Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan

April 2007
City Council Ordinance No. 3070
Prepared for:
City of Chula Vista
276 Fourth Avenue
Chula Vista, CA 91910
Prepared by:
Chula Vista
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Acknowledgements
City Council
Cheryl Cox, Mayor
Steve Castaneda, Councilmember
John McCann, Councilmember
Rudy Ramirez, Councilmember
Jerry R. Rindone, Councilmember
Planning Commission
Bryan Felber, Chair
Pamela Bensoussan
Joanne Clayton
Lisa Moctezuma
Michael Spethman
Bill Tripp
Scott Vinson
Urban Core Specific Plan Advisory Committee
Stephen C. Padilla, Former Mayor, Chair
Dr. Richard Freeman, Vice Chair
Nikki Clay
Diane Carpenter
Brett Davis
Sharon Floyd
Henri Harb
Tom Hom
Peter Mabrey
Greg Mattson
Gary Nordstrom
Manuel Oncina
Bill Ostrem
Debi Owen
Jerry Rindone, City Councilmember
Pedro Romero, Jr.
Dave Rowlands, Former City Manager
Colton Sudberry
Chula Vista
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
City Staff
The following is a list of the core staff team involved in the preparation of the
Specific Plan. It is acknowledged that many other staff members participated
in the planning process.
Ann Hix, Acting Community Development Director
Mary Ladiana, Planning Manager
Brian Sheehan, Senior Community Development Specialist
Ray Pe, Senior Community Development Specialist
Jim Sandoval, Planning Director
Jim Hare, Assistant Planning Director
Luis Hernandez, Deputy Planning Director
Ed Batchelder, Deputy Planning Director
Alex Al-Agha, City Engineer
Frank Rivera, Deputy City Engineer
Samir Nuhaily, Senior Civil Engineer
Jim Newton, Civil Engineer
Dave Kaplan, Transportation Engineer
Ann Moore, City Attorney
Joe Gamble, Landscape Planner
Ed Hall, Principal Recreation Manager
Prepared by:
Chula Vista
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Table of Contents
I. Executive Summary I-1
II. Introduction and Background II-1
A. What is a Specific Plan? II-1
B. Consistency with the General Plan II-2
C. Plan Purpose and Intent II-4
D. Boundaries and Setting II-5
E. Relevant City Documents II-9
F. Community Outreach Process II-20
III. Vision III-1
A. Vision for the Urban Core III-1
B. Ten Key Principles III-4
C. Vision Areas III-5
IV. Existing Conditions IV-1
A. Introduction IV-1
B. Historic Resources IV-2
C. Land Use, General Plan, and Zoning IV-12
D. Circulation and Mobility IV-17
E. Economic Conditions IV-19
V. Mobility V-1
A. Introduction V-1
B. Pedestrian Facilities V-2
C. Bicycle Facilities V-5
D. Transit Routes V-9
E. Vehicle Traffic V-14
F. Parking V-46
VI. Land Use and Development Regulations VI-1
A. Administration VI-1
B. Land Use Matrix VI-4
C. Development Standards VI-10
D. Special Provisions for Neighborhood Transition Combining Districts
and Transit Focus Areas VI-40
E. Special Provisions VI-42
Chula Vista
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
F. Urban Amenity Requirements and Incentives VI-48
G. Signs VI-52
H. Other Regulations VI-53
I. Development Exceptions VI-54
VII. Development Design Guidelines VII-1
A. Introduction and Background VII-1
B. What is Urban Design? VII-4
C. How to Use the Design Guidelines VII-5
D. Village District VII-33
E. Urban Core District VII-79
F. Corridors District VII-107
G. Special Guidelines VII-139
VIII. Public Realm Design Guidelines VIII-1
A. Introduction VIII-1
B. Purpose VIII-2
C. Urban Design Treatment VIII-3
D. Village Theme VIII-5
E. Urban Core Theme VIII-12
F. Urban Amenities, The Unifying Elements VIII-27
G. Landscape Treatment VIII-30
H. Sidewalks and Pedestrian Improvements VIII-34
I. Lighting Concepts VIII-37
J. Street Furnishings VIII-39
K. Key Intersections VIII-43
L. Gateways and Wayfinding VIII-44
M. Public Art VIII-50
N. Parks, Plazas, Paseos, and Public Spaces VIII-52
IX. Infrastructure and Public Facilities IX-1
A. Introduction IX-1
B. Growth Forecasts IX-2
C. Water, Sewer, Drainage and Solid Waste IX-3
D. Law Enforcement, Fire Protection and Emergency Services IX-13
E. Schools IX-19
F. Parks and Recreation IX-23
G. Energy and Telecommunications IX-30
Chula Vista
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
X. Plan Implementation and Community Benefits Program X-1
A. Introduction X-1
B. Regulatory Framework X-2
C. Visualization X-4
D. Long Term Implementation Process X-9
E. Description of Improvements X-11
F. Mobility Improvements X-12
G. Urban Amenity Improvements X-17
H. Additional Community Improvements X-20
I. Key Short-Term Demonstration Projects X-22
J. Infrastructure Financing Mechanisms and Funding Sources X-24
K. Community Benefit Analysis X-28
XI. Plan Administration XI-1
A. Introduction XI-1
B. Specific Plan Adoption XI-2
C. Specific Plan Administration XI-3
D. Specific Plan Amendment XI-9
E. Five Year Review XI-12
Appendices (Bound under separate cover)
Appendix A. Glossary
Appendix B. Traffic Impact Analysis
Appendix C. Market Analysis
Appendix D. Public Facilities and Services Program
Chapter I Executive Summary
Chula Vista
I. Executive Summary
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Chapter I Executive Summary
Chula Vista
I-1
I. Executive Summary
The City of Chula Vista has grown substantially over the years through annexations
and development, and is the second largest city in San Diego County. Chula
Vista continues to play a significant role in the region’s growth and is emerging
as the hub of civic and cultural activity in South San Diego County. Chula Vista is
one of the most rapidly growing areas in the region with a projected population
of approximately 300,000 by 2030. While much of the City’s recent growth
has occurred in large master planned communities developing on vacant land
in the eastern portion of the City, demographic changes and other influences
are bringing about population growth and renewed interest and need for
revitalization and redevelopment in the older, developed western portion of the
City.
The recent update to the City of Chula Vista General Plan focused primarily
on revitalization and redevelopment within the older, developed area in the
western portion of the City. The Urban Core Specific Plan follows the direction
and vision provided in the City’s General Plan and establishes a more detailed
vision, guidelines, and regulations for future development and beautification
in the traditional downtown area. The Specific Plan area is generally located
east of I-5, west of Del Mar Avenue, north of L Street, and south of C Street.
While there are approximately 1,700 acres within the Specific Plan boundary,
it was determined that changes should be focused on areas more in need of
redevelopment. Therefore, the Specific Plan focuses on the redevelopment of
approximately 690 gross acres within the larger Specific Plan study area. The
Specific Plan creates a framework to attract investment and be a catalyst for
revitalization. The overall goal is to create pedestrian-friendly environments,
gathering places and public amenities through community development.
The Specific Plan considers marketplace realities to increase the economic viability
of the downtown and surrounding areas to meet City, business, and community
needs. The Specific Plan addresses land use mixes and distributions; zoning;
urban and sustainable design; vehicular, bicycle and pedestrian circulation;
parking; transit services and facilities; public improvements and infrastructure;
gateways and image; street furniture and pedestrian amenities; parks and
public spaces; implementation strategies and possible funding sources. The
Specific Plan is based upon the valuable comments and participation from
residents, business leaders, and other community stakeholders, as well as the
diligent and committed Urban Core Specific Plan Advisory Committee.
The intent of the Specific Plan is to facilitate and encourage development and
improvements that will help realize the community’s vision for the Urban Core
area. The community wants the Urban Core to be a desirable San Diego County
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
I-2
destination for both visitors and residents alike, with an identity of its own. The
community wants a downtown that is vibrant, forward thinking but respectful of its
past, and alive with thriving businesses, attractive housing, and entertainment,
cultural and recreational activities. The plan envisions a broad mixture of uses
and business opportunities, as well as a wide range of residential housing types.
The Urban Core is envisioned to be the “heart” of the community, where people
gather to enjoy special events, farmers markets, street performances, and
outdoor dining. It is a downtown with a synergistic mix of land uses, attractive
streetscapes and sidewalks, full of people, all interconnected with a series of
plazas and pedestrian paseos. To this end, the Specific Plan includes a variety
of recommendations to help obtain this vision including:
• Mobility recommendations
• Land Use Development Standards
• Development Design Guidelines
• Public Realm Design Guidelines
• Plan Implementation Strategies and Community Benefits Program
Mobility
Specific Plan mobility recommendations provide a variety of approaches and
strategies to “get people from here to there.” Improvements for the main
thoroughfares and other streets within the Urban Core are identified in Chapter
V - Mobility and address pedestrian, bicycle, transit, automobile and parking
opportunities.
Traffic calming elements and pedestrian improvements are introduced to slow
traffic and create a more pedestrian-friendly environment, such as along Third
Avenue in the Village District. The suggested improvements include bulbouts
(sidewalk extensions), narrowed travel lanes, reducing the number of travel
widths in some areas, special paving at crosswalks and median refuge islands.
Paseos and pedestrian walkways are emphasized in the Specific Plan as well.
For bicycle transit, the Mobility chapter includes recommendation for new
and upgraded bikeway facilities throughout the area for both recreational and
commuting users.
Three transit focus areas within the Urban Core provide multi-modal opportunities
for both local and regional transit. The stations located at I-5/H Street and I-5/E
Street link to the San Diego Trolley’s Blue Line. As a feature of the Specific Plan,
a new shuttle loop system called the West Side Shuttle is proposed. The shuttle
route will serve both the Urban Core Specific Plan and Bayfront Master Plan
areas in western Chula Vista. This new service would complement existing and
planned future transit improvements.
Chula Vista
Chapter I Executive Summary
I-3
A program of improvements to the roadway network is proposed, especially
reintroducing the street grid in areas where it has been interrupted over time.
The Mobility chapter also addresses off-street parking within the Urban Core
Districts and offers public parking strategies, including parking districts for
portions of Third Avenue and strategically located parking structures particularly
for the transit focus areas.
Land Use Development Standards
Chapter VI – Land Use and Development Standards establishes three different
Specific Plan Districts: Village, Urban Core and Corridors, as well as twenty-six
subdistricts to allow for customized regulations and standards. The subdistrict
regulations shape the building form and intensity, allowable land uses, and
parking requirements. In summary, the land uses are customized to encourage
a mix of pedestrian-oriented uses integrated with higher density residential. The
development and parking standards have been relaxed to encourage investment
in the Urban Core, including locating buildings closer to the street with parking
behind or tucked under the building. The Specific Plan regulations stress
flexibility and provision of urban amenities such as streetscape improvements,
parks, plazas, transit, cultural arts and mixed use.
The tallest buildings are allowed in the transit focus areas located at I-5/H Street
and I-5/E Street where support by alternative modes of transportation is readily
available. Neighborhood Transition Combining Districts have been created for
subdistricts adjacent to R-1 and R-2 zoning areas to protect and buffer existing
residential neighborhoods and ensure compatible, stepped-back building
heights and setbacks. Special provisions address live/work units, mixed-uses
and parking structures. Zoning incentives are provided to entice developers to
provide urban amenities such as parks and plazas beyond required levels.
Development Design Guidelines
In Chapter VII – Development Design Guidelines, comprehensive design
guidelines are provided for development within the three Specific Plan Districts, as
well as special guidelines for hotels, mixed-use projects, multi-family residential
projects, and sustainability principles. The form-based guidelines supplement
Specific Plan development regulations and the City’s Zoning Ordinance to create
a more attractive, well-designed urban environment. The guidelines apply to
construction, conservation, adaptive reuse, and enhancement of buildings
and street scenes. Although no specific architectural style is prescribed, the
quality of design is guided by policies addressing site planning, building height/
form/mass, building materials/colors, storefront design, landscaping, lighting,
parking, circulation, signs and other development considerations. The goal of
the guidelines is to create a positive image for the Urban Core and frame the
streets and sidewalks with inviting buildings, entrances, awnings and outdoor
dining areas.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
I-4
Public Realm Design Guidelines
Chapter VIII – Public Realm Design Guidelines focuses on ways to create more
attractive and pedestrian-friendly public environments and gathering places.
Street furniture, landscaping, sidewalks, crosswalks, lighting, paseos, public
art, parks and plaza concepts are defined. Two main themes emerge within the
Specific Plan: an art-deco inspired design theme is proposed along Third Avenue,
building upon the era when much of the development along the street occurred,
and a more contemporary theme is proposed for the remaining public realm
areas in the Urban Core, indicative of a forward-looking Chula Vista. Gateway
treatments are proposed at six locations to welcome people to the Urban Core
and to reinforce the identity of the Urban Core.
Plan Implementation Strategies and Community Benefits Program
One of the most important elements of the Specific Plan is identifying the
implementation programs that will result in the desired changes emphasized in
the Specific Plan. The sole purpose of the Specific Plan is to improve the quality
of life for Chula Vista in general, with a focus on the west side in particular.
Visual simulations of potential future conditions for four areas of the Specific
Plan are provided to help illustrate the possible positive changes and community
benefits envisioned.
The visions expressed in the Specific Plan include investments in streets, transit,
parks, plazas, cultural facilities, protection of historic resources, schools, and
improvements to City services such as utilities, police, fire, health and human
services. These investments will be supported by a partnership between the
City and the private sector as new development occurs. Chapter X – Plan
Implementation and Community Benefits Program contains realization strategies
and forms a critical link between the improvements the City desires and how
both the City and private investment will contribute to make the improvements
happen. Specific improvements are identified, and financial tools and strategies
are outlined.
Chula Vista
Chapter II Introduction
II. Introduction and Background
A. What is a Specific Plan? II-1
B. Consistency with the General Plan II-2
C. Plan Purpose and Intent II-4
D. Boundaries and Setting II-5
E. Relevant City Documents II-9
F. Community Outreach Process II-20
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Chapter II Introduction
Chula Vista
II-1
II. Introduction and Background
A. What is a Specific Plan?
The Urban Core Specific Plan (“Specific Plan”) is established pursuant to the
authority granted in the Chula Vista Municipal Code Section 19.07, Specific
Plans, and the California Government Code, Title 7, Division 1, Chapter 3, Article
8, Sections 65450 through 65457 and contains all the mandatory elements
identified in Government Code Section 65451.
Specific Plans must be consistent with the policies contained within the General
Plan and may be adopted by resolution or by ordinance. This differentiation
allows cities to choose whether their specific plans, or portions thereof, will
be policy driven (adopted by resolution), or regulatory (adopted by ordinance).
This Specific Plan is adopted by ordinance. All zoning related portions of
this Specific Plan (i.e. land use matrix, permitted uses and development
regulations) are prepared to serve as regulatory provisions and supersede
other regulations and ordinances of the City for the control of land use and
development within the Specific Plan subdistrict boundaries. Other portions,
such as the development design guidelines and public realm design guidelines
are provided as City policies aimed at providing direction for future planning and
public improvement efforts. Future development projects, subdivisions, public
improvement projects and other implementing programs should be consistent
with the adopted Specific Plan.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
II-2
Land Use Existing Net Increase Total
Multi-Family
Residential
(dwelling units) 3,700 7,100 10,800
Commercial Retail
(square feet) 3,000,000 1,000,000 4,000,000
Commercial Office
(square feet) 2,400,000 1,300,000 3,700,000
Commercial -
Visitor Serving
(square feet) 1,300,000 1,300,000
Projected Buildout
Fg. 2.1
Projected buildout of the Specific Plan area
B. Consistency with the General Plan
Over the last several years the City of Chula Vista has been in the process of
updating the City’s General Plan, which was last comprehensively updated in
1989. The main focus during the 1989 update was on the newly annexed and
developing eastern portions of the City. Although comprehensive, the recent
General Plan (2005) has instead been primarily focused on the currently
developed areas of the city, in particular the western portions of the City. As such,
the planning effort was confronted with balancing “how” the City should grow
over the next 25 years given the continued growth projections with “where” the
growth should occur, given the numerous established stable neighborhoods.
This challenge was seen as an opportunity to utilize the key principles found in
smart growth strategies relative to urban revitalization and apply them to areas
that have experienced recent decline or underutilization.
The General Plan is based on many of the common elements and concepts of
smart growth such as:
• Provide a mix of compatible land uses
• Take advantage of compact building design
• Create a range of housing opportunities and choices
• Create walkable neighborhoods
• Strengthen and direct development towards existing communities
• Provide a variety of transportation choices
In order to realize the vision for the urban core established by the updated
General Plan, it was recognized that existing zoning for the urban core needed
“re-tooling”. The 30+ year-old zoning regulations either precluded or created a
cumbersome entitlement process
to achieve the variety of living,
employment and service choices
envisioned by the General Plan and
quite commonplace in the 21st
century. Therefore, the Specific
Plan was prepared to provide a set
of contemporary implementing
tools to allow new development
and redevelopment to occur over
the next 20-25 years. To that end,
the Specific Plan anticipates the
following projected buildout over
the life of the plan consistent with
the General Plan. (Refer to Figure
2.1)
Chapter II Introduction
Chula Vista
II-3
Due to the length of time that buildout of the Specific Plan is expected to take
(i.e. 20+ years), as well as the nature of urban revitalization, the exact extent,
timing and sequencing of development is difficult to predict. However, the
Specific Plan is not a static document and as such will be revisited on an on-
going basis to evaluate progress towards buildout projections, priority ranking
of important public improvements and other issues that may arise. A series of
checks and balances will be part of that process and may include review under
the City’s Growth Management Ordinance, the biannual budgetary and Capital
Improvements Program (CIP) cycle, and five-year progress check of the Specific
Plan.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
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C. Plan Purpose and Intent
First and foremost, the purpose of the Specific Plan is to revitalize and enhance
the economic, social, cultural, and recreational fabric of the City’s Urban Core.
