more, please see the Local Events Calendar
on our website: JacksonvilleReview.com
If you like tight editing,
a fast paced story, and
riveting suspense, you’ll love
BRITISH INTELLIGENCE,
the frst flm of a double
feature Boris Karlof billing.
This is no monster movie
but an intelligent drama set
in World War I. Karlof is
superb as the master German
spy operating within the
heart of the British command.
Karlof was ably supported
by Warner Brothers who
provided great production
values for this one hour flm.
Our second feature is
CHARLIE CHAN AT THE
OPERA, the only Chan feature
to use a guest star. Karlof
plays an opera singer thought
dead in a fre. Mistaken as
insane, he escapes his prison
hospital and it is up to Chan
to fnd him and determine
what really happened at the
opera house. Many Chan fans
will say this is the BEST of the
Chan flms. This flm runs for
68 minutes.
The show begins at 7:00pm at Old City Hall on
Friday, February 21st. Doors open at 6:30pm.
February’s Film Fare a Double Feature at Old City Hall
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 21 February 2014
A Cup of Conversation
by Michael Kell
The Decision
Christian Hamilton, Principal Broker
541-621-0679
chamilton@windermere.com
www.jvilleagent.com
THIS MONTH’S FEATURED PROPERTY
Talk to Christian Today!
Beautiful home with nearly
1900 sq ft! 3 bedrooms, 2 full
bathrooms, open kitchen
w/granite countertops,
hardwood fooring & large
island with great room
concept opening up to the
living room. $265,000
505 N Fifth St, Jacksonville, OR 97530
2321 Savannah Dr
Central Point
Love at first Cup.
2013
Jacksonville/Medford
N
othing cuts to the quick of
reality faster than burying the
young. For one brief moment
time slows down enough for us to come
up out of this world’s ether and see life in
its natural state; brief and fragile, precious
and fnal. No exchanges, no returns.
I met Rob in college. We became fast
friends and joined the same fraternity our
junior year. Life was bliss for lack of a beter
word. We were privileged, young, healthy
and strong. All we had to do was graduate
and then whatever our hearts desired. Rob
was athletic, popular, and studied business.
We were best of friends each with wild sides
explored to the furthest reaching boundaries.
Sleep was optional so we heavily mortgaged
our youth believing there would always
be a full tank the next day. We were bullet-
proof evidenced by needlessly reckless
decisions and carelessness only the young
can aford. However, our season in the
sun soon ended with graduation and
we joined the ranks of the young urban
professional class. Oh, the irony.
For the next few years we sputered
around together launching our careers.
Those were fast years with the freedom,
time, and resources enough to enjoy life
at top speed. Rob was eventually ofered
the big job in San Francisco and moved
away. Smartphones and Facebook were
still science fction so communication was
limited. The week I was in the area on
business we were to connect but I lost his
number with no way of geting in touch. I
remember taking the last fight out of SFO
frustrated and bummed my buddy was
somewhere in the big city wondering what
happened to me. I fgured he’d call to rip
on me the next day but no call came. A
few days later a mutual friend rang with
news Rob was dead, killed in a motorcycle
accident over the weekend. When I didn’t
show he decided to go road racing in the
foothills with his older brother, Bill.
The funeral was mid-week and the
service was packed with family and
friends. Still in shock, I entered the
church late, numb and shaken. Looking
for a familiar face of which there were
many, Rob’s mother found me and
asked if I would say a few words about
her youngest son. Making my way
up the aisle my mind was frantically
searching for something of comfort to
ofer the grief-stricken family seated in
the front row. Rob’s family was uterly
despondent. Bill’s face was buried in
his hands with chest heaving grieving
sobs while a sea of faces betrayed broken
hearts of everyone present. I paused,
breathed deeply and slowly recounted
a time when Rob and I were up late
talking about seemingly nothing when
the conversation turned to what frightened
us most in life…not a typical topic among
young men. Rob told me his greatest fear
was to be left paralyzed physically or
mentally…a prisoner in his own body not
able to escape. The thought scared him to
death. I fnished by expressing gratitude
for knowing and loving my friend closer
than a brother, how he lived his years
strong, full of life and joy, loved by many
without ever having to live out his greatest fear.
A few weeks later a leter arrived from
Rob’s sister-in-law. She recounted the
whole story of what happened on the
highway that fateful day. Up until after
the funeral, Bill refused to talk about the
events in real time. All anyone knew was
a logging truck coming around a tight
curve clipped Rob in the helmet as he tried
to swerve out of the way. At the botom
of the embankment, younger brother
died in older brother’s arms. The truth
is Rob was still alive when Bill made the
desperate decision not to stop the massive
hemorrhaging from the severely crushed
head. Bill chose to allow his litle brother
to bleed out life in his arms than risk
him sufer a fate of physical and mental
devastation. Can you imagine the guilt and
second guessing tormenting his soul?
After the service, the older brother broke
down and confessed all to his family. When
Bill heard the words spoken about litle
brother being spared his personal living
nightmare, he knew the decision was the
right one, at least one he could now begin
to live with and the entire family rallied
around him. Bill’s wife wanted me to know
the healing power in the words spoken
that night and how grateful the family was
their youngest had experienced the gift of
true friendship on earth. The night of the
memorial I told the family I’d never forget
my friend. That was thirty years ago. I’ve
kept my word. Be Good not biter.
Michael Kell is co-owner of GoodBean
Cofee in Jacksonville.
Next Medford Food Project
Jacksonville Pickup Day: Saturday, February 8
th
Please contact Jerrine Rowley at 541-702-2223 or
Faye Haynes at 541-324-1298 if you have any questions or wish to
become involved with the Food Project in Jacksonville!
(Always the 2nd Saturday of even-numbered months.)
• Your Friendly, Professional
Pharmacy Staff
• Buy Local - Support Local
• Short Wait Time
• We Specialize in Custom
Compounding
• We offer Delivery to Your Home
• Unique Gifts - Large Selection
2355 West Main St, Medford
(541) 772-2330
www.WestMainPharmacy.com
Cold out? Warm up with our
hot homemade soup!
Wednesday-Saturday
7:00am-2:00pm
HOURS
Sunday 7:00am-1:00pm
Breakfast Only All Day
130 N. 5th Street, Jacksonville • 541-899-2977
Like us on Facebook!
Jacksonville Review Page 22 February 2014
Purchasing a home or piece of land
may be one of the biggest decisions you’ll
ever make. Knowing what land uses are
allowed (and what’s not) is one of the
most important steps you can take during
the due diligence period before closing
on the property. A title search can tell you
who owns a property but will not tell you
anything about what uses are allowed
by its zoning. Unfortunately, many people
do not fnd out what is allowed on their
property until they’ve moved in and decided
to build an addition or become urban
farmers and get some chickens and a cow. At
that point, disappointment may set-in when
they fnd out the lot is already at maximum
lot coverage or farm animals are not allowed
in the zoning district. Worst-case, some
people do not realize the rules for their
property until after the fact—when they’ve
been “red tagged” for illegal construction or
a use not allowed by zoning ordinances.
Zoning Ordinances are established by
the local government in order to regulate
land use in accordance with goals and
policies set by the State and the local
governing body. The goal of land use
planning is to promote a livable and
economically viable community, while
balancing the needs of property owners,
businesses, agriculture, recreation, and
other community priorities.
Zoning regulations divide the land
within its boundaries into zones
or districts, including Residential,
Commercial, and Industrial, and then
further into sub-districts such as HR,
RR-5 or UR-1, each with diferent rules.
For example, one residential district may
allow only single-family detached homes,
while another may allow multi-family
housing and certain in-home businesses.
In general, single-family residential
districts are the most heavily regulated.
Zoning regulations typically govern
the density and type of housing allowed,
including such things as the minimum
lot size, required setbacks from property
lines, building size and height, and what
percentage of a lot may be built on or
paved (also known as lot coverage).
Zoning regulations may also regulate
such things as keeping chickens on your
property, starting and running a home-
based business, how much parking
is required, as well as the legality of
“ancillary” or “granny” units. The
number of bedrooms you can have in
your home may be limited by how many
parking spaces you have as well as the
size of your septic system. These are just
examples of some of the regulations that
are included in zoning ordinances.
Special zoning districts often have
stricter regulations than standard
districts; these are often called zoning
overlays, which create rules on top of
rules. Examples include historic districts,
(as in Jacksonville’s historic core which
is strictly regulated) steep slopes, and
foodplains. Historic districts may restrict
the size, shape, design, color, and exterior
fnish of a building. Other restrictions that
you might not think of can include:
• Views: Some areas require that
buildings not be visible on ridgelines
or other scenic areas.
• Trees: Some areas restrict the size,
number, or areas of trees that can that
be removed on your property.
• Other: Restrictions due to
archaeological sites, threatened
species, aquifer protection, etc.
Violating the zoning regulations is not
a good idea. If you go over the height
limits, build too close to the property
lines, or build a structure without a
permit, you can be forced to modify,
or even demolish some or all of the
construction… and you’ll likely face fnes.
It is, therefore, important to understand
the zoning regulations that apply to the
property you are interested in acquiring.
Don’t make any assumptions and be sure
to check any representations made by the
seller. A good place to start your research
is at the local planning department—
talk to the planner on staf as to what is
allowed and what is not. Good luck on
that next purchase!
Sandy J. Brown, AICP, lives in
Jacksonville and is a certifed land use
planner and broker with Western Properties
of Southern Oregon, LLC. She can be
reached at sandyjbrown@gmail.com, 831-
588-8204, or online at www.facebook.com/
WesternPropertiesofSouthernOregon.
See ad this page.
Know the Zone…When Purchasing a Lot or Home!
by Sandy J. Brown, AICP
Sandy J. Brown, AICP
Broker, Certifed Land Use Planner
831-588-8204 cell
541-734-0043 ofce
sandyjbrown@gmail.com
Investing in real estate is one of the
most important decisions you’ll make.
Hiring a real estate broker EDUCATED
in LAND USE ISSUES is one of the
BEST decisions you’ll make.
WesternPropertiesofSouthernOregon
Speaking of Antiquing with
Joelle Graves, Sterling Creek Antiques
Pretty in Pink
P
ink
Depression
glass; pink
custard glass;
pink dishes; pink
linens—anything
pink! Pink is
a beautiful color to decorate with when
combined with other vibrant colors of the
season. February, of course, lends itself
to decorating with pink—
and if you are like me, the
minute the garden begins
to bloom in pastels, you're
picking and arranging.
Chances are you have
inherited or bought a piece
of pink “something” and
wonder what to do now.
Here is some background
about what you might have
and suggestions on how to use it!
Depression glass was inexpensive in
its day and was made in great quantity
during the 1920’s and into the 1930’s.
Later, machine pieces were produced
in the 1970’s. Patern names include
American Sweetheart, Dogwood,
Bamboo, Optic—the list goes on and on
and the colors were green, amber, yellow,
blue, cobalt, tangerine, and even black.
