WALT DISNEY AN ANTI-SEMITE?

Page 4
NOVELIST CREATES A NEW WORLD Page 9
ROCKLAND
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C H A N G E S E R V I C E R E Q U E S T E D
2 ROCKLAND JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 2014
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ROCKLAND JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 2014 3
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celebrities did visit Israel,
there would be less cov-
erage of the Israeli vaca-
tion trips of the dubi-
ously or weirdly famous.
In these fame categories,
I would place actress
Pam Anderson, 46, and
her new (Jewish) hub-
bie, RICK SALOMON, 45.
The two married around
January 12 and shortly
thereafter boarded an El
Al flight to Israel. Their
Israeli honeymoon got
more than a bare men-
tion in many Israeli and
Jewish media outlets.
Anderson has visited
Israel before: in 2010 she
filmed some ads in Israel,
and in 2011 she was a
judge for the Israeli ver-
sion of “Dancing with the
Stars.”
Salomon, to be frank,
is a pretty cheesy guy.
His father was a pretty
important Warner Broth-
ers executive (it’s unclear
if Rick inherited any big
bucks). Whatever money
Rick earns seems to be
made in a shadowy, if not
actually illegal way. He is
reported to be a big-time
poker player, playing
house games in the Los
Angeles area. (Maybe
true, maybe not.)
Drake
MUSIC NOTES:
Grammys
and more
Pink Ari Levine Diane Warren
The Grammy
Awards will be
broadcast live on
Sunday, January 26, on
CBS, starting at 8 p.m.
Only a smallish number
of awards in the big-
gest selling categories
are presented onstage,
and there are a handful
of tribe-affiliated per-
formers/producers up
for a TV-worthy Grammy
award.
DRAKE, 27, is up for
a Grammy for best rap
performance and best
rap song (“Started from
the Bottom”) and may
perform at the ceremony.
PINK, 34, is nominated
for co-writing “Just Give
Me a Reason,” a song-of-
the-year nominee. (She
also sang the hit version
of the song.) Pink will
perform onstage at this
year’s Grammys.
Drake — born Aubrey
Graham Drake — and
Pink — born Alecia Beth
Moore — both are chil-
dren of a Jewish mother
and a non-Jewish father.
Pink always has been
secular, while Drake was
raised Jewish.
“Locked out of Heav-
en,” which was sung by
Bruno Mars, is vying for
best song of the year.
Mars, whose paternal
grandma was Jewish,
co-wrote “Locked” with
ARI LEVINE, 30, a nice
guy from Teaneck who I
talked to last year. (Mars
will headline the Super
Bowl halftime show on
February 2.)
Last but not least is
LUKE GOTTWALD, 40,
AKA Dr. Luke, a me-
ga-pop producer and
songwriter. He’s the tonic
behind big acts like Katy
Perry and he co-wrote
“Roar,” a Perry tune up
for the Grammy for song
of the year.
Worthy of note, but
not presented on TV:
singer/songwriter RE-
GINA SPEKTOR, 33, is
nominated for her origi-
nal theme song for the
Netflix series, “Orange
Is the New Black.” Also
nominated in the same
category (“song for
visual media”) is vet-
eran DIANE WARREN,
57, who has won a slew
of Grammy awards. She
wrote the theme song
for the hit film “Silver Lin-
ings Playbook.”
The Grammys Founda-
tion is taking advantage
of the fact that tons of
musicians will be in Los
Angeles for the awards
and is filming an all-star
tribute to the Beatles the
day after the Grammys
ceremony. The tribute
will air on the 50th anni-
versary of the Beatles’ Ed
Sullivan Show February
7 appearance. No doubt
some Jewish musicians
will be on that program
— but performers’ names
haven’t been released
yet.
Israeli media sources
are saying that Justin
Timberlake will play Tel
Aviv on May 28 and that
Neil Young will perform
in Tel Aviv on July 17. If
these concerts do hap-
pen — which seems to
this observer pretty likely
— they will represent a
big setback for the cam-
paign to boycott Israel
culturally.
However, big name
stars have canceled
Israeli concerts before
with very little notice. So
nothing is certain until
Timberlake or Young
take the stage in Tel Aviv.
I suspect that if more
CANDLELIGHTING
January 24 ........................................................ 4:45 PM
January 31 ......................................................... 4:54 PM
February 7 ......................................................... 5:03 PM
February 14 ........................................................ 5:11 PM
February 21 ....................................................... 5:20 PM
February 28 ...................................................... 5:28 PM
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He absolutely made
money off of the 2004
sex tape featuring him
and his then girlfriend,
Paris Hilton. Whether
parts of the tape genu-
inely were stolen will
remain a mystery. Ulti-
mately, however, Rick
and Paris made a lot of
money off the tape, and
the tape gave Hilton’s
dubious show biz career
its biggest boost.
Anderson’s “Bay-
watch” TV show fame
was fading in 1995, when
a sex tape with her then
husband, rock musician
Tommy Lee, supposedly
was stolen and released
to the Internet. Ander-
son ultimately profited
big-time from legit sales
of the tape and she
pioneered the path that
Hilton/Salomon and, a
bit later, Kim Kardashian
followed — fame and
money based on sleeze
and very little talent.
Well, I guess it’s ap-
propriate, somehow, that
these sex-tape pioneers
found each other.
–N.B.
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Op-Ed
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KEEPING THE FAITH
A shameful double standard
SHAMMAI ENGELMAYER
R
abbi Avi Weiss is not
Orthodox in the eyes of
Israel’s chief rabbinate.
So the office declared
last week in a statement released by
its attorney, Harel Goldberg, who
said the allegedly pre-
liminary decision was
based in part on the tes-
timony of members of
the Rabbinical Council
of America.
For the record, over
last weekend the RCA
distanced itself from
that announcement.
At i ssue i s Wei ss’
lenient views on a vari-
ety of matters, and
especially his espousal
of what has become known as
“Open Orthodoxy,” which he defined
in a 1997 article. Open Orthodoxy,
he wrote in Judaism: A Journal of
Jewish Life and Thought, is “open
to secular studies and views other
than those of [Orthodox] rabbis;
open to non-Jews and less obser-
vant Jews; open to the State of lsrael
as having religious meaning; open
to increased women’s participation
[in religious life]; open to contact
with the Conservative, Reform, and
Reconstructionist movements; and
open to public protest as a means of
helping our people.”
This is an undeniable fact: Distin-
guished, even revered rabbis, have
deviated from traditional norms
from the very start of the rabbinate
two millennia ago. We have Hillel
and Shammai, Sephard and Ashke-
naz, chasid and mitnagid, and this
only scratches the surface of the
myriad shades of halachic diversity.
There is no gold standard for what it
means to be halachic or traditional,
but there does seem to be a double
standard when it comes to the Mod-
ern Orthodox.
There is one rabbi, revered to the
point that his rulings are virtually
accepted without question, who did
questionable things in his career, yet
no one ever did to him what is being
done to Avi Weiss, who has gone
nowhere near as far as this rabbi in
the things he has done.
There is the case, for example, of
a Jewish man who wanted to marry
a Jewish woman, but the rabbis in
Israel declared that man a mamzer
— a child of a forbid-
den relationship — and
declared him ineligible
to marry another Jew.
The rabbi heard of the
case, found a loop-
hole, and drove a truck
through it. The man
was not a mamzer, he
said, and he may marry.
The rabbis in Israel
accepted the decision.
Another time, this
r abbi c ompl et el y
shoved aside Torah law in a finan-
cial matter. Why? It was because the
Torah law was anachronistic and
even harmful. Again, no one chal-
lenged him.
Perhaps the most outrageous
example is when he converted a man
whose only reason for wanting to be
Jewish was so that he could dress
like one. Seriously; the man became
enamored of a form of Jewish dress,
and this revered rabbi saw no reason
to deny him his conversion — even
though the rabbi knew that most Jews
actually did not dress that way.
More to the point, there is no
record that this rabbi ever called in
a bet din to oversee the conversion,
or insisted on circumcision and mik-
vah. Yet the conversion was — is —
accepted by everyone as valid.
Avi Weiss would never consider
converting anyone for so flighty
a reason; he would not automati-
cally dismiss black-letter Torah law
as anachronistic and harmful; and
he would not so lightly dismiss the
ruling of other rabbis on matters of
mamzerut. Yet he is vilified, while
this other rabbi is praised.
By now, some readers probably
suspect this column’s veracity. These
cases, after all, appear so egregious
that they cannot be true.
They are true. The rabbi’s name
was Hillel the Elder (yes, that Hillel).
To take the last case first, the man
in question was so taken by the spe-
cialized clothing of the high priest
that he wanted the job so that he
could wear the clothing. Hillel con-
verted him, apparently on the spot,
and then had the man find out for
himself that he could never be a
priest, much less high priest. As
explained by Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz
in his commentary, “In practice,
people like the ones that Hillel con-
verted [there were two other equally
strange cases] are not accepted as
converts.... However, Hillel appar-
ently relied on the fact that these
converts could eventually accept
Judaism in its entirety at a later
time.” (See the Babylonian Talmud
tractate Shabbat 31a for the three
cases.) That reliance would not pass
muster with today’s chief rabbinate
or the RCA.
The Babylonian tractate Gittin
(34b-37b) reports on the institution
of the prosbul, a document appar-
ently thought up by Hillel that in
essence overturns the Torah’s com-
mandment regarding the release of
debts in a sabbatical year. Through
the legal fiction of the prosbul, the
debts remain in force no matter what
year it is.
It is in BT Bava M’tzia 104a that we
find Hillel overturning a ruling of the
sages regarding the status of Jewish
men in Alexandria, Egypt. The some-
what complicated case involved
women who were formally betrothed,
but then forced to marry other men,
who may not even have been Jewish.
The sages ruled that their children
were mamzerim; Hillel found a some-
what questionable loophole (it was
based on wording in marriage con-
tracts that could not possibly have
been written because the marriages
never took place), which the sages
accepted.
We revere Hillel precisely because
he epitomized “Open Judaism.” Yet
Avi Weiss is reviled. That is a double
standard — and a sad commentary on
Jewish life in 2014.
Was Walt Disney
anti-Semitic?
RAFAEL MEDOFF
A
ctress Meryl Streep has reignited a debate
that has simmered below the surface in
Hollywood for decades: Was Walt Disney
anti-Semitic?
The occasion was the annual awards event of the
National Board of Review, an organization of filmmak-
ers, students, and movie
scholars. Ms. Streep pre-
sented an award to Emma
Thompson for her role in
the new movie “Saving Mr.
Banks,” about the mak-
ing of Mary Poppins. Ms.
Thompson co-stars as Mary
Poppins’ creator, author
P.L. Travers, alongside Tom
Hanks as Walt Disney.
Ms. Streep took the
opportunity to blast Mr.
Disney as racist and misog-
ynist who also “supported an anti-Semitic industry
lobbying group.”
She did not actually call Mr. Disney an anti-Semite,
but many people took it that way. The Hollywood
Reporter declared that Streep accused Disney of being
“sexist, racist and anti-Semitic.” Film professor David
Hajdu said Disney was “a deeply flawed human being.
A misogynist? You bet. An anti-Semite? That, too.” An
Dr. Rafael Medoff is director of the David S. Wyman
Institute for Holocaust Studies in Washington, D.C.
The Wyman Institute worked with Disney Educational
Productions on its new DVD, “They Spoke Out:
American Voices Against the Holocaust.”
Rafael
Medoff
4 ROCKLAND JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 2014
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Shammai
Engelmayer
Walt Disney’s legacy has provoked
controversy. ALAN FISHER
Was Walt Disney
anti-Semitic?
RAFAEL MEDOFF
A
ctress Meryl Streep has reignited a debate
that has simmered below the surface in
Hollywood for decades: Was Walt Disney
anti-Semitic?
The occasion was the annual awards event of the
National Board of Review, an organization of filmmak-
ers, students, and movie
scholars. Ms. Streep pre-
sented an award to Emma
Thompson for her role in
the new movie “Saving Mr.
Banks,” about the mak-
ing of Mary Poppins. Ms.
Thompson co-stars as Mary
Poppins’ creator, author
P.L. Travers, alongside Tom
Hanks as Walt Disney.
Ms. Streep took the
opportunity to blast Mr.
Disney as racist and misog-
ynist who also “supported an anti-Semitic industry
lobbying group.”
She did not actually call Mr. Disney an anti-Semite,
but many people took it that way. The Hollywood
Reporter declared that Streep accused Disney of being
“sexist, racist and anti-Semitic.” Film professor David
Hajdu said Disney was “a deeply flawed human being.
A misogynist? You bet. An anti-Semite? That, too.” An
Op-Ed
ROCKLAND JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 2014 5
RJS-5*
unnamed “female Academy member” interviewed by
the Reporter referred to him as “that old anti-Semite
himself, Mr. Disney.”
Hollywood historian Neal Gabler examined the anti-
Semitism charge in his 2006 biography of Disney. “Of
the Jews who worked [with Disney], it was hard to find
any who thought Walt was an anti-Semite,” Mr. Gabler
reported. “Joe Grant, who had been an artist, the head
of the model department, and the storyman respon-
sible for Dumbo... declared emphatically that Walt was
not an anti-Semite. ‘Some of the most influential peo-
ple at the studio were Jewish,’ Grant recalled, thinking
no doubt of himself, production manager Harry Tytle,
and Kay Kamen [head of Disney’s merchandising arm],
who once quipped that Disney’s New York office had
more Jews than the Book of Leviticus. Maurice Rapf
concurred that Walt was not anti-Semitic; he was just
a ‘very conservative guy.’”
On the other hand, one former Disney animator,
David Swift, has claimed he heard Walt make an anti-
Semitic remark, and another ex-staffer, David Hilber-
man, has alleged that one employee was fired because
he was Jewish. (However, according to Mr. Gabler, Mr.
Disney himself was rarely involved in firing anyone
except the top brass). In addition, the original ani-
mated version of the “Three Little Pigs” portrayed
the Big Bad Wolf as a stereotypically Jewish peddler,
although after complaints, the segment was altered.
When it comes to explicit proof that Mr. Disney was
anti-Semitic, the critics’ case weakens. “There is zero
hard evidence that Disney ever wrote or said any-
thing anti-Semitic in private or public,” according to
Douglas Brode, author of “Multiculturalism and the
Mouse: Race and Sex in Disney Entertainment”. Mr.
Brode told the Hollywood Reporter that Mr. Disney
used more Jewish actors “than any other studio of
Hollywood’s golden age, including those run by Jew-
ish movie moguls.”
Mr. Gabler also revealed that Mr. Disney “frequently”
made unpublicized donations to a variety of Jewish
charities, including a Jewish orphanage, a Jewish old
age home, Yeshiva College (precursor to Yeshiva Uni-
versity), and the American League for a Free Palestine.
The League, better known as the Bergson Group, pub-
licly supported the armed revolt against the British in
Palestine by Menachem Begin’s Irgun Zvai Leumi. Mr.
Disney was embracing not just Zionism, but its most
militant wing.
How, then, did the rumors of Mr. Disney’s alleged
anti-Semitism spread so far and wide?
That’s where Meryl Streep comes in.
The “anti-Semitic industry lobbying group” with
which Mr. Disney was associated was the Motion Pic-
ture Alliance for the Preservation of American Ideals.
The group’s statement of principles said nothing about
Jews; its declared purpose was to prevent “Commu-
nist, Fascist, and other totalitarian-minded groups”
from gaining a foothold in Hollywood. Among its
members were politically conservative actors such
as John Wayne, Clark Gable, and Ginger Rogers. But
some of its other members were accused of being pri-
vately anti-Semitic, and in general it had a reputation
as being reactionary.
Mr. Gabler believes that “the most plausible expla-
nation” for the rumors about Mr. Disney were a kind
of guilt by association: “Walt, in joining forces with the
MPA and its band of professional reactionaries and
red-baiters, also got tarred with their anti-Semitism.
Walt Disney certainly was aware of the MPA’s pur-
ported anti-Semitism, but he chose to ignore it…. The
price he paid was that he would always be lumped not
only with anti-Communists but also with anti-Semites.”
The irony is that while Meryl Streep was condemning Walt
Disney for associating with extremists, she was doing the
very same thing herself. The actress to whom she gave that
award when she made her anti-Disney speech, her close
friend Emma Thompson, is active in the anti-Israel boycott
movement.
Ms. Streep hailed Ms. Thompson as “splendid, beautiful,
practically a saint … a living, acting conscience.” Yet this
“saint,” together with other British actors, publicly urged
a boycott of Israel’s Habimah theater troupe when it par-
ticipated in a festival in England. Habimah, of course, has
nothing to do with Israeli government policies or any politi-
cal issues. Its only “crime” is that it’s Israeli.
By contrast, Ms. Thompson had no problem with the
National Theater of China taking part in that festival, even
though it really does represent the Chinese regime — a
regime guilty of the most heinous human rights violations,
aid to terrorists around the world, and support for the geno-
cidal government of Sudan.
But of course, hypocrisy is the hallmark of the “saints” of
the anti-Israel boycott crusade.
JNS.ORG
OurChildren
About
Useful Information for
the Next Generation
of Jewish Families
Supplement to The Jewish Standard and Rockland Jewish Standard • February 2014
Camps Galore
Tunes for Kids
How to Pick the Right Instruments
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
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the breadth and scope of services we offer as well as providing seamless access to Morristown Medical Center,
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ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
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Monday Classes Start: Feb. 3
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February 2014
Baby Steps to Big Strides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Our children never walk alone
Preparing for Adventures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Day camps offer close-to-home choices
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Local camps offer a rich experience
Plenty of Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Listing of summer programs
A Symphony of Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Pick the right instrument for fledgling musician
Caramel vs. Chocolate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
There are only winners in the war of sweets
Controlling Asthma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
The right medical attention is key
Top Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Hot highlights for February
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Great and glorious things to do this month
OurChildren
About
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
AOC-4
4
W
hat the hack happened?
First I hear a whistle
on my phone at a pre-dawn
hour alerting me to a text.
Then I get a message from the
school. It was the principal asking
me to return his call, but assuring me
that it was nothing about the kids.
As the day unfolded, it was the
beginning of my global warning.
My laptop had been hacked. I had
been e-jacked. A plaintiff message
was sent out to all the recipients of
any email that I sent in the past. All
my contacts for as long as I’ve been
emailing (and I’m AOL, you know, the
dinosaur of email) received a note
from me (!) asking them for money
($900!) because I was stuck in Greece,
having gone there to help a cousin
with a failing kidney, and my credit
card was not working.
