Volume 47 - Issue 15 January 29, 2014 theeyeopener.

com @theeyeopener Since 1967

Everything was the same

The Eyeopener’s John Scott wants to be RSU president. We should let you know ahead he’s coming back on his worst behavior. P7

PHOTO/ILLUSTRATION: Farnia FEKri

City leaders weigh in on Gould St. P3
photo: Farnia FEKri

The rise of Bitcoins P8
ILLUSTRATION: JEss tsanG

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Wednesday Jan. 29, 2014

The Eyeopener Love & Sex ISSue
JANUARY 31 TO FEBRUARY 13, 2014

February 12th
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Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014

NEWS

3

Accused in flames, witness recalls
By Jake Scott and Laura Woodward
On the morning of July 2 2010, witness Jai Sarin said he watched alleged murderer Farshad Badakhshan walk down the hall of a Huron Street house as its basement was engulfed in flames. Sarin, who along with Badakhshan was a resident of 502 Huron St., explained how he walked behind Badakhshan while attempting to extinguish the flames along his back and shoulders with his hands. “I can’t say what went through my mind, but my body moved toward him very quickly and I tried to pat out the flames with my hands,” Sarin testified in front of a superior court jury on Tuesday, Jan. 28. Badakhshan, 31, is accused of murdering his then-girlfriend, Carina Petrache, on July 2, 2010. Badakhshan allegedly stabbed the 23-year-old in her torso before he allegedly proceeded to slit her throat and light her on fire — while also igniting himself and the Annex residence’s basement in the process. Badakhshan has pleaded not guilty on the grounds that he is not criminally responsible by reason of mental illness. According to Sarin’s testimony, Badakhshan, referred to as “Shawn,” was walking away from Sarin and into the communal kitchen. Badakhshan then sat on a kitchen chair as Sarin continued to try to put out the flames. “The clothes were smoldering,” Sarin said. “They were difficult to put out because of the material.” Sarin noted that Badakhshan was silent when he sat down. It was then that Sarin noticed the body on the floor. “Carina was in the kitchen as well,” Sarin said. “She was lying on the floor on her side.” Shortly after, Volodymyr Selivanov, another tenant of the Huron Street house and witness in the ongoing murder trial, walked into the room. “That was when [Selivanov] entered,” Sarin said. “I’ll never forget the look on his face. He was stunned. His jaw dropped and then froze. That was when I tried to snap him out of it. I said, ‘Get me [a] blanket and dial 911.’” Selivanov testified in front of a jury on Jan. 27. Prior to this incident, Sarin said he saw “subtle tension and power dynamics” between the accused and the victim. “My judgment of that interaction was one of bullying,” he said. Two other witnesses took the stand on Tuesday — 46-year-old Ngawang Sangpo testified that he witnessed Selivanov pull Petrache from the burning building after bringing out his computer. The other witness, Steve Masse, was questioned about his prior testimony. “[Selivanov] went back into the house and dragged the girl out. He was literally dragging the girl, holding her two hands,” Sangpo said. “She was burned. She was wearing a bra and tight shorts. The clothes were sticking to her flesh. I recognized her as a resident of the first floor.” After leaving the burning building, Sangpo said he walked around the outside of the house to see if there were any other residents inside. “I saw the basement on fire — fire meaning something making smoke — and the basement window was broken like someone had hit it,” Sangpo said. Sangpo said he saw a man through the kitchen window moments later. He said the man made no attempts to escape the flames or ILLUSTRATION CourtEsY LucY WEissfloG open the window. Sangpo was unable to identify Farshad Badakhshan has pleaded not guilty to charges of first-degree murder. the man because his face was “too black, not like skin.” burns and has had skin-grafting now requires a wheelchair. Badakhshan suffered severe operations since the incident. He The trial continues.

A nightmare on Gould Street
The Eyeopener speaks to city experts to get their take on the chipping paint on Rye’s walkway
extraordinary.” “I’m pleased to know that Ryerson will not dream small,” she said. Others like Mark Van Elsberg, project manager for pedestrian projects for the city of Toronto, also praised the university on its efforts to add a more visual component to its urban campus. “It’s really an amazing way to transform people’s perception of a roadway,” Van Elsberg told the Eyeopener. “Ryerson is a real leader for showing innovation.” The design, which included blue pathways shaped like rivers leading to various buildings on campus, acts as a tribute to Taddle Creek, a waterway that once travelled through the city long ago. But Van Elsberg also acknowledged the difficulty that often comes with working with paint. “It’s hard to say where the adhesion issues stem from,” he said about the blue epoxy paint, which is meant to prevent deterioration and avoid dirt build-up. “While it could be because the paint sticks better to older or newer asphalt, the rough weather Toronto’s been having certainly hasn’t helped.” Christopher De Sousa, Ryerson’s director for the School of Urban and Regional Planning, also agreed that painting a road is “not an easy thing to do,” but said that people need to focus more on the positive aspects of the situation rather than the negative ones. “I thought [painting the roads] was a pretty good thing,” De Sousa said. “Finally people are starting to know we’re marking a space.” De Sousa said that this relates to what he feels is a historical problem Ryerson has faced for many years ﹘ a lack of distinction of the university’s place in downtown Toronto. He said that it needs to establish itself as a place students can truly call home. This is something that De Sousa believes is especially important for those who commute to the university. “Urban schools have this challenge — how do you make it a campus?” Christopher Hume, the Toronto Star’s urban affairs columnist, doesn’t think “street exercises” like painting the road are necessary. ROAD continued on page 5

PHOTO: Farnia FEKri

Gould Street’s new paint job was damaged by the winter snowfall that blanketed the campus in December

By Jennifer Ferreira
For Ryerson University students, the new school year began with one distinct change — a fresh layer of yellow paint on Gould Street. Parts of both Gould and Victoria streets were covered in a bright yellow paint in what was just phase one of larger project intended to give the campus a much needed makeover. Fast-forward almost five

months, add a few coats of blue paint and Ryerson is now the owner of a colourful street whose paint has since chipped and faded, despite the $195,000 price tag. Now, amidst apologies for rushed work, questions as to who will fork over the repair costs and the possibility of a new paint treatment have arisen. A confused student body has been left to make sense of the situation as the rest of the city watches. Nevertheless, it’s clear the paint job has got people like Ward 27

Coun. Kristyn Wong-Tam talking. “I think the [school’s] administration is just as disappointed as I am,” Wong-Tam told the Eyeopener. “I’d imagine they’re going to look into it.” But even with the poor result, Wong-Tam commended the university for its ambitious plans to revamp the school’s pedestrian space. “I’m confident Ryerson had the right strategic thinking,” WongTam said, calling the idea “quite