Pink is among the most desirable and
expensive. Fostoria glass was made in the
late 1880’s and is a beautiful example of
using pink glass when it was fashionable
to set a table for tea, breakfast and
luncheon with the assortment of pieces,
from plates to stemware. I like to combine
pink glass with whatever other colored
glass I have. Float a pink rose in a bowl
for a beautiful, simple centerpiece. When
Spring fnally arrives, cut a branch
from a fowering tree to force bloom
inside and use one of your beautiful
vases. If you have a set of china you use
regularly, use the dinner plate from your
set as a charger
for your pink
Depression glass
dessert plates.
The same
companies that
were producing
crystal and
colored glass
were also
making custard
glass… for me, there’s almost nothing
pretier than pink custard glass. Like
milk glass, it is heavier and made
mostly as serving pieces. Custard glass
sets a stunning table and the pink
looks especially gorgeous on a brown
table cloth. For you chocolate lovers—
anything chocolate in or on pink custard
glass is wonderful.
And gentlemen, if you are seeking a
Valentines Day gift this year that is new
and diferent—try something old! Your
sweetie will love anything pink flled with
diamonds and chocolate!
See Sterling Creek Antiques ad this page.
150 S. Oregon
Jacksonville, OR
541-702-2224
P
a
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g

b
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a

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From turn of the century to
mid-century, antiques and collectibles
for your shopping pleasure
Open - Wednesday-Sunday
Closed - Monday & Tuesday
A Great Fit for the Perfect Smile!™
541.899.9516
valleydenturecare@gmail.com
590 Blackstone Alley • Jacksonville, OR 97530
Serving Jacksonville
for over a decade
with 30 years of
experience in
the Valley
Our services include:
• Full Dentures
• Partial Dentures
• Immediate Dentures
• Repairs • Relines
• Implant Dentures
• Great Service
• Customer Support
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 23 February 2014
Adam Haynes is the owner of Artisan Landscapes, Inc.
Contact him at 541-292-3285, adam@artisanlandscapesinc.
com, or visit his website at www.artisanlandscapesinc.com.
See ad this page.
Love Your Landscape by Adam Haynes
ALS halfpg ad fnl.pdf 1 4/30/13 11:01 AM
The Weed Wrangler by Bob Budesa
W
ell, here we go again! It’s time to get an
early-season start on Scotch broom.
Scotch broom is one of four broom species
(not counting hybrids and cultivars) found in the Pacifc
Northwest. The other three are Spanish, French, and
Portuguese brooms. Of those four, the only one I’ve
not seen around here is
Portuguese, although
it’s known to exist in the
Roseburg area.
Scotch broom is an early
bloomer, and as such,
produces an abundance
of seed early in the year
(as early as March). In order to keep this plant in check,
it’s imperative that we begin early in seeking out plants
before they can bloom and produce seed.
For 3 years now, we’ve been able to stay ahead of the
seed production, which means we’ve pulled, killed,
or destroyed all plants before they’ve had a chance to
mature and produce seed. That means we’re slowly but
surely diminishing the amount of seed lying dormant in
the soil. One of these days, we may be hard-pressed to
fnd a Scotch broom around here!
Until that time, we must remain diligent in working
to remove any and all plants. Towards that end, I’m
promoting a weed-pull event on Saturday, February
15th from 9:00am to 12:00pm. We’ll meet in the upper
parking lot behind the Brit pavilion. I’ll have maps of the
areas in which Scotch broom is known to exist, and from
there, we can divide and conquer.
Once the rains saturate the soil, these small stems are
easy to pull. There won’t be any large plants, as they’ve
all been pulled in years past. Bring gloves, rain gear if
it looks like you’ll need it, and some good energy. Like
I said, this isn’t really tough work, it can be fun visiting
with the weed-puller to either side of you, and in no time
at all, we’ll be done. Hope to see you there.
Woodlands Broom-Pull
Bob Budesa moved to Jacksonville from Alturas California
in 1989, retired from BLM after 38 years where he oversaw the
noxious weed program with Medford District BLM (850,000
acres), worked in the Wild Horse Program in1970’s, and has
been a member of the Jacksonville Woodlands Association since
2009. Bob is still involved with noxious weed education and
awareness, primarily through the Jackson Coordinated Weed
Management Area he helped start several years ago.
High quality
toys from
around the
world for the
young and
young at
heart.
www.scheffels.com
Mon.-Sat. 10-5 • Sun. 12-4
180 W. California St. • Jacksonville, Oregon
541-899-7421
WScheffel’s Toys Scheffel’s Toys
• Overwhelming Selection • Remarkable Service
• Vast Product Knowledge • 90 Day Layaway
• Free Gift Wrapping • Ship Worldwide
Mon-Sat 10-5 • Sun 12-4
180 W. California Street • Jacksonville, Oregon
541-899-7421 • www.schefels.com
541-899-0255
245 N. 5th Street
www.magnolia-inn.com
Romance is in the air...
Com
plim
entary Cham
pagne and
Chocolates on February 14th!
O
ne of my favorite focal
points in any landscape
is the trees. Like me,
the sheer number of trees is most
likely one of your
favorite things about
living in Jacksonville.
Trees can serve many purposes. For
example, the gigantic Sequoia planted by
Peter Brit up in the Brit grounds towers
above the surrounding trees. It was planted
by Mr. Brit to honor the birth of his son,
Emil. For me personally, this served as an
inspiration ten years ago when my son was
born. At that time, my wife and I decided to
plant a Blue Spruce tree in his honor—and
it’s a tree we cherish every day!
Trees can be more than just a “piece”
in a landscape plan. As I’ve said in my
columns many times, there’s no quicker way
to add depth and interest to a landscape
than by planting semi-mature trees, either
deciduous or evergreen.
These are timely words and although
it’s February, this is a good time to plan
your spring planting. If you need some inspiration, I
suggest taking a walk through Jacksonville...take a look
at diferent landscapes and see what you like and what
excites you. Jot down notes on what is it that draws you
to diferent trees and their placement in the landscape?
Take photos, too. Then, take a look at your yard and see
what might ft best. It might be a shade tree, a smaller
ornamental tree that doesn’t take up too much space, an
evergreen or something else!
As mentioned, inspiration for planting a specifc
tree can be a person. In a recent
landscaping project, I planted
three maple trees for a family, each
representing the three young boys in
their family.
Paying a visit to your local
nursery can be a great way to
learn more about the specifcs of
certain trees. Well-trained nursery
personnel are always happy to
help educate you about what size
trees to plant and how big they will
eventually grow to be. Knowing this
ahead of time is an important step in
your long-term landscape planning.
Please remember that not all
trees have the same needs as far
as sun exposure, nutrients, soil
types and water amounts. I suggest
consulting your nursery staf or a
good planting guide to determine
what’s needed to give new plantings their best possible
growing environment!
On March 22, 1862, the day of his
son Emil’s birth, Peter Brit planted
this Giant Sequoia by his home.
541 899 8614
www.farmhousetreasures.com
120 West California Street Jacksonville
Refesh & Renew
for the new year
with Miss Mustard Seed’s
milk paint!
Jacksonville Review Page 24 February 2014
Arthritis: Benefts of Massage
by Kyleen Brodie, LMT
The Elements Massage Therapy LLC
Pencil Drawing Class
Beginning Watercolor Painting Class
For more information, please contact
toniandes@charter.net
Beginning & Advanced students welcome!
Learn to Paint or Draw!
You can do it!
Y
o
u
c
a
n
d
o
it!
A
fecting
nearly 70
million
Americans, or
about one out
of every three
adults, arthritis is
considered one of
the most prevalent
chronic health
problems and
the leading cause
of disability in the United States. It atacks
both men and women and is not just a
disease of old age; two-thirds of people with
arthritis are under the age of 65, including
300,000 children. The condition comprises a
complex family of musculoskeletal disorders
consisting of more than one hundred
diferent diseases or conditions that can
afect people of all ages, races and genders.
Osteoarthritis, the most common form of
arthritis, is a progressive degenerative joint
disease characterized by the deterioration of
joint cartilage resulting in pain, swelling, and
loss of movement. Repetitive stress injuries
and excess body weight are considered two
of the avoidable causes of osteoarthritis,
as well as associated risk factors including
history of joint injury and age.
Rheumatoid Arthritis is a systemic /
autoimmune disease in which the body’s
immune system atacks the tissue that
lines and cushions joints. This eventually
leads to the erosion of cartilage, bone and
ligaments along with the formation of scar
tissue, pain, stifness, warmth, swelling
and sometimes severe joint damage.
While osteoarthritis and rheumatoid
arthritis are the most widely recognized
in the arthritis family, the list also
includes:
• Psoriatic Arthritis
• Gout
• Bursitis
• Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
• Fibromyalgia
• Lyme Disease
• Rheumatic Fever
• Scleroderma
• Tennis Elbow
When looking at treatment methods for
certain types of arthritis, there are many
therapies not traditionally looked at that
can ofer both temporary and lasting relief.
According to the Arthritis Foundation,
recent studies on the efects of massage
for arthritis have shown regular use of the
manual therapy led to improvements in
pain, stifness, range of motion, hand grip
strength and overall function of the joints.
The improvements in symptoms
following massage therapy are atributed
to a few key factors. The frst beneft we
see comes from the associated relaxation
and increased circulation to surrounding
muscles and connective tissues. Because
of the damage caused by arthritis and
subsequent infammation, surrounding
muscles tighten to form a splint around
the joint in order to maintain stability.
By relaxing these splinted muscles,
we allow movement of the joint which
signals the body to begin lubricating the
moving parts. The movement also signals
an increase in blood circulation thereby
bringing in much-needed oxygen and
nutrients to the damaged tissue to help
rebuild and remove waste.
Another beneft derives from the
hormonal efects of massage. Research
recently published in The Journal of
Alternative and Complementary Medicine
has shown the link between massage and
decreased levels of the stress hormone
cortisol as well as an increase in serotonin,
oxytocin and possibly even white blood
cell counts. The study also showed a
lower production of the neurotransmiter
substance P which is often linked to pain
receptors. These hormonal shifts could help
with decreasing pain, lifting mood and even
improving sleep quality—all important
factors when dealing with arthritis.
Lastly, massage therapy can help
decrease the painful symptoms of
arthritis by calming pain receptors.
Tifany Field, PhD, Director of the Touch
Research Institute at the University of
Miami School of Medicine, published
a 2010 study in the International Journal
of Neuroscience showing the beneft of
massage linked to its ability to stimulate
pressure receptors—long, well-insulated
nerve fbers under the skin. By applying
moderate pressure to the afected area, the
subsequent pressure receptor signal to the
brain blocks out the current pain receptor
message. Your body now registers the
pressure instead of the pain. It’s the same
concept as grabbing your ‘funny bone’
after you hit it—pressure beats pain when
dealing with the nervous system.
Whether the massage is for relieving
anxiety and stress caused by arthritis, or
seeking to relieve pain and stifness in
specifc joints, it’s important to consult with
your doctor frst to ensure it is safe for you.