Well, I told the principal as I sat
in my apartment in Manhattan in the
throes of winter, the only Greece I’ve
seen lately, is the grease at the bot-
tom of the pan from the roasted Shab-
bos chicken that I made last week!
Jokes aside, a bit of panic set in
because I didn’t know how far this
invasion into my personal informa-
tion intrusion went. So, foolishly and
in my haste, I googled AOL technical
support to get a number to talk to a
live person. I found an 800 number,
spoke with someone who told me
that the damage was deep and that
I’d have to pay his company $199 to
return my computer and me to safety.
It was then I realized that I was not
speaking to AOL, but a company that
claimed to support AOL. How rude!
Another scam!
Finally, I got in touch with my real
Internet carrier and after speaking
to three people (two in Romania and
one in India) secured my account,
changed my password and recovered
my email list, which had disappeared.
I now had to spend the time
getting back to all to apologize and
explain that it wasn’t me sending out
the message.
Needless to say, a good chunk
of my day had been hacked. I didn’t
expect to wake up and fnd myself
troubleshooting for hours. Starting
with Yehuda and Shaina, my IT team,
ministering advice, followed by my
attempt to fx, and fnally really clear
up the problem.
If I could get over the heebie-jee-
bies of feeling digitally violated, there
was a silver lining to be had here. In
one fell swoop, in one mass mailing,
everyone who I knew and emailed
over the years had heard from me.
First, in my phony Greece location,
and then in my apology and explana-
tion that followed.
Most people knew the message
was a scam, but some were very con-
cerned and called to see if I was okay.
My father’s accountant in Florida
called me to ask if I really needed
money.
Another one of my father’s friends
also called to see if things were fne.
(One friend remarked that most
younger people who are more digi-
tally plugged in knew it was a scam,
but this may have eluded the more
senior people on my email list).
But who did I hear from? Sud-
denly, I got updates from folks from
all walks of my life.
I heard from two, no three old
beaus, and learned sadly that two of
them had recently lost their fathers.
The third ex sent me a photograph
taken when I was about 12 years old
at his bar mitzvah. What a hoot to
show the kids a picture of my tween
self.
I also learned that a dear friend’s
son found his betrothed.
I heard from an old editor from
my frst daily newspaper, thrilled to
hear that her health was good. And
from another editor, also thrilled to
hear that her health was good.
There was the sarcastic and funny
exchange from some.
“Really? You’re not in Greece?
I was just about to wire you some
money.”
But mostly, it was a chance to say
hello to so many old friends.
It really was a pain in the neck,
this hacking business.
But the episode was also a sort of
“This is Your Life” and I was reminded
of how many people I’ve been blessed
to touch and be touched by.
Cheers,
musings from the editor
Don’t Miss About Our Children in March
Published on February 21, 2014
Natalie Jay
Advertising Director
Peggy Elias
George Kroll
Karen Nathanson
Janice Rosen
Brenda Sutcliffe
Account Executives
About Our Children is published 11 times a year by the New Jersey/Rockland Jewish Media Group,
1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666; telephone: 201-837-8818; fax: 201-833-4959.;
e-mail: AboutOC@aol.com
OurChildren
About
Rachel Harkham
Slovie Jungreis-Wolff
Denise Yearian
Contributing Writers
MissionStatement
About Our Children is designed to help Jewish families in our area live healthy, positive lives that make the most of
the resources available to them. By providing useful, current, accurate information, the publication aims to guide par-
ents to essential information on faith, education, the arts, events, and child-raising — in short, everything that today’s
Jewish family, babies to grandparents, needs to live life to the fullest in northern New Jersey and Rockland County.
James L. Janoff
Publisher
Marcia Garfinkle
Associate Publisher
Heidi Mae Bratt
Editor
Deborah Herman
Art Director
AdvisoryBoard
Dr. Annette Berger, Psy.D.
Psychologist, Teaneck
Michelle Brauntuch, MS, CCLS
Child Life Specialist, Englewood Hospital, Englewood
Hope Eliasof
Marriage and Family Therapist, Midland Park
Howard Prager, DC, DACBSP
Holistic Chiropractor, Oakland
Jane Calem Rosen
Marketing and Communications Specialist
Barry Weissman, MD
Pediatrician, Hackensack and Wyckoff
Cheryl Wylen
Director of Adult Programs and Cultural Arts
YM-YWHA of North Jersey, Wayne
AOC-5
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
5
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four times in a row.
Once again, we have been awarded
the highest possible grade for patient
safety from the Leapfrog Group.
®
We remain committed to providing the highest level of quality
healthcare and safety for you and your family. Learn more at
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6
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
From Baby Steps to Big Strides,
Our Children Never Walk Alone
S L OV I E J UNGR E I S - WOL F F
P
arents can get bogged down in the carpool sched-
ules, the after school activities, the stress of late
homework and tests. The constant hurdles of dis-
cipline and scheduling our children’s lives can rob us of
the bigger picture. We easily forget that our parenting is
truly a journey of love.
Whenever I think of my father, especially as his
yartzeit approaches, I recall his taking my smaller hand
into his larger one, and giving me the gift of his words
to carry me throughout the many seasons of my life.
Though he is no longer here beside me, the image of
him walking next to me and trying to share a life legacy
is never lost. These are sweet moments that for me are
frozen in time. Though they may have occurred years
ago and took just a few minutes to relay, the imprint has
never left my soul. My father let me know that I never
walk alone. Perhaps we can all take a closer look at the
message we would like our children to recall when they
think about us, one day.
Season of Love
August, 1984
The soft music was playing in the distance. Before me
stood two tall doors that would soon be opened. I was
in my tulle-wedding gown, veil covering my face, antici-
pating my walk down the aisle with my parents at my
side. I was starting a whole new stage of life and was
excited to begin my married life.
My father motioned to me. He wanted to tell me
something. He took my hand and I saw that his eyes
were moist. “Sheyfelah,” he whispered. (He always
called me ‘shayfelah,’ a Yiddish term of endearment.)
“As you walk to the chuppah tonight I want you to know
that you are not walking alone. On your sides are all
your holy bubbies and zaydies who walked before you.
Their souls are here and they are bringing you bless-
ings. They are so holy and they are watching over you.
Wherever life takes you, never be afraid.”
I knew that my father had lost his parents and en-
tire family in the Holocaust. I knew that for him to see
life begin anew was a miracle. And I knew that he had
inhaled despair but exhaled faith. Now he was sharing
this faith with me. As I began my life as a young bride
my father wanted me to always know that my faith
would carry me through. He gave me this blessing, this
incredible knowledge that we never walk alone.
The doors opened. We began our walk down the
aisle, hand in hand.
Season of Life
September, 1985
“The doctor says I need to walk.”
There we were in the hospital, anticipating the birth
of our frst child. My husband and I had arrived at the
light of dawn thinking that I was in heavy labor. Instead
I was informed that I had lots of time to go. My parents
arrived and I relayed to them the advice that the doctor
had given us. He had said that walking would be the
best thing to do.
Once again my father took my hand in his. “Come,
sheyfalah, let’s take a good walk around the block to-
gether. When you feel terrible pain, squeeze my hand.”
I squeezed my father’s hand hard that day. I was
afraid that I was hurting him but he laughed and said,
“This is what fathers are for.” As we walked he once
again reminded me that I never walk alone.
That night my husband and I welcomed a precious
baby boy into this world. He was named for my father’s
elder brother who had been taken away by the Nazis.
He had left behind a beautiful family who were also
never seen or heard from again. My father carried their
lives within him. It was a heavy load though he never
allowed himself to grow bitter or become lost in sad-
ness. He never uttered a word of complaint. I knew that
we could offer some little solace for all that my father
lost through the naming of our son. And my father of-
fered us great love and patience for all our children who
followed.
Watching my father parent my children was a les-
son in joy. He would take the toddlers to the lake across
the street and laugh as they would feed challah to the
ducks. He enjoyed carrying our babies on his shoulder
and rocking them to sleep with his kisses. He always
had time for another bedtime story or to sing the She-
ma prayer. As the children grew they would love to visit
with him because he listened — he really listened. He
was never impatient. He never seemed tired or bored.
He made us all feel loved unconditionally. I know that
he had plenty of pressures. But somehow he always
pushed the stress to the side, put a magnifcent smile
on his face, and delighted in us, his children and grand-
children. This is the inspired parenting that I draw upon
as I am trying to climb my own ladder in life.
Season of Loss
January, 1996
“The doctor says I need to walk.”
Once again I am in a hospital but this time we are
not anticipating the exciting birth of a child. My fa-
ther is in Memorial Sloan Kettering, a cancer hospital
in New York City. I know that he is very ill though we
discovered that he was facing the fght of his life only
a few weeks before. We are shell- shocked. My beauti-
ful 6-foot-2 father who had always carried us upon his
broad shoulders now lay in a hospital bed. I was spend-
ing time with him and my father told me that the doctor
had said it would be a good idea to take a walk around
the corridors. I helped my father up from the bed and
we approached the hallway.
My father took my hand into his. We took a few
steps, silently. I did not know what to say.
My father stopped walking for a moment.
“Shayfelah,” he turned to look at me. “Do you re-
member another walk we once took together? Do you
remember how you said that the doctor wants you to
walk?”
I nodded not trusting myself to speak.
“This is a different walk, I know. But I am still tak-
ing your hand in mine. And you can still squeeze my
hand if you feel pain. I want you to know that even here
we never walk alone. You never have to be afraid. And
when one day I will not be here next to you anymore, I
want you to know that I am still by your side. Remem-
ber that I am walking along with all your bubbies and
zaydies. You will never walk alone.”
Soon after that day, my father gave me his fnal
blessing. He left me with a legacy of parenting that I try
to live up to each day.
As we parent our children, let’s try to show them
that we enjoy being with them. Let’s give them the
message that even though there are pressures and mo-
ments of stress, we hear their voices and never turn
away. And when there are moments of challenge or fear,
let us impart a message of faith.
“My sweet child, you will never walk alone. No mat-
ter what, I am here beside you. Never be afraid.”
Slovie Jungreis-Wolff is a parenting educator and author of
“Raising a Child With Soul,” (St. Martin’s Press).
Reprinted with permission from Aish.com.
OurChildren
About
AOC-7
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
7
The Elisabeth Morrow School
An independent, co-educational country day school
for age three through eighth grade.
• Located on 14 wooded acres in Englewood, NJ,
just 9 miles from Manhattan.
• An environment designed to meet the educational
needs of students at all stages of childhood and
prepare them for secondary schools.
A school so close can take them so far.
Find out more.
Schedule a visit today.
435 Lydecker Street, Englewood, NJ 07631
admissions@elisabethmorrow.org
201-568-5566 x7212
elisabethmorrow.org
EMS_Image ad_JewishStd_half_1-16.indd 1 1/16/14 11:08 AM
SUMMER EXPLORATIONS
The Elisabeth Morrow School
Open House
March 9
1–3 p.m.
435 Lydecker Street, Englewood, NJ 07631
201.568.5566 x7150
explorations@elisabethmorrow.org
June 23 – August 8, 2014
Ages 3 to Grade 1: Early Childhood Program
Grades 2 to 6: Enrichment Workshops
Grades 7 to 9: Academic Program
EMS_Summer_JewishStd_half_1-15.indd 1 1/15/14 10:04 AM
AOC-8
8
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
Parents pick us
because of our
experience
kids love
us because
of theirs
With 25 acres, a natural lake, 6 pools, 7 tennis courts, a 7,000 sq ft dining hall, 1,000
sq ft newly renovated performing arts center and numerous courts, felds and cabins
for sports and fne arts, Deer Mountain Day Camp offers the attributes of a large camp
with a small camp feel. Smart, authentic leadership and an experienced staff create
an environment where kids feel safe and comfortable to be who they are. Expert
activity instructors create engaging, high quality programs so kids develop real skills.
www.deermountaindaycamp.com
845.354.2727
Preparing for Adventures
Close to Home in Day Camp
DE NI S E Y E A R I A N
S
ummer day camp is a place where children can
stretch their minds, exercise their bodies, develop
new interests and create lasting friendships. But
preparation is key. So how can you help your child
make the most of his day camp experience?
First fnd the right program. When choosing a day
camp, consider what you and your child want from the
experience. Talk about their interests. Would he enjoy
an assortment of activities or does he want to concen-
trate on one skill, such as soccer or art?
Next consider program length. Day camps range
from several hours to a full day and can run from one-
week long to an entire summer. How long your child
should participate in a program will depend largely
upon his age, developmental level and previous camp
experience. First-time campers would do well starting
in a partial- to full-week program. Experienced campers
may enjoy one that runs throughout the summer.
Once a camp has been chosen, call and ask for in-
formation regarding staff, facilities and cost. Find out
the camper-to-counselor ratio. Ideally it should be six
campers to one counselor, as recommended by the
American Camping Association. What experience and/
or training do the counselors have? How are they se-
lected? What is the camp’s discipline policy? Can they
accommodate health concerns such as asthma, aller-
gies and dispensing medicine?
Ask about indoor and outdoor facilities. Is there
enough space indoors for the children to play in in-
clement weather? How often is the outdoor equipment
and grounds maintained? Are the children’s swimming
skills tested before they are allowed to enter the water?
Adventures continued on page 16
OurChildren
About
AOC-9
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
9
Parents pick us
because of our
experience
kids love
us because
of theirs
With 25 acres, a natural lake, 6 pools, 7 tennis courts, a 7,000 sq ft dining hall, 1,000
sq ft newly renovated performing arts center and numerous courts, felds and cabins
for sports and fne arts, Deer Mountain Day Camp offers the attributes of a large camp
with a small camp feel. Smart, authentic leadership and an experienced staff create
an environment where kids feel safe and comfortable to be who they are. Expert
activity instructors create engaging, high quality programs so kids develop real skills.
www.deermountaindaycamp.com
845.354.2727
Local Camps Offer
Learning, Playing and
Growing Experiences
HE I DI MA E B RAT T
F
or nearly three months, the children are free from a
rigorous school schedule. No homework, no tests,
no stress of the academic life. Summer camp gives
them the opportunity for summer play where they can
experience sports, arts, and even more enrichment and
learning, if they like. Their time spent can be mixed and
matched to their needs. There are so many local op-
tions to explore.
At Kidville in Englewood, young campers up to
6 years old can dip their feet into the world of camp
and become acquainted with all the fun that older-kid
camps offer. For the real little ones, says Bibi Peneva,
one of the owners of Kidville, the program is an oppor-
tunity to learn sensory skills, cognitive skills, gross mo-
tor skills and a host of other things while having fun.
“It’s a great introduction to summer camp for chil-
dren,” says Peneva.
Also in Englewood, for the youngster who wants
academic enrichment presented in a very imaginative
and creative way, The Elisabeth Morrow School offers
a 7-week program — students can take one, two or all
weeks offering youngsters grades 3 to 9 an opportunity
to blend school and camp. For the youngest set, the
program is much like day camp. The older grades get a
choice of academic classes straight up or with a twist,
such as cooking and Lego Robotics.
“None of the kids feel like they’re in school,” says
Liza Hards, director of the school’s auxiliary program.
Shalom Yeladim, with locations in Teaneck, Tenafy
and New York, gives pre-school youngsters an opportu-
nity to learn and have fun. Its program is a creative one
that teaches Jewish culture and ritual with kabbalat
Shabbat and fun holidays, such as Purim in August and
Chanukah in July, says Marina Blyumin, camp owner.
This year is a red-letter year at Ramoquois Day
Camp in Pomona, N.Y., says owner Arthur Kessler, be-
cause it marks the 40th anniversary of the day camp.
On August 2, there will be a big alumni gathering at the
camp. There are 150 second generation campers al-
ready, he says.
With 25 acres, a natural lake, six pools, seven tennis
courts, a 7,000 square-foot dining hall, 1,000 square-foot
newly renovated performing arts center and numerous
courts, felds and cabins for sports and fne arts, Deer
Mountain Day Camp in Pomona, offers the attributes of
a large camp with a small camp feel. Smart, authentic
leadership and an experienced staff create an environ-
ment that is safe and happy.
Bounce U in Paramus offers summer fun for young-
sters who want to experience jumping for joy in its col-
orful and spacious location flled with infatable fun.
Artist Sheryl Intrator, creator of Art for Learning,
which is based in Englewood, runs one of the most
engaging, intense themed art programs, which marry
visits to museums and real-life fashion sites and real
creation of art.
Cresskill Performing Arts Center continues its year-
long offerings during the summer with programs that
inspire youngsters to act, sing, dance, fence and have a
wonderful time.
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor of About Our Children.
Learn more at montclair.edu/gifted
Gifted & Talented Summer Program for Grades 1-11
The Gifted & Talented program at Montclair State offers a wide variety
of courses for high-aptitude students in grades 1-11. Our program
strives to help young scholars discover the joys of lifelong learning.
SUMMER PROGRAM: June 30–July 18 / July 21–August 8
Intellectually passionate.
OurChildren
About
Special Education Consultant,
Advocate, & Tutor
Former Committee on Special Education
Chairperson & NYS Certified Teacher
Ilene Weiss
● CSE Meeting & Annual Review Representation ● IEP Development,
Placement, & Review ● Tutoring ● Direct multisensory instruction in
reading, literacy, & elementary school subjects
prizeteacher@gmail.com ● 845-267-6720



`



Bissli
Family Pack
AOC-10
10
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
ART
Lessons
Art of Excellence Studio
Unlock your Creativity with Classes in
Drawing and Watercolor
Structured Lessons - Relaxed Atmosphere
Fabulous Results!
Age 7 to Adult - All levels of ability
Art Portfolio Preparation Available
Artist, Rina Goldhagen 201-248-4779
www.artofexcellencestudio.com

Two great locations!
Training – Beginner to Premier
• Soccer, Lacrosse, Baseball,
Speed & Quickness and more
• Fall & Winter Leagues – Youth & Adult
• Winter Select Soccer Training
• FC Maximus Elite Soccer Club
• Rising Stars sports classes, ages 3 and up
Birthday Parties, Special events and more
PREMI E R CLUB
Soccer Training – ongoing registration
• FC Maximus Elite Soccer Club
• New! 5v5 Soccer Leagues
• Winter Select Soccer
• Men’s Soccer League – Fall, Winter & Spring
• Goalkeeper Training
Waldwick, NJ
superdomesports.com
201.444.7660
Teaneck, NJ
soccercoliseum.com
201.445.1900
Perfect weather every day
inside or out!
PRE MI E R CL UB
Soccer Institute Academy training Sept. to June
• Become a better player – guaranteed
• Change your game without changing your team.
