TM

2010

Jamboree

NATIONAL SCOUT JAMBOREE EmerGencY PrepareDness AWarD

” In addition to rebuilding and repairing property. and other activities. there is also work to be done in trying to bring physical and emotional health back to a stable condition. Scouts have responded to the needs of their communities and nation in time of disaster. The National Scout Jamboree Emergency Preparedness Award was designed with the above aims in mind and was first introduced at the 2005 Jamboree.2010 National Scout Jamboree Emergency Preparedness Award From its beginning. has been earned by more than 18.000 participants.” Prevention goes hand-in-hand with mitigation. it is important that they emphasize emergency preparedness training and have a plan that will help protect the unit and those around them. to do their duty to God and country. as Scouting has always taught youth to be prepared. and to prepare themselves physically.  Mitigation and Prevention. this training will continue to contribute to the well-being of these members and their families and neighbors. to help others. your response to an emergency can take many forms.  Preparedness. you may be called upon to help with shelter. and to develop courage. assembling an emergency or disaster supply kit. as do response and recovery. After a disaster or other emergency. The word “mitigate” means “to lessen in force or intensity. you will understand what your actions are helping to accomplish. Your response can help reduce the occurrence of secondary damage. The 2010 Jamboree promises to be bigger and better than ever as Scouting celebrates its 100th Anniversary. It can be challenging to be prepared for emergencies in our complex world of human-caused and naturally occurring hazards. All the more reason to “Be Prepared. and the will to be ready to serve in an emergency. On a personal level. such as evacuating an area. self-reliance. The emergencies of today’s world demand more than ever that Scouts be trained as individuals and as units to meet emergency situations. As units across the country begin to plan their jamboree experience.” and “to make less severe. and morally to meet these goals. to be helpful to others. and responding to. The award.” The primary reason for this award is to encourage jamboree participants to be prepared to act promptly and to be able to take care of themselves in an emergency. Making a plan and practicing it. conceived by Jack Coughlin (a member of the BSA’s National Insurance Team). 3. That is just one reason it is a good idea to become familiar with such terms. The importance of this training is not new to the Boy Scouts of America.  Recovery. use many of the same terms when talking about emergency management. and installing warning devices are all actions you can take to prepare for an emergency. When you take actions to prepare for emergencies. if you find yourself working with emergency personnel. The Four Aspects of Emergency Preparedness Emergency personnel. The National Scout Jamboree Emergency Preparedness Award was developed to foster the skills to meet this challenge while traveling to and from the jamboree and during the jamboree itself. Mitigation often involves managing risk—becoming aware of. 2. Mitigation efforts can even help prevent an emergency from happening. first aid. the Scouting movement has taught young people to do their best. After the jamboree. you recognize the possible threats from natural and other disasters. mentally. . Teaching young people to know and be able to use practical skills when needed is an important part of individual preparedness.  Response. Since Scouting began in the United States. In this phase of emergency management. It also can make the difference between inconvenience and tragedy. the goal is to try to get things back to “normal. The basic aims of Scouting include teaching young people to take care of themselves. 4. such as the American Red Cross and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) workers. 1. risks and hazards.