Massage is not medicine—it’s a complement
to your current health care regimen. And
don’t forget, aside from massage, there is a
growing number of alternative treatments
available to you in your fght against
arthritis. Tai chi, qigong, yoga, diet, exercise
and increased water intake have all been
shown to beneft the body and help relieve
painful, arthritic joints.
Cheers to a Healthy 2014!
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Ladies Who Lunch ~ in the Heart of the Applegate Valley
Baked fresh here-Annie Mac’s Baking Co!
A beautiful 20 minute drive from Jacksonville!
15095 Hwy 238,
Applegate, OR
541-846-6659
Breakfast • Lunch •To-Go Orders
Wine Tasting Picnic Supplies
Gas • ATM • Espresso
Deli • Beer & Wine
Cafe Hours: 6am-3pm, 7 Days a Week!
Applegate Store & Cafe
H
appy New Year! This year has
already brought big changes
to Jacksonville Elementary.
Our beloved school secretary Vikki
Dalton retired
in December.
Her smiling face,
lovely demeanor,
and solid hugs
will be missed
by everyone.
Congratulations
to Lori DeVries
(pictured here)
who has been
hired as our new school secretary. Lori
has worked as an educational assistant
for the past few years at Jacksonville
Elementary and is excited to take on this
new role. She is a wonderful addition to
the front ofce. Welcome Lori!
There are a few annual events coming
up. The Science Fair will be held on
Wednesday, January 29th from 6:00-
8:00pm in the school gym. This event is
not to be missed. The projects
from our budding scientists
always prove to be creative
and interesting and it makes
for a really fun evening.
Coming in February is the
Talent Show. It will be held on
February 25th from 6:30-8:00pm
in the school gym. Come
prepared to enjoy everything
from singing and dancing to
poetry authors and hula hoopers. This is
such an entertaining and fun evening. The
show allows our students the opportunity
to showcase their abundant talent. Food
and drinks will be available for purchase at
the show. Hope to see you there!
News From Jacksonville
Elementary School!
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 25 February 2014
Family Views by Michelle Hensman
214 E. California Street (next to Las Palmas)
(541) 899-1972
• Quilt Finishing
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• Hand or machine quilting
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CountryQuilts.com
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email: countryquilts@msn.com
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Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
best coverage at the best price.
Like a good neighbor,
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1001183.1 State Farm, Home Office, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
best coverage at the best price.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
®

CALL ME TODAY.
Need
someone
that speaks
fluent
insurance?
I’m your agent for that.
1001183.1 State Farm, Home Office, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
best coverage at the best price.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
®

CALL ME TODAY.
Need
someone
that speaks
fluent
insurance?
I’m your agent for that.
1001183.1 State Farm, Home Office, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
155 West California Street • Jacksonville
www.jacksonvillecompany.com
Where style meets elegance.
Jacksonville Company
Brighton handbag available
at Jacksonville Company
F
rom the time we accept
responsibility for our litle
darlings we want nothing
but the best for them. We devote
our lives to making sure their
experiences are both enduring and
valuable. We recall our own experiences and use them as
lessons to teach our children what to do and what not to
do. We believe these children of ours will be outrageously
successful because they will listen, learn from and retain
all the knowledge we share, from our greatest victories to
our most miserable defeats. They will not have to make
the same mistakes we made because we will be there to
save them. If you’re a doting new parent, I don’t want
to burst your bubble, but I will, because misery loves
company and it’s kind-a like my job here!
Unfortunately, the formula to create a well-rounded,
knowledgeable human is not so simple. The twisted irony
of parenting is that despite all the experiences of everyone
whoever came before us, humans rarely learn long-term
lessons from well-intended advisors, regardless of who
they are or the consequences looming overhead; if you’ve
ever dealt with a defant toddler or a hell-bent, determined
teenager, you know what I’m talking about. On the contrary,
errors, both large, small and everything in-between are
sometimes necessary for important life lessons to penetrate
the beautiful, but thick and ductile brain of our children.
It doesn’t feel natural for us, the once doting parent
who made the above commitment to that tiny infant
sleeping so safe and peaceful in our arms, to sit back and
watch their child struggle, make a mistake or even get
hurt. Unfortunately, sometimes that’s what’s necessary
for growth. I think parents, myself included, have
become too consumed with everything being so perfect
for our children that we fail to see the beneft of lessons
that can only be learned from failure… that’s why it’s
called tough love.
So what do we do? Are we supposed to sit back and
do nothing while they hurt themselves or screw their
lives up? Yes and no. There are a variety of parenting
philosophies out there ranging from, “Kids are beautiful,
everything they do is perfectly aligned with the universe,
so just let them be” to “Kids need to be wrapped in
bubble wrap and sprayed down with hand sanitizer!”
I prefer a more moderate, less intense approach; make
it very clear what the ramifcations of their action may
be. And here’s the most important, most critical, most
difcult part: follow through. Regardless if it’s within
our control or not, we need to allow the consequence to
proceed, without interfering; other than to ofer guidance
and support and a loving, “I told ya so!” thrown in for
good measure doesn’t really hurt.
We should try not to regard a decision to do something
their way as an act of disrespect or defance, but rather
as taking steps, or sometimes strides, towards autonomy.
It’s also an opportunity to teach our children how to handle
a situation when it doesn’t go as expected; in fact this
mentoring process enhances trust. To quote an amazing
mother of four grown children, “Right, wrong or indiferent,
they always need to know that I’m there for them; no mater
how old they are or what happens, they know who to call.”
Certainly no one wants to see their child fail. We worry
about their safety, their future and their self esteem. But
we do want them to be self-reliant, determined adults
who have the courage and confdence to take on the
world. And when, not if, but when things go wrong, we
want them to proceed with confdence and know they
have the ability to turn things around and carry on.
It should go without saying that this is my opinion based
on my experience and education in the Human Development
Family Science feld, should a child/adolescent present a
danger to themselves or others or you suspect they are engaged
in criminal activity or if their defance is risky and habitual,
please intervene and seek professional guidance.
Tough Love
541-899-9965
Orders to Go!
Catering Available
PATIO DINING
210 E. CALIFORNIA STREET
DOWNTOWN JACKSONVILLE
March 1, Guide to Pruning, Planting & Training Fruit
Trees—See pruning demos on existing fruit trees and
newly-planted ones, learn the best way to plant your
fruit trees and options for maximizing yield in smaller
spaces. Registration fee $10
March 8, Small Fruit Class—Learn about the great
selection of perennial fruits you can grow in your yard—big
or small, from strawberries, blueberries, currants, hardy
kiwis, grapes, gojis, raspberries and more. Bring the kids
and get them excited about harvesting their own berry
patch. Registration fee $10 includes a take-home poted
fruit of your choice. Kids free with adult registration.
March 15th, Deer Resistant Plants for the Rogue
Valley—Tired of the deer chewing your beautiful
plants and ruining your hard work? Let us show you
many deer resistant plants you may not have seen
before! Registration $5. Please note: this class is at North
Mountain Nature Park in Ashland. Please register
through Ashland Parks and Rec at htp://www.ashland.
or.us/sectionindex.asp?sectionID=426.
March 15, How to Prune your Shrubs for a Natural
and Healthy Look—Learn the best techniques for
keeping your shrubs healthy and beautiful from our
pruning experts including specialized techniques such as
rejuvenation, renewal depth pruning and treating shrubs
like perennials. Registration fee $10.
March 22, Creating a Successful Garden, Part 1–Garden
Design Basics (1st in a 2-part series)—Learn how to start
designing a balanced and beautiful garden bed. Using our
in-progress display garden, we will teach the skills to create
a large or small, low maintenance or a collector’s garden.
Begin with the basics and then come to our following class
to implement the design skills you learned with a hands-on
demo. Registration fee $20 or $30 for both classes.
March 29, Creating a Successful Garden, Part 2–
Making a Garden Bed—See how a garden bed comes
to life. Using our new display garden we will show
you how to amend the soil, layout your plants, and
the correct method for planting. We will also cover
mulching options and where to place your drip emiters.
Registration $20 or $30 for both classes.
Please visit www.roguevalleynursery.com/class for more
information and to register for classes.
March Classes at Shooting Star Nursery
Mon-Sat
10:30-5:30
Kerby will be passing out chocolate hearts in
February to celebrate becoming a certifed
therapy dog with Therapy Dogs International.
Congratulations, Kerby!
La Bohème
Clothing & Gift Boutique
(541) 899-1010
175 W. California Street
Jacksonville Review Page 26 February 2014
Julie D. Danielson, O.D.
541-899-2020
950 N 5th Street • Jacksonville
www.jacksonvillevisionclinic.com
• Complete Vision Care and Personal Service
• Hundreds of frames to choose from
• Free adjustments and minor repairs
Jacksonville Vision Clinic
See the diference...
Just across from
the Chevron
station in
Jacksonville!
SightSeeing by Julie D. Danielson, O.D.
Protect Your Eyes – Wear Sunglasses Year Round
Julie Danielson, an optometric physician, is available by
appointment at 541-899-2020. See ad this page.
Shedding Light on Seasonal Affective Disorder
by Shae Johnson, MD, Asante Physician Partners
( 541) 899- 9999
725 N. 5th St., Jacksonville
www.MyDentureClinic.com

• Full and partial dentures
• Personalized cosmetic
dentures
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541-899-1924
570 Blackstone Alley • Jacksonville
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541-899-1924
570 Blackstone Alley • Jacksonville
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Open Mon. - Thurs. and the
first Sat. of every month.
T
hough the weather may still
be cold and cloudy, the best
way to protect your vision is
to wear sunglasses whenever you are outdoors. The sun's
damaging efects are a concern year round regardless of
what the temperature is outside.
In addition to visible light, the sun gives of ultraviolet
radiation. This radiation is divided into three types:
UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C. The earth's ozone layer absorbs
UV-C radiation,
leaving sunglasses to
protect against UV-A
and UV-B rays.
Studies indicate that
long-term exposure
to UV-A and UV-B
can contribute to
the development of
cataracts, retinal problems, benign growths on the eye's
surface, cancer of the eyelids and skin around the eyes,
and photokeratitis—a temporary but painful sunburn of
the eye's surface.
The sun's brightness creates a disabling glare that
interferes with comfortable vision and the ability to see
clearly. It causes eyes to squint and to water. This glare
occurs on cloudy as well as sunny days. On snow days,
sunglasses reduce the refected glare that occurs when
the sun's light bounces of snow.
The best protection against the sun's damaging rays is
consistent use of sunglasses. Use the following tips when
selecting your next pair of sunglasses. For optimum sun
protection, the sunglasses should:
1. Block out 99-100 percent of both UV-A and UV-B
radiation.
2. Screen out 75-90 percent of visible light (fashion-
tinted lenses usually do not meet this level).
3. Be perfectly matched in color and free of distortion
and imperfection.