Winter Sports
About Our Children’s
Guide to Summer Camps
DAY CAMPS
Deer Mountain Day Camp
63 Call Hollow Road
Pomona, NY
845-354-2727
www.deermountaindaycamp.com
With 25 acres, a lake, 6 pools, 7 tennis
courts, 7,000 square-foot dining hall,
1,000 square-foot performing arts cen-
ter, courts, felds and cabins for sports
and fne arts, Deer Mountain offers the
attributes of a large camp with a small
camp feel. Smart, authentic leadership
and experienced staff create an environ-
ment where kids feel comfortable to be
who they are. Expert instructors create
engaging, high quality programs so kids
develop real skills. Parents pick Deer
Mountain because of their experience;
kids love it because of their’s.Please see
our ad on page 8.
,
Camp Ramaquois
20 Mountain Road
Pomona, NY 10970
845-354-1600
845-354-0764
prainone@ramaquois.com
Camp Ramaquois, “A day camp as com-
plete as sleep-away camp,” situated on 44
acres in Rockand County. From adventur-
ous activities to creative arts to athletic
activities, boys and girls, ages 3-15 expe-
rience a traditional day camp program
flled with a variety of stimulating activi-
ties including instructional and general
swim in our eight heated pools, boating
on our 5-acre crystalline lake, tennis,
basketball, volleyball, hockey, softball,
soccer, computers, puppetry, ceramics,
nature, dance drama, special events and
more. We offer an optional Adventure
Trip Program for grades 3-10; optional
overnight trips for grades 6-10. Many air-
conditioned buildings. Please see our ad
on page 12.
,
Camp Veritans
225 Pompton Road
Haledon, NJ
Phone 973-956-1220
Fax 973-956-5751
Passaic County
www.campveritans.com
4 Years-10th grade
June 30-August 22
Counselor to Camper Ratio1:5
Camp Veritans, a Jewish day camp lo-
cated in Haledon, is a camp for children
entering pre-K through 10th grade. We of-
fer a variety of fantastic activities on our
beautiful 64 acre campus including Red
Cross swim instruction, amazing sports,
creative arts, ropes/challenge course,
in addition to daily hot kosher catered
lunches, transportation and so much
more. Specialized Trip & Travel program
for 8th and 9th graders and a comprehen-
sive CIT program for our 10th graders.
Please see our ad on page 11.
,
Carousel Early Learning Center
Summer Camp
200 Third Ave.
Westwood, NJ
201-722-9822
535 Walnut St.
Norwood, NJ
201-767-0784
www.carouselearlylearningcenter.com
Ages 5-8 years
7 a.m.-6 p.m.
Carousel Early Learning Center of West-
wood and Norwood offers a Funtastic
Summer Camp for children. Breakfast,
lunch and snack are included. The camp
curriculum consists of approximately 2-3
feld trips per week. Some of our summer
events are: swimming, sports activites,
weekly feld trips, arts and crafts, magic
shows, pony rides, and much more. Each
day is flled with a variety of exciting ac-
tivities and curriculum. Please see our ad
on page 14 .
,
OurChildren
About
11
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
AOC-11
SHALOM YELADIM
SUMMER 201
J UNE 3 0- AUGUS T 2 2
Marina Blyumin, Director
NURSERY SCHOOL
For more info
or to register:
201.894.8300 or
201.837.0837
• Swimming/Water Play • Animal Centers • Nature Exploration •
• Arts and Crafts • Music and Movement • Weekly Trips • Baking •
• Sports/Gymnastics • Creative Dance • Shabbat Parties •
Our warm and experienced staff is
looking forward to giving your child
a summer to remember!
3CONVENIENT LOCATIONS:
TENAFLY
91 West Clinton Avenue
Tenafly, NJ 07670
shalom.yeladim@hotmail.com
TEANECK LOCATIONS:
815 Prince Street
1650 Palisade Avenue
Teaneck, NJ 07666
shalomyeladim@optonline.net
shalomyeladim.com
Registration for 2014/2015
school year is now open.
For infants
through
5-year-olds.
Register today!
AD DESIGN: JULIE FARKAS GRAPHIC DESIGN • JULIE@JULIEFARKAS.COM
Join us for an exciting summer experience.
4
The Neil Klatskin Day Camp
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
201-567-8963
www.jccotp.org
Ages 3-11 years
June 24-August 16
9 a.m.-4 p.m.
(extended care available)
For more information on all Day Camp
programs, call 201-567-8963.
NKDC offers a summer of adventure
and nonstop fun. Our beautiful 21-acre
campus in Tenafy and 600-acre campus
in Alpine provide the perfect backdrop
for your camper to enjoy the outdoors,
learn new skills, make new friends and
explore their personal interests. With
dynamic, age-appropriate programming
including sports, Red Cross instructional
and recreational swim, art, music, Ju-
daic programming, fun theme days and
much more, your camper will be sure to
have an incredible summer to remember.
Membership to the Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades required for NKDC enrollment.
Families who have never been a member
can join for just $250. Membership good
for June, July and August 2014. Restric-
tions apply.
Camp Katan
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 East Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
201-408-1433
www.jccotp.org
Ages 24-35 months
Mon-Fri or Mon, Wed, Fri,
July 23-August 15
9:15-11:30 a.m.
A separation preparation camp provid-
ing all the fun of day camp in an ideal
setting for young children to get used to
being on their own. Program highlights
include daily indoor and outdoor play,
art, music, water activities, story time,
singing, puppetry, and a scheduled visit
from a petting zoo. A parent or caregiver
stays with each child until the separation
process is complete.
Can’t Wait for Summer
School Mini-Camp
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Call Franci, 201-408-1435
or Sheli, 201-408-1436.
www.jccotp.org
Ages 2-5 Years (As of Oct. 15, 2013)
June 17-21, Monday-Friday
9 a.m.-2 p.m./4 p.m./6 p.m. (4 p.m. on
Fridays)
Join us for a fabulous transition into sum-
mer, before other day camp options be-
gin. Our mini-camp for pre-schoolers fea-
tures sport of all kinds, arts and crafts,
swim and water play, live entertainment,
outdoor activities, snacks and more. Pre-
registration required with a minimum of
10 children to run the programs. Bring a
kosher nut free lunch. Extended hours
available. Pre-registration required.
,
Shalom Yeladim
815 Prince St. and 1650 Palisade Ave.
Teaneck, NJ
91 W. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
201-894-8300 or 201-837-0837
www.shalomyeladim.com
shalomyeladim@optonline.net
Infants through 5-years-old
June 30-August22
A warm, safe and fun environment for
children 5-years-old and younger. We
have many activities: swimming/water
play; nature exploration; arts and crafts;
music and movement; baking; sports/
gymnastics; creative dance; and shabbat
parties. See our ad on page 11.
,
SLEEP-AWAY CAMPS
Camp Pocono Trails
(New Image Weight Loss)
Reeder, PA
800-365-0556
www.newimagecamp.com
For ages 7-18
At Camp Pocono Trails, kids have the op-
portunity to lose weight, gain self-esteem,
and have fun, all in a non-threatening,
stress-free environment. Located in the
Pocono Mountains just 90 minutes from
New York City. Pocono Trails’ 350-acre
facility features two separate swimming
pools (boys/girls), climbing wall, golf
course. Other activities include drama,
arts and crafts, a wide range of sports, as
well as ftness and nutrition classes.
,
PROGRAMS FOR TEENS
Teen Adventures Travel Camp
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Alexis Robins 201-408-1470
arobins@jccotp.org
www.jccotp.org
Monday-Friday
June 23-July 25
This exciting fve-week program for teens
features daily trips to amusement parks,
water parks, beaches, baseball games,
trips into Manhattan and more! This sum-
mer, the program will feature two com-
munity service days every week, a two-
night trip to Lake George, and an amazing
extended trip to Los Angeles, California.
Volunteering for Teens (ages 12 & up)
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Alexis Robins 201-408-1470
arobins@jccotp.org
www.jccotp.org
Teens can spend a meaningful and re-
warding summer at the JCC as a camp
volunteer and earn community service
hours. Volunteer opportunities are avail-
able in many departments.
Counselor-in-Training Program
The Neil Klatskin Day Camp
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Alexis Robins 201-408-1470
arobins@jccotp.org
www.jccotp.org
Teens Entering Grade 10
Call for details.
Teens have an incredible opportunity to
develop the skills and experience they
need to become future camp counselors
and form close relationships with other
teens in a leadership capacity.
,
AOC-12
12
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
• Learn from the Pros
• Meet sports celebrities
• Make play-by-play &
reporting tapes
• Make sports anchor tapes from
a TV studio and much more!
For more info call
800.319.0884 or visit
www.playbyplaycamps.com
Nation’s
#1 Sports
Broadcasting
Camp!
Nation’s
#1 Sports
Broadcasting
Camp!
SPORTS BROADCASTING CAMP!
is back for our 9th season in North Jersey

Boys & Girls 10-18
Day/Overnight
options available
7   July 7-11, 2014
Facebook.com/sportsbroadcastingcamps
Youtube.com/sportsbroadcastcamp
ENRICHMENT CAMPS
Bounce U
70 Eisenhower Dr.
Paramus, NJ
201-843-5880
BounceU.com/Paramus
Ages 4-11
Weekly Programs Starting
July 8-August 28
Tuesday-Thursday from 9:00a.m.-3p.m.
Create and Bounce is an art camp for
children that combines exciting art proj-
ects with structured physical activities.
Children will work on a different fun art
and craft project each day from canvas
painting to clay. With its unique blend of
upbeat exercises and dedicated time for
painting and projects, Create and Bounce
offers an experience that’s healthy, men-
tally engaging, and seriously fun. We
also bring in some spectacular special
guests — from magicians and performers
to traveling petting zoos — and change
lesson themes each week in order to en-
sure that every day at Create and Bounce
is distinctly different. Each weekly ses-
sion is three-days and is offered for eight
consecutive weeks this summer. Lunch
is provided. Create and Bounce Summer
Art Camp includes: different art and craft
project each day; games and activities;
guest performers; daily snacks and lunch-
es; offcial camp T-shirt; well-trained staff
of camp counselors and experienced art
instructor; secure, climate-controlled
facility. Now enrolling for summer 2014.
See our ad on page 13.
,
EMS Explorations
The Elisabeth Morrow School
435 Lydecker Street
Englewood, NJ
201-568-5566, ext. 7150
www.elisabethmorrow.org
Ages 3-grade 6
June 23-August 8
EMS Explorations, the summer program
of the Elisabeth Morrow School, offers
a unique blend of camp and school,
with a wide variety of choices to stretch
a child’s imagination, intellect, and
muscles. The 14-acre wooded campus,
playgrounds, playing felds, science and
computer labs provide just the right set-
ting for learning and recreation. Children
from age 3 through grade 1 explore their
world through games, movement, music,
stories, water play, drama, and arts and
crafts. Students in grades 2-6 investigate
special interests, develop concepts, and
extend skills in mathematics, reading,
writing, science, technology, and more. In
the afternoon, students make daily choic-
es, which include sports, arts and crafts,
technology, cooking, science, and other
activities. Please see our ad on page 7.
,
iD Tech Camps
Held at Vassar, Sarah Lawrence, NYU,
and 80+ prestigious universities nation-
wide
Ages 7-17
Please check website for costs and
dates
8:1 ratios
1-888-709-TECH (8324)
iDTech.com
Take interests further and gain a com-
petitive edge! Create apps, video games,
C++/Java programs, movies, and more
at weeklong day and overnight summer
programs. Held at Vassar, Sarah Law-
rence, NYU, Columbia, Stanford, and oth-
ers. Also 2-week, pre-college programs
for ages 13-18. Please see our ad on page
13.
OurChildren
About
Name _________________________________________________________________
Street _________________________________________________________________
City/State/Zip ___________________________________________________________
Phone _________________________________________________________________
Email ___________________________________________________________
Mail to: Jewish Standard, 1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666
or fax to: 201-833-4959 by February 17, 2014.
*By entering this contest you agree to have your
name added to the Jewish Standard e-mail newsletter list.
Enter to Win
A $30 Gift Certificate
For Playtime
at
Englewood
One winner will be chosen in a random drawing
from all entries received by February 17, 2014
AOC-13
• Giant Slides
• Obstacle Course
• Air Cannon Alley
• Sports Arena
• Giant indoor inflatables
• Private bounce and party rooms
• Hassle-free, easy to plan!
• Dedicated party pros
• Clean, safe and secure
• We clean up!
• Open Bounce
• Create & Bounce Art Camps
• Field Trips
• Class and Team Parties
• Fundraisers and more!
Thrilling New Rides!
Birthday Parties!
Beyond Birthdays! Air Cannon Alley
Spider Mountain
Obstacle Course


N
ewer, Better, M
o
re Spectacular!
• Giant Spider
Mountain
and Slide
• And More!
Paramus • (201) 843-5880
BounceU.com/paramus
/BounceUofParamus
All new
experience!
70 Eisenhower Drive • Paramus, NJ 07652
KOSHER
AVAILABLE
Tech Camps
held at Vassar,
Sarah Lawrence, NYU,
and 80+ Universities
Ages 7-18
iDTech.com
1-888-709-TECH (8324)
from age 3 through grade 1 explore their
world through games, movement, music,
stories, water play, drama, and arts and
crafts. Students in grades 2-6 investigate
special interests, develop concepts, and
extend skills in mathematics, reading,
writing, science, technology, and more. In
the afternoon, students make daily choic-
es, which include sports, arts and crafts,
technology, cooking, science, and other
activities. Please see our ad on page 7.
,
iD Tech Camps
Held at Vassar, Sarah Lawrence, NYU,
and 80+ prestigious universities nation-
wide
Ages 7-17
Please check website for costs and
dates
8:1 ratios
1-888-709-TECH (8324)
iDTech.com
Take interests further and gain a com-
petitive edge! Create apps, video games,
C++/Java programs, movies, and more
at weeklong day and overnight summer
programs. Held at Vassar, Sarah Law-
rence, NYU, Columbia, Stanford, and oth-
ers. Also 2-week, pre-college programs
for ages 13-18. Please see our ad on page
13.
iD Programming Academy
Held at NYU, Stanford, Princeton,
and select universities
Ages 13-18
Please check website for costs and
dates
8:1 ratios
1-888-709-TECH (8324)
iDProgrammingAcademy.com
Gain a competitive edge and learn how
programming can become a college
degree and even a rewarding career.
2-week, pre-college summer programs in
programming, app development, and ro-
botics engineering. Held at top universi-
ties including NYU, Princeton, Stanford,
and others. Also weeklong programming
and robotics camps for ages 7-17 held
at iD Tech Camps. Please see our ad on
page 13.
iD Game Design & Development
Academy
Held at Vassar, Stanford, Harvard,
and select universities
Ages 13-18
Please check website for costs and
dates
8:1 ratios
1-888-709-TECH (8324)
iDGameDevAcademy.com
Instead of just playing games, design and
develop your own. Two-week, pre-college
summer programs in design, develop-
ment, programming, and 3D modeling.
Held at top universities including Vassar,
Harvard, Stanford, and others. Learn
how game development can lead to a
rewarding career. Also weeklong game
design and development camps for ages
7-17 held at iD Tech Camps. Please see
our ad on page 13.
iD Film Academy
Held at NYU, Yale, and UC Berkeley
Ages 13-18
Please check website for costs and
dates
8:1 ratios
1-888-709-TECH (8324)
iDFilmAcademy.com
Put your creativity to use while exploring
NYU and using NYC as your flm or pho-
tography backdrop. Pre-college summer
programs where ages 13-18 discover how
visual arts can lead to a rewarding career.
Held at NYU, Yale, or UC Berkeley. Also
weeklong flm and photography camps
for ages 7-17 held at iD Tech Camps.
Please see our ad on page 13.
,
Kidville
20 Grand Avenue
Englewood, NJ
201-266-0633
www.kidville.com/englewood
18-24 months: 2 or 3 days per week
2 years: 2 or 3 days per week
3-5 years: 5 days per week
Counselor to camper ratio: 4 to 1
2-Week, 8-Week, 12-Week, and
16-Week Sessions starting May 12
Camp Kidville is THE place for learning,
playing, and making new friends! Each
small camp group participates in devel-
opmentally appropriate activities in gym,
music, art, exploration and more. Weekly
themes such as The Wild Wild West and
Safari Adventure set the stage for sports
and movement games, live jam sessions
with a Kidville musician, take-home
art projects, interactive story time and
dramatic play in our state-of-the-art air
conditioned facility. No sweltering heat,
no sunburns, just an amazing line-up of
exciting and structured Kidville activities
all summer long! See our ad on page 19.
,
Montclair State University
Gifted and Talented Summer Camp
1 Normal Ave
Montclair, NJ
973-655-4104
Fax 973-655-7895
Students who have completed K-11
www.montclair.edu/gifted
Counselor to Camper ratio: 1:10
Session I: June 30-July 18
(no class July 4)
Session II: July 21-August 8
The summer program provides high-
achieving students, in grades 1-11, the
opportunity to immerse themselves in
an educational environment focusing on
mathematics, science, technology, fne
and performing arts, English, and the
humanities, as well as enjoying activi-
ties such as swimming and tennis. The
summer course schedule and application
will be available in February. Registration
deadline for Session I is May 16; Session
II is June 13. Please see our ad on page 9.
,
Sports Broadcasting Camp
1420 Walnut Street, Suite 605
Philadelphia, PA
800-319-0884
www.playbyplaycamps.com
Boys & Girls Ages 10-18
July 7-11
The Sports Broadcasting Camp is located
on the campus of Montclair State College
in Montclair this summer. Learn from the
pros. Meet sports celebrities; make play-
by-play, sports anchor, and reporting
tapes. Participate in mock sports talk ra-
dio and PTI-style shows, and much more.
Please see our ad on page 12.
,
ARTS, PERFORMANCE AND
MUSIC CAMPS
Art for Learning, LLC
Englewood area, NJ
artforlearning@yahoo.com
http://www.artforlearning.com/
201-503-9796
Art grades 1-10
Fashion grades 4-10
Teen Travel grades 7-10
June 23-August 22
Programs include various age appropri-
ate levels of Impressionist, Modern, Co-
lonial and Victorian Art. Other programs
are taught for specifc age groups, like Art
of China and Japan, Mosaic and Glass Art,
Princess Experience. All art programs
are taught based on history and sociol-
ogy, music and poetry of time is some-
times introduced. Excerpts from books
are required for the Jewish Immigrant
Experience, and Greek and Roman Art,
which are based on Percy Jackson and
the Lightning Thief book. Younger kids
programs focus on dinosaurs and fsh,
African zoo animals and farm animals.