An overall goal is to develop the Urban Core with a mix of retail, office, and
residential uses that are supported by a variety of options for moving from
one place to another, often referred to as “mobility”. The Specific Plan is a
tool to facilitate and prioritize community improvement projects, evaluate
development proposals and new land uses, and enhance existing uses. To do
this, the Specific Plan provides a structure to implement the Specific Plan vision
over time. Implementation measures include development standards, design
guidelines, land use regulations, and a series of specific actions that may be
undertaken by both the City and private sector to make progress toward the
Specific Plan goals. Existing City zoning is not adequate to realize the desired
vision for the Specific Plan area and must be updated and retooled. As the
existing zoning dates back to last century, revisions are necessary to modernize
and allow for the living and lifestyle choices appropriate for current needs.
The Specific Plan provides detailed development scenarios and regulations for
the Urban Core. It features focused design guidelines tailored to individual
neighborhoods.
The Specific Plan focuses on increasing the economic viability of the downtown
and surrounding areas in order to meet City, business, and community
needs. Many of the stable residential areas within the Specific Plan area will
be maintained with as few changes as possible, though all neighborhoods,
including those outside the Specific Plan boundaries, benefit from the
improved services and amenities (e.g. bikeways, parks, etc.) resulting from the
revitalization efforts.
The Specific Plan seeks to establish a direct connection between the City of
Chula Vista General Plan and revitalization and enhancement opportunities
within the Urban Core of the City. An overall goal is the orderly development of
Chula Vista’s Urban Core in a method consistent with the City’s General Plan
and, more specifically, with the vision as developed through the Specific Plan
public outreach process.
The intent is to produce a realistic, market-based action plan that will bring
about programs, policies, and partnerships that will facilitate a major increase
in the quality and quantity of retail and other commercial activity and provide
additional housing opportunities in the Urban Core. The future Urban Core
will contain a diversity of public, commercial, civic, financial, cultural, and
residential uses that will emphasize its role as the central focal point of the
City.
Chapter II Introduction
Chula Vista
II-5
Fg. 2.2
Regional context map (Source: City of Chula Vista)
D. Boundaries and Setting
1. Background
The Specific Plan area represents the traditional downtown heart of the City. This
northwestern corner of the City was the nucleus of Colonel William Dickinson’s
town plan for Chula Vista from the late nineteenth century (see Figure 4.1 -
Chula Vista Plat Map). Originally a thriving agricultural community known for
lemon orchards, the City’s main economic focus shifted to industrial production
during the time of World War II, due to the opening of Rohr Aircraft Corporation,
a major manufacturing company supplying the US military forces. Due to the
proximity to the San Diego metropolitan area, the City of Chula Vista has since
acted as a commuting suburb of the larger city. Over the last 30 years, large
tracts of land have been annexed in the City’s eastern area and subsequently
developed as master planned communities. One major annexation was that
of the Montgomery community, a 3.5 square mile area considered the largest
annexation of an inhabited area in State history. Over the last century, especially
the latter decades, significant annexation, and subsequent population growth
led to a decentralization of the City center. The Specific Plan will revitalize
the fabric of the City’s Urban Core and reestablish the focus on the traditional
center of the community.
2. Regional Context
The City of Chula Vista
covers approximately 52
square miles of southern
San Diego County and is
the second largest city in
the County. The City is
bounded by the South San
Diego Bay on the west, the
Sweetwater River on the
north, mountains and the
Otay Lakes on the east,
and the Otay River to the
south. Please see Figures
2.2 - Regional Context
Map and 2.3 - City Context
Map.
In 2004, the City had an
estimated population of
approximately 210,000.
Based on the General Plan Update population projections, the population in
Chula Vista will continue to rise, reaching approximately 300,000 by 2030.
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Chapter II Introduction
Chula Vista
II-7
Though for many years Chula Vista was largely a residential suburban
community, the City is evolving into a regional economic center. Located just
south of downtown San Diego and a few miles north of the United States-
Mexican border, the City is well-situated to take advantage of two very different
economic markets. Regional transportation routes, such as the I-5, I-805,
and SR-125 corridors as well as links to the San Diego Trolley system, are
contiguous to the Urban Core boundary and provide convenient connections
to the surrounding region. The traditional downtown area along Third Avenue,
as well as the Chula Vista Center and other retail facilities along H Street, have
been regional shopping attractions for decades. However, expansion of the
City to the east, as well as growth in other parts of the County, have led to a
decline in the Urban Core’s market share of consumers.
3. Specific Plan Boundary
The Specific Plan Study Area covers approximately 1,700 acres within the
northwestern portion of the City of Chula Vista. It is generally bordered by the
San Diego Freeway (I-5) to the west, C Street to the north, Del Mar Street to the
east, and L Street to the south. While there are 1,700 acres within the Specific
Plan Study Area, it was determined that changes should be focused on areas
more in need of redevelopment. Therefore, the Specific Plan focuses new
development zoning regulations and design guidelines for approximately 690
gross acres within the larger Specific Plan Study Area, denoted as the Specific
Plan Subdistricts Area. Existing zoning outside of the Specific Plan Subdistricts
Area is not modified by this Specific Plan and future development outside of
the Specific Plan Subdistricts Area will be processed under the existing zoning
ordinance. Its final form takes into consideration areas of unique urban
design challenges, areas of particular economic interest, and areas in need
of character retention or redefinition. (Refer to Figure 2.4 for a map of the
Specific Plan area.)
4. Setting
The Urban Core area is flanked by the proposed Bayfront project to the west and
the almost built-out territory east of the I-805. Residents from the east and west
will primarily access the Urban Core by car; however, alternative transportation
modes are encouraged. In addition, walking and bicycling between the Urban
Core and the proposed Bayfront will be feasible as the distance from 3rd Avenue
to Lagoon Drive is approximately two miles. E Street, F Street and H Street
provide linkages over the I-5 between the Urban Core and Bayfront.
The Specific Plan area is characterized by urbanized development on relatively
flat topography. The built environment largely consists of one- to three-story
buildings with a few exceptions. Streets are generally laid out in a traditional
grid pattern while some portions of the grid system have been substantially
interrupted over time. Freeway access is predominantly provided at E Street, H
Street and J Street.
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Chapter II Introduction
Chula Vista
II-9
E. Relevant City Documents
The following documents provided the basis for many of the goals, polices,
standards, guidelines and approaches developed for the Specific Plan. In
some cases the Specific Plan provides the implementing regulations or further
refinements to existing policies contained in these documents, and in other
cases the Specific Plan replaces the relevant documents. Future development
proposals must be found consistent with the Specific Plan, therefore, where
inconsistencies arise in implementation documents, the provisions of the
Specific Plan will take precedence.
1. City of Chula Vista General Plan
The City’s General Plan is intended to guide the physical development of the
City over a 20-30 year time frame. It establishes a vision for the City’s future.
The plan provides guidelines for making decisions concerning development of
the City. Though largely focused on land use decisions, the plan addresses a
range of elements, such as housing, open space and conservation, and public
facilities and services that contribute to the City’s well-being.
State law requires that the General Plan cover the following areas: Land Use,
Circulation, Housing, Conservation, Open-Space, Noise, and Safety. In addition,
cities may choose to address subjects of particular interest to that jurisdiction;
Chula Vista’s plan includes elements on Public Facilities and Services, Growth
Management and Child Care.
The Specific Plan is consistent with and furthers the objectives of the City of
Chula Vista’s General Plan by providing detailed criteria for development of
specific sites and public streetscape improvements.
The update to the General Plan built upon the City’s 1989 General Plan and
provides a vision for the next 25 years of Chula Vista’s future. Goals, objectives,
and policies are presented that will guide the development of Chula Vista
through the year 2030. Reference to the General Plan throughout this Specific
Plan refers to the updated General Plan (2005) unless specifically referenced
to previous versions (e.g. 1989).
The General Plan (2005) includes a new Economic Development Element
and Environmental Element. It also features a combined Land Use and
Transportation element that reinforces the link between land use planning
and circulation throughout the City. An Implementation Chapter facilitates the
ease of using the Specific Plan and makes the Specific Plan more beneficial
for the citizens of Chula Vista. In the northwest area of the City, the General
Plan recommended land use changes to “Focus Areas” primarily consisting of
existing commercial corridors and residential areas close to transit facilities.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
II-10
The Specific Plan’s vision, goals, and implementation measures are based on
direction given in the City’s General Plan. There are many goals, objectives,
and policies within the General Plan that are relevant to this Specific Plan; the
most representative objectives have been selected and are listed below. These
objectives may apply to the entire City or only to the specific district noted in
the policy.
a. Vision and Themes
Each of the Vision and Themes established in the General Plan will be
implemented in the Urban Core and are reflected in the subsequent pages and
chapters of the UCSP. For example, General Plan Theme 4 - Improved Mobility
is addressed through UCSP Chapter V - Mobility and Chapter VIII - Public Realm
Design Guidelines. The following theme is of particular importance to the Urban
Core:
• Theme 8 - Shaping the Future Through the Present and Past: Chula Vista
values its unique heritage and sense of place and manages change in a
way that complements the important qualities and features that shape
its identity.
To this end, it is important to recognize the specific components of the UCSP
that implement this theme.
1. Regulate new development and other physical alterations to be
completed in a manner that respects the character, scale, and historical
value of the City:
Chapter IV - Existing Conditions
Chapter V - Mobility
Chapter VI - Land Use Development Regulations
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines
Chapter IX - Infrastructure and Public Facilities
Chapter X - Plan Implementation and Community Benefits Program
2. Harmonizing changes to blend in with and enhance the positive aspects
of what is already there, see:
Chapter IV - Existing Conditions
Chapter VI - Land Use Development Regulations
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines
Chapter II Introduction
Chula Vista
II-11
3. Shaping established Chula Vista’s future through policies that focus on
preserving and enhancing stable residential neighborhoods, see:
Chapter VI - Land Use Development Regulations
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines
Chapter IX - Infrastructure and Public Facilities
Chapter X - Plan Implementation and Community Benefits Program
4. Enhancing community image, see:
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines
Chapter IX - Infrastructure and Public Facilities
Chapter X - Plan Implementation and Community Benefits Program
5. Protecting cultural and historical resources, see:
Chapter IV - Existing Conditions
Chapter V - Mobility
Chapter VI - Land Use Development Regulations
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines
6. Implementing compatible land uses and edge transition, see:
Chapter VI - Land Use Development Regulations
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines
b. Land Use and Transportation Objectives
• Objective LUT-1: Provide a balance of residential and non-residential
development throughout the City that achieves a vibrant development
pattern, enhances the character of the City, and meets the present and
future needs of all residents and businesses.
• Objective LUT-2: Limit locations for the highest development
intensities and densities, and the tallest building forms, to key urban
activity centers that are well served by transit.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
II-12
• Objective LUT-3: Direct the urban design and form of new
development and redevelopment in a manner that blends with and
enhances Chula Vista’s character and qualities, both physical and
social.
• Objective LUT-4: Establish policies, standards, and procedures
to minimize blighting influences and maintain the integrity of stable
residential neighborhoods.
• Objective LUT-5: Designate opportunities for mixed use areas
with higher density housing that is near shopping, jobs, and transit in
appropriate locations throughout the City.
• Objective LUT-6: Ensure adjacent land uses are compatible with
one another.
• Objective LUT-7: Appropriate transitions should be provided
between land uses.
• Objective LUT-8: Strengthen and sustain Chula Vista’s image as a
unique place by maintaining, enhancing and creating physical features
that distinguish Chula Vista’s neighborhoods, communities, and public
spaces, and enhance its image as a pedestrian-oriented and livable
community.
• Objective LUT-9: Create enhanced gateway features for City entry
points and other important areas, such as special districts.
• Objective LUT-10: Create attractive street environments that
complement private and public properties, create attractive public
rights-of-way, and provide visual interest for residents and visitors.
• Objective LUT-11: Ensure that buildings and related site improvements
for public and private development are well designed and compatible
with surrounding properties and districts.
• Objective LUT-12: Protect Chula Vista’s important historic
resources.
• Objective LUT-15: Improve transportation connections within Chula
Vista and between eastern and western Chula Vista, particularly transit
connections between major activity centers.
• Objective LUT-16: Integrate land use and transportation planning
and related facilities.
• Objective LUT-17: Plan and coordinate development to be compatible
and supportive of planned transit.
Chapter II Introduction
Chula Vista
II-13
• Objective LUT-18: Reduce traffic demand through Transportation
Demand Management (TDM) strategies, increased use of transit,
bicycles, walking, and other trip reduction measures.
• Objective LUT-20: Make transit-friendly roads a top consideration in
land use and development design.
• Objective LUT-21: Continue efforts to develop and maintain a safe
and efficient transportation system with adequate roadway capacity
to serve future residents, while preserving the unique character and
integrity of recognized communities within the City.
• Objective LUT-23: Promote the use of non-polluting and renewable
alternatives for mobility through a system of bicycle and pedestrian
paths and trails that are safe, attractive and convenient forms of
transportation.
• Objective LUT-26: Establish an Urban Core Improvements Program
for the Urban Core Subarea.
• Objective LUT-27: Establish a program for development to provide
public amenities and/or community services necessary to support
urban development and implement the following policies. (Refer to
General Plan for list of policies.)
• Objective LUT-28: Consider use of lot consolidation, where
appropriate, so that projects meeting the objectives of this General
Plan can be achieved, and a high level of community amenities can be
provided.
• Objective LUT-29: Allow for the clustering of residential development
to respond to site constraints, and improve amenities for project
residents.
• Objective LUT-30: Use parking management to better utilize parking
facilities and implement policies to reduce parking demand before
considering public expenditures for additional parking facilities.
• Objective LUT-31: Provide parking facilities that are appropriately
integrated with land uses; maximize efficiency; accommodate alternative
vehicles; and reduce parking impacts.
• Objective LUT-32: Evaluate the use and applicability of various
strategies to provide parking.
• Objective LUT-33: Ensure that parking facilities are appropriately
sited and well-designed in order to minimize adverse effects on the
pedestrian-oriented environment, and to enhance aesthetic qualities.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
II-14
The following objectives are provided in the General Plan for the Northwest
Area Plan, which includes the Specific Plan area and contains “area specific”
policies for the Urban Core.
• Objective LUT-46: Establish linkages between the Urban Core
Subarea and the Bayfront Planning Area for pedestrians, bicycles, and
transit.
• Objective LUT-47: Establish roadway classifications in the Urban
Core Subarea that respond to the special operating characteristics of
roadways within a more urbanized environment, accommodate slower
speeds in pedestrian-oriented areas, and facilitate multi-modal design
elements and amenities.
• Objective LUT-48: Increase mobility for residents and visitors in the
Urban Core Subarea.
• Objective LUT-49: Encourage redevelopment, infill, and new
development activities within the Urban Core Subarea that will provide
a balance of land uses, reinforce its identity as Chula Vista’s central
core, and complement land uses in other planning areas, including the
Bayfront and East Planning Areas.
• Objective LUT-50: Provide for the redevelopment and enhancement
of the Downtown Third Avenue District as a lively, higher density, mixed
use area, while preserving the important elements that contribute to the
charm and character of traditional Third Avenue.
• Objective LUT-51: Maintain Downtown Third Avenue as a focal point
for the City so that it continues to express the City’s history, provides
a venue for cultural vitality, and retains its role as a center for social,
political, and other civic functions.
• Objective LUT-52: Encourage redevelopment of the Chula Vista
Center, as well as properties north of H Street, with a mix of land uses
that will reinforce H Street as a future planned transit boulevard and
gateway corridor, and establish the area as a significant public gathering
space and vibrant mixed use area.
• Objective LUT-53: Encourage redevelopment to be mixed use along
the H Street Corridor, between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue, within
walking distance of a planned future transit station near Third Avenue
and H Street.
• Objective LUT-54: Encourage redevelopment activities within the
North Broadway Focus Area that will result in the establishment of a
pedestrian-oriented commercial corridor providing housing opportunities
and local-serving compatible commercial uses.
Chapter II Introduction
Chula Vista
II-15
• Objective LUT-55: Encourage redevelopment of E Street between
Interstate 5 and Broadway with mixed use, especially near the E Street
Trolley Station, and an emphasis on visitor-serving uses, with some
offices and multi-family residential.
• Objective LUT-6: Encourage redevelopment of the area between
Interstate 5 and Broadway, bounded on the north by F Street and on the
south by G Street, with predominantly high density residential, supported
by mixed use along Broadway.
• Objective LUT-57: Encourage redevelopment of the area between
Interstate 5 and Broadway, between G Street and H Street, emphasizing
transit-oriented mixed use near the H Street Trolley Station and
reinforcing H Street as a major gateway and transit boulevard.
• Objective LUT-58: Encourage redevelopment of the area between
Interstate 5 and Broadway, between H Street and I Street, as a regional
shopping center or transit focus mixed use area that will complement
redevelopment of the existing Chula Vista Center, and reinforce H Street
as a major gateway and transit boulevard.