4. Have gray, green, or brown lenses (gray is
recommended).
Children and teenagers are particularly susceptible to
the sun's damaging rays because they typically spend
more time outdoors than adults and the lenses of their
eyes are more transparent than those of adults. Thus, this
allows more UV radiation to reach the retinas of children
and teenagers (the retina is the light-sensitive layer at
the back of the eyes). The efects of UV radiation are
cumulative, so it's important to develop good protection
habits early in life.
650 G Street • Jacksonville
FOR MORE INFO, CALL J’VILLE SNAP 541.702.0700 www.SnapFitness.com/jacksonvilleor
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M
any people seem to get depressed every
winter. Why is that and is there anything to
be done about it?
If you’ve been feeling blue since winter set in, you’re
not alone. Seasonal afective disorder (SAD) is a type
of depression caused by lack of sunlight. In areas of the
country like Oregon where winter days are cold and
short, SAD is not uncommon. It afects up to 20 percent
of the population, mostly women in their 20s and 30s.
Lack of sunlight interrupts the sleep-wake cycle—
called circadian rhythms—and it can also drain the
body’s levels of serotonin, a brain chemical afecting
mood. SAD is often treated with light therapy. Your
doctor can prescribe a special light box that mimics the
sun and signals the brain to produce more serotonin.
Siting in front of the light box for just half an hour a day
can help lift your mood and relieve symptoms.
SAD usually occurs between November and February,
winter’s darkest months. Symptoms start to ease when
spring weather returns in March or April. Common
complaints include grumpy, anxious, or irritable moods;
loss of interest in usual activities; daytime drowsiness;
and changes in appetite, weight, or sleep habits.
In addition to light therapy, there are other ways to
brighten winter blues. First see, a trusted counselor. Your
primary care doctor can recommend one for you.
Second, try to soak in some natural light every day.
Sit in front of a window on your lunch break or take
a drive during daylight hours. And keep your home
and workplace well-lit, since dim environments only
compound the problem.
Finally, stay active outdoors. Southern Oregon ofers a
variety of winter recreation opportunities, from snow-
shoeing to sledding, skiing, and more. Even a brisk walk
in the fresh air can be therapeutic.
You don’t need to sufer from SAD in silence. See your
primary care provider for solutions and support.
Shae Johnson, DO is a family medicine physician who
provides personalized primary care to adults and children,
with a special interest in urgent care, sports medicine and
managing chronic conditions. His practice is in Grants
Pass. To make an appointment, please call Asante Physician
Partners at 541-472-7880. See ad on page 7.
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 27 February 2014
Strengthening Your Foundation
Joyfull Living
by Louise Lavergne
© Louise Lavergne, 2001-2014
Louise is an international inspirational speaker,
author, creator of JoyFull Yoga and JoyFull
living coaching. She owns JoyFull Yoga LLC in
Jacksonville where she ofers private sessions and
group classes. Email us your questions at info@
joyfull-yoga.com. www.joyfull-yoga.com 541-
899-0707. See ad this page.
I
f you are already of
track with your New
Year intentions, your
foundation may need
some work. Our bodies
are exquisitely designed
with a map of energy centers,
referred to as Chakras, that can help
us be aware of what needs our atention.
If we pay atention we can make
adjustments to improve our physical
and emotional well-being. JoyFull Yoga
is designed to help you balance and
strengthen all the energy centers starting
with the First, referred to metaphysically
as the Root Chakra.
This is where we experience our
Physical Power, our Survival instincts and
our sense of Security. It regulates the lower
back, feet, hips, spine and legs, as well as
the large intestine, rectum, prostate, and
prety much everything that is located at
the root of our bodies. It is also connected
to our sense of smell. Just like the
foundation of a house, when we are strong
and balanced, we have the courage and
strength to weather the storms of life and
stay commited to follow through with our
New Year intentions.
We learn in childhood how to relate
to the world. Through our experiences
we acquire emotions that shape our
belief systems that become the pillars
of our foundation. Many of us received
fear-based conditioning and learned
to be afraid of life very early on. Often,
well-meaning parents use fear as a way
of keeping children safe or to project
their own fears onto their children. In
our adulthood, well-meaning friends
often reinforce fears by responding with
words like, “this is terrible!” instead of
reminding us that we are supported,
strong and safe. Regardless of our
upbringing, we all experience a level of
fear at some point in our life. How we
choose to engage and respond to it has
a tremendous impact on our well-being
and our foundation.
The emotional gift of the Root Chakra
when it is well-balanced is the ability to
feel present in the here and now. There
is harmony with the physical body and
life in general. You feel grounded, stable,
secure and able to accept what is showing
up in life. You can trust yourself, others
and the Universe.
If the Root Chakra is under-active
or blocked, you tend to be fearful or
nervous, feeling like you don’t belong.
This is where the seed of low self-worth
resides. When we don’t feel safe, it causes
our adrenals and kidneys to be strained; it
can sometimes create leg or foot problems
or manifest in back issues.
If this part of your body is over-
active, it can accentuate the tendency
to be rigid, materialistic and greedy.
When something goes wrong you tend
to jump to the horror of the situation
seeing the glass as half empty. You tend
to be worried about having enough, and
obsessed with
being secure and
resist change.
This is where
resentment lies.
The emotional
key to healing
and balancing the
root Chakra is to practice Acceptance
and let go of resentments, grudges and
judgments. Using afrmations can help
us let go of subconscious fears that can
sabotage our best intentions. Here are a
few for you to try. You can use them on
their own or with the exercise below.
♥ I accept and love my body. All is well. I
am supported and safe.
♥ I am deeply rooted and supported by
Mother Earth.
♥ I accept all that I am, as I am, in perfect
harmony with what is, as I align my
intentions now with the Higher Good of All.
Balancing the root chakra physically
can help us feel stronger and more
grounded. Here is a simple exercise to
balance and strengthen the root Chakra
and the pelvic foor which can also help
us feel and look beter, improve posture,
relieve back pain, tone your belly, reduce
and improve incontinence:
1. If you can, go outside and stand on the
grass or earth or stand by a window.
2. Feel your feet into the ground by
pushing into your toes and heels.
3. Close your eyes and imagine roots
beneath you connecting you to the
center of the earth. Feel the breath
coming all the way into the pelvic area.
4. As you exhale, bend your knees
slightly, pull in the belly, doing
a “root lock,” by contracting the
pubococcygeus muscles- pulling
in the rectum, sex organ and navel
tight- (similar to a Kegel) hold that
contraction for 3 to 5 seconds after
the exhale.
5. Relax, inhale as you straighten your
legs and imagine a beam of sunlight
coming in from the sky to fll your
entire body.
6. Releasing back into the earth for
each exhale as in #3. Repeat at least 3
times—try to practice this for 1 to 3
minutes a day.
To learn more ways to strengthen all
your energy centers, try a JoyFull Yoga
class. Also, I will be starting another
8 week group coaching session online
soon, “Healing your spiritual Nature
and self-worth through the chakras”
that you can do from the comfort of
your home. Call or email for more info
on this and other classes to support you
on your journey.
Don’t miss the Applegater
newspaper's special fund-raising
concert on Sunday, February 23,
from 3:00-5:00pm at the Applegate
River Lodge. Featuring musical
performances by our own J.D.
Rogers and the Bear Creek Band. If
we’re lucky, J.D. will announce the
release of his newest rock CD—all
original music writen by J.D. himself
and produced by Grammy award-
winner Dennis Dragon and John
Trujillo! $15 cover charge includes
music and hors d’oeuvres; wine will
be available for purchase. Tickets
will go on sale soon.
For more information, email gater@
applegater.org.
Special Concert to Beneft
Applegater Newspaper
R
uch Community K-8 School is
turning 100 years old! On May
16th, 1914, Ruch School was
dedicated to the children of the Applegate
Valley. One hundred years would see our
small, rural school, with the help of our
community, thrive, struggle, celebrate
success, emerge and sustain itself as an
exemplary place of education.
There exists in our small school a
sense of pride and an atitude and
sense of personal possession and
involvement on part of the students,
teachers, administrators and community
residents. To a great degree, our school
is the community center of our beautiful
Applegate Valley.
As a result of our volunteers and
community members being an integral
part to the success of our school, for our
100th Birthday we would like to give our
community a present!
Similar to the events that took place
in 1914, we are planning a dedication
of the original school building
and renaming it as Ruch School
Community Center to serve the greater
Applegate area. Because of its location
and size, meetings, conferences,
celebrations etc., can be held in a
location that is centrally located.
However, there is work to be done!
With the partnership of Bater Crane
and the Medford School District,
renovations are needed to update and
equip the space for its intended use.
A new cupola will house the 100 year
old bell, conference tables and other
furniture are a must and we would
like to present the building at our
Community Celebration on May 17th,
with refections of its esteemed 100 years
of service. This will include a museum
of past and present photographs and
artifacts, and a working kitchen to
provide food services.
If you have artifacts or photographs
that you would like to donate to or share
with our museum, if you would like to
make a monetary donation, if you desire
to help in the construction, be part of the
process or just obtain more information,
please call the school at 541-842-3850 or
visit us at 156 Upper Applegate Road.
More importantly, if you are a past
educator, administrator or student
of Ruch School, this party is for you!
Please register for the Birthday/Reunion
Celebration by contacting the school
directly or going to the Medford School
District website and click on Ruch School.
There you will fnd a page titled “Ruch
Centennial Reunion Celebration.” A
link is provided to take you through the
registration process. Please join us in
celebrating 100 years!
Thank you for your support and Happy
Birthday Ruch School!
Ruch School Gives Back
to the Community!
Jacksonville Review Page 28 February 2014
Flu Season Hits Hard
by Hillary Brown, Public Relations Coordinator,
Providence Medford Medical Center
H
igh fevers and nights spent shivering from
the chills are more common this year than
they have been in the past. The most recent
infuenza season started with a vengeance in Jackson
County, with the frst cases reported in late November.
“The hospital’s been full, the emergency room’s been
full… there’s patients everywhere,” said Alicia Tyler, the
ED patient guide at Providence.
This year, Providence Medford Medical Center doctors
are seeing a few trends that difer from the fu seasons
we’ve seen in the past.
A signifcant number
of positive fu cases are
the H1N1 strain, also
known as the swine
fu, and many of the
patients coming in with
the fu are younger
adults. Doctors say this
demographic may be
more at risk this year,
because they haven’t
put a priority on
receiving the fu shot.
Even with the shot,
people are still geting
sick. That includes
hospital employees, who say they’re trying to fnd the
bright side of the busy fu season.
“When you have a fever and your body hurts and
everything, it helps you understand how patients are
feeling when they come in,” said Tyler.
Providence is doing what it can to help prevent the
spread of this year’s virulent fu strains. The hospital has
instituted visitor restrictions aimed at keeping patients
from coming into contact with the virus and healthy
community members from leaving the hospital with an
illness. Among the restrictions, children under the age of
18 are asked to stay home and patients are asked to keep
the number of visitors to two.