AOC-14
14
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
Westwood
200 Third Ave.
201-722-9822
Norwood
535 Walnut St.
201-767-0784
Also includes:
• Swimming
• Sports Activities
• Weekly Field Trips
• Arts and Crafts
• Planned Weekly Events:
Magic Shows, Pony Rides
& Much More……
SUMMER
CAMP
at both locations!
Call for details!
WWW.CAROUSELEARLYLEARNINGCENTER.COM
• Programs from 8 weeks - 5 years. We ofer
a year-round full and half day program.
• Hours of operation 7 a.m. - 6 p.m.
• Breakfast and Lunch included.
• Age-appropriate curriculum.
• State-of-the-art security system.
• Fully enclosed age-appropriate soft surface
playground
• On-site enrichment program. Dance, Tae Kwon Do,
Music, Yoga and Swimming (Norwood).
• All our staf are CPR and First Aid Certifed.
Each art program includes two trips to
related venues like the Metropolitan Mu-
seum followed by art lessons in Central
Park, Victorian mansions, Ellis Island,
etc. Fashion programs begin from design
concept through retail, with trips to the
garment district showrooms, meetings
with fashion designers, marketing, and
merchandising experts, lectures at FIT,
and more. Kids have the chance to create
fashion-related artwork and products.
Teen Travel includes fve days of visits
to NBC Studios, Empire State Building
Skyride, Brooklyn Bridge, South Street
Seaport, Madame Tussauds, and more!
Discount offered for early enrollment.
Please see our ad page 15.
,
Cresskill Performing Arts
300 Knickerbocker Road, Suite 1100
Cresskill, NJ
201-390-7513 and 201-266-8830
www.cresskillperformingarts.com
Toddlers-adults (studio)
Age 3-teens (camp programs)
April “Break” Performing Arts Mini Camp
April 14-18. Half and full day camp avail-
able. Dancing, Acting, Singing, Art/Crafts,
Yoga and more. Be productive, busy,
happy and challenged during the school
break! Our expanded program includes
Once Upon a Time (reading readiness/
crafts class for age 4- 7) and Kids Concoc-
tions to Make and Take (designer crafts
for age 8 and up). Activities include bal-
let, jazz, tap, modern, hip-hop, theater
dance, voice/musical theater, acting,
improv workshop, fencing (sword fght-
ing), yoga, on camera workshop and
more! Cresskill Performing Arts’ teach-
ers are extraordinary: on Broadway now,
in Jay-Z videos, and in “Cirque” shows!
Camp runs from June 30 through August
29, 2014. Register for one week, two, or
all summer, and we have camp for ages
3 through teens. Early drop-off and late
pick-up to help working parents. Fencing
Camp will be two weeks this summer the
week of June and the week of August 25.
Beginners as well as more experienced
fencers will get stronger and try all the
weapons in our popular fencing experi-
ence! And our Creative Legos Workshops
return for the month of July, for age
5-10. Families can also win a free week
of Summer Camp! Our annual Summer
Performing Arts Camp Scholarship Con-
test is running through March 31, 2014.
Children age 3 through teens create an
art project illustrating their passion for
the arts. Three winners will each receive
a free week of camp this summer! Sub-
missions should be sent to the studio ad-
dress above. Please see our ad page 15.
,
2014 Maccabi ArtsFest
August 17-22
Call Sara Sideman 201-408-1469
ssideman@jccotp.org
Jewish Teens ages 13-17
Detroit, Michigan
Spend a week with Jewish teens from all
over the world in amazing art specialty
workshops, with a large fnal perfor-
mance and arts showcase. Disciplines in-
clude acting/improv, culinary, dance, mu-
sical theater, rock band, star reporters,
visual arts, vocal music/glee… and more!
Center Stage Musical Theater Camp
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades/
School of Performing Arts
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Ingbal 201-408-1493
www.jccotp.org
Available to members grades 4-9 and
non-members grades 6-9
Monday-Friday, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Session 1: June 27-July 11
Show: July 13 at 6 p.m.
Session 2: July 14-July 25
Show: July 27 at 6 p.m.
Featuring: South Pacifc Passport — com-
bines three of Rogers & Hammerstein’s
popular shows (South Pacifc, The King
and I and Flower Drum Song). An excel-
lent opportunity for students of all levels
to experience the fun of performing at a
very high level. Each session ends with
a Broadway style musical with sets, cos-
tumes, challenging dialogue and big mu-
sical numbers. Daily schedule includes
workshops in acting, improvisation,
stage combat, movement and singing, as
well as an end-of-the-day swim.
Summer Dance Intensive
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades/
School of Performing Arts
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Allyson 201-408-1495
www.jccotp.org
Ages 6-16
Monday-Thursday August 11-21
10:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Performance: Thursday, Aug. 21, 5:30
p.m.
Four days a week of basic technique that
explores all the latest crazes and new
dance forms. Students take class in bal-
let, tap, and jazz each day of camp as
well as an elective such as hip hop, lyri-
cal, modern, musical theater, acrobatics,
salsa, and ballroom. Improve your skill
level, build strength, and gain more fex-
ibility while having a great time. Dance
Camp is available to JCC members of all
ages and JCC nonmembers ages 11+.
BergenPAC-JCC Summer
Performance Intensive
Joseph A. Baker, director
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
201-408-1493
www.jccotp.org
Ages 9-17
July 2-July 20
9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
An exciting program for intermediate-
advanced students that culminates in at
least two performances. Professional skill
development in singing, acting, sketch
comedy and movement. This cabaret-
style performance features favorite num-
bers from Broadway musicals, sketch
comedy, short scenes and popular rock
songs as well as new pieces. The director,
Joseph A. Baker, is a highly successful
Broadway music director/accompanist,
with performances in Wicked, Shrek, The
Lion King, Little Shop of Horrors, and
many other shows.
Little Dancers’ Camp!
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
201-408-1495
www.jccotp.org
Ages 3-5
Monday-Friday
June 16-June 20
& August 18-August 29
9 a.m.-3 p.m. (JCC members only)
A fun-flled week of dance and camp ac-
tivities including creative movement, bal-
let, tap, hip hop, and jazz, as well as arts
and crafts time, fun on the playground,
splash time in the waterpark, lunch
break and rest/video time. Our teachers
are experienced dance teachers with a
warm, caring approach in the classroom.
Extended care available until 5 p.m. upon
request. Call Allyson at 201-408-1495.
Thurnauer Chamber Music Camp
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades/
Thurnauer School of Music
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
201-408-1465
www.jccotp.org
Ages 8-18
Monday-Friday, July 7-11
9:15 a.m.-3 p.m.
OurChildren
About
AOC-15
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
15
FASHION PROGRAM Grades 4–11
Visit fabulous show rooms in the Garment District
and backstage of Broadway shows. Meet with fashion
designers, marketing & merchandising experts, and
perfume manufacturers. Lectures at FIT and more!
Great projects! Two trips per week.
June 23 through August 22
Weekly Sessions at our Englewood Location
TEEN TRAVEL Grades 7–11
Daily trips into popular NYC tourist sites, NBC Studios,
Brooklyn Bridge, Empire State Building and more!
Grade 2nd - 9th
Age Appropriate Art & Fashion Design Programs
Available in Weekly sessions at Our Englewood Location
Book Now! Call
art for learning
201-503-9796 or
E-mail: artforlearning@yahoo.com
Impressionist • Modern • Victorian Art of China and Japan - 4 levels of Fashion
Painting in Central Park • Trips to Museums & Mansions
Visit Garment District Show Rooms
Visit Backstage at Broadway Show to Learn About Costume Design
Teen Tours - Visit Great Sites in New York
june 26
th
thru august 18
th
art, fashion or teen programs
ART PROGRAMS Grades 1–10
www.artforlearning.com
Impressionism • Modern • Victorian • Mosaic Art
Te Princess Experience • China & Japan • Greek & Roman Art
Colonial Art • Jewish Immigrant Experience
Farm, Zoo, Dinosaurs & Fish • Two Trips Per Week
Grade 2nd - 9th
Age Appropriate Art & Fashion Design Programs
Available in Weekly sessions at Our Englewood Location
Book Now! Call
art for learning
201-503-9796 or
E-mail: artforlearning@yahoo.com
Impressionist • Modern • Victorian Art of China and Japan - 4 levels of Fashion
Painting in Central Park • Trips to Museums & Mansions
Visit Garment District Show Rooms
Visit Backstage at Broadway Show to Learn About Costume Design
Teen Tours - Visit Great Sites in New York
june 26
th
thru august 18
th
art, fashion or teen programs
Grade 2nd - 9th
Age Appropriate Art & Fashion Design Programs
Available in Weekly sessions at Our Englewood Location
Book Now! Call
art for learning
201-503-9796 or
E-mail: artforlearning@yahoo.com
Impressionist • Modern • Victorian Art of China and Japan - 4 levels of Fashion
Painting in Central Park • Trips to Museums & Mansions
Visit Garment District Show Rooms
Visit Backstage at Broadway Show to Learn About Costume Design
Teen Tours - Visit Great Sites in New York
june 26
th
thru august 18
th
art, fashion or teen programs
, LLC
Grade 2nd - 9th
Age Appropriate Art & Fashion Design Programs
Available in Weekly sessions at Our Englewood Location
Book Now! Call
art for learning
201-503-9796 or
E-mail: artforlearning@yahoo.com
Impressionist • Modern • Victorian Art of China and Japan - 4 levels of Fashion
Painting in Central Park • Trips to Museums & Mansions
Visit Garment District Show Rooms
Visit Backstage at Broadway Show to Learn About Costume Design
Teen Tours - Visit Great Sites in New York
june 26
th
thru august 18
th
art, fashion or teen programs
, LLC
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Arìs
300 Knickerbocker Rd · Cresskill
Once Upon a Time • Creative Legos
studio-info@cresskillperformingarts.com
www.cresskillperformingarts.com
201-390-7513 · 201-266-8830
Reserve your space now!
New! Acting/Theater Games,
age 6 - 9
April "Break" Camp is coming!
April 14 - 18
Summer Camp Programs
Performing Arts • Fencing • Legos
June 25 - August 24
Call for Information
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READERS’
CHOICE
2013
TOP 3
DANCE SCHOOLS
Chamber Music Camp brings to-
gether talented young musicians
and an acclaimed faculty of art-
ists and educators to experience
the joys of ensemble playing in an
atmosphere of success and enjoy-
ment. The camp accepts a select
group of string players and pianists
based on auditions, interviews and
recommendations.
FluteStars® Camp
Noelle Perrin, Director
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades/
Thurnauer School of Music
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
201-408-1465
flutestars@aol.com
Monday-Friday, August25-29
8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Flutestars® Camp is for interme-
diate and advanced futists. Daily
schedule includes masterclass-style
lessons, private practice time, and
small and large ensemble rehears-
als. Emphasis will be on develop-
ment of good tone and refned tech-
nique. The rehearsal schedule is
mixed with free time for socializing
and recreation. This exciting week
culminates with a fnal concert in
which futists will perform solos, du-
ets, trios, and large ensemble music.
Tuition includes lunches, snacks,
daily swim, and camp T-shirt.
Private Instrumental Instruction
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades/
Thurnauer School of Music
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
201-408-1465
www.jccotp.org
All ages welcome. Current students
continue their progress, while new
students begin private study.
,
SPECIAL NEEDS SUMMER
PROGRAMS
Neil Klatskin Day Camp Tikvah
Program
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
201- 567-8963
www.jccotp.org
Ages 5-15
June 23-August 15,
9 a.m.-4 p.m. (extended care avail-
able)
Children with special needs partici-
pate in a diverse full-day program
including academic remediation,
adaptive physical education, arts
and crafts, Red Cross instructional
and recreational swim, Judaic pro-
gramming, music, theme days, live
entertainment, extended nights,
carnivals, playground time, Shabbat
and more. Group sizes range from
3 to 6 campers and are staffed by a
minimum of two caring and quali-
fed counselors. Intake interview
required.
On Our Own
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Call Shelley at 201.408.1489
www.jccotp.org
Ages 15-30
June 30-August 8
9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
On Our Own summer program is a
six week life skills, vocational and
recreational program for teens and
young adults with intellectual and
developmental delays, including
autism, with self-help skills to in-
dependently participate within a
1:3 staffng ratio. Activities include
work experiences, weekly trips,
swim, gym, music and dance. Door-
to-door transportation is available
within a 15 mile radius in Bergen
County only. We are a qualifed New
Jersey Department of Human Ser-
vices Division of Children & Fami-
lies (DCF), PerformCare provider
and a qualifed New Jersey Division
of Developmental Disabilities (DDD)
provider and accept payments from
other service agency providers as
well as sending school districts. Fi-
nancial aid and scholarships avail-
able. Intake interview required.
Camp Haverim
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Call Shelley at 201-408-1489
www.jccotp.org
Ages 3-21
August 11-22
9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. (extended care
available)
Camp Haverim is a two week camp
for children and teens with au-
tism and other cognitive and de-
velopmental delays, who attend
11 months of special schooling.
Campers participate in social skills
training, swimming and water park
activities, adaptive physical educa-
tion, music, art, dance, academic
enrichment and more! Group siz-
es are between 4 and 8 campers.
Groups are staffed by experienced
professionals, university students
and teen volunteers. New camper
intake interview is required. We are
a qualifed New Jersey Department
of Human Services Division of Chil-
dren & Families (DCF), PerformCare
provider and accept payments from
other service agency providers as
well as sending school districts. Fi-
nancial aid and scholarships avail-
able. Sponsored in part through the
MindWorks Charitable Family Trust,
the Hana and Stanley Goldberg, MD,
Endowment Fund for Camp Haver-
im, and the Ronald L. and Meryl
Gallatin Camp Haverim Scholarship
Endowment Fund. Intake interview
required. .
School’s Out! Special Services
Mini Camp FunDays
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
201-408-1489
www.jccotp.org
Ages 8-21
Tues-Thurs, June 25-27
9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Children and teens with autism and
other cognitive and developmental
delays enjoy gym, swim, art, music,
movies and more prior to the start
of the extended school year. Con-
tact Shelley Levy, Director for Spe-
cial Services, 201-408-1489.
Summer PALS After School
Program
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
201-408-1489
www.jccotp.org
Ages 8-21
Monday-Thursday, July 8-Aug 1
2:30-5 p.m.
Promotes activities and life skills for
youth and teens who are conversa-
tionally verbal, social and have self-
help skills to independently partici-
pate in activities such as life skills
and computers, as well as swim,
yoga, cooking, soccer, ftness, music
and more.
Camp Dream Street: The Pearl
Seiden Summer Program for
Children with Cancer and other
Blood Disorders
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Call Lisa at 201.408.1455
Ages 4-14
Monday-Friday, August 18-22
9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Free
A special camp experience serving
the social needs of children with
cancer and other blood disorders.
Activities includes arts and crafts,
sports, dance, nature, krav maga,
baking, music, swimming and en-
tertainment. Round-trip transpor-
tation, light breakfast and a deli-
cious lunch are provided each day.
Siblings are invited to participate.
Sponsored by the Dream Street
Foundation, Children’s Hospital of
New York Presbyterian, Tomorrows
Children’s Institute of Hackensack
University Medical Center, St. Jo-
seph’s Children Hospital, Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades, Beatman
Foundation, RD Legal Funding, LLC
and Jenna’s Rainbow Foundation.
Call Lisa at 201.408.1455.
Toddler Mommy & Me
Socialization Group
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
201-408-1455
www.jccotp.org
Ages 2-3
Tuesdays & Thursdays
July 8-August 13
9:30-11 a.m.
The goal of this comprehensive pro-
gram is to facilitate age-appropriate
play, social interaction and increase
communication skills. Parents are
provided guidance for entering the
preschool years. The program in-
cludes structured group activities
such as art, music, story time, and
other sensory motor activities.
Therapeutic Nursery
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Lois Mendelson, Director
201-408-1497
www.jccotp.org
Ages 3-6
Monday-Friday
July 7-August 15
9:30-11 a.m. or 12:30-3 p.m.
TN@jccotp.org
Developmental Language based par-
Coming Next Month
Pregnancy & Birth
To advertise
call 201-837-8818
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
AOC-16
16
Rockland
Pediatric Dental P.C.
Ralph L. Berk, DDS, FAAPD
Dorit Hermann-Chasen, DMD
Anne Chaly, DDS · Karan Estwick, DDS
Dentistry, Infancy thru Adolescence and Special Needs
George Pliakas, DDS, MS and
Eleni Michailidis, DDS, MS
Orthodontics for Children and Adults
238 N. Main St., New City, NY · 845-634-8900
www.rocklandpediatricdental.com
COMPLIMENTARY ORTHODONTIC EVALUATION
FOR ADULTS AND CHILDREN
Bissli
Family Pack
ent/child program for bright preschool children ages 3-6
with a variety of developmental challenges including
communication and language disorders, ADD/HD, high
functioning autism, emotional and behavior problems
(including selective mutism). The curriculum focuses
primarily on social skills and emotional and behavioral
regulation. Limited availability. JCC membership is NOT
required to attend. Admission to the program requires
the Director’s approval.
,
SPORTS PROGRAMS/CAMPS
adidas Tennis Camps at Ramapo College
1700 Post Road, Suite D-5
Fairfield, CT
800-944-7112
Fax 203-254-0259
www.tenniscamper.com
Ages 8-18
June 22-27; June 29-July 4; July 6-11; July 13-18; July
20-25; July 27-August 1; August 3-8
Counselor to Camper Ratio: 1-6
Deadline for registration: June 22
The adidas Tennis Camps were developed to provide
athletes an opportunity to become better tennis play-
Are there staff certifed in
lifesaving, present during water
activities?
When inquiring about camp
cost, ask about additional fees.
Some day camps have a base price
but charge extra for trips, special
events and activities. If money is
tight, ask about a scholarship pro-
gram. Also inquire about a refund
policy in the event of an illness or
family emergency.
Finally arrange a pre-visit. Dur-
ing this time you may receive medi-
cal and emergency contact forms to
fll out. This is a time to be thorough
and specifc about medications, al-
lergies and the like. Equally impor-
tant is to share other concerns with
camp staff, such as if your family
is going through a divorce or has
experienced a recent death as this
may affect how your child interacts
throughout the day. Remember
camps look out for the physical and
emotional needs of your child so
the more information you provide,
the better equipped they will be.
Another form you will need to fll
out is for emergency contact. While
it is imperative to have an appoint-
ed individual, equally important is
that the person knows she is des-
ignated as such. Every year camps
have situations where they call the
emergency contact person listed
and she was not informed she was
such. The best advice is to check
with that individual before writing
the name down.
During your visit, the camp
should give you materials on camp
policies, procedures and planned
activities. Talk with you child about
these. If she cannot participate in
an activity due to health reasons,
make sure you (not your child) in-
form the camp.