• Objective LUT-59: Encourage redevelopment activities within the Mid-
Broadway District that will establish a pedestrian oriented commercial
corridor providing housing opportunities and compatible neighborhood-
serving commercial uses.
• Objective LUT-60: Reinforce the existing land use pattern of
predominantly retail uses on the west side of Third Avenue, and office
uses on the east side of Third Avenue between J Street and L Street.
c. Public Facilities and Services Objectives
• Objective PFS-14: Provide parks and recreation facilities and
programs citywide that are well maintained, safe, accessible to all
residents and that offer opportunities for personal development, health
and fitness in addition to recreation.
The Specific Plan provides for more precise implementation of the General
Plan’s goals, objectives, and policies. The Specific Plan has been prepared to
reinforce all elements of the General Plan relative to the Urban Core.
2. Chula Vista General Plan Update Program Environmental
Impact Report (EIR)
The General Plan Update EIR provides an assessment of the existing conditions
within the City and the suitability of those conditions for meeting the goals for
the City’s future. The EIR evaluates potential impacts relating to the General
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
II-16
Plan Update and presents feasible mitigation measures where significant
environmental impacts are identified. Environmental concerns identified
through the General Plan Update EIR were taken into consideration in the
development of the Specific Plan.
3. Chula Vista Municipal Code – Title 19 Zoning
The City of Chula Vista’s Municipal Code, Title 19 Zoning, sets standards and
regulations to protect and promote the public health, safety, welfare, and
quality of life within Chula Vista and to implement the goals set forth in the
General Plan. The Zoning Code provides site specific development and land
use regulations that govern the size, shape, and intensity of development in the
City and uses to which new development may be committed. The Zoning Code
divides the City into districts, each of which establishes a set of regulations
controlling such issues as the uses of land, uses and locations of structures,
height and bulk of and open spaces around structures, signs, and parking.
The traditional Euclidean zoning classifications found within the Specific Plan
districts include: Central Commercial (CC), Administrative and Professional
Office (CO), Commercial Thoroughfare (CT), Visitor Commercial (CV), Limited
Industrial (IL), Mobilehome Park (MHP), Public/Quasi-public (PQ), One- and Two-
Family Residence (R2), and Apartment Residence (R3). These classifications
commonly allow only a single land use type; mixed-use areas are implemented
through rezonings, conditional use permits, and General Plan changes. The
Specific Plan customizes the standards and regulations found in the City
Zoning Code in order to achieve the Urban Core vision. The Specific Plan sets
more detailed zoning standards and regulations for the sub-districts within the
Specific Plan and replaces the zoning regulations provided in 19.24 - 19.40 and
19.44. The provisions of the City Zoning Code apply to the properties within
the Specific Plan area; in such cases where the Specific Plan and Zoning Code
conflict, the Specific Plan regulations and development standards shall apply.
Where the Specific Plan is silent, provisions of the zoning code shall apply..
4. Town Centre I Redevelopment Plan
Adopted in 1976, the goal of the Town Centre I Redevelopment Plan is to
“revitalize the Town Centre area as the commercial-civic focus of the City. The
Town Centre I Redevelopment Plan is a Specific Plan that provides permitted
uses and controls and design guidelines for the project area. The Plan presents
12 objectives toward achieving this goal, including eliminating blighting
influences and incompatible land uses, restructuring City infrastructure, such
as the irregular block and lot subdivisions and poorly planned streets, attracting
new capital and businesses to the area, establishing design standards
and supporting “comprehensive beautification” of the area, incorporating
increased multi-family housing and transit opportunities in the area. A series
of redevelopment actions are proposed for Agency implementation, permitted
Chapter II Introduction
Chula Vista
II-17
uses and controls are addressed, and methods for financing the project are
proposed. The Plan also gives attention to the potential impact the Plan will
have on existing neighborhoods in the area. The Town Centre I Land Use Policy
acts as a land use guide for establishing the traditional downtown of Chula
Vista into a focal business, commercial, and cultural area. The Town Centre I
Land Use Policy delineates permitted, special, and prohibited land uses for the
downtown district based on the objectives of the Town Centre I Redevelopment
Plan (discussed previously).
The Town Centre Design Manual was prepared nearly 30 years ago and
addresses the physical elements of the Town Centre area. The Design Manual
provides general urban design guidelines, standards, and specifications for
development within the project area. It covers such issues as siting, scale, and
density of buildings, landscaping, streetscape elements, and transportation. A
pedestrian orientation is a highlight of the Manual recommendations, including
pedestrian-oriented mixed-uses and the development of pedestrian linkages
between the various sub-sections of the Urban Core. Significant attention is also
given to the importance of landscaping through the area and the opportunities
for development of plazas and parks.
The Specific Plan more fully develops many of the ideas presented in the Town
Centre I Redevelopment Plan, Land Use Policy and Design Manual, and offers
an updated approach using contemporary regulations and design guidelines
for the successful revitalization of the downtown and surrounding areas.
5. Third Avenue District Market Opportunity Study and Recruitment
Strategy
This study was prepared in 2000 and provides a retail market analysis for
the Town Centre I Redevelopment Project Area. An analysis of the marketing
strengths and challenges of the area allows for development of a recruitment
strategy that assists property owners in improving their sites while attracting new
tenants to vacant commercial spaces. The document addresses the continued
economic decline of Third Avenue, despite dedicated Redevelopment Agency
efforts at revitalization. Identified opportunities include the potential to support
a “fine limited local commercial district,” establishing Third Avenue as a “unique
or niche” destination within the larger economic community, the creation of
a Third Avenue identity that sets it apart from other cities and districts, and
the potential to intensify development near transit nodes, areas of greater
pedestrian frequency, and civic uses. Major strategies include strengthening
existing locations, providing transit linkages, developing an improved sign
program and offering a variety of development incentives. These strategies are
further developed through the Specific Plan. Implementation of the Specific Plan
document will help Third Avenue overcome the existing economic challenges
and foster a successful revitalization program for the area.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
II-18
6. Broadway Revitalization Strategy
The focus area of this document is Broadway from H Street to L Street, with
particular attention to the H Street entryway into the City. The plan strives to
reverse deteriorating conditions along the auto-oriented strip and reform the area
into a commercially viable and visually pleasing environment. The document
outlines proposed broad economic, aesthetic, and circulation improvements
along Broadway. The Specific Plan will implement many of the changes and
improvements suggested in the Broadway Revitalization Strategy.
7. Bayfront Master Plan
The purpose of the Bayfront Master Plan is to create a world-class bayfront in
Chula Vista. Goals of the Bayfront Master Plan include creating one unified
Bayfront area from the three existing districts, finding a balance between being
sensitive to both environmental and community recreational needs, creating
an active boating waterfront in the deep water area, developing a sense of
place at the Bayfront, and extending the City to the Bayfront. The Specific Plan
strives especially toward the latter goal of connecting the City’s downtown to the
Bayfront. Design suggestions in the Specific Plan seek to restore and reinforce
connectivity between the Urban Core and the Bayfront.
8. MTBD/South Bay Transit First Study
The Transit First Study evaluates potential future transit options for the City. The
study identifies transit priority treatment options, alternate transit alignments,
and potential transit station locations and types, such as mixed flow transit
lanes, dedicated transit lanes, freeway HOV/transit lanes, guideways, queue
jumpers, and transit priority signals. Based on ridership potential and the
ability to best serve the established travel patterns of the region, alternative
transit routes were divided into Tier One and Tier Two options. The Specific
Plan supports increased public transit usage. Many of the recommendations
made in the Specific Plan will benefit from the implementation of successful
transit projects. Strategies from this report were considered in the Specific
Plan Transportation Impact Analysis and also provide support for the transit
intensive Urban Core.
9. Chula Vista Economic Development Strategy
The Economic Development Strategy was prepared in 2003 and serves as
a blueprint for development of fiscal sustainability for the community. The
Strategy has been updated and incorporated into the General Plan to serve as
a blueprint for development to ensure short and long-term fiscal sustainability.
The Strategy establishes 12 goals, supported by objectives and action items,
Chapter II Introduction
Chula Vista
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which will facilitate Chula Vista’s economic prosperity through the year 2020.
Goals that support increasing investment in western Chula Vista, providing the
necessary physical infrastructure to support economic prosperity, and becoming
the south county hub for leisure, recreational, shopping, and entertainment
activities are directly reflected in the Specific Plan.
10. Historic Preservation Strategic Plan
The Historic Preservation Strategic Plan resulted from an effort by the Ad
Hoc Historic Preservation Committee to evaluate the City’s current historic
preservation program and to make recommendations for the future of the City’s
historic resources. The Committee developed an action plan that could develop
Chula Vista’s Historic Preservation Program as a method for preserving the
important historic resources of the City. Recommendations include becoming
a Certified Local Government, establishing a predictable and consistent historic
review process, establishing an historic preservation review board, and providing
incentives for historic preservation. The Urban Core Strategic Plan encourages
preservation of historic resources within the Urban Core area.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
II-20
F. Community Outreach Process
An important component of the Specific Plan is the public participation process.
The community outreach effort was designed to involve the various citizens
and interest groups of Chula Vista in the Specific Plan process. Careful initial
steps were taken to involve the citizens of Chula Vista. The following is a brief
summary of the outreach efforts included in the public participation process
that helped to shape the Specific Plan.
1. Key Person Interviews
A series of interviews were conducted in March of 2004 with various individuals,
agencies, and organizations with strong interests in the Urban Core area. The
purpose of these meetings was to listen to the issues and observations from
key persons about the planning area. The interviews were quite informative for
laying a foundation of background information and identifying many issues as
well as visions for the Urban Core area.
Overall, most of the stakeholders voiced consistent feedback. Some of the
most frequent comments included the following:
• Third Avenue currently has the wrong tenant mix.
• Third Avenue should have more pedestrian-oriented uses and mixed-
use projects.
• Broadway is an “eyesore” and is in need of aesthetic improvements.
• H Street is the major thoroughfare in Chula Vista.
• Uses such as liquor stores, pawn shops, dentist labs, adult stores,
social service/employment agencies, and check cashing, etc. should be
prohibited from the Urban Core.
• Single-family neighborhoods should be protected.
• The key project in the City is the Gateway project.
• The predominant architectural style should be Historic Spanish
Mediterranean.
• Chula Vista should be connected to downtown San Diego via the trolley.
• A “small loop” trolley should circulate through Chula Vista and connect
to the San Diego Trolley system.
• Connections to the Bayfront are needed.
Chapter II Introduction
Chula Vista
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Fg. 2.5
Advisory Committee meetings helped
guide the Urban Core Specific Plan
Stakeholders also voiced the top things they would change about Chula Vista.
The most prominent ideas were:
• Increase the density and building height of the Urban Core.
• Add open space to the Urban Core.
• Create a different tenant mix on Third Avenue.
• Make H Street more pedestrian-oriented through a variety of streetscape
improvements.
2. Advisory Committee Meetings
Beginning in August 2004, the Chula Vista Urban Core Advisory Committee
met monthly in sessions open to the public. The Advisory Committee meetings
allowed opportunities for the consultant team to present and refine ideas and
concepts with substantial input from Advisory Committee members as well as
the public at each stage of the planning process. The Advisory Committee
was composed of 18 members that were representative of many community
sectors, offering a broad variety of backgrounds and perspectives. The Advisory
Committee members were essential to keeping the project on track for the
benefit of the citizens of Chula Vista.
Topics discussed in the Advisory Committee meetings included:
• Issue Identification
• Key Person Interviews
• Photo Tour and Visual Preference
Survey
• Goals and Objectives for Vision Plan
Areas
• Draft Vision Plan Review and Exercise
• Presentation of Vision Plans, Vision
Statements, and Ten Key Principles
• Design Guidelines
• “At-A-Glance” Zoning Sheets and Land
Use Matrix
• Gateways and Streetscapes Concepts
• Urban Amenities and Incentives
Frequent updates on the traffic analyses and
market conditions studies were also provided
by the consultant team.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
II-22
Fg. 2.7
An Advisory Committee Charrette was
held on August 12-13, 2004
Fg. 2.6
Advisory Committee members and
members of the public develop ideas
The Advisory Committee meetings provided substantial feedback for the
consultant team and were essential to the refining of the draft critical
components of the Specific Plan.
3. Advisory Committee Charrette
In August 2004, the City Council appointed
an 18-member Advisory Committee, chaired
by Mayor Padilla and composed of various
stakeholders, to help guide the Urban Core
planning effort. The first meeting of the
committee was a two-day visioning charrette,
held on August 12-13, 2004. After participating
in a bus tour of the Specific Plan area, an
introduction was provided to the Urban Core
visioning effort and an invitation was extended
to the community to urge citizens to participate
in the development of the Specific Plan.
The workshop meeting continued with a
presentation on the importance of the work
effort and its relationship to the General Plan
Update and the Bayfront Master Plan project. A description of the Specific Plan
effort and purpose was also provided. Following these presentations, a round-
table exercise solicited preliminary thoughts and issues for the Urban Core.
After a preliminary review of the Land Use Concepts, Urban Core Focus
Districts, Urban Design Themes, and Opportunities and Constraints of the site,
the Advisory Committee members were asked to identify potential “big ideas”
for the Urban Core.
The second day of the charrette kicked off with presentations from
subconsultants regarding marketing and economics research as well as traffic
and transportation research. A summary of the urban core market context
and the regional economy and an overview of
urban mobility concepts and transportation
opportunities, respectively, were provided.
The next portion of the meeting provided a
visual overview of each of the nine original
focus districts with a number of images ranging
in height and massing. The images shown also
included a variety of streetscape scenarios.
Chapter II Introduction
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Fg. 2.9
Participants voted on images in terms
of appropriateness of massing and scale
Fg. 2.8
Issues, concerns, and “big ideas” were
solicited at the Charrette
Committee members then participated in a
Visual Preference Survey and were asked to
rank the images as appropriate, neutral, or
inappropriate.
Finally, both Advisory Committee members and
the public were invited to write issues, concerns,
and “big ideas” on six banners provided. Banner
headings included Circulation/Transit, Land
Use, Community Design, Parks & Services,
Implementation, and Other Key Issues.
4. First Community Workshop
The first community workshop was held on September 13, 2004 at the Chula
Vista Public Library (Civic Center Branch). Approximately 85 members of the
public attended. The meeting began with an introduction to the project and
process. A discussion on opportunities for public participation, anticipated
timelines, and related projects followed. The consultant team then presented
the basics of a Specific Plan, the boundaries of the study area, and a description
of the existing conditions for each of the nine Focus Area Districts.
A Visual Preference Survey was then conducted where members of the public
were to vote on various images with regard to building massing and scale.
Participants were able to rate images for each of the nine Focus Area Districts
as being appropriate, neutral, or inappropriate for that particular district.
In summary, participants consistently voted
pedestrian-oriented streetscapes with the
buildings located at the street edge as
their preference. Buildings with interesting
architectural details, such as well articulated
windows, entries, rooflines, and buildings
bases, were clearly preferred over large, box-
like structures. In most districts, a building
height of two to three stories seemed to be most
acceptable, with higher buildings preferred
near the freeway interchange districts.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
II-24
Fg. 2.11
Students at Hilltop High School
participate in a Visual Preference Survey
Fg. 2.10
About 85 people attended the First
Community Workshop
Public comments and questions were solicited. Comments received included:
• A Website is needed as well as access for non-Internet users, such as a
hotline.
• Focus on streetscape – shade trees.
• Consider free shuttle buses to connect to Bay area, 3rd Avenue,
Broadway.
• Encourage public art.
• Create unified features to connect
pedestrian paths.
• Consider allowing 2nd floor residences
over commercial uses.
• Use “walkable communities” principles.
• Encourage adaptive reuse of existing
historic buildings.
• Decide what is desirable about Chula Vista and reinforce that
character.
The workshop was very informative in setting a clear direction for how the
community visualized the short and long-term future of Chula Vista’s Urban
Core. The feedback obtained helped the consultant team to further develop
vision and design plans and ultimately this Specific Plan.
5. High School Presentations
Visual Preference Surveys were conducted at two local high schools on
September 29, 2004. Sixty-four students at Castle Park high school and
53 students at Hilltop High School rated images for each of the nine Urban
Core Focus Area Districts as being appropriate, neutral, or inappropriate for
that particular district with regard to building
massing and scale.
The students were enthusiastic about being
involved in the planning process and having
a chance to have their opinions heard. Both
groups of students presented similar results.
The students’ preferences were comparable
to those of the community at large; though
the students often rated larger developments
as more appropriate than did members of the
Chapter II Introduction
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Fg. 2.12
The Draft Vision Plans were presented at
the Second Community Workshop
community participating in other visual preference surveys. In general, the
students’ preferences showed a greater affinity for higher intensity development
and taller buildings as well as more contemporary architectural styles.
6. Planning Commission and City Council Workshop
The information and ideas generated from the initial committee meetings,
community workshops, and high school surveys were used to create a series
of “vision plans” for the Urban Core. The vision plans were intended to evoke
an image of what the Urban Core could look like over the next 20 to 25 years
and to set the frame work for the preparation of the Specific Plan. A workshop
was then held on November 17, 2004 for members of the Chula Vista Planning
Commission and City Council to review the draft Vision Plans and Ten Key
Principles.
After some discussion on the differences between vision plans, which are
representative of broad ideals, versus master plans, which are more literal
representations of changes to an area, the Planning Commission and City
Council were very supportive of the Vision Plans. Only minor revisions were
suggested, such as the relocation of certain parking areas and structures and
the addition of more commercial development along H Street.