4

EDITORIAL

Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014

New incubator program announced

Editor-in-Chief Sean “Baws” Tepper News Ramisha “Cash Money” Farooq Dylan “New Friends” Freeman-Grist Associate News Sierra “Sizzurp” Bein Features Sean “Mo’ Money, Mo’ Problems” Wetselaar Biz and Tech Badri “Blingin’” Murali Arts and Life Leah “Droppin’ Knowledge” Hansen Sports Shannon “Hoodrat” Baldwin Communities Nicole “Chronic” Schmidt Photo Natalia “OG” Balcerzak Jess “Grillz” Tsang Associate Photo Farnia “Flossy Fonze” Fekri Head Copy Editor Allison “Lettuce” Tierney Elkin Fun Jake “Jizzy” Scott Media Behdad “Flossy” Mahichi Online

Lindsay “Buggin’” Boeckl John “Finna” Shmuel General Manager Liane “Mo Paper” McLarty Advertising Manager Chris “Vibes” Roberts Design Director J.D. “Rollout” Mowat Intern Army Luke “Aight” Peters Jacob “Hi-tops” Dalfen-Brown Contributors Beatriz “Lil’ J” Jereza Julianna “Cool J” Damer Janelle “C-Monster” Seelal Blair “da king” Tate Lara “Skee-Lo” Onayak Julie “Tech N9ne” Sullivan Olivia “Simon” McLeod Alvina “Garfunkle” Siddiqui Brittany “B-Pryde” Ferreira AJ “‘Bout That” McDowell Jackie “RZA” McKay Latifa “Method Man” Abdin Deni “Raekwon” Verklan Devin “Ghostface Killah” Jones Laura “Ol’dirty Bastard” Woodward Jennifer “Masta Killah” Ferreira Brennan “U-God” Doherty Daniel “Shyheim” Rocchi Devin “2 Chainz” Jones Josh “hat-trick” Beneteau Michael “Gritzy” Grace-Dacosta Krista “K-Star” Robinson Daniel “Grilz” Xenophontos Sarah “Cuts-like-Ice” Cunningham-Scharf William “Boozy” Brown

Charles “Punk Bitch” Vanegas Eman “Elephunk” Ali Erin “Hanzy” Hesselink
The Eyeopener is Ryerson’s largest and only independent student newspaper. It is owned and operated by Rye Eye Publishing Inc., a non-profit corporation owned by the students of Ryerson. Our offices are on the second floor of the Student Campus Centre. You can reach us at 416979-5262, at theeyeopener.com or on Twitter at @theeyeopener “New rule to get through the most depressing winter in memory: do whatever you want. Go to hot yoga as often as possible. Buy $50 worth of chocolate from Soma. Cook food with extra butter, eat food without consequence. Buy expensive clothes. Leave work on time. Whatever gets you through the most depressing winter in memory.” These smart words were posted by wise beyond her years, Canice Leung. This winter does suck and we all need to acknowledge that and develop coping skills that help ourselves and others stay sane and happy. Let us all follow Canice’s advice, throw in a few cocktails and a pot luck dinner party! Next week February (the ugly son of a bitch month) will be here. Once February gets here the count down begins. No matter what Wiarton Willie predicts (according to scientific studies the rodent has dismal 37% accuracy), we will be free and clear in 8 weeks. So starting next week my Ryerson peeps we are on our way out of this, horrible, horrible winter. And if The Ram in the Rye’s patio is open on April 3rd, this Mug is buying! See you there.

PHOTO: BaDri muraLi

Simon Fraser University (SFU) has joined Ryerson University and the Bombay Stock Exchange Institute in India to create an international incubator program for startups. The agreement, signed last week, will allow for entrepreneurs at Ryerson and SFU to collaborate and expand their ideas for startups locally and globally. It was signed by SFU President Andrew Petter and SFU vice-president of research Mario Pinto as part of their week-long trip to India. Read the full story online at www.theeyeopener.com

Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014

NEWS

5

“It’s upsetting that we used so much money” School supplies on the fly
ROAD continued from page 3 Hume is critical of the river design, which he believes serves no useful purpose. “They should have used some kind of physical mosaic or material that can be applied to the road but then again, that costs a lot of money,” he said. Hume added that Ryerson closing off Gould Street was a major accomplishment that has aided in transforming the downtown location into a place that feels like a campus. He said this “shouldn’t be forgotten in this controversy.” Ryerson president Sheldon Levy said that the mismanagement of the paint came down to a lack of time. “We had the ambition to have it [ready] for the start of classes and we didn’t do it — or the company wasn’t good enough or we didn’t do enough of what you could call the preparation work aspect,” Levy said. “We were being pushed by the time, [we hoped] that when the students arrived that the campus looked presentable and it really was quite a mess so that was probably the biggest deficiency.” Levy said that though the school and paint company haven’t decided on an updated paint treatment, they don’t want to get it wrong a second time around. “We don’t plan on spending money for failed attempts,” Levy said. The new paint treatment is set to begin in the spring. Although the school “should’ve considered all the consequences,” as well as the “potential of peeling,” De Sousa still thinks the idea of painting campus streets was a successful one in terms of helping assert Ryerson’s place in the city. “I think finally Ryerson has this space marked out,” De Sousa said. “Hopefully we’ll paint it again.” Other members of the school community aren’t as optimistic. Second-year international economics and finance student, Anna Chung is upset that so much money has been spent on the paint job. “They should’ve used the funds for something else,” Chung said. “At this point, I don’t support repainting [the road].” Vice-president education for the Ryerson Students’ Union, Roshelle Lawrence, agrees with Chung, stating that the money could have been put towards more important things like increasing student space. “It’s upsetting that we used so much money,” Lawrence said. “It’s a project that wasn’t well thought out.” Lawrence is especially disappointed at how some of the money used to cover the costs came out of tuition fees, something she says the union has been fighting to lower for years. “A lot of people I see in different campuses, they think ‘what a joke,’” Lawrence said. “It’s funny and sad at the same time.” Lawrence hopes a broader discussion will take place to resolve the issue.“It’s about the administration understanding the real needs of the university.” For Lawrence, it comes down to one thing. “It’s all about priorities.”

PHOTO: FARNIA FEKRI

In an attempt to help students study, a new vending machine in Ryerson’s library building has been stocked with pens, notebooks, batteries, earbuds and USB keys.

News Bites
Rye’s bike-friendly makeover
Victoria Lane, which runs through Ryerson’s campus between Yonge and Gould streets, could be getting a bike-friendly makeover soon. The Victoria Lane design challenge was launched by The American Institute of Architecture Students Revitilization Group in November. The group is encouraging all students to submit ideas for a new pedestrian space in the middle of campus. Of the eight designs submitted thus far, most make use of the bike storage facilities in the lane. Design voting is open until Feb. 5. The lane is currently a loading path for building tenants.