In recent years, some day
camps have developed strict poli-
cies regarding technology items
and ask that cell phones, hand-
held games and other tech toys be
left at home. If restricted items are
brought to camp, they may be con-
fscated and returned at the end of
the day in hopes the child under-
stands to leave it at home.
Sometime before camp starts
stock up on supplies your child will
need. When purchasing the items,
pick up a permanent marker so you
can label all items going to camp.
Include your child’s name, address
and phone number so the staff will
recognize whom it belongs to if it is
left behind. This also avoids confu-
sion if two children bring identical
items.
While you are shopping, talk
with your child about the type
of clothing he will need to wear.
Make sure he is dressed for com-
fort, safety and appropriate tem-
peratures. Another thing to avoid
is clothing with strings attached as
they may get caught on play equip-
ment. Proper shoes are important
too, particularly if she is playing
outside. Avoid strappy sandals and
fip-fops; opt for tennis shoes.
Each night before your child
goes to camp, place a plastic water
bottle in the freezer and a second
one in the refrigerator. The next
morning send both bottles to camp.
The refrigerated one can be used in
the morning and the frozen one will
melt and provide cool refreshment
in the afternoon heat. Spray bottles
are a great idea too. They keep the
face and body cool in the hot sun.
Before leaving for camp, ap-
ply sunscreen to your child’s skin
and send along the tube for later
reapplication. You may even want
to send along a hat for extra pro-
tection. If your child is going to be
in a natural environment, apply
insect repellent. Look for a lotion
form that is safe for children; avoid
sprays. Follow up with a tick check
when your child comes home.
Make sure your child gets plen-
ty of rest each night before camp
and is up early the next morning so
he isn’t rushed getting out the door.
Keep the line of communication
open and talk about camp before
it even starts. Reassure your child
of the positive experience he will
have. Above all, encourage your
child to always do his best, obey
the rules, be respectful of others
and have a great time.
Denise Yearian is the former editor
of two parenting magazines and the
mother of three children.
Adventures from page 8
ers in a fun, positive atmosphere.
Our campers learn from the best
coaches in the sport and leave ten-
nis camp with a confdence and a
passion to enjoy the “sport of a life-
time.” Join us this summer for bet-
ter tennis, new friends, and the best
week of the summer. Please see our
ad on page 10.
,
2014 JCC Maccabi Games
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Keri Thoren 201-408-1476
kthoren@jccotp.org
www.jccotp.org
Jewish teens ages 13-16
Detroit, Michigan, August 17-22
Spend a week with Jewish teens
from all over the world competing
in a Jewish Junior Olympics style
event. Sports include boys basket-
ball, boys baseball, boys/girls ten-
nis, boys/girls soccer, boys/girls
dance, boys/girls bowling, boys/
girls swim and table tennis. Please
see our ad on page 10.
,
JCC Sports Camp: Marty Perlman
Sports School
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Call Joe 201-.408-1446.
www.jccotp.org
Ages 3 & 4 and Grades K-6
Monday-Friday
August 18-29
9 a.m.-3 p.m. (Extended Care avail-
able until 5 p.m.)
Build fundamental skills across a
variety of sports. This multi-sport
camp utilizes all the JCC’s sports
courts and felds and ends each day
in our beautiful outdoor pool. Ap-
propriate for all skill levels, a great
way to learn and improve skills in a
relaxed and fun environment. Week-
ly options available. (JCC members
only.)
The Michelle Weiss Children’s
Tennis Camp
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Joe 201-408-1446
www.jccotp.org
Grades 2-High School
June 23-August 8
9 a.m.-3 p.m. (Extended Care avail-
able until 5 p.m.)
Enhance your child’s understanding
of the game and build confdence
through interactive games and
drills. Campers also enjoy an end-
of-the day swim, the perfect way to
end a day on the courts. Weekly op-
tions available. (JCC members only.)
JCC Super Soccer Stars Camp
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Joe 201-408-1446
www.jccotp.org
Ages 3 & 4 and Grades K-6
Monday-Friday
June 16-20, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
(Extended Care available until 5
p.m.)
Have fun with Super Soccer Stars
in a program designed to teach and
strengthen soccer skills. Enhance
your child’s understanding of the
game and build confdence through
interactive games and drills. (JCC
members only.)
JCC Basketball Camp
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Joe 201-408-1446
www.jccotp.org
Grades 2-High School
June 23-August 8
9 a.m.-3 p.m. (Extended Care avail-
able until 5 p.m.)
Join our basketball professionals
all summer long at our week-long
program designed to teach and en-
hance your child’s basketball skills
at every level. Basketball will be our
focus, but campers will also enjoy
our state-of-the-art water park and
pools, as well as numerous other
fun activities that the JCC has to of-
fer. Weekly options available. (JCC
members only.)
,
Infants · Toddlers · Pre-K
4 Extended Hours
4 Reasonably Priced
4Dynamic Curriculum
4 Creative Art, Music and
Gymnastics Sessions
4Certified Teachers
NOW CELEBRATING 24 YEARS!
FOUR LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER!
555 Palisade Ave, Cliffside Park
(201) 945-0266
5 Legion Dr, Cresskill
(201) 569-9112
225 Edgewater Rd, Cliffside Park
(201) 945-0234
19 Emerson Plaza East, Emerson
(201) 634-8622
Now Registering for Summer Camp Ages 2-9
AOC-17
Musical Instruments for Youngsters
A Symphony of Choices
HE I DI MA E B RAT T
I
f your youngster is ready to graduate
from banging on pots and pans and
belting out toddler tunes to some-
thing more sophisticated, you may have
a budding musician ready to learn his or
her frst musical instrument.
Musical experts say that many dif-
ferent factors go into making this deci-
sion in considering the child’s age, per-
sonality, how much space you have in
your house, and of course, the budget
for classes or private lessons.
For example, when it comes to a
child’s age, woodwind and brass in-
struments, not including the recorder,
should not be started until a child is
about 7 or 8 when he has a mouthful
of adult teeth, in order to position lips
and teeth correctly. String instruments,
such as violins, can be downsized where
even a small child as young as 3 can
start to learn. Drums and piano also can
be started very young, as young as 2½
years old, although it is very important
to choose a teacher who has experience
teaching the littlest ones.
Personality and other physical traits
can also make learning different instru-
ments easier for some youngsters.
For example, the oboe is a rather
intricate instrument that requires intelli-
gence. Playing the tuba might be a good
choice for students with bigger lips. The
trombone is fne for a player with front
teeth that are even. The violin is quite
versatile and usually a good start-
er instrument. Likewise, the
piano is also a good beginning
instrument, although stu-
dents with long fngers and
bigger hands may be bet-
ter suited for this in-
strument. Size would
also matter with an
instrument such
as the bassoon,
which when
as s embl ed
stands at
nearly 6 feet
tall with the
spread of the
fnger holes quite
wide. This instrument
would be best suited to a
larger student.
For the budding rock
’n roll star, guitar lessons
can start for children as
young 3½ and certainly
by 8 years old. The im-
portant thing is that
the child has dexterity
and that the instrument
fts the child’s hand. There are guitars
available in ¼, ½ and ¾ size of reason-
able quality and price. Guitar strumming
is also excellent to increase fne motor
skills.
Whether your child is more of an
introvert or extrovert can also
factor into the choice of instru-
ment. For instance, higher-
pitched instruments like the
trumpet or fute will often have
the melody and may be better
suited to a child who likes to
be center stage. Conversely, a
more reserved child might
be more comfortable
with a supporting role
instrument, such as
the trombone. Oth-
er instruments, like
the oboe, bassoon,
and French horn,
could be the only
one in a band.
Children who
tend to be a bit
more independent
might be drawn to these
instruments.
It’s not just beautiful
listening, but learning mu-
sic can also make a very
big difference to cognitive
development, skills and
acuity, according to Nina Kraus, a profes-
sor of communication sciences, neurobi-
ology and physiology and the director of
the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory
at Northwestern University, who has
studied the impact of music training on a
child’s cognitive development. Defning
a musician as someone who plays for 20
minutes two times a week, her team has
compared the impact music has on at-
tention, language and reading.
“The same biological ingredients
that are important for reading are those
that are strengthened through playing
a musical instrument,” according to
Kraus. “The ability to categorize sounds,
to pull out important sounds from back-
ground noise, to respond consistently to
the sounds in one’s environment, these
are all ingredients that are important for
learning, for auditory learning, for read-
ing and for listening in classrooms.”
Whichever instrument your child
decides to learn, he or she will need en-
couragement to keep practicing, espe-
cially in the beginning. Start with about
10 minutes of practice daily and increase
fve minutes each day, until you build
up to 30 minutes. As they become bet-
ter and more fuent, hopefully they will
come to enjoy playing and their motiva-
tion to practice and advance will come
from them.
And, it’s always good to be a cheer-
ing section for their at-home concerts.
At the Thurnauer School of Music
at the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in
Tenafy, a great resource in the commu-
nity, the approach to choosing which in-
strument for what child is not an exact
science, but rather a confuence of many
factors, including a child’s own interest
in a instrument.
“If a child is expressing interest,”
says Michael Reingold, associate direc-
tor of the JCC Thurnauer School of Mu-
sic, “then go for it. In an ideal world, ev-
ery child would have the opportunity to
learn an instrument.”
Twice a year, the school offers a “Pet-
ting Zoo,” at which at the open house,
youngsters have an opportunity to try-
on, see, hear and sometimes get to play
instruments on display to see which
one, or more than one, clicks.
While playing music certainly has its
“side effects” such as teaching many life
lessons, including learning diligence, the
benefts of hard work, math skills, read-
ing, and social skills among others, the
music school’s goal, says Reingold, is
to “help the child love and become pas-
sionate about music. It’s all about the
music-making.”
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor of
About Our Children.
OurChildren
About
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
17
18
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
There Are Only Winners
in the Caramel vs. Chocolate Lover War
H
ey there. Yes you. Quick question:
What’s your dessert profle? What
do you go for in your desserts?
Sure, absolutely, take a few minutes to
think about it. Perhaps this brief ques-
tionnaire will be helpful in fguring it out.
Don’t worry. There is no right or wrong
answer. There is something for every
sweet-tooth/treat-freak in the bitter-
sweet-salty-fruity-nutty world of des-
serts.
You’re at a restaurant and the des-
sert menu offers Crème Brulee, Pecan
Pie, or Bananas Foster. You choose:
Crème Brulee. Que c’est dèlicieux! It
doesn’t get better than a hard, crunchy,
burnt-sugar shell that reveals soft, silky,
vanilla sweet custard.
Pecan Pie. What can be bad about
sweet toffee-favored pie with toasty
nutty pecans to bring out the meltingly
warm favors?
Bananas Foster. Totes! How often is
dessert served on fre?
None of the above. Are you kidding?!
It’s not dessert if it’s not chocolate!
Your coffee drink of choice:
A. Light & Sweet
B. Hazelnut Latte
C. I don’t drink coffee, for me it’s a frappe
+ whip
D. Double espresso
In my less stellar moments I could
be described as a:
A. Marshmallow
B. Honey Roasted Nut
C. Blondie
D. Pain au Chocolat
Your last meal would comprise:
A. It would be carbo-load!
B. My mother’s _____________
C. A warm fruit pie or cobbler with a
scoop of ice cream melting over it.
D. Three courses of dark chocolate.
If you answered all or mostly a’s, b’s,
or c’s. Congratulations! I’m pleased to in-
form you that you qualify as a Caramel-
low. You are an admirer of sugar in a va-
riety of forms: caramel, toffee, meringue,
marshmallow, and brittle. You like it
sweet and homey. Maybe it’s sweet with
nuts (mostly b’s), sweet with fruit, sweet
with cream — just so long as it’s sweet!
You’re laid back and open when it comes
to your dessert choices. Your taste buds
would be right at home in the South,
which is populated with an abundance
of Caramellows.
If you answered all d’s. You are a cer-
tifable Chocoholic, but you didn’t need
me to tell you that. Your blood type is
C for Cacao. Chocolate is your true love,
and you will never abide anything else.
You like your desserts dark and intense
with a suggestion of bitterness, and
have a slight disdain for milk chocolate
and an outright disdain for white choco-
late (which you don’t consider choco-
late anyway).
To thank you for your participation
in this completely unscientifc dessert
survey I’ve included the following reci-
pes. Each recipe is pretty simple but re-
ally captures the essence of what both
Caramellows and Chocoholics seek out
in their favorite desserts and treats.
For Caramellow consideration, a
Caramel Blondie with a pretzel streusel
topping. It’s sweet, homey, ooey-gooey
with a subtle saltiness that comple-
ments thick and creamy sweetness of
the caramel. If you are a nutty-Caramel-
low substitute your favorite nut for the
pretzels is in the streusel topping.
For the uncompromising Choco-
holic there’s this Dark Chocolate Truffe
Tart. It’s the easiest route to deep choco-
late fulfllment with a slightly bitter edge,
that (bonus) requires no baking!
Caramel Blondie with Pretzel Streusel
1 stick (1/2 cup) butter, softened
1 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1 egg
1 tablespoon vanilla
¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 cup caramel sauce (recipe below)
Pretzel streusel (recipe below)
Preheat oven to 350. Spray an 8 x 8-inch
baking pan with cooking spray. With a
hand-mixer in a medium sized bowl, cream
together butter and brown sugar. Add in
egg, vanilla, salt, and flour until a sticky bat-
ter results.
Spread batter evenly in prepared baking
pan. Pour caramel sauce over Blondie bat-
ter. Sprinkle pretzel streusel over the layer
of caramel. Place in oven and bake for
28-32 minutes or until a toothpick inserted
in center of blondes come out clean.
Caramel Sauce
6 tablespoons butter
1 cup packed brown sugar
½ cup heavy cream
1 teaspoon salt, optional
In a medium saucepan over high heat melt
butter. Mix in brown sugar until a deep gold-
en brown, thick, smooth syrup forms. Let it
cook until it bubbles around the edges.
Reduce heat to medium and pour in heavy
cream mixing well until thickened. Stir in
salt if using. Allow to cool.
Makes 2 cups
Pretzel Streusel Topping
1 cup of salted pretzels, crushed
½ cup all-purpose flour
4 tablespoons butter, cut into small pieces
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Mix all ingredients together in a medium
sized bowl. Then with a fork or with your
fingers rub or mash the butter into peas
sized pieces.
Makes 1 cup
Dark Chocolate Truffle Tart
1 cup crushed chocolate wafer cookies
(about 15 cookies)
¼ cup melted butter
2 cups chocolate chips
1 cup heavy cream
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 egg yolks
Mix cookie crumbs in pie plate with melted
butter. Press down on bottom and sides of
pie plate to form crust. Set aside.
In a double boiler over simmering water,
heat chocolate chips stirring until smooth
and melted. Slowly add the heavy cream,
stirring well until chocolate is thick and
glossy. Mix in vanilla and egg yolks and stir
until well incorporated. Cook over heat until
pudding-like in consistency and hot — about
5 minutes, stirring regularly.
Pour into crust. Refrigerate until firm, about
2 or 3 hours.
Makes 6 to 8 servings
Rachel Harkham is a cookbook author, recipe developer and chocolatier. She lives in
Rockland County with her husband and three children. Visit her on www.reciperachel.com.
OurChildren
About
AOC-18
19
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
AOC-19
Get Jewish wisdom on parenting at
Because your most rewarding
job is also the hardest.
Asthma is Controllable
with the
Right Medical Attention
HE I DI MA E B RAT T
A
sthma is among the most common
of chronic diseases of childhood.
According to the Centers for
Disease Control, asthma affects about
8.5 percent of the pediatric population
in the United States, or more than 7 mil-
lion children.
According to some sources, the
prevalence of asthma is increasing. This
is also the case with other allergy condi-
tions, including eczema (atopic dermati-
tis), hay fever (allergic rhinitis), and food
allergies.
The condition accounts for more
school absences and more hospitaliza-
tions than any other chronic condition
in this country.
What is asthma?
Asthma is a reversible obstructive
lung disease, caused by increased reac-
tion of the airways to various stimuli. It
is a chronic infammatory condition with
acute exacerbations. An asthma episode
is a series of events that results in nar-
rowed airways. These include: swelling
of the lining, tightening of the muscle,
and increased secretion of mucus in the
airway. The narrowed airway is respon-
sible for the diffculty in breathing with
the familiar “wheeze.”
It is characterized by excessive sen-
sitivity of the lungs to various stimuli.
Triggers range from viral infections to
allergies, to irritating gases and particles
in the air. Each child reacts differently
to the factors that may trigger asthma,
including: respiratory infections and
colds, cigarette smoke, allergic reac-
tions to such allergens as pollen, mold,
animal dander, feather, dust, food, and
cockroaches.
Also factors are indoor and outdoor
air pollutants, including ozone and par-
ticle pollution, exposure to cold air or
sudden temperature change, excite-
ment/stress and exercise.
A major — and preventable — culprit
is secondhand smoke, which can cause
serious harm to children. An estimated
400,000 to one million children with
asthma have their condition worsened
by exposure to secondhand smoke.
Dr. Steven Kanengiser, director of
Pediatric Pulmonolgy at Valley Hos-
pital in Ridgewood, says that asthma
can be tamed with the proper medical
intervention.
“We can teach families to control
their asthma rather than having the
asthma control them,” Kanengiser says.
To that end, the family needs to be
clear on what are exactly the particular
triggers for the asthma episodes. In ad-
dition, Kanengiser stresses, it is very
important to maintain a medicine rou-
tine to keep asthma from faring up, that
means taking medicine, usually inhaled
steroids, on a regular basis, to control
the persistent condition.
This may be challenging when the
child seems okay.
“One of the hardest things with
families that have a child with persistent
asthma is to give the medication when
they seem well.” But, he stresses, it is
important to do so.
He stressed that having asthma does
not have to interfere with a youngster’s
regular routines, again, if the asthma is
treated appropriately.
For instance, Kanengiser says, “The
vast majority can participate fully in
sports.”
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor of About Our
Children.
201-266-0633
2-Week, 4-Week, 6- Week, 8-Week,
12-Week and 16-Week Sessions
Summer Camp
Ages:
• 18-24 month
(1.5hr/day 2 or 3 day/week
• 2 years separation optional
(2hr/day 2 or 3 day/week)
• 3, 4 & 5 years (drop off)
3hr/day 3 or 5 day/week)
• Gym • Art and Crafts • Music
• Hand-on Exploration • Snacks
1 Week Specialty Camps
Superheroes and Fairy Princess Camp
20 Grand Avenue, Englewood, NJ, 07631
(Free On-site Parking)
www.kidville.com/englewood
Bring this ad and get $75 off.*
*Valid with Summer Camp 201 Enrollment. Not to be
combined with any other offers.