Award Requirements 1. Give scenarios of potential emergencies and ask unit members how they would respond. What do you do? Where do you go?” The 2010 Jamboree Emergency Preparedness Handbook is available at http://www.  At least 50 percent of adults (all adults are encouraged) have completed ICS-100a (ICS 100). A patch for each member of the jamboree unit will be mailed to the jamboree Scoutmaster after the application has been received in the national office and approved by the BSA’s Risk Management Team. Program Items • 2010 National Scout Jamboree Emergency Preparedness Award patch. The BSA acknowledges the generous support of several organizations in making the patches available.C. participates in emergency preparedness training conducted by community emergency preparedness agencies (i. This temporary patch may be worn on the right pocket of the uniform. 5. Follow the guidelines elsewhere in this publication for a kit for travel by private vehicle or a kit for travel by public transportation. through the National Distribution Center. fire department. Introduction to the Incident Command System (see http://training. Follow the guidelines elsewhere in this publication when developing the plan. CRC Insurance Services.  Every youth and adult carries a personal firstaid kit. 2010. Crump Insurance Services.fema.  Prepare and share with all unit members a written emergency preparedness plan for your unit’s jamboree trip. 7. Unit members become separated. It is awarded when requirements are met. and W estrope & Associates. All emergency training activities carried out by jamboree units must be appropriate for the ages and abilities of the young people involved. including its adult leaders.bsajamboree.. and July 1. 3. 6.  The jamboree unit. The form is available at http://www.org • First-Aid Supplies and Skills • Home or Patrol/Troop First-Aid Kit 8.gov/IS/NIMS. D. 32185.e. 2. Emergency Preparedness merit badge.org/filestore/jamboree/ pdf/632-002_form.pdf. local or state emergency management agency. That award is a pin and must be applied for separately.).. police department. or American Red Cross Wilderness First Aid Course. Please note that applications will not be accepted at the jamboree site.  Prepare a jamboree travel emergency kit. This award is specific to the 2010 National Scout Jamboree and is separate and distinct from the Emergency Preparedness BSA Award earned by traditional troops. a power outage causes the building and surrounding area to go totally dark. • Emergency Preparedness BSA information pocket card. This temporary patch is to be worn on the right pocket. Unit members should participate only under the supervision of their leaders.The Award When a jamboree unit has fulfilled the requirements. even though some of the requirements are the same. including Endurance U.scouting. Another online resource titled Program Hazard Analysis will soon be available for your contingent at this same W eb site. . American Red Cross First Aid Course.org/filestore/jamboree/pdf/632-290_WB_app. No. Each troop has a first-aid kit as outlined in the First Aid merit badge pamphlet: www. with adjustments made for the unit’s particular needs. While we’re in the Smithsonian Institution.S.  Hold a unit session on the jamboree emergency preparedness plan. This is available to local councils as a supply item.scouting.pdf.  All youth members earn at least one of the following: the First Aid merit badge. 4.  At least one adult leader completes American Red Cross Wilderness First Aid Basics Course or equivalent. etc. Correct misunderstandings that surface. a completed application is submitted to the local council between Sept. 1. 2009.asp). Example: “W e are sightseeing in W ashington.

 Each adult leader of the jamboree unit should have a copy of the master contact information list at all times during the trip. even in a place unfamiliar to them. plan an out-of-town evacuation route and an out-of-town meeting point. or public facility. including: — Emergency response team leaders (primary. work. and the dangers of rough-housing while traveling on a bus. carbon monoxide and motion detectors. the family doctor. Someone should confirm that an emergency agency has been contacted after assembly at the prearranged meeting place. 9. tertiary) at the home location. 8. 6.  Because emergency responders will need an address or directions on where to send help.  List them. establish responsibilities for each member of your unit and plan to work together as a team. Agree on a meeting place in the event the unit becomes separated.  Be sure all jamboree unit members (adult and youth) know that in case of emergency. poison control. use of the buddy system while sightseeing. restaurant.  Be sure everyone in the unit can recognize the different sounds made by smoke. Each youth and adult participant should have his or her own list of emergency numbers. burglar alarms. be sure all unit members practice describing where they can be found. and fire drills at home. and the jamboree site number. Apply this to your travel route and to the jamboree site. then discuss what you should do individually and as a group in each situation. Designate alternates in case someone is absent or injured. secondary. 4. in the event unit members are separated during an emergency. the unit should make daily contact (at a predetermined time) with a home location emergency contact coordinator to confirm that all is well. Visualize all possible situations along your route and in the jamboree area. heat. and that they know what to do when they hear them. These emergency numbers must be with each participant at all times. Someone should call for help.Jamboree Emergency Preparedness Plan Your final plan should include (at a minimum): • A buddy plan • Gathering places along your travel route • Potential emergency shelters along your travel route • Hospitals and emergency rooms along your travel route • Role of each member of the unit and assignments for specific responsibilities. such as parents’ work numbers and cell numbers. such as: • Missing contingent member • Natural disaster • Accident • Food or water contamination • Human error or criminal behavior • Medical emergency 2. Practice/Discussion Items The unit should review safety steps to be taken while traveling. 7. 12. a neighbor and one other family emergency contact. The meeting point might be a hotel.  For the home area. or plane.  Be sure everyone knows to call 911 and other emergency numbers. it is their responsibility to keep the unit together. and to explain to those injured or in need of help what has happened and what is likely to happen next. While en route and while at the jamboree. planning evacuation routes from congested areas. 3. or in a vehicle. to remain calm.  Practice earthquake. and determining unit meeting sites along the way. and community sirens and warning signals. 10. secondary. Document these decisions in writing.  Discuss what to do if evacuation from your vehicle or your jamboree site is necessary. These people must have in their possession at all times copies of the unit’s master contact list and emergency preparedness plan. 11. in the event all family members aren’t together at the same time to evacuate. 5. train. and tertiary) — First aid/CPR — Communication — Custodian(s) of important phone numbers and contact information — Custodian of the jamboree travel emergency kit and any other emergency supplies — Practice  Be sure everyone in the unit knows that they must not hesitate. 1. Try to predict the kinds of human-caused and naturally occurring situations and emergencies that could occur during your tour. tornado. For each type of emergency. but must get away from danger as soon as possible. .  Planning ahead is the first step to a calmer and more effective disaster response. fire alarms. Designate emergency contact coordinators (primary. and school periodically.