7. Second Community Workshop
On December 1, 2004 citizens were invited to participate in a second community
workshop. Results were presented from four visual preference surveys,
conducted at an Advisory Committee meeting, the first community workshop,
and two presentations at local high schools. The draft Vision Plans were also
presented, including the 10 Key Principles for future Urban Core development.
Public comments and questions were solicited using an interactive round-table
discussion focused on the three key visioning areas.
In summary, participants were supportive
and enthusiastic of the concepts and visions
presented. Comments included concern over
visitor parking, affordability of housing, and
the need to develop the Broadway corridor as
a retail, hospitality, and housing district that
would serve the needs of existing Chula Vista
residents. Participants were encouraged by
the opportunity to provide feedback.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
II-26
Fg. 2.13
The City provided the Urban Core Specific Plan
Newsletter as an update for residents
8. Other Outreach Efforts
Frequently updated information was made available to the public on the
City’s website regarding the progress of the Specific Plan effort. The website
explained the Specific Plan project and process and kept citizens up to date
on the latest work projects. Information and exhibits presented at Advisory
Committee meetings were presented on the website and upcoming meeting
dates were posted. The website acted as a convenient source of information
for interested citizens.
9. Urban Core Newsletter
The City published an Urban Core Newsletter that informed residents of the
purpose and progress of the Specific Plan. The Newsletter provided a summary
of the initial planning effort culminating in the Vision Plans, which were
completed in December 2004. The newsletter allowed citizens of Chula Vista
to be more knowledgeable about
the Specific Plan effort and
afforded them an opportunity to
be more involved in the overall
Specific Plan process.
Chapter III Vision
Chula Vista
III. Vision
A. Vision for the Urban Core III-1
B. Ten Key Principles III-4
C. Vision Areas III-5
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Chula Vista
Chapter III Vision
III-1
Fg. 3.1
The Urban Core will be a successful environment for a variety of retail,
recreational, and residential opportunities
III. Vision
A. Vision for the Urban Core
The Specific Plan provides framework for enhancement to the economic,
social, and community fabric of Chula Vista’s Urban Core. The Specific Plan will
produce an economically enhanced Urban Core that is once again a thriving
downtown and focus of the City. The vision for the Urban Core builds upon the
vision for the City in the General Plan. The area will exhibit revitalized core uses
linked by pedestrian and bicycle connections with easy access to goods and
services and exhibiting quality design. The vision for the Urban Core seeks to
make a great place to live, work, and play even better.
While much of the existing stable residential fabric of the Urban Core will be
preserved, an increase in living and lifestyle choices for existing and future
residents will be afforded. These residents will further add to local business
revenues and create a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly activity center throughout
the day. The Specific Plan provides framework for additional mobility options by
creating linkages between the Urban Core, the Bayfront, and east Chula Vista
and encouraging increased pedestrian, bicycle, and transit activity. Improved
services and amenities will make Chula Vista’s Urban Core an attractive and
focal hub of the City, as well as the South County region.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
III-2
The Urban Core Vision aims to create a uniquely identifiable Urban Core for
Chula Vista that is an economically vibrant, pedestrian-oriented, and multi-
purpose destination.
As part of the early foundational planning process, a vision for the urban core
was framed using the broad policies and objectives outlined in the General
Plan (2005).
Imagine a future for the Urban Core that is...
• A pedestrian-friendly City Center with an integrated mix of land uses
(retail, office, residential, entertainment and civic/cultural) woven
together by attractive and cohesive street improvements and buildings.
• The entertainment “hub” of the City with movie theaters, a playhouse,
restaurants with outdoor dining, adorned with broad sidewalks, plazas
and green parks that feature music and artistic performances.
• A place where new businesses are eager to locate and are attracted by
the improvements and the encouragement the City gives to investors,
downtown merchants, and property owners.
• A place for living as well as working. New “loft” style apartments that
will allow artisans and small businesses to get a start in the Village, while
new office spaces and residences for a diverse age group will flourish
above and behind ground floor shops.
• Supported by an expanded and improved public transit system, including
a new west side shuttle, with frequent and conveniently located stops
and including connections to the proposed transit centers, the Bayfront,
and the existing regional trolley system.
• Enriched with new cultural, recreational, and civic facilities to support
the mixed-use environment and reinforce the Urban Core as the “heart
of the City.”
• A harmonious blend of old and new, where new development takes its
design cues from the existing culture, character, and history of northwest
Chula Vista.
Chula Vista
Chapter III Vision
III-3
Fg. 3.2
The Urban Core should again be the heart of the City
Imagine a future for the Urban Core that embraces Chula Vista’s unique culture
and celebrates its rich heritage. The Urban Core of the future is the Urban
Core of the past, only better.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
III-4
B. Ten Key Principles
Based on input from the community and Urban Core Specific Plan Advisory
Committee, ten key principles were established. The future development of
Chula Vista’s Urban Core shall be guided by the following overarching ideas and
goals that apply to all of the vision areas.
1. Develop a vibrant, distinct urban atmosphere with a day to evening
environment.
2. Build on and enhance Chula Vista’s cultural and historic traditions and
diversity.
3. Foster visible cultural and civic amenities, such as urban parks, outdoor
dining opportunities and civic promenades.
4. Establish a hierarchy of building forms with greatest densities at key
nodes.
5. Connect and integrate the Bayfront, East Chula Vista and individual
focus areas within the urban core.
6. Create lively and pedestrian-friendly environments through a
concentration of activities in a compact, mixed-use setting.
7. Transition new development to minimize impacts on existing residential
neighborhoods.
8. Provide creative parking strategies, including parking districts, structures
and reductions.
9. Define unique identities for focus areas through individualized
streetscape design and public spaces.
10. Restore the historic street grid in order to maximize transportation choices
and increase mobility and circulation opportunities for pedestrians,
transit and automobiles.
Chula Vista
Chapter III Vision Chapter III Vision
III-5
Chula Vista
C. Vision Areas
As part of the visioning process, three distinct “vision areas” were identified.
The Vision areas were not intended to cover the entire Specific Plan Subdistricts
Area but rather capture the most significant areas that required further
planning guidance beyond that provided in the General Plan Update. The three
areas selected included the “Village”, consisting of downtown Third Avenue and
the surrounding area, the “Grand Boulevard”, concentrating on the H Street
Corridor, and the “Promenade”, focusing on the rectangle between E Street
and H Street and I-5 and Broadway. Though the Urban Core area needs to be
unified and identifiable as the Urban Core of Chula Vista, the individual vision
areas each have distinguishing characteristics. Each vision area is described
below and a vision statement for that area is delineated.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
III-6
1. The Village Vision Area
a. Description
The Village Vision Area is the heart of Chula Vista’s traditional downtown. This
area is generally bounded by Church Avenue and Fourth Avenue on the east
and west and by E Street and G Street on the north and south. Third Avenue
is the primary retail and office district and is anchored by transitional office
and residential uses. The Civic Center, including City Hall and associated
facilities, is located at Fourth Avenue and F Street and is in the process of being
upgraded pursuant to the Civic Center Master Plan. Friendship Park, Memorial
Park, and other potential park opportunities link the Village and provide quality
urban amenities to nearby residents. This area exhibits much of the traditional
community character and is home to many community facilities, such as the
Civic Center, the Central Library, Police Station, and Friendship Park.
b. Vision Statement
The Village will be a lively destination with a small town feel. Restaurants,
outdoor cafes, bookstores, art houses, theaters, and shops will flank the
expanded sidewalks and tree-lined streetscape. This entertainment and retail
destination serves all of Chula Vista by energizing the 3rd Avenue corridor and
vicinity. The district also celebrates cultural arts and civic functions linked by an
enhanced park system. In addition, the new residential housing opportunities
will allow the area to resurge and thrive.
Chula Vista
Chapter III Vision
III-7
Fg. 3.3
The Village Visionary Sketches
Third Avenue
Gateway Monument
Typical Paseo
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
III-8
2. The Grand Boulevard Vision Area
a. Description
The Grand Boulevard Vision Area is the central axis of the Urban Core area.
This vision area consists of H Street and the adjacent area from Third Avenue
to Broadway. This area includes the Gateway office development, the South
County Regional Courthouse Complex, Scripps Hospital and associated medical
facilities, and the Chula Vista Center regional shopping mall, as well as a variety
of other office and commercial activities.
b. Vision Statement
The H Street corridor is the primary business, commercial and transit backbone
of the Urban Core. Buildings, plazas and parkways activate the street edge and
deliver a bustling pedestrian environment. The Grand Boulevard is the most
urban of the vision areas with medium rise buildings forming the backdrop to
the double rows of trees, extended sidewalks, frequent transit stops, newspaper
stands and kiosks. A unique streetscape character provides continuity among
diverse elements such as the regional mall, hospital, and office developments.
Chula Vista
Chapter III Vision
III-9
Fg. 3.4
The Grand Boulevard Visionary Sketches
Chula Vista
III-9
Plaza along H Street
Third Avenue and H Street
Row Housing adjacent to Retail Center
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
III-10
3. The Promenade Vision Area
a. Description
The Promenade Vision Area acts as an attractive entryway to the City of Chula
Vista. Stretching parallel to the I-5 corridor and generally west of Broadway,
from E Street to H Street, the area is currently a mix of auto-oriented retail
commercial uses and low-rise multi-family housing and mobile home parks.
Redevelopment of the area will provide a mix of aesthetically pleasing visitor
serving and resident serving uses and create a desirable neighborhood
atmosphere.
b. Vision Statement
A dynamic mix of regional transit centers, visitor serving uses and a retail
complex surrounds an enhanced, medium-rise residential quarter. Circulation
is improved by re-establishing the traditional street grid. A tree-lined, extended
linear park offers both neighborhood and community serving amenities
supported by mid-block paseos. The park transitions from an active community
venue with a more formal landscape to recreational features such as tennis
and basketball courts to passive greens. Anchoring the park, the retail plaza
links the Bayfront to the regional mall. Ample public spaces provide for open
air markets, mercados, cultural festivals, art exhibits and other community
events.
Chula Vista
Chapter III Vision
III-11
Fg. 3.5
The Promenade Visionary Sketches
Plaza at
Promenade
Terminus
Park Atmosphere
Typical
Paseo
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
III-12
Chapter IV Existing Conditions
Chula Vista
IV. Existing Conditions
A. Introduction IV-1
B. Historic Resources IV-2
C. Land Use, General Plan, and Zoning IV-12
D. Circulation and Mobility IV-17
E. Economic Conditions IV-19
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Chula Vista
Chapter IV Existing Conditions
IV-1
IV. Existing Conditions
A. Introduction
The purpose of this chapter is to describe the built environment within the
Specific Plan area. A brief historical overview of the Urban Core is provided as
well as significant historical structures and features in the area. The chapter
also details the existing conditions within the plan area in terms of land use
and zoning, circulation and mobility, and economic conditions.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IV-2
Fg. 4.1
1894 Plat Map of the Chula Vista area
B. Historic Resources
1. The Early Years Before Incorporation
The Otay Valley has been occupied by Native American cultures for more than
9,000 years. The early Native American inhabitants established settlements,
hunted game, and utilized the abundant resources along the river valley. The
first western settlers were Spanish missionaries sent by the King of Spain to
establish missions along the coast of California. In 1795, the area known today
as Chula Vista became part of a land grant from the King of Spain; the area was
known as Rancho del Rey or the King’s Ranch.
With Mexico’s independence from Spain in 1821, Rancho del Rey became part
of the new Mexican nation and was renamed Rancho de la Nacion, National
Ranch. In 1845, National Ranch was granted to John Forster, son-in-law of
the Mexican governor Pico. After
the Mexican-American War and
the subsequent admission of
California to the United States,
the US confirmed ownership and
operation of the ranch by John
Forster.
A change of ownership and
several significant transportation
improvements, such as the
addition of several major rail lines,
occurred throughout the mid and
late 1800’s. By 1890 a railroad
had been built from San Diego,
through Chula Vista, and ending in
San Ysidro. In the late 1800’s, San
Diego Land and Town Company
developed the 5,000-acre Chula
Vista tract, as a product of the
professional town planner, C.W.
Dickinson. Lots were originally
laid out in 5-acre parcels with 80-
foot wide streets. Many of the new
owners began citrus orchards on
their acreage, particularly lemon
orchards, leading to early Chula
Vista claims of the “Lemon Capital
of the World.”
Chula Vista
Chapter IV Existing Conditions
IV-3
Fg. 4.2
Looking south on F Street east of Third Avenue in 1911.
The first church and school are to the right.
Fg. 4.3
Looking south at intersection of Third Avenue and F
Street in 1936
Lot purchasers were expected to build a modern house within six months; the
house was subject to architectural approval and had a required setback of 125
feet. Land sales in Chula Vista began in 1887 and proved to be very popular. Most
early houses were of a traditional Victorian style. Architecturally, Craftsman folk
cottages and bungalows followed the Victorian style and an eventual transition
was made to a more Mission Revival and Spanish Mediterranean architecture.
Lot sizes also decreased over the years, to an average one-acre and half-acre
lots, with continued generous setbacks.
Around this time, the intersection of Third Avenue and F Street was considered
to be the center of town. In 1907, the National City and Otay Railroad line
was converted to an electric streetcar line. The streetcar line ran north to
south along Third Avenue for several years and was eventually replaced by a
landscaped median.
2. The City of Chula Vista is Formed
In 1911, the City of
Chula Vista was officially
incorporated with a
population of 550. As
a top priority, in 1913
the City installed 26
streetlights and paved
several streets.
Over the next quarter
century, the World Wars proved to have a significant impact on Chula Vista’s future.
The City’s economic system began to shift from agriculture to manufacturing
and Chula Vista
expanded significantly
during World War II due
to booming wartime
production in local
industries. The largest
of these companies
was the Rohr Aircraft
Corporation, a major
military supplier during
WWII that employed
9,000 at the height of
production. In addition,
the high concentration
of military bases in the
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IV-4
Fg. 4.4
The 16-story Chula Vista Community
Tower was the City’s first high-rise
area led to an increase in population as many
veterans decided to remain in the area after
the end of the war. These major changes
caused the population of Chula Vista to triple
in the time period from 1940 to 1950.
Major projects from the later twentieth century
included the 1962 development of the Chula
Vista Shopping Center on Broadway between H
Street and I Street and the 1972 construction
of the first high-rise building, the 16-story
Chula Vista Community Congregation Tower on
F Street. Throughout the century, the City of
Chula Vista experienced continued annexation
and expansion to the east, north, and south and
developed into one of the largest communities
in the San Diego region. However, in the midst
of the expanding community, the central core
experienced problems with the changing
economic situation and began to develop a
blighted atmosphere. In the 1970’s, several
City redevelopment projects, made the first
steps toward revitalization of the declining
Urban Core.
All great cities evolve over time but only the best cities recognize, build on and
enhance their most valued traditions and resources. Beginning with the early
1900’s and the City’s incorporation, the City of Chula Vista progressed through
a series of “lifecycles”, each with it’s own unique contribution to the City’s
history. The community’s lifecycle during the early 1900’s revolved around its
agricultural heyday, the mid 1900’s are remembered as the “Rohr” ing 50’s and
the changes of the latter 1900’s focused on an expanding the City with annexing
new lands and rapidly developing to the east. The City is now approaching its
100th anniversary and, with the new visions established for the urban core, is
poised to write the next chapter in its history.
At the start of the current century, citizens of Chula Vista have high hopes for
the future of their City. With over 200,000 residents and over 50 square miles
of land, Chula Vista is now the second largest city in San Diego County. Citizens
are eager for the City to reflect and reestablish its prominence and aesthetic
quality, especially in the traditional Urban Core.
Chula Vista
Chapter IV Existing Conditions
IV-5
3. Historic Sites in the Study Area
In 1985, the City of Chula Vista sponsored a local historic resources inventory.
The inventory was limited to the area bounded by Trousdale Drive to the north,
L Street to the south, Interstate 5 to the west, and Hilltop Drive on the east. As
a result, approximately 258 homes were included on the survey list with 42 of
the homes being included on the Chula Vista List of Historic Sites. There are
68 sites currently designated as historic by the City of Chula Vista. These 68
structures have been determined by the City Council to meet the City’s historic
criteria.
Several City designated historic sites and structures are located within the
Specific Plan area and provide context and historical reference for the Specific
Plan’s architectural and cultural character. (See Figure 4.5 Historic Resources
Map.)
The Chula Vista Heritage Museum maintains information on the historical areas
and structures in Chula Vista and is an excellent source for further information
on historic properties. The Heritage Museum’s “Take a Walk of History, Tour
Historic Sites in Chula Vista” brochure provides detailed information on many
of these non-designated sites. The following describes the designated historic
sites and their features:
IV-6
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Chula Vista
Chapter IV Existing Conditions
IV-7
Fg. 4.7
Photo of “Our House” before it was
destroyed by fire
Fg. 4.6
Sketch of Bay Breeze, the Greg
Rogers House
a. 699 E Street – Former Site of Greg Rogers House
The Greg Rogers House, also known as
“Bay Breeze” was built in 1910 at 699
E Street. The home was constructed by
Greg Rogers, one of the founders of the
City of Chula Vista and also founded the
City’s first bank. The 5,700 square foot
Craftsman style house had multiple
bathrooms and several fireplaces. In
1985, the home was threatened with
demolition in its original location and
was moved from 699 E Street. The
home was eventually relocated to 616
Second Avenue. At this time, the site
where the home once stood remains a
City designated historical site.
b. 666 Third Avenue – Our House/Orchard
House
“Our House”, a large home in the Queen
Anne style, once stood at 666 Third
Avenue; however, the structure was
destroyed by fire. At this time, the site
where the home once stood remains a
City designated historical site.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IV-8
Fg. 4.8
Original First Congregational Church
building constructed in 1911
Fg. 4.9
New First Congregational Church
building constructed in 1956
Fg. 4.10
301-305 Third Avenue is known as
the Melville Block
c. 276 F Street – First Congregational
Church
The First Congregational Church was the
first church opened in Chula Vista. The
original sanctuary for the church was
constructed in 1894 at 276 F Street.