Experts say the best thing the community can do,
though, is to take common sense measure against
spreading illness,
which includes
washing your hands
frequently. Flu shots
are also an important
tool in the fght against
the virus. Flu season
typically lasts into
March, so even those
who haven’t yet goten
a shot can still beneft.
For more information
on how to prevent the fu,
visit www.providence.
org. For information on
visitor restrictions at
Providence Medical Center, call 541-732-5000. See ad page 5.
Cold vs Flu—Is it a cold or is it the fu? The
diferences between the cold and fu can be subtle,
but it's important to be able to tell one from the other,
as the fu can lead to more complicated illnesses.
Cold
• Usually starts with a sore throat, followed by a
runny nose and congestion.
• Adults don't usually develop fever with a cold,
though it can happen.
• Children are more likely to spike a fever with the
onset of a cold.
• Symptoms last about a week
Flu
• Flu symptoms are slightly diferent and may
include fever, body aches, fatigue and dry cough.
In general, the fu is more severe than a cold.
• Vomiting is common with some strains of the fu.
• Flu can lead to pneumonia and bacterial
infections.
• Symptoms last three to fve days, but you can
feel run down for an additional week.
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During February and March, Jessica Prince is
the featured artist at Crater Rock Museum. Jessica
is a multi-talented artist, creating lovely jewelry,
paintings and drawings. The inspiration for her work
comes from the “splendid scenery and color culture
of Southern Oregon.” For several years, she pursued
bead-weaving, until working on a cabochon that she
“couldn’t capture with my beads to my satisfaction.”
In her frustration, Jessica turned to her friend for
advice, who suggested she take a wire-wrapping class.
She did, and the rest is history. Please take the time
to stop by the museum gift shop and see her lovely
works. Be sure to visit her website at www.ladyjarts.com.
Crater Rock Museum is located at 2002 Scenic Avenue,
Central Point and is open Tuesday-Saturday, 10:00am-
4:00pm. Please call 541-664-6081 for more information.
Crater Rock Museum – Featured Artist is
Jessica Prince in February & March!
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JacksonvilleReview.com Page 29 February 2014
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I
hate snakes. Hate is a strong word,
but there it is. So imagine my
excitement this time last year when
we entered the year of the Black Water
Snake. I knew it was going to be a wild
ride, and not just because I hate snakes:
I knew it because a year whose symbolic
energy is turmoil and transformation ain’t
going to be easy. Your best
shot is to embrace your
inner Bete Davis and croak,
“Fasten your seat belts, it’s
going to be a bumpy year.”
And bumpy it was.
2013 brought a tsunami
of sufering to everyone
I know, myself included:
divorce, illness, fnancial
downturns, deaths. Big
stuf. Stuf that completely
changes the course of your
life. I experienced multiple
losses this year and frankly, I’m done.
Gung hay fat choy my patootie.
My bumpy year culminated in early
December as I lay beside my mother,
watching the low, winter sun skim across
the treetops. I sank under the comforters
and listened to her breathing, her eyes
no longer seeing what I saw. I glanced
around the room, looking at the familiar
remains of a life now past—the jewelry
box on the dresser, the framed wedding
photograph—and I thought, Isn’t it
strange how everything is so important, until
it’s not important at all?
Lying in the simplicity of those long
moments, I was reminded of the beauty
of Death, how it returns us to the truth of
what remains, what maters. When you
come right down to it, there is nothing but
breath and love: Breath that gives us life,
and love that makes that life worthwhile.
Nothing else maters. Not really. We fll
our lives with to do lists and material
things and worry, but when it comes
time, all of that fades into the shadow of
illusion and we are left with breath and
love, and ultimately, just love.
Turmoil and transformation are
necessary because they bring us to
this essential reality. They can lead to
incredible breakthroughs and awarenesses,
but the process is, as my mother liked to
say, rough on rats. A certain wise person
I know, we’ll call her my analyst, loves
to remind me during uncomfortable
transitions that the snake sufers when it
is shedding its skin—when it is sloughing
of its old self. It’s not easy to shed the old
skin. The snake cannot move and it cannot
see: the old skin obscures its sight. It is
blind and vulnerable.
When your marriage falls apart, or
your child has a debilitating disease, or
you can’t pay the rent, or someone close
to you dies, your skin begins to peel
away and, ready or not, your old life
begins to disappear. The best you can
do at these times is hunker down and
wait it through. Shedding a metaphorical
skin is a slow and
incapacitating process.
It is how the superfcial
and unnecessary are shed,
how we evolve and grow,
how we become who we
are rather than remaining
stuck in who we were.
It is also a vulnerable
and humbling process
(humbling, as in, taking
one down to the humus,
the earth, snake-like).
The deaths we endure,
whatever their nature, are in service to
life. I really do believe this, even though—
and I admit this freely and often—the
process just plain sucks. When we are in
the midst of the Great Shed, we cannot
see clearly and life feels onerous. I was
recently lamenting how everything in
my life felt as though it were dissolving
through my fngers when a voice in my
head replied, “Of course. Things have to die
before something new can be born.” The tone
of the voice was such that it might have
just as easily said,“Duh!” Welcome, dear
reader, to my world.
And here we are at the dawn of a new
year, the Year of the Green Horse, a year
of action and new beginnings, and not a
minute too soon, if you ask me. I’m ready
to saddle up this horse and ride out of
Dodge. Still, it must be noted that it is the
terrible power of the snake that leads us
to the energy of the horse. Our old skin
painfully shed, we emerge ourselves,
yet transformed. My fear and loathing
notwithstanding, I have a healthy respect
for the snake. I do. I ofer my respect and
I say, “Don’t let the door slam your tail on
the way out.”
I dedicate this column to my mother, who
gave me breath and love and who was my
biggest fan. May her new life fnd her young
and beautiful, dancing in the arms of a
handsome man to the Glenn Miller Orchestra,
gardenias in her hair, breathing in love.
KATE INGRAM, M.A., is a soul coach
and writer. She was born in the Year of the
Dragon, in case there was any question. Her
book, Washing the Bones: A Memoir of
Love, Loss, and Transformation is available
at Amazon and in Jacksonville at Terra Firma.
The Tail of the Snake
Len Eisenberg, Geologist and long-
time Roxy Ann Gem and Mineral Society
member, recently donated a pterosaur
skeleton replica, which is on display now
at the Crater Rock Museum. The Society
and the Museum thank Len for his
generosity! “ Pterry” (pronounced Terry!),
as he’s been nick-named, will delight all
who visit our museum for years to come.
Pterodactyls (Pterodactylus or
Pteranodon) are the world's most familiar
pterosaurs, or fying reptiles. Pterry is
from the late Jurassic and Cretaceous
periods. The most distinctive feature
of Pteranodon is its backward-pointing
skull crest. It’s been speculated that this
crest was used as a mid-fight rudder,
while others claim it is a sexually selected
characteristic of the male, whose bigger
crest made him more atractive to
females. At any rate, the function of the
crest remains a mystery to this day.
February 15, Crater Rock Museum
ofcially welcomes Pterry. Len Eisenberg
will present four seminars, and point out
Pterry’s unique features. Following Len’s
presentation, be sure to see the rest of the
museum. Those of you have not had the
opportunity to visit us will learn that, in
addition to rocks, minerals & gems, we
have several exhibits. Including glass
works by students of the Dale Chihuly
School, carvings from the Orient, a rare
Scrimshaw collection, African Artifacts,
Anastasi potery, Eskimo cultural
artifacts, and much, much more!
Crater Rock Museum, 2002 Scenic
Avenue. February 15. Pterosaur seminars:
10:30am, 11:30am, 1:30pm & 2:30pm.
Admission (includes seminars): Adults,
$5; Seniors, $3; Students $2; Children 6
and under, FREE.
For more information call 541-664-6081, or
541-608-8091.
New Exhibit at Crater Rock Museum,
Pterosaur Skeleton Replica
Glassware,
Jewelry, Fine
Antiques, etc.
130 N. 4th St.,
Jacksonville
Open Daily 10am - 5pm
Like us on facebook
L.L.C.
Jacksonville Review Page 30 February 2014
To us, our patients are like family. We’ve
seen families through generations of best
friends. We believe in a total wellness
approach to veterinary care which helps our
patients live long, healthy lives. A blend of
compassionate care and the use of the latest
medical technology, all at an affordable
price, makes Jacksonville Veterinary Hospital
the best choice for your pet’s care.
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541.899.1081 | www.jvillevet.com
• Preventitve Care
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Paws for Thought by Dr. Tami Rogers
Dr. Rogers can be reached at the Jacksonville Veterinary Hospital
at 541-899-1081 or jvhospital@qwestofce.net. See ad this page.
Love at Any Age: The Joys of Adopting
a Senior Companion
by Becky Owston, Sanctuary One Volunteer
W
hite-muzzled and lumpy, the senior mut
with the strangely shaped head arrived
at Sanctuary One in spring 2012 after
languishing in a shelter in Crescent City, California.
While he was friendly and mild-mannered, it seemed
unlikely that this older, unusual looking Lab mix stood
much chance of being adopted.
Leo, named for his tawny coat and regal demeanor,
was quick to setle into the routine at the farm. As
“granddad” of the dog pack, he was content to snooze
in the sun, calmly tolerating the antics of the younger
canines—and keeping them in line when necessary. He
was the consummate gentleman with volunteers and
visiting school kids, and was a much-loved walking
companion. Even the ground squirrels residing near the
trail knew they had nothing—or at least litle—to fear
when the old dog approached.
After 10 months, Leo fnally found a loving home with
a local family. Says his guardian Tom Miller, “We’ve
fallen head over heels in love with Leo. My wife Pat and
I have adopted a number of senior dogs over the years,
and while it’s sad when you know you won’t have them
for 10 or 12 years, the old ones just seem to understand
that someone fnally wants them. Leo has a degenerative
disease that afects his chewing and swallowing muscles.
He’s also covered with scars from what was obviously a
prety rough life in the past. But for some reason, even
after the hard life he’s had, he’s patient and gentle. In
short, he’s a great dog and we really enjoy his company. I
hope someone reading
this will consider
adopting an older
animal. The rewards
are tremendous.”
Sadly, in shelters
across the country,
senior animals
typically wait much
longer for new homes
than their more youthful counterparts. Of course, adorable
kitens and puppies are hard to resist. But seniors need
love, too—and they’ve got lots to give in return! They’ve
setled into their personalities (and size) so you know
exactly what you’re geting. They’re usually house-trained
and already know basic commands. They’re much less
likely to devour your shoes or destroy your furniture, and
they know what it takes to get along with others.
Sanctuary One volunteer Mardra Hord has felt
the senior love ever since she and her husband Jason
adopted Tito, an older Chihuahua (and Sanctuary One
alum), last winter. “We've had to get real about our
limitations when it comes to dogs,” she explains.