O YOUR UNI
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5 4 FEB 3 ICE H C R U N YO
CAST YOUR BALLOT FOR
Faculty Directors, Executive and Graduate Council Executive.
MON TUE WED

Polling Stations:
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1) Engineering Building (Lobby) 2) Rogers Communications Centre (Lobby) 3) Kerr Hall East (1st floor near Room 127) 4) Library Building – LIB (2nd Floor) 5) Sally Horsfall Eaton – (Ground Floor)

LIB

6) Library Building – LIB (Ground Floor) 7) Business Building – TRSM (7th Floor) 8) Business Building – TRSM (8th Floor) 9) Image Arts Building – (Lobby)

TRS

Assault near SHE building
An assault occurred on campus Jan. 22. involving a Ryerson student. At 11:02 a.m. a student was standing just outside the Sally Horsfall Eaton Centre building when he or she encountered the unknown assailant. After yelling at the student, the assailant proceeded to spit on cars parked on Gerrard Street before spitting on and punching the student. The suspect fled south down Jarvis Street upon spotting responding security.

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Students may vote at any polling station. Polls are open daily from 10:30am-5:30pm

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6

NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014

Rye set to specify, make funding multiply
New program announced by Ontario government will change the way Ryerson receives funding
By Jackie McKay
Starting next fall, Ryerson will need to specialize in a specific subject area or research intensity to access government funding according to a new differentiation policy set to take place in the spring of 2014. The plan will only distribute funding to schools who have specified areas of interest, allocating funding based on their strengths. The reason for the change, outlined in the differentiation policy, is to make sure there are no unnecessary duplications of programs or research. “I think that’s unfair,” said Mariane Sarvari, a third-year arts and contemporary studies student. “It has to be even for everyone, or it’s unfair.” While some faculties may be awarded less funding due to the plan, others — such as those that Ryerson applies for a specialty in — will recieve more. “From a business student’s perspective, I’ll need that money, but other programs that are as beneficial are getting the short end of the stick,” said Parth Lad, a second-year business student. “For any program to work in this day and age they need money.” The policy will make more of an attempt to allocate funds based on student success and not just first-year enrolment numbers. This will benefit Ryerson, which currently receives the seventh-highest amount of funding but gives out the third-highest number of bachelor’s degrees in Ontario because of its outcomebased approach. The outcome-based funding model put forward by the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario and the province’s Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities is based on an American model that has seen success. “Schools are more likely to take students by their merit, rather than trying to get as many students as they possibly can,” said Seth Holland, a fourth-year politics student at Ryerson. The model will see schools grant funds based on variables such as graduation rates, the number of PhDs and bachelor’s degrees a school awards. The goal of the differentiation policy is to support student success by providing access to high quality education, as well as making Ontario more competitive globally, as stated in the policy framework. “We must now focus on improving access and quality in Ontario’s post-secondary education sector, while making our advances financially sustainable over the long term,” ministry communication branch spokesperson Tanya Blazina said in a statement to the Eyeopener. “They will aim to steer colleges and universities to their areas of strength.”

PHOTO: FARNIA FEKRI

Creative programs such as radio and television arts, housed in the Rogers Communication Centre, may see an increase in funding through new university funding model.

Information regarding student success will be collected through satisfaction surveys to be filled out by students, along with data about co-op placement, to evaluate teaching and learning. Ryerson president Sheldon Levy said universities are in the process of outlining a “strategic mandate agreement” that will outline Ryerson’s strengths, mission and vision.

“We’re in a very strong position to articulate that our mission, which is one that is of innovation entrepreneurship being close to the private sector, the public sector and the careers of students regardless if they’re undergraduate or graduate students,” Levy said. “[There is] every indication is the government really likes what Ryerson is doing, so I think it’ll be a positive outcome.”

Board of Governors lock and load
By Devin Jones
The search for Ryerson University’s next president is officially under way. The latest Ryerson Board of Governors meeting, which took place Monday night in Jorgenson Hall, announced the final seven candidates that will make up the 13-member presidential search committee. The committee’s mandate will be to find the replacement for current president Sheldon Levy when he steps down from his position in the spring of 2015. “The [presidential] committee will solicit input from the community and stakeholders throughout the search process,” said Phyllis Yaffe, chair of the committee, on the Board of Governors’ website. Senate selected their four members in a Jan. 14 vote. Other members include: Mohamed Lachemi, the provost and vice-president academic, faculty member Nancy Walton from the Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Usha George, dean for the Faculty of Community Services and faculty member David Checkland from Ryerson’s department of philosophy. Yaffe will serve as chair of the committee with colleague Janice Fukakusa as vice-chair. The final seven members of the presidential committee include: Curtis Yim — Yim is a fourth-year marketing student. He is also president of Enactus Ryerson, a member of the Digital Media Zone Steering Committee and a Ryerson Fashion Zone advisor. He is the only student on the committee. Darius Sookram — Sookram has a Ryerson bachelor of arts degree in politics, as well as a master of arts degree in public policy and administration. He is also co-president of the public policy and administration alumni association. Jack Cockwell — Cockwell was reappointed to the board in 2005 and was appointed vicechair from 2006–2007. He has also chaired the Building Fundraising Committee for the G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education. Michèle Maheux — Maheux is the executive director and chief of operating officer for the Toronto International Film Festival. She was named as one of Women’s Executive Network Canada’s Top 100 Most Powerful Women last year. Nadir Mohamed — Mohamed is the former president and chief executive officer of Rogers Communications Inc. Mohamed is also on the board of TD Bank Financial Group and a member of the World Presidents’ Organization. Carrie-Ann Bissonnette — Bissonnette has worked at Ryerson for 12 years and served as the special assistant in the office of the president. She is a member of the board of directors of the Canadian Association of Business Incubation. George Thomas Kapelos — Kapelos is an associate professor of architectural science and has been teaching since 2000. He was elected to the board for a two-year term in 2012. He holds degrees from Yale and Harvard universities.

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Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014

NEWS

7

Election season comes to campus
Deni Verklan breaks down this year’s candidates to prep you for the big vote
UNITE RYERSON INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE JOB

Got a computer?
The Eyeopener is going to be LIVEBLOGGING the RSU Elections from the Ram in the Rye on Feb. 5th. our fearless reporters will be putting themselves in harm’s way so you can get updates without leaving the house, or wearing pants. We'll let you know about the election, the winners, the losers, the highs and the lows. We’ll be the first to tell you who’ll be leading your student union for the 2014-15 school year.

President: The RSU president sets all major policies and goals for the academic year. Their job involves overlooking all other executives, operating larger projects and occupying the office closest to the door.

THE CANDIDATES

Rajean Hoilett: If elected, Rajean Hoilett would repurpose student study space and introduce a free lunch program. The free lunch program would include volunteers putting together meals and serving them to the Ryerson student community for no charge. The third-year social work student is currently the RSU vice-president of equity and has been involved in student groups throughout his years at Ryerson.

Roble Mohamed: Weekly or bi-weekly press conferences between students and the Ryerson Students’ Union is one of the major initiatives RSU presidential candidate Roble Mohamed wants to implement if elected. Other initiatives include more transparency in the student government and finding ways to voice where student tuition fees are going. This is Mohamed’s second time running in the election.