Community members raised money to fund
the sanctuary construction and the Land
and Town Company donated the land. The
original structure was torn down in 1951
and a new sanctuary was constructed in its
place; the site of the former sanctuary is a
City designated historical site.
d. 301-305 Third Avenue – Melville Block
The Melville Block was constructed by
Edward Melville, one of Chula Vista’s first
businessmen. The Melville Block consists
of a 1911 two-story building in the Eclectic
Commercial style architecture. The Chula
Vista State Bank originally occupied the
corner spaces, followed by the Chula Vista
Dry Goods Company. The first story of the
building has been significantly altered from
its original state and many of the original
ornamental features have been removed,
but overall the building retains its historical
value. The structure was recently noted in a
guide to San Diego Architecture published
by the American Institute of Architects.
Chula Vista
Chapter IV Existing Conditions
IV-9
Fg. 4.11
The Mark Skinner house at 374
Roosevelt Street
Fg. 4.12
The First Women’s Club in Chula
Vista met here on Del Mar Avenue
e. 374 Roosevelt Street – Mark Skinner
House
Constructed in 1924 by Mark Skinner,
a well-known local businessman, this
house is a unique variation on the
Bungalow style popular in the early part
of the twentieth century. The original
siding on the house has been replaced
but the original design theme remains.
f. 382/384 Del Mar Avenue – The First
Women’s Clubhouse
The Women’s Club was the first place in
the City of Chula Vista for women active
in civic affairs to meet and gather. The
Club was involved in many community
activities, including fund-raising for
various events. The Club first convened
at 382/384 Del Mar Avenue in the
early 1900’s and met at this site on Del
Mar Avenue for many years until the
Club eventually outgrew the site and
relocated to a larger space at 357 G
Street. The building on Del Mar Avenue
retains its historical significance as the
Women’s Club’s first meeting site.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IV-10
4. Other Sites of Historic Interest
The following sections document or describe sites that fall within the Specific
Plan Subdistrict Area that are other sites of historical interest and sites that
were identified as part of the Cultural Resources Report for the Evaluation of
the Historical and Architectural Significance of 50 Properties within the Chula
Vista Urban Core.
In addition to the six designated historic sites, the Urban Core Specific Plan
Area includes other sites of historical interest. These sites include: The El
Primero Hotel, The Memorial Bowl (A Works Projects Administration project),
The Charles Smith Building, The People’s State Bank, Leader Department
Store, and Security Pacific Bank. These sites/structures, in addition to others,
all contribute to the historic fabric of the Specific Plan area. Important historical
sites such as these provide the context of the image, character, and history of
Chula Vista’s urban core that is to inspire and shape future development within
the Specific Plan area.
A photographic essay has been included in Chapter VII - Development Design
Guidelines to provide architects and designers with important visual cues
that can be drawn from existing development and incorporated into new
development. Used appropriately, new development can respond to Chula
Vista’s unique architectural heritage and promote the most positive aspects of
existing development.
5. Sites Evaluated for Potential Eligibility as Historic Architectural
Sites
In 2005, the City evaluated 50 properties within the Specific Plan Subdistrict
Area for historic evaluation and determination of eligibility for listing. This
evaluation is titled Cultural Resources Report for the Evaluation of the Historical
and Architectural Significance of 50 Properties within the Chula Vista Urban
Core.
This focused survey augments the 1985 inventory and is not intended to be
representative of a comprehensive survey of the Specific Plan Subdistrict Area.
The area around Third Avenue and F Street is considered to be the historic
core of the City and includes important elements of the early residential and
business activities of the City. Therefore this area within the Specific Plan Village
District was the focus area for historic evaluation.
The structures were selected based on the periods of significance and include
mostly structures within the Village District along Third Avenue, the City’s
traditional downtown, and adjacent side streets. The sites are also all located
within adopted redevelopment areas and thus have an increased potential to
redevelop over the short to mid term. Five sites were identified as potentially
Chula Vista
Chapter IV Existing Conditions
IV-11
eligible. For a complete listing of properties inventoried, please see the Specific
Plan Program EIR NO. 06-01, Appendix B.
The potential for the existence of other significant historic properties within the
Specific Plan Subdistrict Area is possible given the number of older commercial
structures and homes throughout the Specific Plan Subdistrict Area. These
could be identified as part of a more comprehensive survey conducted in the
future.
In addition, the City is considering developing a Historic Preservation Ordinance
and establishing design standards and other relevant requirements for historic
properties. Currently, the City of Chula Vista historic preservation program is
limited to voluntary historic designation and voluntary participation in the Mills
Act. Under the Mills Act, a property owner enters into a contract that gives City
oversight on matters of rehabilitation and renovation of the site in exchange for
a reduction in property taxes. Conducting a current inventory and establishing
an historic designation process, and seeking Certified Local Government
designation are top historic preservation priorities for the City.
6. How Historic Information Will Be Used
The inventory of existing historical resources lends important reference for
new development in the Specific Plan area. While the plan does not require
strict application of traditional historic architectural styles, the historic
influences, nonetheless, should be honored and retained where possible.
Land use and development recommendations within the plan area will use and
refer to the 1985 Historic Resources inventory. In addition, the Urban Core
Specific Plan Environmental Impact Report (EIR) provides an assessment of
limited additional properties within the Specific Plan area that may qualify as
historic and establishes mitigation measures to be considered in the event of
redevelopment. See EIR NO. 06-01 for specific sites. Other sites that may be
identified as part of other historic surveys should also be considered.
Consideration of important historical features is built into the planning process
and is an important facet of land use planning and urban design throughout
the plan area. The design guidelines encourage the use of building elements
and/or features typically found on historical structures. The development
standards emulate the form, massing, and relationship of building to sidewalk
of these historical structures.
The plan is subdivided into various planning districts, each with a special set of
planning and design directions. The degree to which historic structures influence
the design direction within these districts may vary; however, protection of
existing noteworthy structures and respect for the City’s heritage is a theme
that will guide new development.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IV-12
C. Land Use, General Plan, and Zoning
1. General Plan
The General Plan (2005) divides land uses into six broad categories: Residential;
Commercial; Mixed Use; Industrial; Open Space, Parks, and Public/Quasi-
Public; and Special Plan Areas. Of these categories, the Specific Plan area
encompasses residential, commercial, mixed use, and open space, parks, and
public/quasi-public uses (see Figure 4.13). These designations are further
broken down into subcategories, based on density and intensity of the use. For
General Plan purposes, densities apply to residential uses and are measured in
terms of dwelling units per gross acre (du/ac). Intensity applies to commercial,
mixed use, and industrial uses and is measured by Floor Area Ratio (FAR). On
the whole, the General Plan provides for an increase in density and intensity
for most areas of the Specific Plan. As the population of the City continues
to expand, increasing the intensity of uses provides an opportunity for more
efficient use of land in the Urban Core and will create a more urban, rather than
suburban, context.
One of the most significant changes related to land use designations for the
General Plan is the addition of the new Mixed Use category. The combination
of commercial and residential activities is expected to provide many benefits,
including better utilization of scarce land resources and improved accessibility
to public amenities.
Each General Plan land use designation is related to specific zoning districts,
which are defined by the zoning ordinance. As an implementing action of
the General Plan (2005), several new zoning categories will be created to be
consistent with new General Plan standards. The Specific Plan will provide new
zoning regulations for sub-district areas within the Specific Plan area. (See
Chapter VI - Land Use and Development Standards and Figure 5.1 Specific Plan
Key Map.)
2. Zoning
The majority of the Specific Plan Subdistrict Area is currently designated for some
form of commercial uses, though the outer edges of the area permit broader
uses. Zoning districts within the Urban Core include: Central Business, Central
Commercial, Commercial Thoroughfare, Visitor Commercial, Administrative
and Professional Office, Limited Industrial, Public/Quasi-Public, One- and Two-
Family Residence, Apartment Residential, and Exclusive Mobilehome Park.
(See Figure 4.13 and 4.14.)
Chula Vista
Chapter IV Existing Conditions
IV-13
The existing zoning ordinance includes modifying districts have been attached
to several of the zones within the Specific Plan area. These existing modifying
districts impose special regulations in addition to those otherwise applicable to
the zone. The modifying districts appearing within the Specific Plan area are:
Design Control and Precise Plan. Property within the Design Control modifying
district requires site plan and architectural approval of the City. The Precise
Plan modifying district allows for diversification in structures, land uses, density,
and landscaping. A precise plan for the area must gain City approval.
The traditional downtown along Third Avenue and the area of the H Street corridor
consist mainly of Central Business, Central Commercial, and Administrative
and Professional Office uses. These districts are primarily composed of
general retail sales and restaurant uses that serve the city as a whole and/
or the surrounding community, as well as medical, dental, executive, financial
and other offices. Residential mixed-use development may be permitted with
a conditional use permit. The center of the H Street corridor is marked by the
retail uses of the Chula Vista Mall as a regional shopping destination.
The Broadway corridor is almost exclusively a Commercial Thoroughfare zone.
The Commercial Thoroughfare zone allows the same types of retail sales as
the other districts but also permits car dealerships, hotel uses, and other
commercial recreational facilities. Less intensive multi-family residential, and
occasionally industrial, uses extend out from these three core areas to the
edges of the Specific Plan boundaries.
The Specific Plan subdistricts border established residential neighborhoods
where measures are warranted to minimize impacts from more intensive
commercial activities and development.
The majority of Public/Quasi-Public uses are concentrated in the traditional
downtown area of Chula Vista, between Third and Fourth Avenues and E and G
Streets. The Chula Vista Civic Center is comprised of a number of civic facilities,
including the police headquarters, the library’s main branch, administration
offices, City Council chambers, a public services building, and Fire Station
No. 1. The Civic Center is currently undergoing an extensive expansion to
accommodate the long term needs and growth of the City. In addition to civic
facilities, the Civic Center and downtown are surrounded by a series of parks and
community centers. These public spaces include Will T. Hyde/Friendship Park,
Memorial Park, Parkway Gymnasium and Pool, Norman Park and Community
Senior Center, and Eucalyptus Park.
IV-14
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Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IV-16
3. Land Use Opportunities and Constraints
A primary objective of the Specific Plan is to focus pedestrian-oriented retail
and entertainment uses in the downtown core and minimize the amount of
auto-oriented uses. The Specific Plan will also allow residential and office uses
to mix above retail shops, forming a traditional downtown environment where
living, working, shopping, and entertainment all coexist together.
The H Street corridor will have a continued focus on commercial uses,
though revitalization of the regional mall area into a more pedestrian-friendly
environment is a major goal.
The Broadway corridor will be reinforced as the main visitor-serving area of
Chula Vista and new development will support this focus. The corridor includes a
substantial number of culturally diverse restaurants, and with proper marketing,
this cluster could lend itself to the formation of a successful restaurant row.
Major transit centers are located in this area and will facilitate transportation
throughout the Urban Core. A redeveloped residential neighborhood, which
will provide expanded housing opportunities as well as a variety of recreational
opportunities, will augment the aesthetic quality of the Broadway district.
When working toward achieving the Specific Plan vision, several issues have the
potential to create challenges for the process. The Specific Plan subdistricts
area contain multiple parcels under many different ownerships. Residential
development within the Urban Core has occurred over an extended period
of time and there are varying ages of the existing housing stock. In terms
of commercial activity, there is a current lack of cohesiveness among the
commercial corridors within the area. The Urban Core would also benefit from
the addition of supporting neighborhood-serving commercial businesses.
The traditional street grid pattern offers a variety of connectivity and accessibility
opportunities; however, the traditional grid is interrupted in several places within
the Urban Core, limiting current connectivity options. In addition, the Urban
Core is currently very automobile-oriented and a lack of pedestrian, bicycle and
transit corridors exists. Implementing improvements to these areas will be a
focus of the Specific Plan.
Chula Vista
Chapter IV Existing Conditions
IV-17
D. Circulation and Mobility
Circulation in the Urban Core is primarily provided through the traditional street
grid pattern. H Street, an east-west urban arterial, is the central connector for
the Urban Core, supporting important retail commercial activities for the region.
Broadway runs north-south and provides a more auto-oriented environment,
with a focus on visitor-serving commercial. In contrast, Third Avenue is the
heart of the traditional downtown core of Chula Vista and offers a pedestrian-
friendly, intimate retail/office environment. Other significant roadways include
E Street and F Street. Appendix B provides a complete Traffic Impact Analysis
for the Specific Plan.
Though not within the Specific Plan area, Interstate 5 and the San Ysidro Blue
Line of the San Diego Trolley System form the western border of the Specific
Plan area, thus developing a major connection between the Urban Core and
the surrounding region and providing extended transportation opportunities.
The City is currently served by a variety of mass transit options, including rail,
trolley, and bus services.
In general, the street network within the Urban Core of Chula Vista is laid out in
a grid system. Roadways running east-west are usually “Streets” and roadways
flowing north-south are usually “Avenues”. However, over time, the traditional
street grid has been broken. Many roads have been interrupted, especially
in the extreme northwestern corner of the Specific Plan area, between the
I-5 Freeway and Broadway. The truncated streets create a connectivity
problem within neighborhoods. The Specific Plan endeavors to reintroduce
the traditional grid, thus diffusing traffic along multiple routes and providing a
variety of opportunities for reaching one’s destination.
Another challenge is to improve mobility by clarifying the system of street
hierarchy. Though some streets are more significant than others in terms of
community services provided, these streets are not differentiated from other
roadways in terms of width, number of lanes, or other recognizable features.
For example, as the address of a major regional retail center, H Street should
be more dominant than some of the surrounding streets that provide access to
other neighborhood servicing commercial uses and residences.
The General Plan and Specific Plan both focus on increasing the opportunities
for multiple travel modes in this area. The synchronicity of the transit systems
is also an important topic. Transit stops for different modes of transit should
be located close to one another to provide easy access to changes in mode of
travel. The scheduling of transit vehicles, both within a service and amongst
services, should be coordinated to allow easy transfers between transit routes
and different types of transit services. The Specific Plan addresses these issues
and suggests ways to calm the behavior of traffic within the Urban Core.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IV-18
Other key constraints to mobility within the Urban Core include an environment
that is generally unfriendly to pedestrians and cyclists, as well as the lack of
links from the Urban Core to other portions of the City, such as the Bayfront
area or east Chula Vista.
Chula Vista
Chapter IV Existing Conditions
IV-19
E. Economic Conditions
The following is a summary of economic conditions that will influence the
type and quantity of new and redevelopment activity in the Specific Plan area.
Appendix C provides a complete Market Analysis for the Specific Plan.
1. Existing Conditions and Projected Trends
a. Regional
The City of Chula Vista is located in a strong and relatively stable regional
economic environment. The City’s location within South San Diego County,
between the two growing economic hubs of San Diego and Tijuana, is a prime
location for capitalizing on regional growth. Regional competition continues to
thrive in this market. The diverse regional economy is powered by manufacturing,
the military, tourism, business and technology services, and trade.
The defense portion of the City’s trade has declined in recent decades due
to successful efforts in international relations as well as national economic
trends. However, recent international events have led to somewhat of a
resurgence in this particular industry. Currently, in spite of its location, Chula
Vista is not very competitive in the regional tourism market and tourism is only
a minor player in the local economy. Bayfront development may provide a key
for regional attraction to Chula Vista. Despite the recent challenges to these
sectors, defense, tourism, and the City’s proximity to Mexico will continue to be
significant factors in the region’s economy.
Currently, there is a regional shortage of affordable market rate housing; as long
as San Diego County continues to rank as one of the highest priced housing
markets in the country, affordable housing will continue to be an issue for the
area.
b. Urban Core
Though the Urban Core exists in a relatively stable economic environment,
revitalization is essential to the long-term future of the area. Western Chula
Vista, which includes the Urban Core, is relatively built out compared to eastern
Chula Vista, presenting both opportunities and challenges for development.
Existing SANDAG forecasts predict that the Urban Core may see a declining
portion of sub-regional growth over the next 25 years. However, western Chula
Vista’s share of jobs will continue to remain strong relative to other portions
of the City. New competition may elicit a decline in the Urban Core’s market
share of regional sales, but as the market population grows, local sales are also
expected to expand.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IV-20
In comparison to eastern Chula Vista, the Urban Core overall receives lower
rents but has higher land prices, which makes it difficult for new projects to
achieve financial feasibility. Rents in the Urban Core, for retail, residential, and
office uses, are lower than average, due mainly to the older building stock.
Of these, the retail and residential sectors appear to be faring best overall.
Rising prices and low vacancy rates are positive indicators for these sectors,
despite the low rental rates. Trends show that the Urban Core could absorb at
least 3,600 new housing units over the next 25 years while many opportunities
exist for the retail sector. The office sector is slightly worse off, with both low
occupancy rates and low rental rates. However, recent success in new office
development indicates that there is a potential latent demand for higher quality
office space in the Urban Core.