“Since we don’t have the energy levels that a puppy
would need, we were specifcally looking for an older
dog. Older animals are calmer, seem to listen beter
and have a more centered sense of 'self.' And I think
they adapt easier.”
As most guardians of older animals have experienced,
Mardra and Jason were pleased by how quickly Tito ft
into his new household. “He has blended in efortlessly
and treated our other pets with respect,” says Mardra.
“We haven’t had to expend a lot of energy to train and
work with him—he was just right there on everything.
It seems like someone else put in the training, and all we
have to do is use it. We haven’t regreted bringing him
home. Not once.”
Because helping senior animals is one of our primary
goals at Sanctuary One, we’re especially gratifed to
know that these adoptions have enriched the lives of
Leo, Tito and their loving guardians. Knowing that time
together will be shorter and vet bills may be higher, it
takes a special person to adopt a senior animal. If you’ve
been mulling over the idea of adopting a new best friend,
we hope you’ll consider welcoming an older companion
into your life!
For more information on our adoption program please call
541-899-8627, check out our website at www.SanctuaryOne.org
or email info@sanctuaryone.org.
H
appy New Year
everyone! It’s hard
to believe that one
month has already passed in
2014! The holiday hub-bub is
over and many of us have fallen
back into the daily grind. New
Year’s Resolutions are slowly
being discarded and old habits are looming. Gym
memberships have been forgoten
and rice cakes have been replaced.
The spring TV series have started
and many of us spend our evenings
cuddled up with our pets watching
“The Bachelor” instead of going
for our evening walk. We put on
our “comfy pants” and setle in
for the night with a big bowl of ice
cream…. Of which our pet often
gets to lick clean.
It is easy to look into the mirror
and know that our waistlines are
expanding but many of our clients often seem surprised
when we mention that their pet is overweight. Here are
some indicators that your pet might be overweight: they
are commonly confused with the living room otoman;
their belly drags on the ground and could double as
a dust mop; every time you see your pet running you
sing… “Does your belly hang low… does it dangle
to and fro…” All humor aside, just like you, your pet
should have a nice hourglass fgure. The chest should
be broad and then taper back to a nice trim waist. You
should easily be able to feel their ribs when lightly
running your hand over the chest wall.
Now that we have established that your pet might
be overweight, what can be done about it? Weight loss
plans for animals follow the same general path as they
do for us. First and foremost, a healthy diet is critical.
There are thousands of pet foods out there and just as
many dietary myths. Your pet does not have to be on an
organic/holistic/grain free/soy free/etc. diet for it to be
healthy. I recommend choosing a premium diet that is
AAFCO approved and that your pet approves of also!
Keep in mind, that many overweight pets will require the
aid of a prescription diet to help get the weight of more
efciently. Just as with us, the quantity of food that your
pet consumes is also critically important. A common
mistake that can quickly lead to weight gain is free
feeding. All animals should be fed measured amounts,
not just ofered a free choice bufet! When considering
how much your pet is being fed, treats should also be
factored in. And what exactly is an acceptable treat for
your pet? Keep in mind that most treats purchased at the
store (milk bones, peanut buter
treats, etc) are equivalent to a
mini snickers bar… lots of added
sugar and salt (unnecessary
calories) to make them taste good,
with no nutritional value. For
example, a common treat called
a “Beggin’ Strip" has about 95
calories. Not too bad, right?
However, if you have a healthy
13-pound, small breed dog, their
daily requirement is somewhere
around 250 calories. So, one full
strip is about 40% of their daily requirement! Yikes! I
recommend trying carrots and apples as a treat source.
They are sweet and animals usually love them! One full
cup of raw carrots (or ½ cup cooked carrots) only has 25
calories. Quite a diference!
As we all know, diet is not the only component to
weight loss, exercise should also play an integral role.
Not only is it benefcial for weight loss but it is great
for mental stimulus. For dogs, a nice walk or some time
chasing a ball in the backyard can be adequate. For cats,
play time with a laser pointer or similar toy can help get
them up and moving around.
Remember, overweight and obese animals are at a
greater risk for heart disease, joint pain and arthritis,
diabetes, and many other diseases. A visit to your
veterinarian can provide a lot of guidance for a weight
loss plan. In the meantime, put that cookie down, hook
on a leash, bundle up and head out for a nice walk
around the block or through the woodlands. It will be
good for you and your loving pet!
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 31 February 2014
It’s what’s inside
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In Winco Shopping Center, just behind Jack In The Box
roguevalleypet.com
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• Raw diets
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The Wealth in Our Woods
by Dr. Jeff Judkins, Animalkind Veterinary Clinic
541-973-2101
3960 W Main Street, Medford
Monday-Friday 9am to 6pm
Saturday Noon to 5pm
(Early care drop off by appointment)
www.houseofpawsoregon.com
We are located just outside Jacksonville!
(Across from White’s Country Farm)
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Nrw VotuNtrrn OnìrNtntìoN • 1st Sntunbnv • 1 – 2 PM
adopt  volunteer  foster  donate
www.fotas.org  facebook.com/fotas  541.944.2021
5595 S Pacic Hwy 99
between Talent & Phoenix 
Weekdays, 11 AM to 4 PM
Sat & Sun, Noon to 4 PM
Visit spayneuter.org or call 541-858-3325 for details.
Prevent A Litter
Month
February is
Only in February!
Save lives by having your
cat or dog fixed this February!
Cat spay or neuter: $25
Dog spay or neuter:
$75 up to 60 lbs., $85 over 60 lbs.
Certificates can be purchased in February at:
Pet Country, S. Medford, Central Point, White City
and Ashland Grange Co-op stores, and
Mini Pet Mart (on Stewart)
L
ast week, I went hiking with my
dogs in Jacksonville's Woodland
trails, an area once famous for its
gold. It struck me that there’s another kind
of wealth here in the forests of Southern
Oregon, which lies in not the minerals, but
in the plants. Instead of gold, you could
say, “There's medicine in them thar hills!"
When I relocated my
veterinary practice from
Portland to the Rogue
Valley two years ago, one
of my goals was to learn
about the local medicinal
plants and how to use
them in my practice.
While I’ve been using
herbs in my practice
for many years, I never
had the time to devote
to studying—or much
less making use of—the
plants that grew in my
area. That was one of the
main reasons I sold my
busy practice: so I would
have the time.
Soon after setling
into our new home in
Jacksonville, I enrolled
in a class to learn about
the local medicinal plants and how to
make clinically useful medicines from
them. My fellow students and I gathered
arnica and valerian near Mt. Ashland,
balsam root and wild oats from the
slopes of Anderson Bute, bayberry and
yarrow from the coast near Gold Beach.
Some plants we made into oils for topical
use, and others we made into alcohol
extracts, or “tinctures.” It's quite amazing
that many of the herbal medicines I use
every day in my veterinary practice were
ethically and sustainably harvested from a
variety of public lands in our area. Many
other "weeds" such as California poppy,
lemon balm and vervain came from my
own yard. The herbal powder I use to help
heal damaged ligaments in my patients I
made from teasel plants that I dug up on
the side of the road near my house.
Jon Calson, owner of the Vitalist School
of Herbology in Ashland, has extensive
knowledge of our local healing plants.
Through years of feldwork, he has
developed an intimate appreciation for
them. "When you gather medicinal plants
from their local environment,” he explains,
“it provides the opportunity to learn more
about the nature of the plant, to monitor
plant populations, and to be a steward of
the ecosystem… Just the act of communing
with local medicinal plants can be a
healing experience in and of itself."
As I ambled up and down the hills
above the Brit Pavilion, I made note
of the plants that I use regularly in my
veterinary practice. The leaves of the
ubiquitous manzanita bush have antiseptic
and astringent properties that make it
useful for treating urinary tract infections. I
use a tincture made
from the root of
the equally prolifc
Oregon grape for
skin eruptions
in my patients.
Redroot tincture,
made from the
buckbrush shrub
common in the oak
woodland, is used
to address swelling
of the lymph nodes
and the spleen.
Having a
knowledge of local
herbs is certainly
interesting, and
promotes an
appreciation of
our local wild
lands, but is it
good medicine?
This is a big question that brings up the
diference between conventional Western
medicine and holistic modalities of healing
in general—and is certainly a good topic
for a future article. I can say, however,
that there are certain medically benefcial
efects that can be obtained through the
use of herbs that simply can't be achieved
with pharmaceutical drugs. No one, for
example, has ever come up with a drug
that can heal damaged liver cells the
way that milk thistle can. A tincture of
echinacea fowers can dramatically reduce
the tissue damage from a venomous snake
in a manner no pharmaceutical can match.
I can't think of any drug that promotes
drainage of congested lymphatics as well
as redroot. The list goes on.
We are fortunate to live in an region of
incredible beauty and biodiversity, one
that yields an amazing wealth found in
plants. Using these plants is not only good
medicine, but it also promotes conservation
of our precious wild areas. Buying
locally-made herbal products from such
sources as Vitalist Botanicals in Ashland
or HerbPharm in Williams, supports local
commerce, and even saves fossil fuels. And
that's a win-win all around.
Dr. Judkins is the owner of Animalkind
Holistic Veterinary Clinic in Jacksonville.
See ad this page.
Teasel
Jacksonville Review Page 32 February 2014
March 1st–Final rounds, on the
Brit stage: The four fnalists will
compete on the Brit stage in an indoor
performance. Because of limited
seating, there will be an admission
charge of $5 per person for the
fnal rounds. All proceeds from the
admissions will be awarded to the
Rising Stars winner. At the fnals, food
from Jacksonville Inn and beverages
from South Stage Cellars will be
available for purchase. No outside food
or beverages allowed at this event. See
the Brit web site for details on how to
purchase tickets for the fnals.
For the most current schedule, and more
information visit www.britfest.org, www.
southstagecellars.com, or fnd South Stage
Cellars on Facebook.
• Tim Balfour
• Mayor Paul Becker
• Donna Briggs
• Kyleen Brodie
• Hillary Brown
• Sandy Brown
• Bob Budesa
• Angela Clague
• Kathleen Crawford
• Pat Dahl
• Dr. Julie Danielson
• Paula & Terry
Erdmann
• Graham Farran
• Alyson Fowler
• Joelle Graves
• Randall Grealish
• Adam Haynes
• Dr. Kerri Hecox
• Michelle Hensman
• Tony Hess
• Kate Ingram
• Dr. Shae Johnson
• Dr. Jeff Judkins
• Michael Kell
• Becka Kem
• Carolyn Kingsnorth
• Sara King Cole
• Louise Lavergne
• Becky Owston
• Joy Rogalla
• Dr. Tami Rogers
• Pam Sasseen
• Dirk Siedlecki
• Amy Stevenson
• Kathy Tiller
• Hannah West
• Jeanena Whitewilson
• Kylee Winger
• Dave & Gaye Wilson

THANK YOU to our Contributors!
Have an idea or suggestion for the Review?
For print: Whit at 541-899-9500 or whitman@jacksonvillereview.com.