John Scott: If elected, Ryerson Students’ Union presidential candidate John Scott plans to separate Ryerson University from Canada to become a sovereign nation. The second-year journalism sudent said he plans to look into mining and drilling rights beneath the school, adopt a better apocalyptic defence strategy and use research funding for bionic arms and bionic legs. With these plans of “general debauchery,” Scott said that he wants to “represent all the students [who] really don’t give a shit about student elections.”

THE JOB

VP Equity: The vice-president of equity is directly in charge of campaigns that promote a more inclusive campus. Their day-to-day responsibilities pertain to eliminating racism, homophobia, sexism, transphobia and ableism on campus. They also manage the equity and sustainability committee.
THE CANDIDATE

ELECTION LOCATIONS
Pascale Diverlus: Social Justice is a responsibility that Pascale Diverlus, a second-year journalism student, would like to promote. If elected, Diverlus would like to use her experiences from working for the Centre for Women and Trans People and as the director of events for United Black Students Ryerson to extend equity initiatives on campus. Pascale is the younger sister of former RSU president Rodney Diverlus, who held the position of vice-president of equity in 2012.

ELECTION TIMES

AS MUCH AS YOU’LL WANT TO VOTE FOR JOHN SCOTT AT EVERY POLLING STATION, YOU CAN ONLY VOTE ONCE AT ANY LOCATION

FEB. 3–5
10:30 A.M.–5:30 P.M.

Live at 6pm, Feb 5.

ENGINEERING BUILDING LOBBY

THE JOB

LIBRARY BUILDING
Jesse Root: If elected, lobbying the federal and provincial governments for lower tuition fees would be a “priority” for Jesse Root. “Tuition fees in Ontario are the highest in the country,” said the immigration and settlement studies MA student. Root also said that student study space is of concern, especially in multidisciplinary programs. He plans to prioritize study space for graduate students and repurpose study space for all students if elected.

VP Education: The vice-president of education directly supervises campaigns and events about education and tuition fees. Responsibilities of the VP of education were cut with the implementation of the VP of equity.
THE CANDIDATE

LIBRARY BUILDING SECOND FLOOR

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Dora Adobea: Dora Adobea wants to find ways to discount GTA transit costs and introduce a peer-to-peer walk safe for students if elected. Although there is the option to walk with Ryerson security as far as YongeDundas Square, Adobea said the peer-to-peer walk safe program would allow students to walk in pairs until they arrive at their destination. Adobea is a fourth-year finance student and the director of finance for the United Black Students Ryerson.

VP Operations: The vice-president of operations manages all RSU services offered to students, such as the Used Book Room and discount TTC Metropasses. They also set all the budgets for the RSU and all other student groups on campus.
THE CANDIDATE

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COORDINATOR, SPECIAL EVENTS ORGANIZER, ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE, CORPORATE MEETING PLANNER AND MANY OTHER EXCITING CAREER OPTIONS.

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THE JOB

RCC LOBBY
Saphi Subendran: Saphi Subendran would like to build a stronger Ryerson community through the creation of more student events while increasing resources and support for student groups. If elected, the fifth-year business technology management student plans to have more events with the students’ athletic council and would like to bring interactive events seen at other campuses to Ryerson.

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VP Student Life and Events: The vice-president of student life and events handles all major events held by the RSU and tries to get students involved on campus. Events include the Culture Jam Showcase and pep rallies at sporting events.
THE CANDIDATE

KERR HALL EAST FIRST FLOOR

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PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: LINDSAY BOECKL

8

FEATURES
purred by an insatiable curiosity he developed from surfing Internet forums, Towayne Brown started mining last March. But unlike traditional mining operations, the then-high school student from Etobicoke was not digging into the depths of the earth. Instead, he used a standard graphics card in his home computer to run a complex algorithm in the hopes of finding his treasure. The product of this venture is very different than natural resources, but it’s still making some people millions — all from the comforts of their homes. Brown was mining for Bitcoins (BTC) from his bedroom. Bitcoins aren’t a tangible resource — you can’t hold them in your hands or put them in your pockets. They are a type of cryptocurrency, meaning they allow anonymous purchases and transfers between users online through specialized third-party websites. For university students and 20-somethings, Bitcoins are like the money tree they’ve always fantasized about. Now money can actually grow on trees, or rather, on graphics cards. itcoins were introduced in 2009, but some young investors have already made outrageous profits. Their value shot up this winter reaching a record-breaking high of about $1,250 CDN per BTC on Dec. 4. When the media buzz exploded, Brown, now a first-year electrical engineering student at Ryerson, remembered that he still had some of the virtual cash from mining. He quickly sold the 0.05 BTC he had mined for about $35 CDN to an anonymous buyer. Brown made the trade using two components — a public and a private key, which are a series of randomly generated numbers from Bitcoin servers. Each of these keys acts as a unique signature, but only the public one is visible to the world as a virtual record. Unlike public keys, private keys are only visible to owners and stored in a virtual wallet. Each person who owns Bitcoins has a virtual wallet with a QR scan code, just like the black-and-white

Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014

S

B

November “Bitcoin: A Peer-To-Peer Electronic Cash System” is released on the internet under the name Satoshi Nakamoto, which is likely a pseudonym. It’s the first place that outlines a peerto-peer currency system.

2008 2009 2010
January The first Bitcoin system is created, the first open-source Bitcoin client is created and the first “block” is mined — dubbed “genesis block,” which was worth 50 Bitcoins.

barcodes commonly seen in ads. Mugino Saeki, the information systems security officer at Ryerson, studied cryptocurrency as part of her Master’s degree thesis. “The purpose of signatures is for authenticity,” Saeki says. “The signature is the public key that makes the transaction authentic.” The virtual wallets that contain these signatures can be scanned at Bitcoin ATMs to make transactions quick and painless. Toronto is one of the only cities in the world so far with this banking machine — a Bitcoin ATM opened in January at the intersection of King Street and Spadina Avenue. Funds can be deposited into the machine and transferred to BTC — or withdrawn — using a 4-digit code sent to the user’s cell. There is a maximum daily purchase of $2,000 CDN. Before a Bitcoin can be purchased, it must first be mined. In the early days of the Bitcoin, people were able to use average graphics cards in their personal computers to mine but today, the equipment needed to mine is becoming increasingly complex, specialized and more energy intensive. The graphics cards run a network designed to scale in difficulty after each 10-minute mining cycle to avoid the chance of one individual owning too much of the currency. The increasing amount of cash necessary for setting up and running a Bitcoin miner also creates a barrier for those trying to get into the game today — and it’s not going to get cheaper. Sammy Shaar, an electrical engineer and Columbia University graduate based in New York City, started mining in December. Today, his share of 0.256 BTC is worth $258 CDN. “I wanted to invest but I didn’t want to invest a lot of money,” Shaar says. He bought a USB-powered Bitcoin miner for $18. He managed to make this purchase from a private seller just before the price of the equipment spiked. While he’s already made a profit, mining Bitcoins will continue to get harder and he’ll need to invest in new provisions if he wants to keep up.