2. Economic Strategies
Opportunities for residential development appear to be a major basis for future
development in the Urban Core. The shortage of affordable housing stock
presents an immediate need and opportunity both within the Urban Core and
the region as a whole.
Retail development is also key to the revitalization of the Urban Core. The
traditional role of the Urban Core must adjust to growing competition from
surrounding areas, including eastern Chula Vista, downtown San Diego, and
border communities. The Urban Core should develop a strategy to recapture
sales lost to these surrounding locations.
A strategy with high potential for success is that of focusing on a niche market.
The Urban Core could greatly increase its retail trade by developing a unique
niche environment, focused on culture, music, and food, that would attract
its own visitors to the region. Tourism opportunities could increase from this
development and the City may expand its regional entertainment value from its
current state.
Another viable opportunity is that of leveraging the Mexican market. The Urban
Core has potential to increase the quantity of cross-border shoppers for a variety
of retail products, services, and entertainment needs.
Chula Vista
Chapter IV Existing Conditions
IV-21
3. SWOT Analysis
Development prospects within the Urban Core have many competitive strengths,
weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) to capitalize upon or avoid
and prepare against. SWOT analysis is a tool used to identify each of these
potential market and economic issues early in the planning and development
process to help concentrate efforts and avoid diluted or scattered development.
Ultimately, the goal of any SWOT analysis is to focus efforts towards achieving
early success and generate the momentum necessary to achieve the long-
term vision. The following is an examination of the Urban Core’s market and
economic strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.
a. Strengths
• Location between San Diego and Tijuana
• Strong and established retail market
• Proximity to the Bay
• Established employment, retail, and residential center with high
occupancy
• Public investment in infrastructure
• Quality entry-level and mid-market rate ownership housing
• Transit linkages
• Traditional downtown district
• Good regional access
b. Weaknesses
• Relatively lower incomes
• Practically nonexistent tourism industry
• Low hotel room costs and hotel occupancy rates
• Aging building stock
• Relatively lower rents
• Public facility deficiencies
• Relatively neutral regional market image
• Weak linkage with the Bayfront
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IV-22
c. Opportunities
• Affordable development relative to downtown San Diego
• Ability to capture a larger share of housing demand than SANDAG
forecasts
• An alternative urban lifestyle from downtown San Diego
• Coastal view development and links to the Bayfront
• Pedestrian and transit-oriented development
• Intercept Mexican market consumers
• Become South County’s office employment, retail, and entertainment
center
• Housing for many incomes, preferences, and cultures
d. Threats
• Competition from other mixed-use urban nodes in the region
• Competition from Bayfront development if not linked with core
• Competition from the Eastern Urban Center if not adequately
distinguished
• Cost and complexity of land assembly and infill development
• Infrastructure and public facility constraints
• Not overcoming “second tier” reputation in regional market
• Exposure to Mexican currency fluctuations
1
Chapter V Mobility
Chula Vista
V. Mobility
A. Introduction V-1
B. Pedestrian Facilities V-2
C. Bicycle Facilities V-5
D. Transit Routes V-9
E. Vehicle Traffic V-14
F. Parking V-46
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-1
V. Mobility
A. Introduction
This chapter of the Specific Plan discusses the roles of mobility to support the
vision and goals for the planning area. This chapter presents improvements for
the main thoroughfares of the Urban Core and other streets within the Specific
Plan area, including pedestrian, bicycle facilities, transit, vehicular and parking
opportunities.
The Specific Plan strives to create pedestrian-friendly destinations in the Urban
Core. The Mobility chapter is intended to foster a downtown environment that
is the heart of the City with active, engaged, human-oriented streetscapes and
where the car is not viewed as the only mode of travel for the people who live,
work, or shop here.
Although mobility in many forms is encouraged and needed throughout the
Urban Core, the hierarchy of emphasis is: pedestrian, bicycle, transit, and
finally, the automobile. However, the mode emphasis will vary from street to
street and neighborhood to neighborhood. For instance, H Street is the transit
and vehicle backbone for the Urban Core, yet still provides enhanced pedestrian
and bicycle amenities. For Third Avenue, the pedestrian takes precedence and
vehicle speeds are reduced. While different streets will have varying emphasis
on the type of travel modes utilized, it is a goal of the Specific Plan that non-
motorized trip making will be the fastest growing component of all types of trips
made, rather than trips by private vehicle.
Information contained in this chapter relies in large part on the traffic engineering
analyses conducted for the Urban Core by Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.,
and is also complemented by the policies contained in Chapter VIII - Public
Realm Design Guidelines. For the complete traffic analyses, see Appendix B
- Traffic Impact Analysis.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-2
Fg. 5.1
Example of a refuge island
B. Pedestrian Facilities
1. Introduction
Creating better pedestrian facilities and providing an expanded and enhanced
pedestrian environment is a primary objective of the Urban Core. In fact, almost
all of Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines is devoted to improving
the pedestrian environment. With the increased density, mix of uses, and
pedestrian improvements, walking will become a preferred way to move about
the Urban Core.
Widened sidewalks are proposed for all key streets including Third Avenue, E
Street, F Street, H Street and Broadway. In Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design
Guidelines, direction is provided for sidewalks, crosswalks, furnishings,
intersections, trees and other landscaping, lighting, plazas and paseos -- all in
support of improving the pedestrian experience and encouraging “feet on the
street.” In this chapter, focus is provided on traffic calming elements in support
of pedestrian circulation.
2. Traffic Calming Design Elements
The potential design elements described below aim to balance the needs to
effectively moderate vehicle speeds and improve the pedestrian environment
while conforming to acceptable engineering standards. These traffic calming
tools include adding median refuge islands, corner curb extensions or
“bulbouts,” accent paving at crosswalks, and speed tables, as well as narrowing
traffic lanes. Design elements should be considered at key intersections, such
as those described in Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines, Section
H. Sidewalk and Pedestrian Improvements. Specific locations for these
elements will be identified through a Streetscape Master Plan or other similar
improvement plans.
a. Refuge Islands
Medians can be used to create pedestrian “refuge islands” that reduce the
number of lanes a pedestrian must cross at one time. Refuge islands are
extensions of the median that create a protected
crosswalk in the middle of the street. Refuge
islands should be considered on streets where
medians are provided: Third Avenue, H Street,
F Street and Broadway.
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-3
Fg. 5.2
Example of a bulbout
b. Bulbouts
The use of curb extensions or “bulbouts’ is
also suggested at selected intersections in the
Urban Core including Third Avenue, F Street,
Broadway and Woodlawn. Bulbouts extend the
curbs to widen the sidewalk area at crosswalk
locations. This reduces the distance that
pedestrians must cross. Intersections that
include bulbouts shall be designed so that the
outer travel lanes have adequate clearance
for turning of larger vehicles such as trucks.
Drainage issues with bulbouts are also an
important consideration, particularly in Chula
Vista where much of the drainage is surface. So where gutter flow cannot be
accommodated around the perimeter of a bulbout, it may be necessary to
incorporate features such as removable grates to facilitate water flow. Fire lane
access also can be accommodated successfully with thoughtful design.
c. Street Trees
Street trees offer an aesthetic alternative to the wide-open speedway feeling
of a treeless arterial. Street trees planted at the sidewalk edge and in medians
have a traffic calming effect as they create a visually enclosed and perceptually
narrower street scene. Street trees are encouraged throughout the Specific
Plan area. Within Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines, conceptual
streetscape plans incorporating street trees are provided for Third Avenue, E
Street, F Street, H Street, and Broadway as well as other primary streets and
neighborhoods streets. Street tree species recommendations are provided as
well as complementary landscape palettes.
d. Accent Paving
Accent paving such as unit pavers or colored concrete can be used on crosswalks
to accentuate pedestrian crossings. The change in texture gives motorists a
visual and audible heightened awareness which in turn can slow traffic. Please
refer to Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines for additional information
on accent paving and pedestrian crossings.
e. Narrowed Travel Lanes
Narrowing travel lanes, such as those proposed for H Street and Broadway,
encourage slower vehicle speeds and reduce the pedestrian crossing distances.
Drivers have been found to travel more slowly on streets with narrower lane
widths. The effect is largely psychological. Narrower travel lanes and street
widths require more attention from drivers and are often used in downtown
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-4
environments that experience a higher degree of potential conflicts, such as
pedestrians, frequent movements to and from side streets, and vehicles making
parking maneuvers.
Narrower lanes also have the benefit of reducing pedestrian crossing distances
(which is also a safety benefit) and freeing up space for other uses such as
parking, bike lanes, medians, and widened sidewalks. The street cross sections
provided in the following section of this chapter provide for the least wide travel
lanes while still meeting traffic engineering needs.
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-5
Fg. 5.3
Bikeway classifications
C. Bicycle Facilities
The bicycle is an important component to any mobility plan in Chula Vista,
and especially for the Urban Core. Bicycling offers enjoyment and quality of
life for residents of Chula Vista, and it also offers a valuable, cost-effective,
and environmentally sensitive form of transportation. The Circulation Element
of the General Plan and the Bikeway Master Plan have targeted corridors in
areas of the City for improvement with regard to bicycle facilities. Presently
the General Plan does not contain plans to add bikeways routes or upgrade
classifications of existing bikeways in the Urban
Core. Despite higher volumes of traffic on many
of the Urban Core roadways, bicyclists will still
access downtown businesses and attractions
and, therefore, will need to be considered
in any planning efforts encompassing this
area. Therefore the Specific Plan provides
an opportunity to address deficiencies in
the bikeway network. Figure 5.4 presents a
graphic depiction of the Existing and Proposed
Bikeways.
Class III bikeways (signs, no paint in right-of-way) are presently provided on the
following roadways within the Urban Core:
• Fourth Avenue
• Fifth Avenue (except between H and I Streets)
• F Street
• J Street
As a project feature of the Specific Plan, Class I bike paths are proposed to be
added to F Street and H Street. Both F and H Streets are excellent candidates
for enhanced bicycle transit due to the available right-of-way and connectivity
with the Bayfront. Bike path and lanes (Class I or Class II facilities respectively)
are typically more attractive to families and casual cyclists. The proposed
improvements parallel E Street and G Street, and provide an improved
opportunity for east-west bicycle travel. F Street and H Street cross sections
and proposed improvements are described under the Future Conditions and
Street Improvement Opportunities section found in Section E. Vehicle Traffic.
Bicycle paths should also be evaluated for Davidson Street and G Street.
V-6
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Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-7
Bicycle facilities improvements are proposed for the following roadway
segments:
• Third Avenue - Class III
• Fifth Avenue (between H Street and I Street) – Class I (Future
redevelopment of Chula Vista Center may allow the opportunity to
complete this link.)
• Broadway (between C Street and L Street) – Class II
• E Street – Class III
• F Street (between 3rd Avenue and I-5) - Class I
• G Street – Class III
• H Street (between Third Avenue and I-5) – Class I
• I Street – Class III
• J Street – Class III
Bike lanes on arterials with raised medians and bikeways in low traffic volume
neighborhoods should also be pursued. Higher traffic volumes on most streets
dictate Class II facilities, although bike lanes are generally not compatible
with diagonal parking. Further, the street network within transit focus areas
should accommodate at least Class I bicycle facilities to accommodate bicycle
commuters accessing public transit at the stations located at H Street/I-5 and
E Street/I-5, as well as the potential Bus Rapid Transit station at Third Avenue/
H Street. Opportunities may also exist for the addition of Class III bike lanes on
other streets within the Urban Core, such as Woodlawn Avenue.
Off-street facilities for bicycles (bicycle parking) are also integral to cyclists
for accessibility. Convenient bicycle parking should be provided along Third
Avenue, Fourth Avenue, Broadway, F Street, H Street, and J Street, as well as at
transit focus areas such as Third Avenue/H Street, H Street/I-5 and E Street/I-
5. Convenient bicycle parking should also be provided in commercial parking
lots, including destinations such as malls, and in commercial areas, event
locations, transit stops, and parks. Bicycle racks should be placed along the
street where appropriate and provided in parking lots at 5% of the number
of vehicle stalls. Racks in off-street locations should be visible and well lit to
discourage theft or vandalism and be placed to be convenient to the cyclist.
Refer to Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines for guidance on bicycle
rack design.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-8
In addition, bike stations should be considered at the H Street trolley and E
Street trolley centers. Bike stations should be located close to connections to
different modes of transit, to allow bicycle riders to make a convenient switch
in transportation choices without limiting mobility. Bike stations offer a secure
parking area, changing rooms, restrooms and showering facilities for bicycle
riders. There may also be shops for bicycle rentals, repairs and accessories.
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-9
D. Transit Routes
Chula Vista is presently served by a variety of local and regional transit systems.
These networks are planned to grow over the next thirty years. Provision of
adequate transit service is a key component for creating the desirable pedestrian
and urban environment envisioned for the Specific Plan.
1. Existing Conditions
The Urban Core is currently served by 11 Chula Vista (CVT) routes (Routes 701,
702, 703, 704, 705, 706, 707, 708, 709, 711 and 712), two Metropolitan
Transit System (MTS) routes (Routes 929 and 932), and the San Diego Trolley’s
Blue Line. Several CVT transit routes circulate within the Urban Core and Bayfront
area; others serve the greater Chula Vista area and provide connections to
National City Transit and other transit providers. MTS route 929 runs along
Third and Fourth Avenues through the Urban Core; MTS transit route 932 runs
along Broadway.
The San Diego Trolley’s Blue Line provides service between Qualcomm Stadium
and San Ysidro/Tijuana and extends through the Urban Core parallel to and
on the east side of I-5, with stations at Bayfront/E Street and H Street. Service
is provided seven days a week with service starting at around 5:00 a.m. and
ending around 12:00 a.m. During the peak periods, service is provided with 7.5-
minute headways and additional service to America Plaza/Old Town is available.
Headways of 15 minutes are provided during off-peak periods. Existing transit
routes are illustrated in Figure 5.5.
2. Future Conditions
Building upon the existing transit network, a number of regional transit
improvements are envisioned that will serve the Urban Core area. Many of these
lines provide transit stations within the Specific Plan and are integrated with the
land use concepts and planning. Other routes are located with transit stations
nearby; these routes could serve the Urban Core area. Figure 5.6 depicts the
planned routes in the South Bay.
a. Route 510 (Existing Blue Line Trolley)
This route would have increased frequency of service. Light Rail Transit (LRT)
headways would be reduced from ten minutes to five minutes. In order to
achieve this level of transit service, it would be necessary to grade separate the
LRT tracks from key surface streets, such as E Street and H Street within the
project area.
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Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-12
b. South Bay Transit First Project
This project would provide regional Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) service between
Otay Ranch in eastern Chula Vista and downtown San Diego. As described in
the transit first report, the first phase of the project would follow I-805 and SR-
94, along with East Palomar Street. Phase 1 of the project could be completed
by Year 2010. The second phase of the project would extend the line to the Otay
Border crossing and serve businesses in Otay Mesa.
c. Route 540 (I-5 Express Service)
This route would provide regional Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) service from San
Ysidro to downtown San Diego and Old Town. This route would use median
lanes in the I-5 Freeway and would have a transit stop at H Street (with elevators
to the H Street overcrossing at I-5). This route would have infrequent stations,
which would allow for shorter travel times, as compared to Route 510.
d. Route 627 (H Street BRT)
This route would provide a transit connection between the Specific Plan area
and Southwestern College and the Eastern Urban Center. This route will connect
the major activity centers in the redeveloping areas of western Chula Vista to
the rapidly growing areas of eastern Chula Vista.
e. Route 628 (Sorrento Valley to San Ysidro International Border)
This route would provide regional BRT service between the San Ysidro and
Sorrento Mesa along the I-805 corridor. This service would connect Chula
Vista to major employment centers in Kearny Mesa and Sorrento Mesa. Transit
stations for this route would be located on I-805 at H Street.
f. West Side Shuttle
This project is a concept proposed to serve both the Specific Plan and Bayfront
Master Plan areas in western Chula Vista. This service would complement existing
and planned future transit improvements. The shuttle would provide localized
service between various uses in western Chula Vista and provide connections
to the regional transit system. (See Figure 5.7 for proposed West Side Shuttle
Route.) The shuttle would provide regional connectivity with the existing E Street
and H Street trolley stations (Routes 510, 540, and 627) and with the future
station at Third Avenue. In addition, five other stations are planned to serve
destinations within the Specific Plan, along with three additional stations within
the Bayfront Master Plan. Formation of the West Side Shuttle is included as
an implementation action in Chapter X - Plan Implementation and Community
Benefits Program.
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-13
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Fg. 5.7
West Side Shuttle Proposed Route (Source: Kimley-Horn and Associates)
Note: Route may use E Street or F Street
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-14
E. Vehicle Traffic
1. Existing Conditions
The existing roadway network is based upon a traditional grid system. “Streets”
typically running east-west and “Avenues” typically running north-south.
