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By: Nelson K Alexander 1MS07EE035

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Introduction What is CAN, History when to use CAN CAN protocol signals, salient features Advantages Applications Disadvantages Conclusion

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ƒC ƒA

- control - area ƒN ± network
Introduction

ƒ protocol for wired asynchronous serial communication Introduction .

The CAN protocol was internationally standardized in 1993 (as ISO 11898-1) It was developed for automotive application keeping in mind the electromagnetic noisy environment it operates in .ƒ This bus system was developed by Robert Bosch in the 1980s. CAN protocol more than 17 years ƒ ƒ ƒ Introduction .

ƒ To connect a large number of controllers each working relatively independent (distributive control ) and don¶t require continuous data link If required data transmission is with in 1Mbit/sec (and 40m in length) High reliability and error proofing To reduce cost ƒ ƒ ƒ .

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CAN protocol .

CAN protocol .

CAN protocol .

CAN protocol .

CAN protocol .

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ Data Frame Remote Frame Error Frame Overload Frame CAN protocol .

ƒ Carrier Sense Multiple Access / Collision Detection Synchronization Bit stuffing and destuffing Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) ƒ ƒ ƒ CAN protocol .

ƒ Also called arbitration CAN protocol .

CAN protocol .

CAN protocol .

Instead of sending an acknowledge signal an error frame is sent. CAN protocol .ƒ Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) The CRC is calculated over the non-stuffed bit stream starting with the SOF and ending with the Data field by the transmitting node The CRC is calculated again of the de stuffed bit stream by the receiving node A comparison of the received CRC and the calculated CRC is made by the receiver In case of mismatch the erroneous data frame is discarded .

Message Frame Check One undetected error every 1000 years CAN protocol .Monitoring (transmitters compare the bit levels to be transmitted with the bit levels detected on the bus) .ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ .Bit Stuffing .Cyclic Redundancy Check .

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ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ Lower cost at vehicle construction Increased flexibility and reusability of design Reduces time to market Facilitates drive by wire which reduces cost further Facilitates advanced features in vehicles Enhances debug at point of service .

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ Building Automatisation Domestic & Food distribution appliances Automotive & Transportation Robotic Production Automatisation Medical Agriculture .

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ƒ ƒ ƒ LIN ± local interconnect network MOST.Media Oriented Systems Transport Flexray .

ƒ ƒ Data Bottle necks Need for even more Reliability .

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1983 : Start of the Bosch internal project to develop an in-vehicle network ƒ 1986 : Official introduction of CAN protocol ƒ 1987 : First CAN controller chips from Intel and Philips Semiconductors ƒ 1991 : Bosch¶s CAN specification 2.0 published ƒ 1991 :CAN Kingdom CAN-based higher-layer protocol introduced by ƒ Kvaser ƒ 1992 : CAN in Automation (CiA) international users and manufacturers group established ƒ 1992 : CAN Application Layer (CAL) protocol published by CiA ƒ 1992 : First cars from Mercedes-Benz used CAN network ƒ 1993 : ISO 11898 standard published ƒ 1994 : 1st international CAN Conference (iCC) organized by CiA ƒ 1994 : DeviceNet protocol introduction by Allen-Bradley ƒ 1995 : ISO 11898 amendment (extended frame format) published ƒ 1995 : CANopen protocol published by CiA ƒ 2000 : Development of the time-triggered communication protocol for CAN (TTCAN) ƒ Appendix .

Appendix .

BUILDING AUTOMATION DOMESTIC & FOOD DISTRIBUTION APPLIANCES ƒ ƒ ƒ Heating Control Air Conditioning (AC) ƒ Security (fire. burglar«) ƒ Access Control ƒ Light Control ƒ ƒ Washing machines Dishes cleaner Self-service bottle distributors connected to internet Appendix .

AUTOMOTIVE & TRANSPORTATION ROBOTIC ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ Dash board electronic Comfort electronic Ship equipment Train equipment Lifts Busses Trucks Storage transportation systems ƒ Equipment for handicapped people ƒ Service & Analysis systems ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ Appendix Tool machines Transport systems Assembly machines Packaging machines Knitting machines Plastic injection machines .

PRODUCTION AUTOMATISATION & ROBOTIC AGRICULTURE ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ Control and link of production machines Production control Tool machines Transport systems Assembly machines Packaging machines Knitting machines Plastic injection machines Harvester machines Seeding/Sowing machines Tractor control Control of live-stock equipment Appendix .