For website or kiosk: Jo at 541-227-8011 or jo@jacksonvillereview.com
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CONSTRUCTION • ALL PERIODS
541-890-5690
WWW.RWHIPPLE.COM
Tax Tips You Can Use
by Kathleen Crawford
& Angela Clague, Enrolled Agents
A
lthough there have been many
changes to federal tax code
in recent years, the Oregon
personal income tax laws have been
steady...until this year. The Oregon
legislature has made numerous changes,
but one in particular will afect most older
people in the state.
Up to 2013, the special medical
deduction has allowed taxpayers, who
itemize, to deduct 100% of the medical
expenses for the entire family if any
one of the taxpayers was at least 62
on December 31 of the tax year. That
deduction has been eliminated and
replaced with a less valuable subtraction.
The subtraction has several restrictions.
First, it is only for a taxpayer over 62.
That means that taxpayers must separate
their medical expenses, including mileage
between each member of the family and
only those expenses for the 62 or older
taxpayer are used in the calculation. If
both taxpayers are 62 or older, they still
must separate their expenses because one
may have few expenses and will get a
reduced amount. The subtraction is only
for taxpayers, so a dependent parent, for
example, cannot take any subtraction.
Next, it is limited to $1800 per taxpayer
or $3600 per joint return. Actually, there
is a "means test" so that higher income
returns get less of a subtraction. For a
joint return, if the adjusted gross income
is between $50,000 and $100,000, the limit
is $1400. Adjusted gross incomes between
$100,000 and $200,000 are limited to a
$1000 subtraction per taxpayer. Above
$200,000, the subtraction is eliminated.
These amounts are halved for single flers.
Also, the age of eligibility goes up over
time and reaches 66 instead of 62 by 2020.
Finally, the legislature decided that this
change should be back-dated to January
1, 2013 so everyone needs to plan for this
for the return due in April.
In practice, what this means is that, since
I turned 62 in 2012, I got to take the 7.5%
of my Adjusted Gross Income that was not
allowed as an itemized deduction as the
special medical deduction on my Oregon
return. For 2013, I need to separate my
medical expenses from my husband’s and
other family members and then proportion
the amount the IRS eliminated of my
Schedule A to see how much was mine.
Then I need to see what limits my other
income imposes. Only then can I calculate
what subtraction is allowed.
The good news is that the subtraction is
independent of fling a Schedule A, so it
appears that even people who do not itemize
will be allowed to take the subtraction. Now
even a small amount of expense will help
those over 62. Keep those receipts!
As a note, taxpayers should be aware
that all of the pharmacies in this area, most
doctors, dentists and each of the hospitals
will print an annual summary of amounts
paid if you ask for it. Now there is no need
to fsh around for those litle slips of paper.
The Jacksonville Tax Lady LLC ( OR
Lic #13695) is located in beautiful, historic
Jacksonville at 610 N. Fifth Street across from
Pony Espresso. Kathleen and Angela can be
reached at 541-899-7926. See ad below.
The fne print: This article is for
information only. Please see your tax
professional for questions about your
individual tax situation.
Representation & Tax Preparation
Personal Income Taxes • Trusts • Business Taxes
We take the Fear out of Taxes!
541-899-7926
610 N. Fifth Street • Jacksonville, Oregon
www.jvilletaxlady.com · Oregon OBTB #B13695
Kathleen Crawford & Angela Clague
Enrolled Agents
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Personal Taxes • Trust Taxes • Business Taxes
We take the fear out of taxes!
Accepting new clients.
Angela Clague &
Kathleen Crawford
Enrolled Agents
541-899-7926
610 N. 5th St, Jacksonville, OR
www.jvilletaxlady.com • Oregon OBTB #B13695
Ann Marie
Dollison, 78,
of Jacksonville,
passed away
on January 8,
2014, after a
courageous
batle with
cancer. She
was born in
San Francisco, February 15, 1935, the
daughter of John and Catherine McEntee,
both whom emigrated from Ireland. She
graduated from Presentation High School
in 1952 and eventually obtained an AA
degree from Diablo Valley College in
Pleasant Hill. She was married to Philip
Dollison in San Francisco on April 24, 1965,
and was his devoted wife until her death.
Ann worked for the FBI ofce in San
Francisco for 13 years before leaving in
1966 to raise her children and help run
the family business, San Francisco Fire
& Burglar Protection, Co. Inc., until they
retired in 1997 and divided their time
between California and Oregon where
they maintained a second home.
In addition to being matriarch of her
family, Ann was an artist in tole painting
and devoted her free time to volunteering
as usher for the performing arts, at the
Ginger Rogers Craterian Theater in
Medford, the Brit Festival in Jacksonville,
and cuddling sick babies at Providence
Hospital in Medford.
She is survived by her children, Theresa
Brees, John Dollison and Cathy Brandt;
Grandchildren Lexi Brandt; Mia Brees
and Aiden Brees, and her brother, Tom
McEntee. Her parents and two brothers,
Ed McEntee and John Patrick preceded
her in death.
A funeral mass was said on January 25,
2014 at noon at Christ the King Church
in Pleasant Hill, Ca. Please see www.
traditioncare.com for more information. In
Lieu of fowers, the family is requesting
donations be made to The Bruns
House, Hospice of the East Bay (www.
hospiceeastbay.org).
In Memoriam–Ann Dollison
1935-2014
Rising Stars - Cont'd. from Pg. 6
Want to advertise in the Review?
Contact Whit Parker for advertising information
at whitman@jacksonvillereview.com
or 541-899-9500.
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 33 February 2014
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Jacksonville Review Page 34 February 2014
This month, we are pleased to present an interview with
world-renowned artist, Yeh Fei Pai, our cover artist. Born in
1950 in Taiwan to Den Yu Chen and Yeh Tsui Pai, he now
lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.
JR: Tell us a bit about what it was like growing-up
as the son of a revered Republic of China military
nationalist soldier and ofcer. Your father rose to the
rank of General in an era of worldwide instability and
chaos, yet he possessed immense artistic talent which
you obviously inherited.
YFP: As a child, I wished I had a Magic brush. As
a young child, I was intrigued and amazed by Walt
Disney's Cartoons. With the stroke of a brush, princes
and princesses, castles and Mickey Mouse sprang forth
right in front of my eyes. I said to myself, “I wish I have
a magic brush.” This notion, in some way, infuenced my
spontaneous and swift strokes in capturing the horses’
energy and motion.
In elementary school, I would draw litle characters
in the corner of textbooks. When I thumbed through
those books, those litle characters came to life, dancing
and fipping. Now I can show infnite motion without
thumbing through.
My father was rarely home during my childhood. His
large desk, calligraphy tablets, shuen paper (rice paper),
ink stones and brushes were readily available for me to
experiment with drawing and practicing calligraphy.
One day in high school, I
asked my father, “Why do
your horses always have that
piercing sparkle in their eyes?”
He replied, “It was the spirit
of the revolution.”
Then I asked, “What is
the diference between the
revolutionary soldier and a
soldier?”
He replied, “The
revolutionary soldiers always
advance to the most dangerous
places.” At that moment, I saw
that same piercing sparkle in
his eyes.
From then on I looked
for dangerous experiences
through mountain climbing and diving. These
adventures did not compare with my father’s
experiences as a Revolutionary General.
However, through my close encounters with nature, I
began to appreciate the philosophy of “Harmony between
Humanity and Nature.”This philosophy has become the
spirit of Fei Pai's Celestial Horse Art. All aspects of the
universe resonate in harmony with each other.
My father also had his kind and light-hearted side. The
same qualities are present in my paintings. This is one
of my favorite paintings, entitled “Upside-Down Still a
Hero.”I simply call it, “Untitled."
I was always able to express myself freely in
accordance to my true nature while I was growing up.
This contradicted with the Taiwanese social mentality
of the sixties—“thinking nothing, but achieve entering
a higher level educational school.” For this, I am deeply
grateful to my mother for allowing me to pursue my
dreams without strings atached.
I graduated from National Cheng-Chi University,
Taiwan, in 1974 with a major in journalism. From 1971
to 1974, I was the newspaper column cartoonist for the
Journalism Department’s weekly journal. I studied black
and white photography and darkroom manipulation.
This in-depth exposure to modern art media impacted my
painting’s compositions and their sensitivity to lighting.
I began composing music during this same period.
This helped me to comprehend the similarity between the
rhythm of the music and the rhythm of painting. Among
the best-known contemporary musicians, I am particularly
impressed by the legendary sitar Virtuoso Ravi Shankar,
and the Brazilian Bossa Nova musician Antonio Carlos
Jobim. While they have a place in the creation of unique
local music, they have also greatly impacted world culture.
JR: After graduating from
college in 1974 in Taiwan at the
age of 26, you headed to San
Francisco. Tell us about your
experience on the west coast and
what you did during this time.
YFP: From 1978 to 1981, I
studied television production
and flm at San Francisco
State University. I combined
my passion for poetry
and calligraphy, with the
disciplines of cinematography
and music to create my “Yeh
Fei Pai Celestial Horses.”
JR: Tell us about how you create your work.
YFP: Chinese painting emphasizes the mind. Poems,
my own creations and quotes from ancient poets, are
often inspirations for my paintings. When the sun shines
on the just-completed paintings, I feel like a “God!”
JR: Your work focuses on Celestial Horse Art. Your
horses appear to foat in the air and gallop across the page.
Tell us something about the deeper meaning of the horses
and what they represent to you and your cultural heritage.
YFP: I paint Celestial Horses as a tribute to their virtue.
According to Confucius, “Horses are praised by their
virtue, not by their strength.” Thus, I chose horses to be
my incarnation.
JR: You are also an accomplished poet, calligrapher,
cinematographer, and musician. Are you working on any
of these other projects now?
YFP: I am currently recording and producing songs
that I have writen over the years, many with the
emphasis in advocating environmental awareness.
I noticed as I traveled through the countryside over the
years, young people are still listening to my music and
remembering the lyrics of my songs.
What is most meaningful to me is that the China Youth
Corps choreographed a Camp Fire Dance routine using
my song, entitled, “Camp Fire.” More than three decades
later, children still dance around the campfre singing
my, “Camp Fire.” It has become pop culture.
JR: Tell us about your family today?
YFP: I am happy that my son Eric Kevin Yeh is willing
to accept the responsibility to be the third-generation
successor of Yeh’s Celestial Horse.
JR: How often do you visit Southern Oregon and what
are your impressions of Jacksonville?
YFP: My frst invitation was in 2006 from SOCCA as
the featured artist to exhibit at the Schneider Museum of
Art, in Ashland.
When I climbed the ladder to fnish the last stroke of
the horse’s mane, I received an explosive applause from
the audience at the Meese Auditorium. I was very touched
by their warm response. A few more live art and music
performances at the US Hotel in Jacksonville were also
joyful. The vivid memories still bring warmth to my heart.
Jacksonville is a beautiful and friendly place. I am
honored to receive a return invitation from SOCCA to
celebrate 2014, the Year of the Horse, with the people
in Jacksonville.