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“You’ll have to run a nuclear power plant in your basement just to do this [mining] eventually,” Shaar says. he creator of Bitcoins, known under the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto, intentionally designed this system to allow for a finite number of Bitcoins. Just as there is only a certain amount of gold in the world, there will only ever be a certain number of Bitcoins — 21.3 million. Because mining becomes more difficult, it slows down the process so that they can’t be created all at once. Currently, it’s estimated that there are about 12.3 million Bitcoins in the market. At some point, however, the last coin will be mined. At the present rate of mining, the last Bitcoin will be produced in 2140. When this

happens, the market and stability could completely change. Spencer*, a 23-year-old Toronto-based software engineer and Bitcoin investor, says the market’s instability won’t scare him away. He keeps logs and closely follows trends to ensure he is making the most profitable decisions. “You have to keep emotions out of it… this is high-risk investment,” Spencer says. “You don’t have a stock broker, it’s just you.” The value of Bitcoins is a volatile figure that is constantly changing. They were worth just tiny fractions of a dollar when they were introduced in 2009, but now the value has been hovering around $800-1,000 CDN. While the highest Bitcoin value ever was recorded in early December (around $1,200 CDN) it dropped down to just

May 21 The first real-world Bitcoin purchase took place — wherein Florida native Laszlo Hanyecz purchased a Papa John’s pizza for 10,000 Bitcoin. At current market value, that pizza would be worth around $8.8 million.

July 17 Mt. Gox is estab lished — one of the largest Bitcoin marketplaces to this day.

November 6 Bitcoin econo surpasses $1 lion US. Acco Mt. Gox, the one Bitcoin at point was $0.

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Despite ground, could b

Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014

FEATURES
The bubble hasn’t burst yet though. Those who got into the game early and played it to their advantage have seen outrageous profits. hen Spencer was attending an Ontario university for network security, he started reading up about Bitcoins on tech websites from his dorm room and began to purchase them. “I’d heard about them in 2009 from a friend who said he was mining, creating this currency,” Spencer says. “He said one day it would be worth a lot of money.” He didn’t have much cash to invest in them at the time, but he did what he could. When he graduated and started working as a software engineer in Toronto, he was able to put more money towards purchasing Bitcoins. Now Spencer has a group of tech-savvy friends he follows the market with and attends Bitcoin society meet-ups. “When I was first interested in Bitcoins, the value was about $7 CDN,” Spencer says. “In the last year I’ve turned about $1,500 into $30–40,000.” Spencer’s annual profit is higher than what someone working full time at a minimum-wage job makes per year and nearly the average wage of working Canadians. Profits can be even higher — one of Spencer’s investor friends has made $2 million CDN from playing the Bitcoin market. Despite their value to investors like Spencer, Bitcoins are plagued by a reputation connecting them to the Internet’s black market. Initially, the release of this cryptocurrency in 2009 enabled a seamless, anonymous method of trafficking to develop online. In 2013, the website Silk Road was shut down by the FBI for providing users with a way to purchase illicit drugs — the only currency the site accepted was Bitcoins. Over the summer of 2013, Marcus*, a recent Ryerson graduate, was one of many customers who used Silk Road to buy drugs using Bitcoins. He first invested in Bitcoins by purchasing them from a Japanese website called MtGox and later decided to use some to buy narcotics. He made five purchases in total which included marijuana, LSD and psychedelic mushrooms. He was able to do all of this with complete anonymity. “[People who are] into Bitcoins are either fascinated about getting rich or getting drugs,” Marcus says. In addition to the discreetness this system allows, it’s possible to convert almost any currency into Bitcoins. The untraceable arrangement makes Bitcoins lucrative to criminals looking for a way to launder cash, which has damaged the currency’s reputation. “International criminal establishments are going to launder money [anyway],” Marcus says. “You can’t say it’s because of Bitcoins.” This aspect appealed to Charlie Shrem, the CEO of the major Bitcoin exchange site, BitInstant. Shrem was arrested on Jan. 27 in New York City and is being charged with money laundering. He allegedly was involved in selling over $1 million USD worth of Bitcoins to customers of the Silk Road and purchasing drugs on the site as well. Despite economic concerns and the murky reputation surrounding Bitcoins, both brick-and-mortar and online businesses across Canada are starting to accept Bitcoins as currency. According to the Canadian Bitcoin Business Directory, there are 169 merchants who accept this cryptocurrency as a form of payment. n Friday, Jan. 24, a cold, windy winter day on Queen Street West, Brown meets with a man, about his age, to purchase an Application-specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). He’d met the man on Kijiji and agreed to pay $70 for the circuit. He slips the USB into his pocket, ready to get back to mining, despite speculations on the future and viability of Bitcoins. “It’s already plugged into my computer,” he says. Brown understands the risks behind Bitcoins, but that’s precisely why he only mines minimally. “It can either work really well or really poorly. I just have my pinky toe in to make sure I feel the heat but don’t get burned.” *names have been changed to protect anonymity.

9

HE BITCOIN

e a reputation plagued by drugs, guns and the under, Bitcoins are making some people a fortune. And you be next. Allison Tierney Elkin and Badri Murali report

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ILLUSTRATION: JESS TSANG

over $600 CDN by mid-month. The Bitcoin economy is inherently prone to extreme dips and spikes like this and public interest can impact the already-rocky trends. Basically, if people see a surge in news about Bitcoins in media, they might decide to make moves. Bitcoins aren’t attached to any country’s economy though, and their rate fluctuates independently. This renders their value unpredictable and subject to rapid change unrelated to global market trends. Kam Chari, an associate advisor at WSC Insurance Group in Oakville, Ont., says that the risk behind digital currencies is the lack of standardization. “When people invest money, they want to know that it is stable and they can have some sort of protection if something doesn’t

omy mil ording to value of t this .50 US.

February 9 June 8-12 Bitcoins are valued BTC peaks at a at $1 US on Mt. Gox. value of $31.91 US before dropping to $10 in the largest percentage drop in value to date.

2011

work out,” Chari says. “But this Bitcoin is still new, and isn’t tied to any central institution and its [value] is too volatile.” Chari’s concerns are common amongst economists and others involved in financial sectors. Since there is no middle-man (like a bank or government institution) this increases the risk for those who use Bitcoins and mine for them. Each transaction that takes place is also irreversible, so once a purchase has been made there is no going back. The websites that coordinate trade between Bitcoin users have no responsibility to facilitate refunds and there can be a risk of getting scammed. “I think the bubble and many bubbles will burst,” Shaar says. “At some point you might be left with nothing.”

O

December 6 The first time a Bitcoin exchange is licensed as a Payment Service Provider (like a bank without the ability to issue debt).