but be sure to have enough to meet the group’s needs for at least three days: • Flashlights (include extra batteries). cash in small manual can opener. per day. personal hygiene items. Include a current list of all members’ family phone numbers and e-mail addresses. • Blankets. including energy bars. including someone out of the home area who may be reached if local phone lines are overloaded. pliers. towelettes. high-protein items. • Medications. than one leader are suggested. Plan to store enough of these supplies in the vehicle for everyone in your unit for • Drinking water. • Fluorescent vests. Be sure all unit members have needed eyeglasses or contact lenses and solution. and copies of important papers. screwdriver. • Booster/jumper cables. Travel by Public Transportation Unit equipment and supplies. and return home. You won’t need one for each unit member. See www. Be sure all unit members have adequate supplies of needed prescription medications for the entire trip plus at least three days. Personal supplies. • Flares and/or chemical light sticks. (ATMs and credit cards won’t work if the power is out. • Cell phone (including charger). including identification cards. • Food. Have at least two • Medications. • Battery-operated and/or crankoperated radio (include extra batteries). (ATMs and credit cards won’t work if the power is out. starting from your local area. or cooking. per day. knife. are suggested. and copies of important papers. Be sure all unit members have 12-ounce bottles per person. These are to be worn by those directing traffic or giving aid on the roadside until the emergency agencies have arrived and taken control. Also. • Signal mirror. Include your entire route. preparation. including someone out of the home area who may be reached if local phone lines are overloaded. • Personal items. • Sanitary supplies. Plan to store enough of these supplies in the vehicle for everyone in your unit for at least three days: • Drinking water. hammer. ready-to-eat soup. and include all side tours.tsa. • Food. and little or no water. in order to minimize the possibility of theft.gov. peanut butter. Have enough general-use nonprescription items for the group. etc. and return home. • Flashlights (include extra batteries). including identification cards. • Itinerary. plus coins for machines and public phones. Pack nonperishable. be sure to abide by the Transportation Security Administration’s list of permitted and prohibited items for checked and carry-on luggage. in order to minimize the possibility of theft. • Matches or lighter. • First-aid kit (include a first-aid guide). and garbage bags and ties. Include a current list of all members’ family phone numbers and e-mail addresses. or cooking. Mark your entire route by day. Pack nonperishable. starting from your local area. arrival at the jamboree site. peanut butter.) Travelers’ checks issued to more Personal supplies. Select foods that require no refrigeration. duct tape. • Money. high-protein items. Four suggested.Jamboree Travel Emergency Preparedness Kit What you have on hand when a disaster happens could make a big difference in how well you react. Have at least two 12-ounce bottles per person. plastic sheeting. • Map. • Personal items. You won’t need one for each unit member. etc. If traveling by air. but be sure to have enough to meet the group’s needs for at least three days. • First-aid kit (include a first-aid guide). etc. Select foods that require no refrigeration. ready-to-eat soup.) Travelers’ checks issued to more than one leader are suggested. Be sure all unit members have needed eyeglasses or contact lenses and solution. at least three days: • Master contact list. • Cell phone (including charger). preparation. adequate supplies of needed prescription medications for the entire trip plus at least three days. including energy bars. arrival at the jamboree site. You’ll want toilet paper. and little or no water. • Multipurpose tool kit that includes denominations. . Travel by Private Vehicle Unit equipment and supplies. • Money. and include all side tours. • Master contact list.