Starting May 12
4
Kosher
Food
Available
AOC-20
20
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
MOHEL
Rabbi Gerald Chirnomas
TRAINED AT & CERTIFIED BY HADASSAH HOSPITAL, JERUSALEM
CERTIFIED BY THE CHIEF RABBINATE OF JERUSALEM
(973) 334-6044
www.rabbichirnomas.com
Emily
ARAMS
Emily Arams, daughter of
Jacqueline and Ron Arams of
Tenafly and sister of Ryan and
Alex, celebrated becoming a
bat mitzvah on January 4 at
Temple Emeth in Teaneck.
Joshua
DELUCA
Joshua DeLuca, son of
Laurie and Joseph DeLuca of
Hillsdale, celebrated becom-
ing a bar mitzvah on January
11 at Temple Beth Or in
Washington Township.
Maya
FLEISCHER
Maya Fleischer, daughter of
Jessie and Joseph Fleischer
and sister of Kira, celebrated
becoming a bat mitzvah on
January 20 at Congregation
Beth Sholom in Teaneck.
Benjamin
GLAZER
Benjamin Glazer, son of
Amy and David Glazer of
Ridgewood and brother
of Andrew and Stephanie,
celebrated becoming a bar
mitzvah on December 21
at Temple Emanuel of the
Pascack Valley in Woodcliff
Lake.
Charles
HALL
Charles Hall of Harrington
Park, son of Dana and Chris
Hall, celebrated becoming a
bar mitzvah on January 11 at
Temple Beth El of Northern
Valley in Closter.
Ashley
KASHANI
Jason
KASHANI
Ashley and Jason Kashani,
twin children of Naz and
Yahya Kashani of Paramus,
celebrated becoming b’nai
mitzvah at the Jewish
Community Center of
Paramus/Congregation Beth
Tikvah on January 11. Their
grandparents are Baher and
Jacob Saghian of Oradell
and Heshmat and George
Kashani of Hackensack.
Joshua
KENT
Joshua Kent, son of Karen
and Martin Kent of Montvale
and brother of Andrea, cele-
brated becoming a bar mitz-
vah on January 11 at Temple
Emanuel of the Pascack
Valley in Woodcliff Lake.
Caleb
LIPPE
Caleb Jude Lippe, son of
Mindy and Scott Lippe of Fair
Lawn, who has seven broth-
ers and sisters, celebrated
becoming a bar mitzvah
on December 21, Parashat
Shemot, at the Anshei
Lubavitch Congregation in
Fair Lawn. Caleb attends
Yavneh Academy in Paramus
where he is a member of
the school’s Youth Baseball
League.
Erica
NOE
Erica Noe, daughter of
Elizabeth and Christopher
Noes of Woodcliff Lake and
sister of Jonathan, celebrated
becoming a bat mitzvah on
January 11 at Temple Beth
Or in Washington Township.
Jonah
PITKOWSKY
Jonah Pitkowsky, son of
Rabbi Joel Pitkowsky and
Ingrid Goldfein of Teaneck
and brother of Lili, became a
bar mitzvah on January 18,
2014 at Congregation Beth
Sholom in Teaneck.
Jacob
QUINN
Jacob Quinn, son of Robin
and Stephen Quinn of Saddle
Brook and brother of Alena,
celebrated becoming a bar
mitzvah on January 4 at
Temple Avodat Shalom in
River Edge. His grandparents
are Bernice and Sheldon
Berman of Paramus.
Seth
RATUSHEWITZ
Seth Ratushewitz, son of
Dawn and Philip Ratushewitz
of Hillsdale, celebrated
becoming a bar mitzvah on
January 4 at Temple Beth Or
in Washington Township.
Justin
SHERMAN
Justin Sherman, son of
Jennifer and Jonathan
Sherman of Ridgewood and
brother of Jack and Sam,
celebrated becoming a bar
mitzvah on January 18 at
Temple Emanuel of the
Pascack Valley in Woodcliff
Lake.
Maya
WASSERMAN
Maya Wasserman, daugh-
ter of Lymor and Jack
Wasserman of Bergenfield
and sister of Elan, became a
bat mitzvah on January 11,
2014 at Cong. Beth Sholom
in Teaneck.
Simchas
Gifted and Talented Summer Program at Montclair State
Summer is a great time for students to
challenge their minds. Montclair State
University offers a Gifted and Talented
summer program in two, three-week ses-
sions. The frst session runs from June
30 through July 18 and the second ses-
sion runs from July 21 through August
8. The summer program provides high-
achieving students, in grades 1-11, the
opportunity to immerse themselves in
an educational environment focusing on
mathematics, science, technology, fne
and performing arts, English, and the
humanities, as well as enjoying activi-
ties such as swimming and tennis. The
summer course schedule and applica-
tion will be available in February. Please
visit montclair.edu/gifted for more
information.
The Gifted and Talented program
is accepting applications for the Spring
Weekend Program offered across nine
weekends with courses available to stu-
dents on Saturday and/or Sunday, be-
ginning on March 1 through May 4. For
detailed information on registration, eli-
gibility, and tuition, visit montclair.edu/
gifted.
Honors and AP-level students in
grades 9-12 who wish to enrich their ed-
ucation have the opportunity to enroll in
intensive courses and academically tar-
geted workshops in the spring and the
fall. The intensive courses and targeted
workshops cater to Honors and AP-level
students interested in exploring aca-
demically challenging topics in the arts,
mathematics, and sciences.
Spring intensive courses and work-
shops range from 1 to 3 weekends and
focus on varied areas of study including
SAT preparation, Fine Arts, and College
Essay Writing.
The Hi-Jump program is an oppor-
tunity for high-achieving high school
students to earn undergraduate college
credits. Through this early college pro-
gram, students can prepare for college
course work and experience university
life by taking full credit courses along-
side Montclair State University students.
Accepted Hi-Jump students may register
for courses during the fall, winter, spring,
and summer. For more information on
opportunities for high school students,
visit montclair.edu/gifted/high-school.
To learn more about Montclair
State University Gifted and Talented or
Hi-Jump, call (973) 655-4104 or email
gifted@montclair.edu.
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
21
OurChildren
About
TopChoices
F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4
COMP I L E D BY HE I DI MA E B RAT T
AOC-21
Fabulous Children’s
Fashions
Every Day of the Week
From everyday to Shabbat, Yom Tov
and special occasion clothing, Tuesday’s
Child in Teaneck offers a unique blend of
brands that marry mid-to-high fashion,
quality and wearability, with a touch of
trend for girls and boys, infants through
teenagers. The West Englewood Avenue
store, named for the classic children’s
poem about the days of the week –
“Tuesday’s child is full of grace” – carries
such brands as Ella Moss, Meme, Stella
McCartney, Kiki Riki, Marc Jacobs, John
Galliano, Lili Gaufrette, Diesel, Armani,
Junior Gaultier, Il Gufo, to name a few.
But hurry in. Now through when its
racks are empty, the winter collection is
discounted up to 70 percent. Tuesday’s
Child also has much of its new spring
collection, which is all about cheer-
ful color, says owner Rachel Fischer,
who also has stores in Brooklyn.
and in Lakewood. Tuesday’s Child,
177 West Englewood Ave., Teaneck
201-357-8363. wwwtuesdayschild.
New Summer
Program for Lil’ Ones
at Camp Veritans
This summer, Camp Veritans is launching Yeladim, a new program for Pre-K
children. The program’s goal is to help instill independence, positive attitudes,
develop social growth,
enhance coordination
and skills, but mostly to
give the youngsters a
happy summer camp
experience. Yeladim
campers will have the
same quality sum-
mer day camp fun
that older campers
experience but in a
condensed day that is
tailored to their needs.
The program includes
instructional and free swim,
sports, arts and crafts, science, cooking and more. A hot lunch and snack are
also provided. Camp Veritans, 973-956-1220,Carlacampveritans.com.
David Weinstone and Music
for Aardvarks
David Weinstone and The Music for Aardvarks Band will perform two concerts for chil-
dren 2 to 5 at The Jewish Museum on Sunday, February 9 at 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Families will hear favorite songs, including City Kid, Taxi, Jack Hammer Joe and Modern
Art. David Weinstone, found-
er of Music for Aardvarks,
explains, “Our shows are
rockin’, and we try to have
as much audience participa-
tion as possible. We’ve even
had kids come up on stage
with us to sing or dance.”
Tickets are $18 per adult;
$13 per child with a discount
for museum members. $15
adult Jewish Museum fam-
ily level member; and $11
child Jewish Museum family
level member. The Jewish
Museum, 1109 Fifth Ave.,
Manhattan. 212-423-3200,
www.thejewishmuseum.org.
Rockland “Street Fair”
Features The Maccabeats
The popular a cappella group, The
Maccabeats, who rocketed to fame
in 2010 with their Chanukah spoof of
Taio Cruz’s “Dynamite,” will be the main
attraction at a family festival, “Come
in from the Cold,” hosted by New City
Jewish Center on Sunday, Feb. 9. The
event, which includes brunch, an indoor
“street fair” and the concert, gets rolling
at 11 a.m. The concert begins at 12:45
p.m. Tickets cost $18 per person and
family pricing start at $50. For reserved
concert seating, the cost is $36 for
individuals with family pricing starting at $100. All prices go up on Feb. 1 by $5. New City
Jewish Center, 47 Old Schoolhouse Road, New City, N.Y. 845-638-9600, 914-643-1988,
To Our Readers: This calendar is a day-by-day schedule of events. Although all information is as timely as we can make it, it’s a good idea to call to
verify details before you go.
To Add Your Event to Our Calendar
Send it to:
Calendar Editor
About Our Children
New Jersey/Rockland Jewish Media Group
1086 Teaneck Road
Teaneck, NJ 07666
or email it to: AboutOCaol.com
or fax it to: 201-833-4959
Deadline for March issue (published February28):
Tuesday, February 18
January 25-February 21
Saturday, January 25
Fitness Zumba Party: Open to all 12 and older.
Join at the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades at
7:30p.m. for a free, 90-minute Zumba event.
JCC on the Palisades, 411 E. Clinton Ave., Tenafly.
201-408-1475.
Comedy in Glen Rock: Glen Rock Jewish Center
will hold a Comedy Night and Silent Auction
at 8 p.m. featuring Chris Coccia, Sandy Marks
and Barry Weintraub. Check for pricing. 682
Harristown Road, Glen Rock, 201-652-6624,
office@grjc.org.
Sunday, January 26
Kids in Action: Sunday program focuses on
the five senses, featuring using your feet to do
good deeds. Trip to The Ice Vault skating rink.
Transportation from the Chabad Center, 194
Ratzer Road, Wayne. From 1 to 2:30 p.m. for 6 to
12 years old. $10 per child, includes light lunch.
For information, chanig@optonline.net, 973-
694-6274.
Friendship Circle Bowling: The Friendship Circle
of Passaic County is holding its bowling league at
the Holiday Bowl, 29 Spruce St., Oakland, from
noon to 1 p.m. and at the Van Houten Lanes,
564 Van Houten Ave., Clifton. $5 per child.
Information, fcpassaiccounty.com, chaya@fcpas-
saiccounty.com, 718-483-5682.
Defiance Screening: The Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades and the Jewish Federation of Northern
New Jersey host a screening for families of bar/
bat mitzvah children of the 2007 film, “Defiance”
with special guest Brenda Weisman, daughter of
Aron Bielski, the film’s real-life hero. 4:45 p.m. for
pizza followed by 5:30 screening. $18 in advance,
$25 at door.
Pattern Palooza: Join in Pattern Palooza Family
Day from noon to 4 p.m. Performances by Oran
Etkin at 12:30 and 2:30 p.m., drop-in art work-
shop and family tours. Free with admission. The
Jewish Museum, 1109 Fifth Ave., Manhattan. 212-
423-3200, thejewishmuseum.org.
Family Art Project: Hibernator’s den. Make your
own furry bear, bat, toad or hedgehog mask.
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wave Hill House, Wave Hill, 675
W 252 St., the Bronx 718-549-3200.
Tuesday,
January 28
Tailgate Party: The Star Ledger and NJ.com
are collaborating with the Newark Museum on
a Super Bowl XLVIII Media Day from noon to
8 p.m. in Newark. $60 at the Museum. The
Newark Museum, 49 Washington Place, Newark,
973-596-6699.
Sunday, February 2
Concert at Wave Hill: Family concert by Sonic
Escape and the Music Makers at 2 p.m. Call for
admission prices. www.wavehill.org.
Tuesday, February 4
Free Exercise for Mom and Daughter:
Presented by Valley’s Spirt of Women program
join a discussion by local OB/GYNs followed by
fitness at Ethos Spa and Fitness Center from
6 to 8 p.m. This evening targets daughters
13 to 16 years old. For more information call
1-800-VALLEY 1 or www.valleyhealth.com/
events.
Wednesday, February 5
Shalom Baby: Jewish Federation of Northern
New Jersey hosts Shalom Baby for parents of
their newborn or newly adopted child. Pajama
party themed playgroup, 9:30 to 10:45 a.m.
at Solomon Schechter of Bergen County, 295
McKinley Ave., New Milford.
Dr. Mehmet Oz: America’s doctor appears at
the 92St Y at 8 p.m. Kaufmann Concert Hall. 92
Street Y, Lexington Avenue at 92 Street. Prices
from $34. www.92StY.org.
Friday, February 7
Family Shabbat Services: Family-friendly ser-
vices at 7:30 p.m. Temple Emeth, 1666 Windsor
Road, Teaneck, 201-833-1322, www.emeth.org.
The Fab Four: Uncanny rendition of the famed
Beatles. Performance 8 p.m. bergenPAC, 30
North Van Brunt St., Englewood, 201-227-1030,
www.bergenpac.org.
Family Shabbat in Franklin Lakes: Rabbi Elyse
Frishman and Rabbi Rachel Steiner of Barnert
Temple lead a family-friendly 7 p.m. Shabbat ser-
vice. Potluck supper follows. Barnert Temple, 747
Route 208 South, Franklin Lakes, 201-848-1800.
www.barnerttemple.org.
Saturday, February 8
Winter Music: Temple Israel and the JCC of
Ridgewood continue its Winter Music Saturdays
with a concert by Jonathan Taylor. Concert follows
7:45 p.m. havdalah service. $10 donation request-
ed. 475 Grove St., Ridgewood. 201-444-9320.
Think Pink Floyd: The iconic band of the 70’s
and 80’s brings its music to an 8 p.m. show at
bergenPAC, 30 North Van Brunt St., Englewood.
201-227-1030, www.bergenpac.org.
Sunday, February 9
“Street Fair” in Rockland County: The
Maccabeats will be the main attraction at a fam-
ily festival, “Come in from the Cold,” hosted by
New City Jewish Center. The event, which includes
brunch, an indoor “street fair” and the concert,
starts at 11 a.m. The concert is at 12:45 p.m.
Tickets cost $18 per person and family pricing
start at $50. For reserved concert seating, the
cost is $36 for individuals with family pricing
starting at $100. All prices go up on Feb.
1 by $5. New City Jewish Center, 47 Old
Schoolhouse Road, New City, N.Y. 845-
638-9600, 914-643-1988, www.newcityjc.
org.
Monday, February 10
Parenting Conference: For parents with
children from 2 to 10 years old. Edward
Hallowell, Harold Koplewicz, Catherine
Steiner-Adair and Dr. Ron Taffel will be
featured at the conference, 9:15 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. 92 Street. Y, at 92 Street and
Lexington Avenue in Manhattan. www.92Y.
org.
Friday, February 14
Shabbat in Franklin Lakes: All are invited
to Shabbat service at 7 p.m. at Barnert
Temple followed by an Oneg Shabbat (des-
sert). 747 Route 208 South, Franklin Lakes,
201-848-1800. www.barnerttemple.org.
Saturday, February 15
Shalom Baby: Jewish Federation of Northern
New Jersey hosts Shalom Baby for parents of
their newborn or newly adopted child. Baby
Sign Language themed playgroup at the
Jewish Community Center of Paramus, 9:30 to
10:45 a.m., 304 Midland Ave., Paramus.
Bubblemania: Casey Carle brings his soapy
show to the Kidz Caberet Series, 1 and 3 p.m. at
bergenPAC, 30 North Van Brunt St., Englewood,
201-227-1030, www.bergenpac.org.
Shabbat Yoga: All levels, including beginners,
are welcome. Please bring a yoga mat and wear
comfortable, non-binding clothing (appropriate for
exercise). Classes are from 9 to 10:15 a.m., free
for members, $18 donation for non-members.
Barnert Temple, 747 Route 208 South, Franklin
Lakes. 201-848-1800. www.barnerttemple.org.
Friday, February 21
Musical Shabbat: Temple Emeth presents a
Shabbat filled with music. 8 p.m. with singing and
dancing. Temple Emeth, 1666 Windsor Road,
Teaneck, 201-833-1322, www.emeth.org.
DaybyDay
FYI
AOC-22
OurChildren
About
See Sonic Escape Trio, Sunday, February 2
See Bubblemania, Saturday, February 15
“Defiance,” see Sunday, January 26
F E BRUARY
The Good Life With Kids
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
22
23
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
Saturday, February 15
Shalom Baby: Jewish Federation of Northern
New Jersey hosts Shalom Baby for parents of
their newborn or newly adopted child. Baby
Sign Language themed playgroup at the
Jewish Community Center of Paramus, 9:30 to
10:45 a.m., 304 Midland Ave., Paramus.
Bubblemania: Casey Carle brings his soapy
show to the Kidz Caberet Series, 1 and 3 p.m. at
bergenPAC, 30 North Van Brunt St., Englewood,
201-227-1030, www.bergenpac.org.
Shabbat Yoga: All levels, including beginners,
are welcome. Please bring a yoga mat and wear
comfortable, non-binding clothing (appropriate for
exercise). Classes are from 9 to 10:15 a.m., free
for members, $18 donation for non-members.
Barnert Temple, 747 Route 208 South, Franklin
Lakes. 201-848-1800. www.barnerttemple.org.
Friday, February 21
Musical Shabbat: Temple Emeth presents a
Shabbat filled with music. 8 p.m. with singing and
dancing. Temple Emeth, 1666 Windsor Road,
Teaneck, 201-833-1322, www.emeth.org.