Some areas of the grid system have been interrupted over time. Following
are descriptions of the main roadways within the Urban Core; City roadway
classifications are illustrated in Figure 5.8. Existing daily traffic volumes are
shown in Figure 5.9. Existing Average Daily Traffic Volumes. As a rule of thumb,
typical existing dimensions for four lane east-west streets in the Urban Core is
64 feet of curb-to-curb roadway width on 80 feet of right-of-way. Typical existing
dimensions for north-south avenues in the Urban Core is 80 feet of curb-to-curb
roadway width on 100 feet of right-of-way. The descriptions of the following
roadways are based on the new classifications as provided for in the General
Plan Update (2005).
a. Third Avenue
Third Avenue is a north-south roadway. Third Avenue is classified as a four-lane
commercial boulevard between C Street and E Street and between H Street and
L Street and a two or four-lane downtown promenade between E Street and H
Street. Third Avenue is two lanes between E Street and F Street, approximately
72 feet in width. Between F Street and Madrona Street, Third Avenue is a four-
lane roadway with a raised median, approximately 101 feet in width. Between
Madrona Street and G Street, Third Avenue is four lanes and approximately
72’ feet in width. Angled parking is provided in these first three sections. Third
Avenue is a four-lane roadway with a center two-way left-turn lane between G
Street and H Street; it is approximately 66 feet in width and parallel parking is
provided. Sidewalks are provided on both sides of the street in all four sections.
The posted speed limit is 35 mph.
b. E Street
E Street is an east-west roadway. E Street is classified as a four-lane gateway
between I-5 and I-805, with the exception of the segment between Broadway
and First Avenue, which is classified as a four-lane arterial. E Street is four
lanes between Third Avenue and Broadway, approximately 62 feet in width.
Parallel parking is provided on both sides of the street in this section. E Street
to the west of Broadway has four lanes plus a two-way left turn lane and no on-
street parking; it is approximately 70 feet in width. Sidewalks are provided on
both sides of the roadway in both sections. The posted speed is 30 mph.
c. F Street
F Street is an east-west roadway. F Street is classified as a four-lane downtown
promenade between I-5 and Broadway and as a two-lane downtown promenade
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-15
Fg. 5.8
City of Chula Vista Roadway Classifications (Source: City of Chula Vista)
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-16
Fg. 5.9
Existing Average Daily Traffic Volumes (Source: Kimley-Horn and Associates)
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-17
between Broadway and Third Avenue. F Street is four lanes between Third Avenue
and Fourth Avenue with a raised median in the center and is approximately 65
feet in width. The only on-street parking provided in this segment is limited
parallel parking on the north side of F Street between Third Avenue and Garret
Avenue. Between Fourth Avenue and Broadway, F Street is a two-lane roadway,
approximately 40 feet in width with parallel parking on both sides. F Street has
four lanes between Broadway and I-5 with parallel parking on both sides and
is approximately 66 feet in width. Sidewalks are provided on both sides of the
roadway in all three sections. The posted speed limit is 30 mph.
d. H Street
H Street is an east-west roadway with a center two-way left turn lane. H Street is
classified as a six-lane gateway street between I-5 and Broadway and between
Hilltop Drive and I-805 and as a four-lane urban arterial between Broadway and
Hilltop Drive; however, it should be noted that H Street is not built to its ultimate
classification and functions as a four-lane roadway between I-5 and Broadway.
Parking is provided on-street east of Third Avenue. H Street is approximately 70
feet in curb-to-curb width between Third Avenue and Broadway and 64 feet in
curb-to-curb width between Broadway and I-5. Sidewalks are provided on both
sides of the street. The posted speed limit is 35 mph.
e. Broadway
Broadway is a north-south roadway. Broadway is classified as a four-lane gateway
street between SR-54 and C Street and as a four-lane commercial boulevard
between C Street and L Street; parallel parking is provided on both sides of the
roadway in these sections. Broadway is approximately 68 feet in width between
E Street and F Street. Between F Street and H Street, there is a two-way left turn
lane and the roadway is approximately 82 feet in width. Sidewalks are provided
on both sides of the street. The posted speed limit is 35 mph.
f. Neighborhood Streets
Neighborhood streets are located throughout the Specific Plan study area,
mostly outside the focus areas and sub-districts. These streets predominantly
serve established single-family and some multi-family neighborhoods.
Neighborhood streets generally are two lanes in width with on-street parking
on both sides. Figure 5.35 shows Woodlawn Avenue at 36’ in width. Sidewalks
and curb improvements are typically provided. Street surface and landscaping
conditions vary from street to street.
g. Alleys
The alley system within the urban core allow for increased access for delivery
services, as well as for residential and commercial parking areas. In addition
to providing alternate access routes, the alleys also somewhat relieve traffic
volume along the major corridors.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-18
h. Roadway Segments
Currently all roadway segments within the Urban Core are performing at a Level
of Service (LOS) C or better, based on volume to capacity ratio.
i. Intersections
Intersections within the Specific Plan area presently operate at Level of Service
(LOS) D or better during both a.m. and p.m. peak periods, except for the following
intersections:
• I-5 Northbound Ramp at E Street (LOS F - PM Peak)
• Woodlawn Avenue at H Street (LOS F – PM Peak)
• Broadway at SR-54 Westbound Ramp (LOS F – AM Peak)*
• L Street at Bay Boulevard (LOS F – PM Peak)*
• Bay Boulevard at I-5 Southbound Ramp (LOS E – PM Peak)*
The above intersections marked with an asterisk (*) are outside of the Specific
Plan Study Area boundary but are presented as the functioning of these
intersections affects traffic movement within the urban core.
3. Future Conditions and Street Improvement Opportunities
Following General Plan guidance, the Urban Core will provide a mix of housing,
offices, retail, civic and hospitality uses to support a vibrant urban environment.
Growth factors determined through computer modeling were applied to existing
traffic volumes at intersections to determine projected conditions in twenty five
years (Year 2030). The average growth in the Urban Core area was estimated to
be 10 percent. (See Figure 5.10 Year 2030 Projected Roadway Volumes.)
In developing the street improvement opportunities, focus was given to providing
a street environment that not only moves vehicle traffic and transit but creates
a safer and more enjoyable environment for pedestrians and bicycles in the
Specific Plan area. As noted previously, each street is intended to serve a multi-
modal function, with different modes of travel emphasized to a greater or lesser
extent on each street. The following section describes the improvements along
the roadway segments in the Urban Core area, specifically focusing on roadway
operational characteristics. The Mobility chapter concentrates only on curb-to-
curb street improvements that facilitate traffic flow. Although some information
is provided regarding parkway treatment and size, this element is a focus of
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines. The following recommendations
are to be used in conjunction with the recommendations contained in Chapter
VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines. The improvements will be implemented
over the term of the Specific Plan and may occur as comprehensive street
improvements or may be improved in phases as part of the redevelopment
process.
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-19
Fg. 5.10
Year 2030 Projected Roadway Volumes (Source: Kimley-Horn and Associates)
V-20
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Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-21
Figure 5.11 summarizes the proposed changes to the existing roadway network.
The table shows existing versus proposed conditions for the number of total
travel lanes, turn lanes or raised medians, curb-to-curb width, parking and bike
lanes. It should be noted that roadway segments that do not have any changes
compared to existing conditions are omitted from the table.
In addition to improvements to existing street segments, reintroduction of the
traditional street grid is proposed. By adding street segments, additional routes
choices are provided to all modes of travel (pedestrian, bicycle, transit and
vehicles). These reintroduced connections are especially important within an
approximately one-mile radius of the transit focus areas (E Street/I-5, H Street/
I-5 and Third Avenue/H Street). New connections could include:
a. Davidson Street between Woodlawn Avenue and Broadway – This
roadway segment could also be considered for future bikeway
improvements and providing bikeway priority at intersections due to the
lower vehicle volumes and direct connection to the future transit focus
area at E Street/I-5.
b. Woodlawn Avenue between F Street and G Street
c. Jefferson Avenue between E Street and H Street – This segment
potentially could also be extended to F Street or H Street
d. Parkway between Broadway and Woodlawn Avenue extension
e. Oaklawn Avenue between Flower Street and G Street
The reintroduction of roadway segments is a long range vision that can only
be accomplished if and when development occurs. The above segments are
provided only as examples of where the street segments could be reintroduced.
The City would evaluate the merits of such connections and retain its full
discretion as to whether such actions are in the City’s best interest.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-22
a. Third Avenue
The cross section of Third Avenue varies greatly between E Street and G Street.
The roadway varies between 72 feet and 101 feet.
The roadway will be maintained in its current two and four lane configuration
between E Street and G Street. The remainder of Third Avenue to L Street will
stay in the current four-lane configuration. It is proposed to retain the existing
median.
Diagonal parking will be provided for most parts of Third Avenue. Figure 5.16
shows the cross section where angled parking is permitted. Due to relatively
high through traffic volumes, it is recommended that the roadway be of sufficient
width to allow vehicles to back out without blocking the through traffic lane. It
should be noted that the curb-to-curb dimension is not reduced where diagonal
parking is provided on the segment of Third Avenue between E Street and F
Street.
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-23
Fg. 5.12
Existing Third Avenue between E Street and F Street (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
Fg. 5.13
Existing Third Avenue between F Street and Madrona Street (Source: Kimley-
Horn and Associates)
*Dimension varies
*Dimension varies
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-24
Fg. 5.15
Existing Third Avenue between G Street and H Street
Fg. 5.14
Existing Third Avenue between Madrona Street and G Street
*Dimension varies
*Dimension varies
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-25
Fg. 5.17
Proposed Third Avenue between E Street and G Street without diagonal parking
Fg. 5.16
Proposed Third Avenue between E Street and G Street with diagonal parking
72’
24’
Not Approved
Not Approved
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-26
Fg. 5.18
Proposed Third Avenue at signalized intersections (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
52’
Not Approved
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-27
b. E Street
The existing roadway cross section on E Street is adequate to serve future
traffic needs except for the segment between I-5 and 300’ east I-5. To mitigate
the intersection impact at the I-5 northbound ramp with E Street, a westbound
right-turn lane is required. It is recommended that E Street be widened between
Woodlawn Avenue and I-5, which will add an additional six feet in the curb-to-
curb width. This segment will need an additional 22 feet of right-of-way. This
added width will allow for an extended right-turn lane on westbound E Street
onto the I-5 northbound on-ramp. This improvement will help to reduce the
queues in the westbound direction and will improve the operations at the I-5
northbound ramp at the Woodlawn Avenue intersection.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-28
Fg. 5.19
Existing E Street between Third Avenue and Broadway (Source: Kimley-Horn
and Associates)
Fg. 5.20
Existing E Street between Broadway and Woodlawn Avenue (Source: Kimley-
Horn and Associates)
*Dimension varies
*Dimension varies
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-29
Fg. 5.22
Proposed E Street between Third Avenue and Broadway (Source: Kimley-Horn
and Associates)
Fg. 5.21
Existing E Street between Woodlawn Avenue and I-5 (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
62’
*Dimension varies
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-30
Fg. 5.23
Proposed E Street between I-5 and 300’ east of I-5 (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
76’
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-31
c. F Street
As a project feature of the Specific Plan, Class I bike lanes will be added to
F Street between Third Avenue and I-5, as illustrated in Figure 5.27. The new
Class I bike paths will improve the connectivity of the Urban Core to the Bayfront.
Greater synergy between the two areas will be fostered through pedestrian and
bicyclist opportunities. Wide parkways, off-street bike lanes, and wide sidewalks
will provide an opportunity to stroll or bicycle through the Urban Core. A Class II
facility will exist on F Street where a Class I bike path cannot be accommodated
due to mature trees or new/existing medians.
For F Street, a 16-foot parkway is provided between Fourth Avenue and
Broadway and a 12-foot parkway is provided between Third Avenue and
Fourth Avenue. The exact location and configuration of bike path and parkway
amenities will be decided through a future Streetscape Master Plan or other
similar improvement plan. Existing trees from Third Avenue to Broadway are
proposed to be preserved and incorporated into the streetscape theme. It is
also recommended that the overhead utility line be placed underground as part
of this improvement project.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-32
Fg. 5.24
Existing F Street between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue (Source: Kimley-
Horn and Associates)
Fg. 5.25
Existing F Street between Fourth Avenue and Broadway (Source: Kimley-Horn
and Associates)
* Parallel parking exists on north side of F Street between Garret Avenue and Third Avenue; Dimension varies
*Dimension varies
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-33
Fg. 5.27
Proposed F Street between Fourth Avenue and I-5 (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
Fg. 5.26
Existing F Street between Broadway and I-5 (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
48’
Class I
Bike
Path
Class I
Bike
Path
* Raised median east of Broadway in some segments
*Dimension varies
**Dimension varies
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-34
d. H Street
The segment of H Street from Third Avenue to Broadway will be widened by
eight feet. The new segment configuration will feature two travel lanes, a raised
center median, and a Class I bike path on both sides of the street. One side of
the street will also have parallel parking.
An additional 22 feet in the curb-to-curb width will be added to H Street between
Broadway and I-5 to include an additional travel lane in both directions.
This improvement is consistent with the ultimate classification of H Street
as defined in the General Plan (2005). The additional travel lane is needed
to accommodate buildout daily and peak-hour traffic on H Street and would
improve the operations along this segment.
Further, a Class I bike path is proposed to be added to H Street between Third
Avenue and I-5. H Street is intended as the “backbone” of the Urban Core, as
it connects the transit focus areas at H Street/Third Avenue and H Street/I-5
and facilitates local and regional transit routes (and Bus Rapid Transit in the
future). A sixteen-foot wide parkway is proposed in order to create a grand
boulevard feeling and promote pedestrian use. The exact location of bike path
and other amenities will be decided through a future Streetscape Master Plan
or other similar improvement plans.
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-35
Fg. 5.29
Existing H Street between Broadway and I-5 (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
Fg. 5.28
Existing H Street between Third Avenue and Broadway (Source: Kimley-Horn
and Associates)
*Dimension varies
* *
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-36
Fg. 5.31
Proposed H Street between Broadway and I-5 (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
Fg. 5.30
Proposed H Street between Third Avenue and Broadway (Source: Kimley-Horn
and Associates)
70’
86’
* Raised median varies in width (from 4’-14’) and is not provided in all locations.
PARKWAY PARKWAY
PARKWAY PARKWAY
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-37
e. Broadway
Broadway will be improved by adding a 12-foot raised median as a project
feature. In addition, a Class II bikeway is proposed to be added along Broadway
between C Street and L Street. Broadway will be widened by 14 feet between E
Street and F Street to accommodate a final consistent configuration consisting
of the raised median, bike lanes in both directions, and narrower traffic lanes.
Between F Street and H Street, the roadway will not need to be widened and the
existing median will be converted to a raised median. Nine-foot wide sidewalks
will support pedestrian circulation. It is proposed to retain the existing palm
trees within parkway areas.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-38
Fg. 5.32
Existing Broadway between E Street and F Street (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
Fg. 5.33
Existing Broadway between F Street and H Street (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
*Dimension varies
*Dimension varies
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-39
Fg. 5.34
Proposed Broadway from C Street to L Street (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
82’
*At intersections, parking is removed to allow for 14’ median
*
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-40
f. Woodlawn Avenue Couplet
Woodlawn Avenue is not currently built as a continuous roadway between E
Street and H Street, but it is recommended that the street grid be recreated by
adding the currently missing segments. As redevelopment occurs, Woodlawn
Avenue will be extended and converted to a one-way couplet between south
of E Street and north of H Street. The creation of the one-way couplet could
include the addition of a neighborhood public park between two one-way streets.
The neighborhood park may include a variety of uses, such as playgrounds,
walkways and basketball courts. The couplet would likely be implemented over
time as property redevelops.
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-41
Fg. 5.35
Existing segments of Woodlawn Avenue between E Street and H Street (Source:
Kimley-Horn and Associates)
*Dimension varies
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-42
Fg. 5.36
Proposed Woodlawn Avenue entire length (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
XX’
** Park area dimension to be determined.
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-43
g. Neighborhood Streets
Enhancement strategies for neighborhood streets focus on the public realm
rather than roadway width and lane configuration; therefore, these strategies are
described in Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines. Such improvements
will focus on beautification, landscaping, improving sidewalk and street
conditions, and pedestrian system improvements such as crosswalks where
warranted. New connections reintroducing the grid system are also possible
and should be encouraged as development occurs or planned as capital
improvements projects in the long-term.
h. Alleys
Alleys, to the extent feasible, will allow for short-term loading and unloading
and other delivery services. Alleys will also function as alternative access to
uses and parking areas.
i. Roadway Segment Levels of Service and Intersection Improvements
With the implementation of recommended improvements and reclassifications,
Urban Core roadways will perform at an acceptable level of service. Intersection
improvements have been identified at 20 intersections related to implementation
of the Specific Plan. (See Figures 5.37 and 5.38 Proposed Intersection
Improvements.) After implementation of recommended improvements, 17
of the intersections would be improved to acceptable levels of service. Three
intersections would be improved to operation at LOS E: H Street/Broadway,
Third Avenue/J Street, and Hilltop/H Street. Although mitigation options have
been explored, improvement to an acceptable LOS of D is not feasible due
to right-of-way and existing building constraints or impediments to pedestrian
circulation.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-44
Fg. 5.37
Proposed Intersection Improvements (Source: Kimley-Horn and Associates)
IntersectIon Þecommended Improvements
Bay Boulevard/I-5 SB Ramp/E Street Add EBT, EBR, SBL, SBR, and NBR lanes*
I-5 NB Ramp/E Street Add WBR lane and Light Rail Transit grade separation*
Broadway/F Street Add EBR lane
I-5 SB Ramp/H Street Add SBL, EBT, and EBR lanes*
I-5 NB Ramp/H Street Add WBR, WBT, restripe south approach to accommodate
dual left turns and Light Rail Transit grade separation*
Woodlawn Avenue/H Street Change Woodlawn Avenue to a one-way couplet
Broadway/H Street Add EBT Queue Jumper Lane, WBT and WBR lanes
Fifth Avenue/H Street Change NB and SB approaches to protective plus permissive
phasing in traffic signal and add WBR lane
Fourth Avenue/H Street Add EBR and WBR lanes
Hilltop Drive/H Street No improvements recommended due to ROW constraints
Broadway/SR-54 WB Ramp Add WBR lane*
Fourth Avenue/SR-54 EB Ramp Add EBR lane*
Fourth Avenue/Brisbane Street Add SBR overlap phase
Third Avenue/J Street No improvements recommended due to ROW constraints
Second Avenue/D Street Convert to an all-way stop controlled intersection
J Street/I-5 NB Ramp Add EBL and WBR lanes*
L Street/Bay Boulevard Add SBL lane, signalize intersection, and add NBR overlap
phasing to traffic signal
Bay Boulevard/I-5 SB Ramp Signalize intersection*
Industrial Boulevard/I-5 NB Ramp Signalize intersection*
RT = Right turn lane NBT = Northbound through lane
EBL = Eastbound left turn lane NBR = Northbound right turn lane
EBT = Eastbound through lane SBL = Southbound left turn lane
EBR = Eastbound right turn lane SBT = Southbound through lane
WBT = Westbound through lane SBR = Southbound right turn lane
WBR = Westbound right turn lane *Coordination with Caltrans is required
Chula YIsta Urban Core SpecIfIc Þlan
IntersectIon Improvements
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-45
4. Conclusions
The Specific Plan emphasizes a multi-modal strategy and provides project
benefit features in addition to required mitigation measures. This approach
accommodates additional development intensity while providing sufficient
levels of service.