Scouting.ready.ScoutStuff. prepare for. Jessup. item number. 34416D (Also available at www. including as a read-through or reference guide. and after each hazard type. Are You Ready? can be used in a variety of ways.S.org. animals in disaster. MD 20794-2012 or calling 800-4802520. AMERICAN RED CROSS (www. The publication below may be ordered from FEMA by writing to FEMA. Other topics covered include evacuation.RedCross. and protect the nation from all hazards. chemical. Please visit this site. zip code. nuclear power plant. landslide and debris flows (mudslide).org) The American Red Cross provides relief to victims of disaster and helps people prevent. address. or may be ordered through your local council service center. tsunamis. and community preparedness. Include the title. The following hazards are covered: floods. hazardous materials incidents. and radiological hazards). family. and daytime telephone number. wildfires. Scouting Safely) OTHER RESOURCES These may also be helpful: •  http://www. nuclear. and quantity.org) as part of the nation’s emergency management system. household chemical emergencies. tornadoes. thunderstorms and lightning. how to identify hazards that affect the local area. Are You Ready? An In-depth Guide to Citizen Preparedness (IS-22) is FEMA’s most comprehensive source on individual. emergency public shelters. earthquakes. 35888 • Guide to Safe Scouting. BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA www.org and www. FEMA works in partnership with other organizations including the American Red Cross (www. • Emergency Preparedness merit badge pamphlet. Department of Homeland Security) •  American Red Cross local chapter (emergency procedures and training) • Other local disaster relief agencies • Local law enforcement agencies .gov (U. volcanoes. P. and terrorism (including explosion. during. biological. and information specific to people with disabilities.Resources FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY (FEMA) (www. fires. Box 2012. and how to develop and maintain an emergency communications plan and disaster supplies kit. extreme heat. Prepare for Events to select a hazard with its fact sheet.org These materials are available at your local Scout shop.O. Are You Ready? also provides in-depth information on specific hazards including what to do before. winter storms and extreme cold.Scouting. and respond to emergencies.org) The primary mission of this agency is to reduce the loss of life and property.fema. hurricanes. Are You Ready? provides a step-by-step approach to disaster preparedness by walking the reader through how to get informed about local emergency plans.RedCross. along with your name.

8. following the required guidelines. �������� Number of youth members who completed the American Red Cross First-aid Course. participated in emergency preparedness training ________________________________________________________________________________________________ . Signed____________________________________________________________ Date________________________________ Council Approval National Approval Signed____________________________________________________________ Date________________________________ Youth and adult members of the unit completing the requirements receive a 2010 National Scout Jamboree Emergency Preparedness Award patch. All instruction and participation associated with this Emergency Preparedness Award must be carried out in an environment free from all hazards and dangers. �������� The jamboree unit. 6. �������� Number of unit sessions held on the Jamboree Emergency Preparedness Plan. including its adult leaders. 2. �������� A written emergency preparedness plan for your unit’s jamboree trip was prepared and shared with all unit members. as explained in the Guide to Safe Scouting and in other Scouting literature. 5. (Name of community emergency agency that conducted the training) Requirements 4. �������� Every youth and adult carries with them a personal first-aid kit. �������� Number of youth members who completed the American Red Cross Wilderness First Aid Course. �������� Number of youth members who earned the First Aid merit badge. 3. approved application to Risk Management Team. Delivery of patches in time for the jamboree cannot be guaranteed for applications received after July 1. Introduction to the Incident Command System. �������� At least 50 percent of adults (all adults are encouraged) have completed ICS-100a (ICS 100). 1. has been assembled. and each troop has a first-aid kit. Recognition 632-290 2009 Printing . Signed____________________________________________________________ Date________________________________ This unit has satisfactorily completed requirements for the 2010 National Scout Jamboree Emergency Preparedness Award. Council submits the completed. �������� Number of adult leaders who completed the American Red Cross Wilderness First Aid Basics Course. S402 at the national office. All BSA precautions and safety measures. �������� Number of youth members who earned the Emergency Preparedness merit badge. 7. �������� A jamboree travel emergency kit. 2010. as appropriate. A copy of the plan is enclosed with this application. apply.2010 National Scout Jamboree Emergency Preparedness Award Application Name of jamboree unit__________________________________________________________________________________________ Jamboree unit number_________________ Council number___________ Number of members in jamboree unit________________________________ Council name_________________________________________________________________ Name of unit leader_ __________________________________________________________________________________________ Home unit number____________________ Position in home unit_______________________________________ Please check each completed requirement or indicate the number.

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