2012 2013
February 28 After a long road to recovery, BTC surpasses the June 8, 2011 high of $31.91 US.
INFOGRAPHIC: JESS TSANG

March 28 Bitcoin market cap surpasses $1 billion US.

10

SPORTS

Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014

Ryerson racers rev up their engine
In the dungeon of Kerr Hall, the Ryerson Formula Racing team engineers its own F1 race car
By Charles Vanegas
Members of the Ryerson Formula Racing (RFR) team gather around a partially built race car in the basement of Kerr Hall as they install the engine. It’s too early in development to know all the details, but one thing is certain: it’s going to be fast. The engine they’ve just installed is that of a 2007 Yamaha R6 motorcycle, which has a top speed of 295 km/h. But as a safety precaution, they restricted the air intake — forcing the air entering the engine to fit through the diameter of a dime to bring down the revolutions per minutes (RPM) from 15,000 to about 9,000. “Our cars aren’t designed to go that fast, they would just disintegrate,” said fourth-year mechanical engineering student Dan Savery, who desiged the air intake. Although the car still needs a lot of work, the RFR team has already registered it into the Formula SAE International Series in Brooklyn, Michigan. It’s a competition that pits students from 120 universities worldwide against each other. The event, which will be held May 14 17, tests teams on everything from speed and fuel consumption, to design and marketing presentation. “[F1 racing] is small in North America — the big stuff is in Germany, Italy [and] England,” said team captain and fourth-year mechanical engineering student Greg Lister. Without major corporate backing, Ryerson’s team relies on the university as well as a variety of smaller sponsors for funding. RFR currently has 12 sponsors, but just the registration fee for the Formula SAE series costs $2,100 — and the team still has to be able to afford to build the car. This season, RFR has seen serious commitment from members — some spending upwards of 15 hours per day in the shop. Lister said that the only classes he attends are labs. “I go to school for this team,” Lister said. “I know that [it] will get me a better job than my marks will.” As captain of RFR this season, it’s Lister’s job not only to work on one of the 10 systems of the car, but to also make sure he and the other system managers are communicating and working together. “If the chassis (framework) guy doesn’t communicate with the intake guy and the suspension guy, then things won’t fit,” Lister said. “Every little thing works together.” The team spent the fall semester designing their car and studying the designs of last year’s Formula SAE’s top 10 cars in each individual category. They are now in the building and redesigning stage. While RFR is run through the engineering department and consists predominantly of engineering students, the team is open to all faculties. But for those hoping to work as engineers post-graduation, there’s extra incentive. In addition to the industry skills learned in the shop, involvement with the team counts as a year served by the Professional Engineers of Ontario (PEO), which requires applicants to have four years of supervised engineering to become professional engineers. “In engineering [classes], you don’t learn the teamwork that you learn here,” Savery said. “This is a professional environment. It really forces you to pull up your socks and go above and beyond the engineering program for this race car team.” Once the car is built, the team will test it out during autocross events hosted at the Powerade Centre in Brampton. One of the key tests will be determining who will drive at the Formula SAE. Typically, the driver is a senior member who put considerable time into the team, but Lister said it will come down to one factor. “Fastest man drives ­ — period.”

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STUDENT NIGHT

▶ THURSDAY, Jan 30 vs Brock 7:30 PM ▶ $3.00 Beer / $1 Pop & Juice

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PHOTO: CHARLES VANEGAS

Ryerson’s Formula Racing team posing with this year’s car that they will race in the Formula SAE International series in May.

Getting dizzy spinning at the MAC
By Erin Hesselink
My original expectation for a spin class was that it’s just an easy class for soccer moms to build up a light sweat. I’ve never been so wrong about anything in my life. When I got home from the gym, I was physically, mentally and emotionally exhausted. The Spin and Sculpt class kicked my butt — in a good way. “Spin and Sculpt” actually turned into spin and stretch because the spinning part went longer than expected, which was slightly disappointing, but I kept spinning. The class starts slow but ups the intensity quickly — sitting and standing and leaning and swerving. It was crazy and tiring and ridiculously awesome. The instructor would say “stand!” and we would start to stand but then she would say “sit!” — and we were barely standing. By the time we got to the cooldown, it felt heavenly. My eyes started shutting and I was almost asleep, but then I remembered I was in a Mattamy Athletic Centre (MAC) studio surrounded by sweaty women and one man. The class costs $8 and happens every Saturday morning, from

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PHOTO: FARNIA FEKRI

Erin Hesselink takes on a spinning class.

Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014

SPORTS

11

Jahmal Jones makes history from the three-point line
year point guard Yannick Walcott, who’s played with both Jones and Bakovic. But Jones’s time at Ryerson hasn’t always been on the upswing. Last season, Jones averaged career lows in three-point percentage (26 per cent) and in field goal percentage (38 per cent). The team lost three of its last four regular-season games and was eliminated in the OUA quarter finals — just one year removed from making nationals. This season Jones is averaging a career-high 19 points per game — shooting 46 per cent as three pointers and ranking tenth in the CIS. “Shooting was a big thing for me to work on,” Jones said. “When I first came in I couldn’t shoot the ball… now I’m finally finding rhythm.” In addition to his improved play, Jones is making strides as a leader. “Sometimes I’ll look over during practice or even in the change room and he’s talking to some of the rookies [about] things to work on and what he sees when he’s playing,” Walcott said. The Rams rank fourth in the nation and have one of the best defences in the CIS — they’re third in opponents’ field percentage, seventh in points allowed per game and tenth in opponents’ three-point percentage. “We’re just hoping [that] as we get healthy down the stretch we’ll begin to tighten up and really start to play defence the way we’re capable [of],” Rana said. Jones needs to average 17.5 points per game — 1.5 less than his current average — for the remainder of this season and into next season (his final year at Ryerson) to become the Rams’ all-time leading scorer. “I never really thought about it. I guess I’ll think about it when I’m done,” Jones said. “Right now I’m just trying to enjoy [playing] and give back to the young guys.”

Nothin’ but net

For all your Rams news and recaps visit theeyeopener.com and follow #EyeSports

PHOTO: CHARLES VANEGAS

Jahmal Jones is the second-leading scorer at Ryerson with a career high 1,337 points.

By Michael Grace-Dacosta
With a swish from behind the Ottawa Gee-Gees’ three-point line, Jahmal Jones became the secondleading scorer in school history. At the Rams’ Jan. 18 game, fourth-year point guard Jones took the title from Jan-Michael Nation, who played from 1998–2002. “I never thought it would actually happen to me to be honest,” Jones said. He now trails Boris Bakovic, who is one of the most prolific scorers in Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) history and scored 2,068 points in his four years at Ryerson for the top spot by 731 points as of Jan. 29. Even in high school, Jones was considered a coveted recruit for Ryerson. He was named a second team All-Ontario selection and the most valuable player of the Peel Region all-star game in the 2009– 10 season.