There are two 2014 events scheduled in Jacksonville
to showcase my art: an exhibit at the Elan Art Gallery,
starting on February 7th, and a live performance at the
US Hotel on February 8th.
And my 2014 events scheduled in Medford include
a live art performance at HEC, February 6th, at 6:30pm
(by invitation only), the Rogue Gallery exhibit from
February 7-28, and a tour & book signing on February
8th, 2:00-4:00pm.
JR: Do you have any advice for budding artists who’d like
to be professional artists in today’s world with dwindling
public resources allocated for the arts and arts education?
YFP: Keep your day jobs!
JR: Your work has been shown and purchased
globally, hasn’t it?
YFP: I am grateful that I can use my art as a vehicle
to help raise funds for disaster recovery and medical
research. I recently donated a painting entitled, “Leap
Over the Kingdom,” to an American Cancer Society Gala
event live auction. The event was held in September
2013 at the Old Grandview Ranch (owned by Dr. Donald
Head, a world-renowned art collector).
Amongst collectors of my art are business owners,
entrepreneurs, homemakers, engineers, corporate executives,
retirees, and fellow artists.
I was pleased that in
2008, members from the
overseas Nationalist Party
were in San Francisco
to present my painting
entitled, “Benevolent
Invincible,” to the now
President of Taiwan,
Republic of China, Ma
Ying-Jeou as a warm
welcoming gift.
For more on Yeh Fei Pei,
please visit his website at
www.feipaihorses.com.
A Conversation with Artist, Yeh Fei Pai
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President Chiang Kai-Shek
& General Yeh Tsui Pai
"12 o'clock High"
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 35 February 2014
YEAR OF THE HORSE 2014
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 541-899-8118 or VISIT WWW.SOCCA.US
NOT TO MISS!
8AM - The Galloping 5K Fun Run Co-
organized by SOCCA and student volunteers
of SOU’s “Outdoor Adventure Leadership”
program, this family friendly run starts at the
Bigham Knoll Campus rain or shine. Advance
registraton recommended. Visit our website
www.socca.us for entry form and complete
instructons.
10:30AM - Traditonal Chinese New Year
Parade - Lions, dragons, gongs and local
celebrants will welcome the Year of the
Horse. Procession begins at the intersecton
of Oregon Street and Main Street. Visit our
website www.socca.us for entry form and
instructons. Come and join the revelry!
11:30AM-12:30PM “Horse Arrives; Instant
Success!” 馬到成功 Be awed by Yeh Fei Pai
葉飛白 at this unique artstc performance
rarely seen in the United States. Mr. Yeh
comes from Taiwan to help SOCCA celebrate
Chinese New Year 2014 in Southern Oregon.
See in person how he makes celestal horses
come alive on a mural with his distnctve
splash ink brush paintng style. Let his
powerful strokes and signature presentaton
inspire you to reach for success in this Year of
the Horse. U.S. Hotel Ballroom, Second Floor,
125 E. California Street. Underwriten by U.S.
Bank. Free Admission.
12:30-1:30PM Chinese Cooking
Demonstraton - Watch Mohkeed Wong
demonstrate the traditonal art of brining
mustard green to cook up a hearty Chinese
soup noodle that is delicious and easy to
prepare. It’s a complete
meal for the busy cook.
Wait tll you sample this
home-cooked delicacy.
Admission is $5, available
at the Jacksonville Chamber
of Commerce. Presented at
the Bella Union Restaurant
& Saloon, Second Floor, 170
W California St.
2PM “Images of China” By
popular demand from the
young and young at heart,
the award-winning Dragon
Art Studio 龍兿 from Portland returns to
Jacksonville. Master Puppeteers Yuqin Wang,
Zhengli Xu and their daughter/apprentce,
Brenda Xu will present vignetes and stories
of China with large handmade Chinese Rod
Puppets. Performance is in the Gymnasium
at the Jacksonville Elementary School, 655
Hueners Lane. Admission is $5. Tickets
available at the Jacksonville Chamber of
Commerce.
ACTIVITIES &
PRESENTATIONS
(The following actvites are FREE & open to
the public)
11:30AM-12:30PM Searching for Gold
Mountain - The Chinese of Jacksonville
presented by historian Larry Smith, meet at
the front lobby of the Jacksonville Library
(340 West ‘C’ St). Weather permitng, the
group will visit the “Long Tom” Sluice Box
Chinese Memorial Fountain.
11:30AM-12:30PM Shi-ba Shi 十八式
(18 Forms) is a modern form of Qigong
based on elements of Yang Style Tai-Chi. A
gentle, beautful form of exercise that can
be performed standing or sitng in a chair,
recommended as a warm-up routne for
the Senior Citzen Fall Preventon program.
Barbara Meredith (of the Rogue Valley
YMCA), a Natonal Faculty for Y-USA MFBB,
will teach this adaptaton at the Historic
Presbyterian Church (Fellowship Hall/
downstairs), 405 E. California St.
11:30AM-1PM Chinese (Brush) Calligraphy
書法 - Unique to Asian cultures: the ink,
fexibility of brush, and absorptvity of the
rice paper, produce an infnite variety of
styles and forms and ofen thought to reveal
the character of one’s personality. Fuyou
Long 龍伏佑, graduate of Wuhan University
and People’s University in China and a
published author will give an introducton and
demonstraton, in the Naverson room at the
Jacksonville City Library.
11:30AM-1PM Acupuncture
Treatment: Relieving Pain
Using Needles - practcing
acupuncturist Owen Jurling
demonstrates 4000 year old
traditonal Chinese healing art
with the use of needles. Persons
seeking pain management are
encouraged to present for
treatment. At the Naverson
Room in the Jacksonville Library.
(Simultaneously with Chinese
Calligraphy.)
11:30AM-12:30PM Scaring the Devils
Away: One Hundred and Fify-Thousand
Firecrackers in Ashland’s Chinatown in
the Year of the Horse 1895 by Victoria
Law, founder of the Ashland Historic and
Railroad Museum, will retell the tales from
documented reports of this event, at the
Historic Presbyterian Church Sanctuary
(upstairs), 405 E. California St.
11:30AM-12:30PM Chinese Astrology:
The Year of the Green Wood Horse - In the
Chinese Zodiac calendar, if you were born in
1942, 1954, 1966, 1978, 1990 or 2002, you
would be a ‘horse.’ So what’s the year like for
all of us? Ken Bendat, Chinese scholar and
doctor of Chinese medicine, reveals amusing
and insightul perspectves and stories for this
year. At the Old City Hall, on the corner of
Main and Oregon St.
11:30AM-12:30PM Feng shui can improve
your health. Yes it can. Feng Shui 風水 Master
and Owner of Creatve Vision, Sugeet Posey
will explain principles to reduce stress and
make living in this crazy world much easier.
Does that improve your health? Of course.
Come to this interactve presentaton and
pick up useful tps you can use in your home
or business. Presented at the Art Presence
Gallery, corner of 5th and ‘D’ Street (formerly
the Children’s Museum).
12:30-1:30PM
Martn Gold
recounts the long
and shameful
legislatve history
of the Chinese
Exclusion Laws. He
brings to life the
politcs and racism
of Exclusion Laws in
his book: Forbidden
Citzens. With thirty-fve years of legislatve
background in Washington, DC, Mr Gold was
appointed by President George W. Bush in
2006 to serve on the Commission for the
Preservaton of America’s Heritage Abroad
and he advised the 1882 Project in its eforts
to obtain congressional apology for the
Chinese Exclusion Laws. Historic Presbyterian
Church Sanctuary (upstairs), 405 E. California St.
12:30-1:30PM Rice Is Life for All of Us - A rice
revoluton is underway: a presentaton by Ken
Lee and Caryl Levine, co-founders and owners
of Lotus Foods are changing how Americans
think about and eat rice. They pioneered
the introducton of exotc rices grown on
small family farms to US markets. Come
hear how farmers are being empowered to
produce more by using less while preserving
traditonal seeds and beneftng the planet
and how you can be part of the soluton. Old
City Hall, on the corner of Main and Oregon St.
12:30-1:30PM Tea House and Chinese Music -
Relax to a complimentary cup of tea and listen
to live Chinese music played on authentc
Chinese instrument, performed by Who’s Hu
(Chinese Band), and contnue to browse Yeh
Fei Pai’s paintngs, prints and books being
exhibited at the U.S. Hotel Ballroom, 125 E.
California Street, Second Floor.
12:30PM-1:30PM “The Mood and the Wind:
Beyond Kung-fu” - the forms 法 and rituals
禮 of Chinese Kung-fu: it is not all fst and
fury, it is philosophy and poetry in moton:
demonstrated and explained by Sijo 師祖
Grand-master David Day of Shui Bing Fa 水冰
法 Kenpo, at the Historic Presbyterian Church
Fellowship Hall (downstairs), 405 E. California St.
12:30-1:30PM Remembering Jacksonville’s
Chinese Quarter - Archaeological
investgaton over the last decade in the
Jacksonville has allowed for important
insights into the once bustling 19th century
neighborhood. Several thousand artfacts
have been recovered over the years. Hear the
stories and see some of the actual artfacts, as
Southern Oregon University’s Archaeologist
Chelsea Rose brings history back to life: meet
at the front lobby of the Jacksonville Library,
340 West ‘C’ St.
Chinese New Year Celebration
SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES FEBRUARY 8, 2014 JACKSONVILLE, OR
SPECIAL
EXHIBITS
Month long Exhibits - View Yeh Fei Pai’s
Celestal Horses, Splash Ink Paintng Artst,
at the Elan Guest Suites and Gallery (245
W. Main Street, Jacksonville) and Rogue
Gallery & Art Center (40 S. Bartlet Street,
Medford) beginning February 7.
Jacksonville Library (340 West ‘C’
St) - Recent excavatons into a single
house which burned in the fall of 1888
have resulted in the recovery of a large
artfact assemblage that will give us an
excitng glimpse into daily life within a
single household. Several fne pieces are
exhibited in the large display case in the
front lobby of the Library, from January 2
through February 17.
CHILDREN’S
ACTIVITIES
11:30AM-2PM - Romp, jump and slide
in our Dragon Jumphouse and this year
for the Year of the Horse, we are adding
a second ‘Horse Carousel’ jumphouse:
even more fun for the kids; at the former
Jacksonville (Courthouse) Museum grounds
(206 N. 5th St.)
Children’s Crafs, lantern building and more
at the Jacksonville Museum Annex, (206
N. 5th St). Convert your name into Chinese
calligraphy.
More Children’s Games, face-paintng
and even more actvites at the IOOF Hall
located at 175 S. Oregon Street.
Jacksonville Review Page 36 February 2014
525 Bigham Knoll ∙ Jacksonville, Oregon
PHONE: 541-899-1000 ∙ www.thebrewhaus.com
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Come See And Taste For Yourself
More than just Great Coffee . . .
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