FYI
See Sonic Escape Trio, Sunday, February 2
See Bubblemania, Saturday, February 15
PARTY
973-661-9368
Book Collection at Kaplen JCC
To ensure that students in underserved
communities have access to books in
their school classrooms and librar-
ies, the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades is
partnering with Project Cicero to col-
lect and distribute new and gently used
books. Books, both hardcover and
paperback, must be in new or excel-
lent condition and can include fction,
non-fction, current reference books,
biographies, science and math for early
readers through high school. Picture
books are also welcome. Donations can
be brought to the JCC and deposited in
collection bins any time between Feb-
ruary 17 and March 6, when the books
will be distributed. For more informa-
tion, www.projectcicero.org. For JCC,
201-408-1469.
Chabad Teen NYC Shabbaton
The Chabad Center of Pas-
saic County will be joining the
Cteen Shabbaton in NYC from
February 28th – March 2 to
give teens, grades 9 through
12, a chance to meet their co-
horts from all over the coun-
try and enjoy a weekend in
New York City. Cost is $200.
Discounted price until Jan.
31 if participant signs up with
the Chabad Center. Registra-
tion is open for all Passaic
County Jewish teens, regard-
less of their Religious afflia-
tion. Transportation will be
provided both ways.
To sign up, go to Jewish-
Wayne.com/cteenshabbaton.
Promo code: pV9AHR. For
more information, call 973-
694-6274 or e-mail chanig@
optonline.net.
Arts Scholarship for Bergen County Students
Skyline Theatre Company (www.skyli-
netheatrecompany.org) will continue
to support young New Jersey artists in
Bergen County in 2014. For the 6th year
in a row, Skyline is offering a $1000 cash
scholarship to support Bergen County
high school seniors who will be fur-
thering their education by majoring in
theater, television, flm, or communica-
tions.. Any Bergen County high school
senior planning to major in theater,
television, flm or communications
following their graduation from high
school may submit an application. Ap-
plications can be found on the Skyline
web site, www.skylinetheatercompany.
org. The deadline for all applications is
March 15, 2014.
Barnert Temple Preschool
and Kindergarten Tours
Families that are looking for nurturing
social and learning opportunities for
their children are invited to explore the
Barnert Temple Preschool and Kinder-
garten. Barnert Temple is a warm and
supportive Reform Jewish preschool
community offering Jewish and inter-
faith families preschool and kindergar-
ten programming for children ages 15
months to 6 years. For over 25 years
Barnert has consistently provided
small class sizes and personalized at-
tention with Jewish values and culture
woven throughout the curriculum.
Barnert’s preschool and kindergar-
ten classes fll up quickly so it is sug-
gested that interested parents arrange
to see the school as soon as possible.
Interfaith families are always welcome.
To schedule a tour, please call Alice
Berdy at 201-848-1027, website at www.
barnerttemple.org.
Breast Feeding Program
The Valley Hospital Center for
Family Education is offering a
program entitled Breastfeed-
ing Basics. This informative
course explores the advantag-
es and benefts of breastfeed-
ing. There will also be discus-
sions regarding techniques
that work, positions that are
comfortable, common prob-
lems, pumping and storage
of breast milk and the correct
use of the breast pumping
equipment. This class should
be taken during the eighth
month of pregnancy. The
course will be held from 7 to
10 p.m. on February 6, 15, and
20 at the Dorothy B. Kraft Cen-
ter, 15 Essex Road, Paramus.
To register online, please visit
www.ValleyHealth.com/Fami-
lyEducation. 201-291-6151.
Mazel Tov, You’re Expecting a Baby
The Valley Hospital’s Center for Family
Education and the Fair Lawn Jewish Cen-
ter have partnered to offer a new class
entitled “Mazel Tov, You’re Expecting
A Baby!” This class is a 4-week course
that includes two classes on Jewish
parenting, one class on Newborn Care,
and a tour of the Valley Hospital’s La-
bor and Delivery and the Mother Baby
Units. Adoptive parents are welcome to
attend. Series 1 is scheduled for Janu-
ary 29 and February 5 and 12. Classes
1-3 will be held at the Fair Lawn Jewish
Center, 10-10 Norma Avenue, Fair Lawn.
Classes 1 and 2 are from 7-9 p.m. Class
3 is from 7 to 10 p.m. Class 4 is a 1-hour
tour held at The Valley Hospital, 223
North Van Dien Avenue, Ridgewood, at
7 p.m. Early registration is encouraged.
The fee is $86.00 per couple. To regis-
ter online, visit www.ValleyHealth.com/
FamilyEducation. 201-291-6151.
AOC-23
AOC-24
24
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N • FEBRUARY 2014
THE PEDIATRIC ER
ALL DAY AND ALL NIGHT
WE ARE HERE
FOR YOUR KIDS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Children become ill at all hours of the day and night. That’s why
The Valley Hospital is keeping its Pediatric Emergency Room open
around the clock, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The Pediatric
Emergency Room offers young patients a soothing environment in which
to be evaluated and treated. It is equipped with appropriate pediatric technology
and is situated away from the adult treatment areas.
SERVI CES I NCLUDE:
I
Board-certified pediatricians with expertise in
pediatric emergency medicine.
I
Separate pediatric waiting areas and treatment rooms.
I
Full roster of consultants.
I
Lab tests, X-rays, CAT scans, MRI, and ultrasound
are available.
The Pediatric ER
For more information visit www.ValleyHealth.com.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recipient of the J.D. Power and Associates
Distinguished Hospital Award
for Emergency Services Excellence
VH Pediatric ER Ad_11x14 1/14/14 1:59 PM Page 1
Cover Story
6 ROCKLAND JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 2014
RJS-6
JCC Rockland
gears up for
11th film festival
SARA GILBERT
P
reparing for a Jewish film festi-
val is no small feat, even the 11th
time around.
JCC Rockland will be holding
its annual International Jewish Film Festi-
val from March 19 to April 30. A complete
list of dates, times and locations will be
available at its website, jccrockland.org,
by the first week of February.
Planning began in June 2013, when the
JCC shared 100 films with a committee.
Each film then was rated, commented
on, and analyzed, until only 18 winners
remained.
“We try to get a mix and have something
that appeals to everyone,” Micki Leader
said.
Ms. Leader is not only the festival’s chair
and its final decision-maker — she’s also
the person behind the festival’s start. She
decided that a film festival in Rockland was
crucial to help expose the community to
Jewish culture. A study done by the JCCA
— the Manhattan-based umbrella JCC orga-
nization — showed that unaffiliated Jews
under 40 years old received their expo-
sure to Jewish culture mostly through films
and television.
And the festival has been working. It has
become the largest cultural arts program
in Rockland, with 6,000 people participat-
ing during its multiweek run.
“We are always trying to reach a younger
audience,” Ms. Leader said, noting that the
general trend of an older demographic
in Rockland, and the country in general,
makes that goal even more of a reach. “We
never give up trying.”
This year, such films as “Cupcakes,”
“Paris Manhattan,” “Melting Away,”
and “For a Woman” are aimed toward a
younger crowd.
A cheerful musical comedy, “Cupcakes”
is about a group of young Israelis who find
themselves the underdogs in an interna-
tional singing contest. Directed by Eytan
Fox, this film is full of pop ditties and
electricity.
A romantic comedy, “Paris Manhattan”
is about a single 30something obsessed
with Woody Allen and his films. Directed
by Sophie Lellouche and shown in French
with English subtitles, it is about Alice,
who works in her father’s pharmacy and
has imaginary conversations with Woody
Allen instead of dating.
Le Figaro calls the film “utterly endear-
ing. As lively and wonderful as Paris in
spring.”
Based on the coming-of-age novel by
Israeli writer David Grossman and directed
by Vincent Bal, “The Zigzag Kid” is about
a boy, Nono, who wants to be just like his
father, the world’s greatest police inspec-
tor. While on the train to his uncle, Nono
meets his father’s nemesis, and decides,
only 24 hours before his bar mitzvah, to
complete a high-stakes mission.
Inspired by her own family memoir,
writer-director Diane Kurys brings us “For
a Woman,” a film, set in 1980s France,
about a daughter who digs up her parents’
old WWII-era memories. Anne (Sylvie
Testud), a young novelist, scours through
photos and letters that trigger an investi-
gation into her shadowy past and uncover
romance and suspense in post-war France.
Ms. Leader makes it clear she loves all
the films that will be shown. “It’s like your
children — you love them all, but differ-
ently!” she said. Still, she is particularly
pleased to show “Melting Away,” an Israeli
film about a family coming to terms with a
transgender child.
“It’s truly heartbreaking and beautifully
“Disobedience” honors a Portuguese official who issued visas to Jews during World War II.
“Melting Away” deals with a transgen-
der child.
Cover Story
ROCKLAND JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 2014 7
RJS-7
2014
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done,” Ms. Leader said.
Director Doron Eran and his partner, screenwriter
Bili Ben Moshe, conceived of “Melting Away” after
hearing of parents refusing to visit their injured chil-
dren after the brutal murder at Tel Aviv’s LGBT youth
center in 2009.
“Bethlehem,” Israel’s official entry for best foreign
language Oscar, is another notable film. It was nomi-
nated for 12 Israeli Academy Awards and won for best
film, best director, best actor, best supporting actor,
and best editing. The story centers around the rela-
tionship between an Israeli intelligence officer and his
Palestinian informant. Writer-director Yuval Adler’s
experience in Israeli military intelligence and co-
writer Ali Waked’s time as a Palestinian journalist add
authenticity.
“Hunting Elephants” was nominated for seven
Israeli Academy Awards, including best film. Writ-
ten and directed by Reshef Levi, this bank heist and
coming-of-age film manages a delightful concoction of
jocular hijinks and tender moments.
At the bank where his father works, 12-year-old Jona-
than, played by Gil Blank, watches his father have a
heart attack while testing a new high-tech security sys-
tem. Guilt-ridden over his father’s death, and morti-
fied when his mother begins dating the evil bank man-
ager out of financial desperation, Jonathan hatches a
plot to rob the bank.
Directed by Eran Riklis, “Zaytoun” is about Yoni, an
Israeli pilot who crash-lands in wartorn Beirut in 1982
and is captured by a group of fighters from the Pal-
estine Liberation Organization. One of them, Fahed,
longs to return home. Yoni and Fahed find themselves
on the run from rival militias together, and an unlikely
friendship begins.
“Before the Revolution” continues the theme of war
and peace. Filmmaker Dan Shadur challenges popular
misperceptions of permanent enmity in Iranian-Israeli
relations through rare archival footage, family movies,
and interviews with former diplomats, Mossad agents,
and family friends.
In the 1960s and ‘70s, Iranians and Israelis wined
and dined together, lived in harmony, and operated as
trade partners. Shadur and his family, and thousands
of other Israeli professionals, lived comfortably with
other Iranians. Everything changed with the 1979 over-
throw of the Shah and the start of the Islamic revolu-
tion. This is the unknown story of a paradise lost and
a close-knit community caught in an historic uprising.
No Jewish film festival would be complete without
several films about the Holocaust and World War II in
general. Among others, this festival offers, “My Ger-
man Friend,” “Disobedience,” and “Aftermath.”
“My German Friend,” partly based on writer-direc-
tor Jeanine Meerapfel’s life, is about a German-Jewish
girl and the son of an exiled Nazi colonel who form a
bond in Argentina.
The film begins in 1950s Buenos Aires, where both
Jews and Nazis have fled. The girl and boy find them-
selves neighbors and become fast friends. It isn’t until
later that the boy learns of his father’s SS officer past.
He then disappears to become a political activist and
join an anti-government guerrilla movement, leaving
the girl to search for him and try to heal the past.
“Disobedience” is a French film, directed by Joël San-
toni. It is based on a true story about Aristides de Sousa
Mendes, the Portuguese consul general who was sta-
tioned in Bordeaux, France, during World War II. His
government had issued strict orders to all its diplomats
to deny visas to Holocaust refugees seeking to escape.
Sousa Mendes defied these orders and issued Portu-
guese visas to an estimated 30,000 people. Holocaust
“Melting Away” deals with a transgen-
der child.
scholar Yehuda Bauer said it was “perhaps the largest rescue
action by a single individual during the Holocaust.”
“Aftermath” is a Polish film directed by Władysław
Pasikow. Although entirely fictional, it does draw loosely on
notorious incidents that befell Jewish villagers during World
War II and importantly it raises the taboo topic of Polish
indifference in the Nazi persecution of Jews.
In this film, a Catholic construction worker from Chicago
visits his brother in Poland, and is threatened and shunned
by local townspeople. The brothers investigate the village’s
dark secrets about its deceased Jewish residents.
“The Jewish Cardinal,” directed by Ilan Duran Cohen, is
a France film about the true story of Jean-Marie Lustiger,
the son of Polish-Jewish immigrants. Lustiger maintained his
cultural identity as a Jew even after converting to Catholi-
cism, joining the priesthood, and becoming Archbishop of
“Bethlehem,” a much nominated film, concerns an Is-
raeli intelligence office and his Palestinian informant.
Cover Story
8 ROCKLAND JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 2014
RJS-8
170 N. Main St., New City, New York
(845) 323-4582 · chanalee@thechallahfairy.com
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Paris. However, when nuns attempt to build
a convent within the walls of Auschwitz,
Lustiger finds himself torn between the two
sides.
The list of films continues with “Mamele,”
“Suskind,” “Sousa Mendes,” “Glickman”
and “Numbered.” And they’re all good, Ms.
Leader said. “I’d never pick a film I didn’t
love.
“All of the films are fantastic and all have
a multitude of groups that they will appeal
to,” she said.
There will be a speaker or presenter at
most screenings. Speakers are not yet set,
but typically they are the producer, director,
actors, or specialist on the topic area.
“It’s very much like a puzzle,” Ms. Leader
of creating the festival schedule. Speakers’
availabilities, film formats, and theater times
all must dovetail.
“For a Woman”
features the
dark World-War
II associations
of the parents
and its effect on
the daughter.
“The Zigzag
Kid” is about
Nono, who
idolizes his
father.
Sponsorships for films are still avail-
able and much needed, she said. Tickets
only cover 20 percent of the cost of run-
ning the festival.
“The best way for anyone who loves
Jewish films to help sustain this tradition
in Rockland is to become a sponsor,” Ms.
Leader said.
For more information, go to www.
jccrockland.org.
Jewish World
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Creating a world
Englewood author releases
first of planned young-adult trilogy
JOANNE PALMER
F
antasy writers get to create
whole worlds.
That used to be done
entirely on the page, and
so through the reader’s imagination.
If the writer was really good, and also
really lucky, that world could move
to the screen — but that would come
much later.
Now, though, technology allows
a writer to create a world that is not
confined to a flat, two-dimensional
page, and the Internet can enhance
and expand it.
Elisa Freilich of Englewood says that
it is a wonderful time to write fantasy
for young adults; she loves creating worlds, and living in
them herself.
Her first novel, “The Silent Echo,” was published in Sep-
tember by Diversion Books; it is available both in print
and as an ebook. Her website, www.elisafreilich.com, fills
out the characters’ backstories, while videos there tell
some of those stories. Music is vitally important to her
characters. Her protagonist, she tells us, had been mute
until the story starts, and her best friend is deaf, so both
the reality and the symbolism of music says much to them.
That’s why the website is loaded with music. And as soon
as the book was published, an audio version was recorded
as well.
“Silent Echo” is the first book of a planned trilogy; the
next book is due in the spring.
Ms. Freilich, 42, has created worlds for herself as long
as she can remember. When she was a child, she knew
that she would write, but it wasn’t until her two older
children went to sleepaway camp that she wrote her first
book. It took only two months to transcribe the stories
she had cobbled together in her head for so long. And
then, with the magical ease that so rarely flows in real life,
she found an agent and then a publisher.
Ms. Freilich, then Elisa Frommer, grew up in Monsey
in a modern Orthodox family — happy, but increasingly
out of tune with the ever-more-black-hat community
around her. “It was just not the right fit for us anymore,”
she said, so eventually, once she was grown, the family
moved to Manhattan. Still, it was the right place to nur-
ture her imagination, she said. “I am so happy that I grew
up there.”
As a child, Ms. Freilich was a constant reader, in the clas-
sic style. “We didn’t turn on lights on Shabbos,” she said. “I
had a bathroom of my own, so I would leave the light on,
and I would lie on the floor in front of that light.” She went
to the Frisch School in Paramus, where she was the editor
of the literary journal. “In my mind, when I see something
I always think to myself about how I would write about it,”
she said. “I see the color red, and I think about how I would
describe it.”
At Boston University, she majored in economics —
“something I never even imagined myself doing,” she said,
but the professor whose courses she took was so good
that “I just kept signing up for them,” she said. After grad-
uation, she worked in marketing, married David Freilich,
an ophthalmologist, had three children — Abigail, 17; Char-
lie, 13; and Juliet, 10 — and moved to Englewood, where
the family belongs to the East Hill
Synagogue. Her father died 11 years
ago — a shattering blow to the fam-
ily — but the extended family is very
close; she now lives around the cor-
ner from her mother.
Ms. Freilich is a crafter as well; she
sees objects, brings them home, and
makes art from them.
All this background explains why,
when she finally found the time to
write, Ms. Freilich produced a fan-
tasy filled with music and art and
Greek mythology, springing out of
her head almost as Athena emerged
from Zeus’s. (Thankfully, minus the
hammer blow to the cranium.)
The music in “Silent Echo” is wide-
ranging. “I’m obsessed with music and lyrics, with every-
thing from Cole Porter to Eminem. I love Marcus Mum-
ford. I really wanted to write a book about music, so the
natural thing was to write about a siren.”
From there, she moved logically to Greek mythology. “I
always loved mythology, so just before I wrote the book, I
reread the Odyssey. It’s an amazing read for an adult; Harry
Potter for adults.” Homer only writes about the sirens for a
few verses,” she added.
“So then I took these mythological creatures and gave
them my own stories,” she said. She was drawn to the
Greek gods as models because “they are flawed. They
have love affairs. They hurt each other. They protect each
other. They are very human superhumans.”
Her heroine, Portia, has been mute since just after her
birth, when she cried once. Her best friend is deaf. And
then she gets her voice back.
When she first wrote the book, Ms. Freilich used lyrics
from songs she loved. “And then I got wind of one very
important word,” she said. “Copyright.” So instead of
trying to get permission to use preexisting work — a pro-
cess that can be both time-consuming and expensive — “I
thought okay, I’ll just take these lyrics out and put my own
in. And I did.
“There are now a few dozen lyrics that are integral to
the plot, and as it stands now, we are running a contest
for readers to send in musical submissions for how they
imagine the music to sound. From that, we are hoping to
download a soundtrack.”
Although there is nothing overtly Jewish in “Silent
Echo,” it is written by an observant Orthodox Jew, and it
shows. “The book has a lot of romance, but it is clean,” Ms.
