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The Chicago Manual of Style Online 15.

9: Author-date referencesexamples and variations

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15: Documentation II: Author-Date References


15.9 Author-date referencesexamples and variations The examples that follow are intended to provide an overview of the author-date system, featuring books and journal articles as models. Each example includes a reference list entry and a corresponding text citation. For the sake of consistency, text citations are presented in parentheses, though they do not always appear that way in practice (see 15.27). For more examples, consult the sections dealing with specic types of works throughout this chapter.
BOOK WITH SINGLE AUTHOR OR EDITOR

For a book with a single author, invert the name in the reference list; in the text, include only the last name. Punctuate and capitalize as shown. To cite a specic passage, a page number or range is included in a text citation (separated from the year by a comma) but not in a reference list, unless the entry is for a chapter, in which case the page range on which the item appears is included (see Chapter in an Edited Book, below; see also 9.5863).
Pollan, Michael. 2006. The Omnivores Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. New York: Penguin. (Pollan 2006, 99100)

A book with an editor in place of an author includes the abbreviation ed. (editor; for more than one editor, use eds.). Note that the text citation does not include ed.
Greenberg, Joel, ed. 2008. Of Prairie, Woods, and Water: Two Centuries of Chicago Nature Writing. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Greenberg 2008, 42)
BOOK WITH MULTIPLE AUTHORS

For a book with two authors, only the rst-listed name is inverted in the reference list.
Ward, Geo!rey C., and Ken Burns. 2007. The War: An Intimate History, 19411945. New York: Knopf. (Ward and Burns 2007, 52)

For a book with three authors, adapt as follows:


Heatherton, Joyce, James Fitzgilroy, and Jackson Hsu. 2008. Meteors and Mudslides: A Trip through . . . (Heatherton, Fitzgilroy, and Hsu 2008, 18889)

For a book with four or more authors, include all the authors in the reference list entry (see also 14.76). Word order and punctuation are the same as for two or three authors. In the text, however, cite only the last name of the rst-listed author, followed by et al. (see also 15.28).
(Barnes et al. 2008, 11819)
BOOK WITH AUTHOR PLUS EDITOR OR TRANSLATOR

In the reference list, do not abbreviate Edited by or Translated by. See also 14.88.
Garca Mrquez, Gabriel. 1988. Love in the Time of Cholera. Translated by Edith Grossman. London: Cape. (Garca Mrquez 1988, 24255)
CHAPTER IN AN EDITED BOOK

In citations of a chapter or similar part of an edited book, include the chapter author; the chapter title, in quotation marks; and the editor. Precede the title of the book with In. Note the location of the page range for the chapter in the reference list entry. See also 14.11117.
Gould, Glenn. 1984. Streisand as Schwarzkopf. In The Glenn Gould Reader, edited by Tim Page, 30811. New York: Vintage. (Gould 1984, 310)
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The Chicago Manual of Style Online 15.9: Author-date referencesexamples and variations

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JOURNAL ARTICLE

Citations of journals include the volume and issue number and date of publication. The volume number follows the italicized journal title in roman and with no intervening punctuation. A specic page reference is included in the text; the page range for an article is included in the reference list, preceded by a colon. The issue number often appears in parentheses (as in the rst pair of examples below). If a journal is paginated consecutively across a volume or if the month or season is included in the reference list entry, however, the issue number (or month or season) may be omitted (as in the second and third pairs of examples).
Blair, Walter. 1977. Americanized Comic Braggarts. Critical Inquiry 4 (2): 33149. (Blair 1977, 33132)

For citations of journals consulted online, Chicago recommends the inclusion of a DOI or a URL; the DOI is preferred to a URL (see 14.5, 14.6). Note that DOI, so capitalized when mentioned in running text, is lowercased and followed by a colon (with no space after) in source citations.
Novak, William J. 2008. The Myth of the Weak American State. American Historical Review 113:75272. doi:10.1086/ahr.113.3.752. (Novak 2008, 758)

When no DOI has been provided along with the article at the site where it is consulted (even if one has been assigned), include a URL. The URL in the following exampleconsulted through the online journals archive JSTORwas listed along with the article as a more stable (and shorter) alternative to the URL that appeared in the browsers address bar:
Karmaus, Wilfried, and John F. Riebow. 2004. Storage of Serum in Plastic and Glass Containers May Alter the Serum Concentration of Polychlorinated Biphenyls. Environmental Health Perspectives 112 (May): 64347. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3435987. (Karmaus and Riebow 2004, 645)

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