Since joining the Rams, Jones has been named an Ontario University Athletics (OUA) all-star every year. In 2011, he was selected as Ryerson’s Male Athlete of the Year, won a silver medal at the Summer Universiade in Shenzhen, China and played for the Canadian men’s basketball team at the Pan American Games. “He’s the guy who’s had the biggest impact on the program,” Rams head coach Roy Rana said. “He’s the heart and soul of the team… we go where he takes us.” In the 2010–11 season, Jones led all CIS rookies (averaging 17.2 points per game) and propelled the Rams to their first playoff victory since 2003. The next season, Jones was a key component to the Rams making their first CIS Final 8 appearance since the 1998–99 season. He led the Rams to their first-ever national championship win. “Jones is honestly the fastest player I’ve ever seen,” said fifth-

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Rye figure skaters strike silver
By Eman Ali
Ryerson’s figure skating team made history by medaling for overall performance at the Ontario University Athletics (OUA) Winter Invitational — earning 64 points as a team and bringing home silver medals. “What was really nice was that they skated the way they did in practice and they were rewarded for it,” head coach Lauren Wilson said. The invitational was hosted by Western University on Jan. 22–23. Guelph University beat the Rams by 25 points to win gold. “Even though we made history, we need to stay focused,” skater Christina Pulla said. She said that winning silver overall is not only a confidence booster, but is motivation to work harder. “We now have a target on our backs and we need to make sure not to lose it,” Alysha Gjos said. When Gjos started on the team four years ago, it was so small that they couldn’t compete in many team programs. “We only focused on our individual events,” Gjos said. “Doing well as a team wasn’t even on our minds.” But this year they won four gold medals, two silvers and a bronze. During Gjos’s solo program, her music skipped repeatedly. This affected her presentation and one of her jumps, but she managed to finish her routine. The Rams will host the OUA Championships at the Mattamy Athletic Centre on Feb. 13–14.

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12

ARTS & LIFE

Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014

Condoms, candy and confetti
School of Interior Design students impress at Toronto Design Week
By Leah Hansen
A group of fourth-year interior design students were featured at this year’s Toronto Design Week with their project Hanging Matters, a piñata-inspired installation filled with condoms, candy and confetti. Evan Jerry, Ryla Jakelski and Jordan Evans installed their first fullscale exhibit at the annual Come Up to My Room event at the Gladstone Hotel. “A lot of our projects, if we’re building anything, it’s always a smaller object or a model, never full scale,” Jakelski said as she stood with Evans under their installation at the opening reception on Jan. 25. “It’s given us a really good insight into a different element of design.” The scale of the project wasn’t the only challenge, according to Evans. “We were challenged from the beginning by only being able to use the ceiling [in the hallway] so we wanted to do that in a really effective way,” he said. Evans said that brainstorming ideas for the project and then building it by hand took almost three months to complete. The resulting installation was both beautiful and interactive enough to keep visitors engaged. Hundreds of two-part conical paper structures hung down from the string was pulled. “We found that piñatas were something that could really connect with anyone who comes to see it,” Jakelski said. “We thought the idea of 1,500 condoms falling from the ceiling onto people was just really funny.” Lois Weinthal, chair of the School of Interior Design and faculty advisor for Hanging Matters, said the team went above and beyond with the project. “We started off by looking at each of their portfolios and seeing how they worked, how they looked at things in the world and different issues that have come up for them in interior design,” she said. “A lot of it was about how light affects the way we look at interiors and materiality.” Come Up to My Room was a great opportunity for the team to finally see a full-scale project all the way through from conception to exhibition, Weinthal added.

PHOTO: LEAH HANSEN

Ryla Jakelski and Jordan Evans under their installation, created with Evan Jerry, at the Jan. 25 opening reception. For the full photo gallery, visit theeyeopener.com.

We thought the idea of 1,500 condoms falling from the ceiling onto people was just really funny
the ceiling in the hallway, backlit by coloured lights. At the end of each cone hung a string with an attached tag containing instructions to pull it at 9 p.m., 9:30 p.m. or 10 p.m. Each cone was filled with condoms, candy and confetti to be released when

The second floor of the hotel was packed for the event’s opening reception. Several other installations appeared alongside their project, but it was Hanging Matters that seemed to be the crowd favourite. As 9 p.m. approached, there was a rush to get into the hallway to be able to pull one of the 9 p.m. strings. A New Years Eve-like atmosphere crept in as the entire crowd counted down to the hour. A cheer went up

as the contents of the cones cascaded down on the crowd, invoking nostalgia of simpler times of birthday parties and candy-filled paper maché structures. Overall, Jakelski and Evans say the reactions and praise they’ve been getting from people are overwhelming. “Just to have people really happy in this space, that’s all we wanted,” Evans said.

Photography’s new era
Ryerson professor explores the transition from analog to digital
“The RIC is a new museum that is dedicated to the study, teaching, research and exhibition of photography and related media,” Burley said. “This was a natural venue for the work.” Student research assistants from the School of Image Arts also collaborated with Burley throughout the development of his project. “[They] have worked with me on all aspects of the book and exhibition and assisted me in producing the exhibition over a three-month period,” Burley said. Parker Kay, a third-year new media student, was one of the students who helped put together the exhibit. Kay primarily focused on framing photographs and assisting with some of the technical aspects of video production. “The exhibition was entirely Robert’s vision,” said Kay. “I worked with him to execute what he had in mind from the beginning.” The RIC is one of several locations the exhibition will be held. It will travel for the next two years beginning this fall as it heads to the International Museum of Photography and Film in Rochester, NY. “I felt it important to do this project not only to record a disappearing history, but also to mark a time when digital technologies irrevocably changed photography forever,” said Burley.

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PHOTO COURTESY BLAIR TATE

Ryerson prof Robert Burley poses in front of photos from his exhibition, The Disappearance of Darkness, on display now until April 13 at the Ryerson Image Centre.

By Lara Onayak
The collapse of the “Kodak moment” and analog photography as a medium captured Robert Burley’s attention. His findings can now be seen in his exhibition The Disappearance of Darkness, currently on display at the Ryerson Image Centre (RIC). Burley, an associate professor at the School of Image Arts, said his show is about “the digital turn” experienced by everyone on some level. “Both the book and the exhibition were outcomes of a six-year project documenting the demise of traditional photography,” he said. When Burley discovered that the

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historical Kodak Canada complex was going to shut down in 2005, his visualization of the project was predominantly photographs from neglected Kodak factories. In 2007, his own personal history with photography helped him expand the scope of his project to include other related sites and companies. Burley’s exhibit has now been immortalized in a book, first published in 2012 as a joint venture between Princeton University Publishing and the RIC. Burley has been working with the RIC on his exhibition since 2011 and it made its first appearance at the National Gallery of Canada last October.

Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014

COMMUNITIES

13

Walking in a woven wonderland
Ryerson students partake in a new form of graffiti art by bringing yarn bombing to campus
By Natalia Balcerzak
A group of yarn bombers gather on campus in the early hours of the morning. Armed with balls of wool and knitting needles, they work quickly to transform Ryerson into a woven wonderland before the first wave of students make their way to class. The group identifies themselves as Operation Merino (merino being the Spanish word for wool from a special sheep breed). These students are experimenting by introducing a new form of graffiti art to campus. “We found people were generally pretty interested, [but] we had a few funny looks as we were literally giving a tree a knitted sweater,” said Melanie Hall, a fourth-year theatre production student who is one of the knitting artists. Yarn bombing is becoming a popular way to personalize urban settings. Although no one knows exactly where it originated, people living in cities across the globe have started to take part in the fad by covering areas with “knitfiti.” knits on Twitter and Facebook. Members who weren’t knitting experts got to work on their advertising skills. Kyrill Lazarov, a third-year business management student with a passion for videography, led the promotional video. “Our goal was to see how we can communicate with others,” Lazarov said. Although group members spent countless hours knitting different pieces, not all of the creations had the chance to be admired. A tree dressed up in red-and-white stripes to resemble Where’s Waldo? was one of Hall’s most timeconsuming crafts. In less than half a day, it disappeared. The group also knitted moustaches and hung them by the Ted Rogers School of Management, but soon after they were put up, some went missing. Despite the mysterious losses, Hall said she’s glad that yarn bombing is making people happy and hopes that the project inspires others to start knitting too.

PHOTo: NAtALIA BALCERZAK

Students involved in Operation Merino have yarn bombed trees, posts and other objects around campus.

But knit-fanatics make it clear that they take no remorse in decorating the streets with explosions of fuzzy colour. Operation Merino has made its mark on campus. What started as a school project last semester has continued to hold its charm through the winter months. Hall was initially introduced to knitting by her grandmother. Her reacquired hobby turned out to be a valuable asset in her communi-

cations and new media class. Students were placed in groups of eight and asked to think of a noticeable way to engage with the people around them. Yarn bombing seemed like the ideal ploy. Initiating the project within only a week, they yarn bombed posts, staircases and many trees. “It’s something that you walk past several times a day, so we tried to make it relatively bright to capture your attention,” Hall

said. “You turn something ordinary into [something] beautiful.” Using social media to promote themselves, their class campaign turned into a success. Other students began posting photos on Instagram and talking about the

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14

FUN

Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014

A Mockery of Democracy
Opinion by Jake Scott
dropped tuition a single cent! So let’s take that money and do something fantastic with it! I’m thinking daily puppy clinics and then kitten clinics. Oh, and research in bionics and cyborg technology. Can’t have a future without robo-humans now, can we? Next we need to secede from Canada and become our own nation. Imagine if we beat Quebec to the punch! We can absorb Zanzibar and Remingtons and turn them into a classroom with puppies and strippers for everyone! There’s other stuff I want to do, but it’s probably not that important. I have a feeling that you simply do not care about the inner workings of democracy. If you’re going to vote, vote for me. Or don’t vote for me if you think student government is a load of crap. That’s cool too. Basically if you’re apathetic, like puppies and cyborgs and want to see how far this joke can go, vote for John Scott. Yes, that is my legal name. It’s a long story. Anyhow, vote for me and be happy! Otherwise, piss off.

Pug Life: Richard Puxon

It’s everybody’s favourite time of year! That’s right folks, it’s RSU election time and this year I’ve decided to throw my hat into the ring. Mind you, there was no physical hat and even less of a ring, but I tossed a fedora into traffic, so it counts. I’m what you would call a “dark horse candidate.” Unfortunately, this doesn’t mean I ride an undead mare through the moors of England with a pumpkin on my head. I thought it did, but had my dreams dashed. No, it means I’m not running under a slate. I’m running alone, like an undead mare through the moors... Anyway, you probably want to know why you should vote for me. The answer is kind of complicated, so hang in there. First of all I want to get rid of the Drop Fees Campaign. Since its inception the intiative hasn’t

ILLUSTRATiON: DASHA ZOLOTA

Non-subliminal future things!
By Jake Scott
Aries Leo Sagittarius Your heart will swell with happi- Your only escape from the monot- Shot through the heart, and you’re ness when you vote for the great- ony of terrible frosh week concerts to blame. Darling you give gloves is to vote J.S. est candidate money can buy. a bad day (bad day). Taurus Virgo Capricorn

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All the people you’re attracted to Your life will have substantially And from on high ye shall see, will suddenly see your greatness more puppies and kittens if you a presidential candidate. make a simple and easy decision. after voting for John Scott. Oh wait, that’s me! Gemini Libra Aquarius

You will give people puppies and A revolution will begin when you Astonishment will fill your brain ascend to supreme leader of abso- convince everyone to vote in the when you work out the intricate upcoming RSU election. lutely nothing. subtleties of propaganda. Cancer Scorpio Pisces

You will undermine the democratic Freedom isn’t free, it actually costs But honestly, vote if you like. It process at Ryerson by voting for a the same as a bumper sticker. One won’t make much of a difference. that says freedom isn’t free. ridiculous third-party candidate. Your tuition will still go up.

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Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014

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RYERSON | EYEOPENER: 10 (W) X 6.8 (D/H)

BE PART OF THE THINKING

THINKING ABOUT OUTPERFORMING THE COMPETITION? SO ARE WE.
OUR WORLD-RENOWNED FACULTY BRING FRESH THINKING TO THE CLASSROOMS OF OUR GRADUATE PROGRAMS WHERE WE ARE PREPARING THE NEXT GENERATION OF BUSINESS LEADERS.

YOU DON’T NEED AN UNDERGRADUATE BUSINESS DEGREE OR ANY WORK EXPERIENCE TO STUDY AT ONE OF THE COUNTRY’S LEADING BUSINESS SCHOOLS
• Our MSc programs in finance, management and marketing are research-based programs that train students to become experts in specialized fields of business • The Graduate Diploma and Certificate in Business Administration provide students with non-business backgrounds with graduate-level business skills • The John Molson MBA with Complete CFA Integration offered by Concordia’s Goodman Institute of Investment Management allows students to pursue two world-recognized designations simultaneously, while working full-time (offered in Montreal and Toronto)
The LEED silver-certified John Molson Building is the dynamic green centre of Concordia’s downtown Montreal campus and was designed with the next-generation business leader in mind.

MEET OUR GRADUATE PROGRAM REPRESENTATIVES: TORONTO Saturday, February 1 3:30 - 6:00 p.m. Monday, February 3 4:00 - 9:30 p.m. OTTAWA Wednesday, February 12 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. Novotel Ottawa 33 Nicholas Street Hilton Toronto 145 Richmond St. W. (QS World MBA) Metro Toronto Convention Centre (The MBA Tour)

R E G I S T E R AT: JOHNMOLSON.CONCORDIA.CA/INFOSESSIONS

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Wednesday Jan. 29, 2014