Freilich said. “There will be no premarital sex in my book.
“And I wanted to create an environment where it was
okay for kids to be smart and enjoy their classes.
“I set it in a private school because that’s what I’m comfort-
able with, although not a religious one. The kids there are
into their studies.
“I was that way. I often couldn’t wait to get to class. I
wanted my characters to be that way too.”
On the other hand, she does live in the real world.
“There are a few places where there are a few curse words.
I davened over those decisions — but it has to sound natu-
ral to a 16-year-old. A 16-year-old will not say ‘Oh, shoot.’
But in terms of a moral compass, I feel that authors writ-
ing for young adults have a responsibility not to say that
there are no rules.”
Elisa Freilich
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Calendar
10 ROCKLAND JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 2014
RJS-10
Saturday,
FEBRUARY 1
Taste of Torah: Join in
as we learn about each
week’s Torah portion and
relate it to meaning in
today’s world. Everyone
gets a chance to voice
opinions. Bagels served.
Every Saturday at
9-10:30 a.m. Temple Beth
Torah, 330 N. Highland
Ave., Nyack. Call (845)
358-2248.
Tot Shabbat: Celebrate
Shabbat morning with
us as we learn, read
stories, play games,
and discover what
Shabbat is all about. For
newborns to 6-year-
olds. Free to all. Every
Saturday at 11 a.m.-noon.
Congregation Sons
of Israel, 300 North
Broadway, Nyack. Call
(845) 358-3767 or email
csioffice@optonline.net.
SAT Clinic: Gear up for
the SAT with a free clinic
to help you prepare
and perform your best
on the test. Join SAT
prep specialist Trevor
Hochman to learn and
practice strategies,
tactics, and skills for
the math, reading, and
writing sections of the
SAT. Bring pencils, a
notebook and calculator.
11 a.m.-noon. Nyack
Library, 59 S. Broadway,
Nyack. Call Elizabeth
Hobson, (845) 358-3370,
ext. 236.
Sunday,
FEBRUARY 2
Bagels and blox: Join
Fawn Schoenberg
Fleissig for a spirited,
musical hour of fun for
children ages 6 weeks to
3 years with caregivers.
Free and open to the
public. 9-10 a.m. Temple
Beth Torah, 330 N.
Highland Ave., Nyack.
Call (845) 358-2248.
Adult Hebrew: Geared
toward adults looking
to learn beginner
Hebrew, the aleph-bet,
every day phrases,
basic conversation, and
prayers. Every Sunday at
9:45-10:45 a.m. Temple
Beth Torah, 330 N.
Highland Ave., Nyack.
Call (845) 358-2248 or
email Eric Berkowitz at
enberk529@gmail.com.
Monday,
FEBRUARY 3
Nursing 101: La Leche
League gives up-to-date
information on nursing,
including benefits, new
beginnings, overcoming
breast feeding obstacles,
and weaning. Free.
10 a.m.-12 p.m. JCC
Rockland, 450 W. Nyack
Rd., West Nyack. Call
(845) 362-4200.
Mommy and me:
Playtime for parents
and children. Every
Monday at 11:15-11:45 a.m.
Finkelstein Memorial
Library, 24 Chestnut St.,
Spring Valley. Call (845)
352-5700.
Lunch and learn: Learn
about Parshat Tetzvaveh
with Leslie Goldress as
you eat lunch. 12-1 p.m.
New City Jewish Center,
47 Old Schoolhouse Rd.,
New City. Call (845) 638-
9600.
Tuesday,
FEBRUARY 4
Hebrew for tots:
6-month-olds through
4-year-olds are invited to
get started with Hebrew
and learn through
immersion in creative
ways, including stories,
songs, music, games
and art. Vocabulary
lists are provided each
week for parents to
take home. Costs $350
per year or $175 per
semester. Every Tuesday
at 12:45-1:30 p.m.
Congregation Sons of
Israel, 300 N. Broadway,
Nyack. Call (845) 358-
3767 or email csioffice@
optonline.net.
Knitting and
crocheting: Meet to knit
and crochet with others,
learn new stitches, and
practice old ones. Every
Tuesday at 1-2:30 p.m.
Finkelstein Memorial
Library, 24 Chestnut St.,
Spring Valley. Call (845)
352-5700.
Talmud class: Learn
Talmud with Rabbi
Berkman. Every Tuesday
at 8-9 p.m. New City
Jewish Center, 47 Old
Schoolhouse Rd., New
City. Call (845) 638-
9600.
Wednesday,
FEBRUARY 5
Boppin’ with Bonnie:
Join trained music
teacher and ventriloquist
Bonnie Halford for
a rockin’ music and
movement class for
newborns to 2-year-olds
with parent or caregiver.
Ten sessions cost $165
for CSI members, $200
for non-members.
Every Wednesday
at 10-10:45 a.m.
Congregation Sons
of Israel, 300 North
Broadway, Nyack. Call
(845) 358-3767 or email
csioffice@optonline.net.
Women in transition:
Rockland Jewish Family
Service’s Women in
Transition group is
designed to support
and empower women of
all ages going through
divorce. Eight-week
program; sessions are
led by a licensed clinical
therapist. Child care
provided, with pizza
for the children. Every
Wednesday at 6-7 p.m.
RJFS, 450 W. Nyack
Rd., West Nyack. Call
Michele Koenig, (845)
354-2121, ext. 141, or email
mkoenig@rjfs.org.
Book club: Discuss
“Tenth of December”
by George Saunders.
Newcomers always
welcome. 7-8:30 p.m.
Nyack Library, 59 S.
Broadway, Nyack. Call
Belinda Cash, (845) 358-
3370 ext. 213.
The observant life:
Join the “Chapter of
the Month” group and
study the Conservative
movement’s approach
to a range of legal and
ethical topics from
the new book with
contributor Rabbi Scheff.
Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m.
Orangetown Jewish
Center, 8 Independence
Ave., Orangeburg. Call
(845) 359-5920 or email
office@theojc.org.
Thursday,
FEBRUARY 6
Text and context:
Review the weekly
Torah portion with
Rabbi Scheff. Every
Thursday at 10 a.m.
Orangetown Jewish
Center, 8 Independence
Ave., Orangeburg. Call
(845) 359-5920 or email
office@theojc.org.
Film: Watch “Unfinished
Song,” a British comedy/
drama about a grumpy
pensioner who honors
his late wife’s passion for
performing by joining
the unconventional
local choir to which she
used to belong, in the
process re-engaging
with his estranged
son. 11 a.m.-12:35 p.m.
Suffern Free Library, 210
Lafayette Ave., Suffern.
Call (845) 357-1237.
Yoga for tots: Empower
2- through 6-year-olds
through a playful and
integrative approach
to yoga. Costs $350 all
year, $175 per semester.
Every Thursday
at 12:45-1:30 p.m.
Congregation Sons of
Israel, 300 N. Broadway,
Nyack. Call (845) 358-
3767 or email csioffice@
optonline.net.
Book club: Discuss
“Andrew Carnegie”
by David Nasaw.
Newcomers always
welcome. 2-3 p.m. Nyack
Library, 59 S. Broadway,
Nyack. Call (845) 358-
3370.
Blogging: Join the
social media global
community with this
interactive multimedia
presentation by travel
bloggers and certified
teachers Melissa Ruttanai
and Neil Friedman of
WorldWinder.com.
No prior knowledge
necessary. $20 members,
$25 public. 7-9 p.m. JCC
Rockland computer lab,
450 W. Nyack Rd., West
Nyack. Call (845) 362-
4200.
Crochet: Share the love
of crocheting while you
create work for charities
or personal projects.
Experienced crocheters
teach beginners.
7-8:50 p.m. New City
Library, 220 N. Main St.,
New City. Call (845) 634-
4997.
Friday,
FEBRUARY 7
Munchkins &
mishpacha: Mommy and
me with a Jewish twist,
including celebrating
Shabbat together and
learning new Hebrew
words, parents and/
or caretakers. For
newborns to 2-year-
olds. Every Friday at
10-11 a.m. Congregation
Sons of Israel, 300 North
Broadway, Nyack. Call
(845) 358-3767 or email
csioffice@optonline.net.
Lunch & learn: Learn
with Rabbi Jill Hackell
about “In the Beginning”
while you eat lunch.
Free and open to
all. 12:30-2 p.m. JCC
Rockland, 450 W. Nyack
Rd., West Nyack. Call
(845) 362-4200.
Saturday,
FEBRUARY 8
Family bingo: JCC
hosts a family bingo
night with food, prizes,
and games for 4- to
13-year-olds. $5 per
person. 6:30-8:30 p.m.
JCC Rockland, 450 W.
Nyack Rd., West Nyack.
Call (845) 362-4400 ext.
111 or email monicar@
jccrockland.org.
Saturday with Sinatra:
Spend Saturday night
with the songs of
Frank Sinatra by Tony
Quaranti, an outstanding
Sinatra impersonator.
7:30-10:30 p.m.
Orangetown Jewish
Center, 8 Independence
Ave., Orangeburg.
Call Jay Rifkin, (845)
634-5728, or email
jaymath72@gmail.com.
Sunday,
FEBRUARY 9
Music: Marc Mathelier and
Michele Sorel join voice
and guitar for a concert
of romantic music. Light
refreshments served.
1:45-3 p.m. Finkelstein
Memorial Library, 24
Chestnut St., Spring
Valley. Call (845) 352-
5700.
Monday,
FEBRUARY 10
Lunch and learn: Learn
about Parshat Ki Tisa
with Rabbi Ruberg as
you eat lunch. 12-1 p.m.
New City Jewish Center,
47 Old Schoolhouse Rd.,
New City. Call (845) 638-
9600.
Film: Watch “The Mortal
Instruments: City of
Bones,” based on the
popular teen novel,
starring Lily Collins.
Free popcorn served.
6-8:30 p.m. Finkelstein
Memorial Library, 24
Chestnut St., Spring
Valley. Call (845) 352-
5700.
Tuesday,
FEBRUARY 11
Film: Watch “More Than
a Month,” a documentary
PBS film. 11 a.m.-1:15 p.m.
Rockland Community
College, 145 College Rd.,
Suffern. Call (845) 574-
4000.
Book and pub club:
Nyack and Valley
Cottage libraries join
forces with a new book
club geared toward
20- and 30 somethings.
Each month it meets
in a different local bar
to discuss a book over
drinks (21 and over only).
This month’s book is
Michael Chabon’s “The
Amazing Adventures
of Kavalier and Clay.”
7 p.m. This month’s bar
is Casa del Sol, 104 Main
St., Nyack. Call Dane
Paciarello (845) 358-
3370 ext. 244.
Book club: Discuss “A
Thousand Splendid Suns”
by Khaled Hosseini.
7:15-8:30 p.m. New City
Library, 220 N. Main St.,
New City. Call (845) 634-
4997.
Wednesday,
FEBRUARY 12
Torah and treats:
Explore the writings
of Rabbi Abraham
Joshua Herschel with
Rabbi Scheff. 12:30 p.m.
Orangetown Jewish
Center, 8 Independence
Ave., Orangeburg. Call
(845) 359-5920 or email
office@theojc.org.
Book club: Discuss “The
Attack” by Yasmina
Khadra with facilitator
Arlene Sandner. 7 p.m.
JCC Rockland, 450 W.
Nyack Rd., West Nyack.
Call (845) 362-4200.
Thursday,
FEBRUARY 13
Film: Watch “All Is Lost,”
a drama/action starring
Robert Redford and
directed by J.C. Chandor.
After a collision with a
shipping container at
sea, a resourceful sailor
finds himself staring
his mortality in the
face. 11 a.m.-12:35 p.m.
Suffern Free Library, 210
Lafayette Ave., Suffern.
Call (845) 357-1237.
Sunday,
FEBRUARY 16
Travel with the J:
The Haifa Symphony
Orchestra is a crucial
and inseparable part
of the cultural lives of
the residents of Israel’s
north. Performing at
the New Jersey State
Theatre. Mid-orchestra
$70 members, $90
public; front balcony
$78 members, $98
public. Price includes
transportation and
concert. Bus leaves JCC
at 12 p.m., concert at
3 p.m. JCC Rockland,
450 W. Nyack Rd., West
Nyack. Call (845) 362-
4200.
Artist’s reception:
David Saintus displays
his paintings. 2-4 p.m.
Finkelstein Memorial
Library, 24 Chestnut
St., Spring Valley. Call
(845) 352-5700 or
(845) 517-9166 or email
saintuspaintings@gmail.
com.
Calendar
ROCKLAND JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 2014 11
RJS-11*
Monday,
FEBRUARY 17
Journey group: Make
a monthly commitment
to a year of learning
with Rabbi Drill as the
group explores living
meaningfully, cultivating
gratitude, and practicing
ethics. 11 a.m.-12 p.m.
Orangetown Jewish
Center, 8 Independence
Ave., Orangeburg. Call
(845) 359-5920 or email
office@theojc.org.
Wednesday,
FEBRUARY 19
Book club: Discuss
“Cyber War” by Richard
Clarke. 1-2 p.m. New City
Library, 220 N. Main St.,
New City. Call (845) 634-
4997.
Fiction book club:
Discuss “Labyrinths:
Selected Stories and
Other Writings” by
Jorge Luis Borges. New
members welcome.
7-8 p.m. New City Library,
220 N. Main St., New City.
Call (845) 634-4997.
Travel with the J:
Overnight trip to Taj
Mahal Hotel Casino with
the JCC. Trip includes
transportation, overnight
stay at Taj Mahal Hotel
Casino, $30 slot bonus,
one breakfast, buffet
dinner, Bobby Darin &
Connie Francis Tribute
show, taxes and baggage
handling. $160 members,
$195 public. JCC
Rockland, 450 W. Nyack
Rd., West Nyack. Call
(845) 362-4200.
Thursday,
FEBRUARY 20
Film: Watch “The Country
Girl,” a 1954 drama
starring Grace Kelly,
Bing Crosby, and William
Holden. Free. 1 p.m. JCC
Rockland, 450 W. Nyack
Rd., West Nyack. Call
Bonnie Wind, (845) 362-
4200, ext. 109.
Saturday,
FEBRUARY 22
Journeys with
Beethoven: Pianist
Yashar Yaslowitz,
director of the Carnegie
Concert Series, partners
with Greg Mitchell, co-
producer of the critically
acclaimed documentary
“Following the Ninth,”
for a multimedia
journey into the life
and music of Ludwig
von Beethoven. $20
adults, $18 seniors and
students, $15 members
(advance) or $25 adults,
$22 seniors and students,
$18 members (at door).
7:30-9:30 p.m. Nyack
Library, 59 S. Broadway,
Nyack. Call (845) 358-
3370.
Sunday,
FEBRUARY 23
Music: Listen to the band
“Rave On,” featuring the
music of Buddy Holly and
Roy Orbison. 1:30 p.m.
Suffern Free Library, 210
Lafayette Ave., Suffern.
Call (845) 357-1237.
Israeli Film Club: Each
session Timna Mekaiten
will screen an Israeli
film that illustrates
the Israeli society and
its complex structure
and culture. 4-6 p.m.
JCC Rockland, 450 W.
Nyack Rd., West Nyack.
Call Timna Mekaiten
(845) 362-4200 or
email tmekaiten@
jewishrockland.org.
Monday,
FEBRUARY 24
Film: Watch “Fast and
Furious 6,” starring Paul
Walker and Vin Diesel.
Free popcorn served.
6-8:30 p.m. Finkelstein
Memorial Library, 24
Chestnut St., Spring
Valley. Call (845) 352-
5700.
Book club: Discuss
“Ghana Must Go” by
Tayle Selasie. Newcomers
always welcome.
7-8:30 p.m. Nyack
Library, 59 S. Broadway,
Nyack. Call (845) 358-
3370.
Tuesday,
FEBRUARY 25
Raising a self-reliant
child: Presentation
for parents and
caregivers about raising
a self-reliant child by
pediatrician and mother
Dr. Alanna Levine.
7-9 p.m. Rockland Jewish
Family Service, 450 W.
Nyack Rd., West Nyack.
Call Michele Koenig,
(845) 354-2121.
Thursday,
FEBRUARY 27
Ready for college: What
does it take to really
be ready for college?
It’s so much more than
completing applications
and meeting deadlines.
Find out how to help
your teen be a confident,
independent young adult
who can set goals, take
care of him or herself,
and communicate
effectively with everyone
in the college community.
Presented by Jill
Greenbaum, Ed.D. For
parents/caregivers only.
This workshop is the first
of three. Register online.
7 p.m. Suffern Free
Library, 210 Lafayette
Ave., Suffern. Call (845)
357-1237.
Maccabeats
coming
to Rockland
The Maccabeats, the popular a cappella group that
rocketed to fame in 2010 with its Chanukah spoof
of Taio Cruz’s “Dynamite,” will be the main attrac-
tion at a family festival, “Come in from the Cold,”
hosted by the New City Jewish Center on Sunday,
February 9.
The festival, which includes brunch, an indoor
street fair, and the concert, gets rolling at 11 a.m. The
concert begins at 12:45 p.m. Tickets cost $18 per per-
son; family pricing start at $50. For reserved concert
seating, the cost is $36 per seat, with family pricing
starting at $100. All prices go up on February 1.
The street fair will sell everything from Judaic
art to children’s books and jewelry. A strolling guitarist,
magician, and pianist will entertain, and there will be
games and activities going on throughout the morning,
as well as a raffle of one- to three-week internships for col-
lege-age students at various businesses and organizations.
The Maccabeats originally formed in 2007 as Yeshiva
University’s student vocal group. They emerged as both
Jewish music and a cappella phenomenon, with a large
fan base; more than 10 million views on YouTube; many
television appearances, including the Today Show;
and success with two albums, 2010′s “Voices From
the Heights” and 2012′s “Out of the Box.” They have
appeared at the White House, entertaining for Jewish
American Heritage Month.
Buy tickets online at www.newcityjc.org. Vendors
who wish to work at the fair are welcome and should call
the synagogue at (845) 638-6900 for more information.
The New City Jewish Center is at 47 Old Schoolhouse
Road, New City. More information is at www.newcityjc.
org.
We pay cash for
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Oil Paintings
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We come to you ❖ Free Appraisals
Call Us!
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Shabbas
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CARING, reliable lady with over 20
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at $10. hour. Excellent references.
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FOR SALE
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Call Bert at
Georgetown Investing
845-548-8400
DONATE
UNWANTED
Furniture · Pianos · Cars
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to help your community
at no charge to you
We can clean out your
home or apartment.
Receive a generous tax write-of
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12 ROCKLAND JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 2014
RJS-12
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