The comprehensive traffic impact analysis for the Specific Plan evaluated
a total of 64 intersections and 32 roadways. Under existing conditions, five
intersections operate at LOS E or worse during peak periods and all roadway
segments function at an acceptable LOS. With implementation of the Specific
Plan, proposed improvements and multi-modal strategies, future conditions
show three intersections operating at LOS E or worse.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-46
Fg. 5.38
On-street parking is provided in some
areas
F. Parking
1. Existing Conditions
Parking within the Specific Plan area is primarily provided for individual land
uses on-site. For example, commercial and office uses along H Street and
Broadway meet their parking demand on-site, and existing residential uses
are required to provide on-site parking. In addition, many of the major and
neighborhood streets with the Urban Core have on street parking available to
the general public.
In addition to on-site parking, a parking district has been established along
Third Avenue and abutting streets within the Village District. The parking district
through a metered system includes public parking both on Third Avenue, and
a series of small to large public parking lots. Within the Village parking district
approximately 509 metered spaces are on street and 1,205 spaces are provided
in 11 different public parking lot locations. The parking district establishes
parking supply for existing and new (permitted) commercial uses in the Village
commercial corridor and provides a mechanism for new conditionally permitted
commercial uses to pay an in-lieu fee instead of providing new on-site parking
spaces, which is often infeasible given the
developed condition of the commercial corridor.
The district also provides a comprehensive
maintenance program of existing parking lots.
2. Parking New Uses
Successful implementation of the Specific
Plan, which promotes pedestrian-friendly and
transit-friendly streetscapes and development,
will cause a gradual transition to a “park-once/
walk-many” environment. This would be in stark
contrast to the current pattern, where many
customers park at one business then take a
short car trip to the next business. Proper design and promotion of local transit
and the proposed West Side Shuttle could promote the arrival of customers
by bus and bicycle/pedestrian travel to each business. Although alternative
modes of transportation (walking, bicycling and transit) are foundational to the
Specific Plan, vehicle use may remain one of the primary means of access
throughout the Urban Core. Therefore, in concert with the pedestrian, bicycle
and transit centered improvements recommended in the Specific Plan, the
provision of an adequate parking supply is necessary in order to provide for all
modal types of trips.
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-47
Fg. 5.39
Diagonal parking such as that above
is provided on portions of Third Avenue
Parking supply will need to be balanced and
should not overshadow the primary goal
of creating a vibrant pedestrian friendly
urban core. It is also recognized that one of
the greatest challenges to revitalization of
properties within the Specific Plan area may be
the ability to provide adequate on-site parking
for new commercial uses. With limited land
resources and the additional costs typically
associated with infill development, provision of
on-site parking is often financially challenging,
and can make or break the success of a
commercial project.
The Specific Plan allows an intensification of development in the Urban Core
which will create an increased demand for off-street parking. Chapter VI - Land
Use and Development Regulations identify parking requirements such as the
minimum number of parking spaces required per use and parking locations.
Parking standards are identified for residential, guest, and non-residential
uses; parking locations are for the most required on-site parking. In addition,
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines provides guidance on the design
of parking lots and facilities, with an emphasis on accessibility and safety. As
new development occurs compliance with the development regulations and
design guidelines will be required.
While the majority of new uses will provide parking on-site, there are specific
locations such as within the Village district and transit focus areas that allow
some of the parking needs to be met off-site and/or through alternative
means such as in lieu fees and shared parking arrangements. This approach
is appropriate given the planned land uses for these subdistricts which are
primarily mixed use and typically have opposing peak parking demands. As
part of the approval process, projects will need to demonstrate that sufficient
parking will be made available with their development. The following section
further describes potential parking improvement strategies within the Urban
Core.
3. Parking Improvement Strategies
a. Parking Circulation
Parking should always be designed with accessibility and safety in mind. In
areas where pedestrian streetscapes and site design will be promoted, it is
desirable to provide buffers between pedestrians and traffic as much as
possible. Buffers can include low-profile elements such as bollards near the
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-48
Fg. 5.40
Example of parking structure
wrapped with retail uses
curb or additional parkway/tree well landscaping. A consistent layout of on-
street parking also helps to create visual separation between roadway traffic
and sidewalk areas. Properly designed buffers induce a feeling of safety by
pedestrians and help define crosswalk and outside seating areas. These design
principles are described in further detail in Chapter VII - Development Design
Guidelines and Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines.
Access to new parking areas should be designed carefully so that incoming traffic
to centralized parking lots does not conflict with pedestrian circulation either
on major streets such as Third Avenue, H Street and Broadway, or internally
through parking lots and garages. Traffic should be routed onto major streets
by a directional sign program, so that undue incursions into nearby residential
neighborhoods do not occur. Alleys, although not currently a predominant
feature within the Urban Core, should be dedicated and extended with proper
site planning for new development. Alleys can provide additional access routes
to both on-site and centralized parking lots.
b. Parking Reductions
One method to create incentives for
redevelopment and restructuring of the urban
form is to minimize the number of required
parking spaces at identified transit nodes
and mixed-use areas. As set forth in Chapter
VI - Land Use and Development Regulations,
parking requirements have been reduced to
be more consistent with urban standards and
reflective of the multi-modal design principles
embraced by the Specific Plan.
c. Parking Districts
Parking Districts can be very effective tools to help create more parking, to
promote efficient use of existing parking spaces, and to provide a means for
allowing shared parking and off-site, remote parking for a development site. A
parking district was established several years ago in the Village District. Figure
5.42. Parking Strategy Map indicates areas within the Urban Core where
additional parking districts and transit focus area parking may be studied and
located. Future parking districts should be developed in cooperation with area
property owners and business owners.
Consideration should be given to expanding the Village parking district to
better align the boundaries with the Village subdistricts. On-site parking for
new commercial uses should not impede the intended pedestrian character
of the area, and may be better suited in centralized easy to reach locations. In
V-49
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Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-50
Fg. 5.42
The pedestrian area is separated
from parking areas
Fg. 5.43
Multi-level parking facility with retail
on ground floor
addition, some diagonal parking may be phased
out along Third Avenue as pedestrian and
landscaping improvements are implemented.
Replacement parking should be provided if
determined to be necessary in the short term.
An expanded in-lieu parking fee program
may be another means to providing efficient
parking supply within the parking districts.
The in-lieu fee program could assist some new
businesses in locating within the Urban Core,
as the expense of providing on-site parking
would be offset. The assessment could also
assist the City by providing reimbursement for property acquisition, capital
funding, and operating funds for new parking lots or structures. The existing
in lieu fee program within the Village District should be reevaluated to ensure
adequate funding or reimbursement for new publicly owned parking lots is
being assessed. Parking developed under an in- lieu program would need to
be strategically timed in order to ensure a proper balance between parking
demand and supply.
Unlike a parking assessment district, the in-lieu fee program would not be a local
tax that would be levied upon all business owners in a designated area. The in-
lieu fee would be optional and only assessed on new commercial developments
within a specified area if on-site parking is not provided. The in-lieu fee would
be based on the number of required parking spaces that could not be provided
on-site by the development. A radius from a particular development could be
utilized, between one-quarter mile and one-
eighth mile walking distance, to determine
the location of the nearest off-street parking
lots that could feasibly serve that particular
business. This assessment would need to
evaluate the availability of parking in the
identified lots, including both the existing
demand and parking supply commitments
made to other nearby developments.
d. Parking Structures
The use of structured parking can be particularly
effective in allowing increased densities. The
Specific Plan recommends parking structures
where feasible, and in particular within the
transit focus areas (such as UC-2, UC-12 and
Chula Vista
Chapter V Mobility
V-51
Fg. 5.44
New surface parking lots should be
well landscaped
UC-15), to encourage the intensification of mixed-use, commercial, office and
residential projects where parking can be provided on-site in a structured
format. Land values and the proximity to transit in these areas tend to support
the higher economic investment necessary to construct parking structures.
These parking structures could serve individual development sites, provide
shared facilities and/or serve as additional public parking facilities.
Over the mid to long-term, parking structures
may also be warranted in the area around
Third Avenue, since existing surface parking
lots may only be sustainable in the near term.
As existing public surface lots redevelop, new
development should be required to replace
public parking either on or off site. In addition,
where appropriate and feasible, the use of
the incentives program should be encouraged
to enhance public parking opportunities
(See Chapter VI - Land Use and Development
Regulations.)
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-52
1
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
Chula Vista
VI. Land Use and Development Regulations
A. Administration VI-1
B. Land Use Matrix VI-4
C. Development Standards VI-10
D. Special Provisions for Neighborhood Transition Combining Districts
and Transit Focus Areas VI-40
E. Special Provisions VI-42
F. Urban Amenity Requirements and Incentives VI-48
G. Signs VI-52
H. Other Regulations VI-53
I. Development Exceptions VI-54
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-1
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
VI. Land Use and Development Regulations
A. Administration
1. Purpose
The purpose of this chapter is to establish the appropriate distribution, mix,
intensity, physical form, and functional relationships of land uses within the
Urban Core. These regulations are intended to encourage and facilitate infill
development, mixed uses, pedestrian scale, urban amenities, transit use,
creative design, and the general revitalization of the Urban Core.
In contrast to the City’s existing Zoning Code, the Specific Plan’s Land Use and
Development Regulations and associated design guidelines utilize a “form-
based” approach. This approach places primary emphasis on the physical
form of the built environment and focuses on where and how the buildings are
placed rather than the use occupying the building. This is especially important
given the extent of mixed use development envisioned in Specific Plan which
requires flexibility in uses in order to be responsive to market demands while
still ensuring a clear vision of what the built environment should look like.
To that end the Specific Plan proposes a multi-dimensional approach to
creating the building form through the use of floor area ratio, lot coverage and/
or street wall frontage, and height regulations. In addition, the Specific Plan
provides graphic depictions of building placement relative to the street and
public spaces, and extensive design guidance for building and site planning is
contained in Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines.
2. Applicability
Proposed land uses and development regulations within the Urban Core shall
comply with the applicable provisions of this chapter. This chapter replaces
provisions of the Chula Vista Municipal Code Sections 19.24 through 19.40
and 19.44. Where in conflict with other sections of the Municipal Code, this
chapter shall apply, and where this chapter is silent, the Municipal Code shall
apply. The definitions found in the Chula Vista Municipal Code, section 19.04
apply to the Specific Plan, except where specific definitions are provided within
the Specific Plan (Section C of this chapter and Appendix A - Glossary).
3. Administration
The administration of this chapter shall be in accordance with Chapter XI - Plan
Administration.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-2
4. Subdistricts
The Specific Plan area has been grouped into the following three districts based
on similar building and use types: the Village, the Urban Core, and the Corridors.
These three districts have been further subdivided into 25 subdistricts, each
with its own character for buildings and public spaces and specified uses.
Zoning regulations for each subdistrict are presented on individual zoning
sheets specific to that subdistrict. The Urban Core Specific Plan Subdistricts
Key Map, shown in Figure 6.1, identifies the subdistrict boundaries. Please
note that in the event that a project encompasses more than one subdistrict,
a determination of the primary subdistrict may be necessary at the time of
individual project submittal.
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Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-4
B. Land Use Matrix
The following Land Use Matrix specifies permitted uses, conditionally permitted
uses, and prohibited uses for each of the Specific Plan subdistricts. Permitted
land uses of the existing underlying zone shall continue to apply to areas outside
of the Specific Plan subdistricts.
Permitted uses indicate that the use is allowed in the specified zone. Conditionally
permitted uses require the granting of a Conditional Use Permit as provided in
Municipal Code Section 2.55, 19.14, and/or 19.58. Uses marked as prohibited
uses are not permitted in the specified subdistrict. Accessory uses means a
use or structure subordinate to the principal use of a building on the same
lot, and serving a purpose customarily incidental to the use of the principal
building. Uses not specifically listed in the Land Use Matrix may be considered
by the Chula Vista Redevelopment Corporation (CVRC) or Planning Commission
if determined to be of the same general character of those uses listed in the
matrix for the Specific Subdistrict to those uses listed in the matrix.
VI-5
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
Fg. 6.2
Land Use Matrix (Page 1 of 5)
CorrIdors
0IstrIct
Y·1
Y·2, Y·3,
Y·4
UC·1, UC·2,
UC·10, UC·12,
UC·13, UC·1S
UC·3, UC·6,
UC·B, UC·11,
UC·14, UC·11
UC·4, UC·S,
UC·1, UC·9,
UC·16, UC·
1B, UC·19
C·1, C·2,
C·3
Residentiul (a)
Apartments, efficiency P P(a) P P - - P(a)
Boardinghouses or lodginghouses P P(a) P P - - P(a)
Dwellings, single-family - - - - - - - - - - - -
Dwelling groups (2 or more homes on same lot) - - - - P P - - - -
Dwellings, two-family or duplex - - - - - - - - - - - -
Dwellings, townhouse P P(a) P P - - P(a)
Dwellings, multiple P P(a) P P - - P(a)
Dwellings, temporary - - - - - - - - - - - -
Family day care homes, large (9 to 14 children) CUP CUP(b) - - - - - - CUP(b)
Family day care homes, small (8 or fewer
children)
CUP CUP(b) - - - - - - CUP(b)
Full-time foster homes P P(a) - - - - - - P(a)
Live/Work P(c) P(c) P(c) CUP - - P(c)
Mixed commercial/residential projects - - P(a) P - - - - P(a)
Mobilehomes - - - - - - - - - - - -
Mobilehome parks - - - - - - - - - - - -
Nursing homes CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Residential care facilities CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Senior housing developments CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Shopkeeper unit P(c) P(c) P(c) CUP - - P(c)
Tract offices, temporary - - - - - - - - - - - -
Poblic, Qousi-Poblic und
Institotionul
Ambulance services CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Animal shelters - - - - - - - - - - - -
Cemeteries CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Civic facilities P P P P P P
Community service facilities - - P(d) P - - P P
Court facilities - - - - P - - - - - -
Court-supported facilities - - P(a) - - - - P P
Fire stations - - P P - - P P
Health care facility (including 24 hour facilities) CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Libraries - - P P - - P P
Museums CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Non-commercial recreation centers (indoor) - - P P - - P P
Non-commercial recreation centers (outdoor) CUP CUP P CUP P P
Parks (public and private) P P P P P P
Police stations - - P P - - P P
Post office - - P P - - P P
Public utility uses and structures CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Religious facilities CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Schools, professional, business and technical
(not requiring outdoor facilities)
- - P(b) P - - P P
Schools, public CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Social and fraternal organization facilities CUP CUP(d) P CUP P P
Telecommunications facilities CUP CUP(d) CUP CUP CUP CUP
Radio and television broadcasting CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Youth center CUP CUP(d) P - - P P
Þ = ÞermItted
CUÞ = CondItIonal Use ÞermIt ÞequIred
· · = ÞrohIbIted
Iand Use HatrIx
Chula YIsta Urban Core SpecIfIc Þlan
YIllaee 0IstrIct Urban Core 0IstrIct*
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-6
Fg. 6.3
Land Use Matrix (Page 2 of 5)
CorrIdors
0IstrIct
Y·1
Y·2, Y·3,
Y·4
UC·1, UC·2,
UC·10, UC·12,
UC·13, UC·1S
UC·3, UC·6,
UC·B, UC·11,
UC·14, UC·11
UC·4, UC·S,
UC·1, UC·9,
UC·16, UC·
1B, UC·19
C·1, C·2,
C·3
Þ = ÞermItted
CUÞ = CondItIonal Use ÞermIt ÞequIred
· · = ÞrohIbIted
Iand Use HatrIx
Chula YIsta Urban Core SpecIfIc Þlan
YIllaee 0IstrIct Urban Core 0IstrIct*
ProIessionul OIIice
Administrative and executive offices - - P P - - P P
Financial offices - - P P - - P P
Medical and dental offices/clinic - - P P - - P P
Medical, optical, and dental laboratory - - CUP(b) CUP - - CUP P
Professional offices (architectural, engineering,
law)
- - P P - - P P
Real estate offices - - P P - - P P
Research and development - - P P - - P P
Veterinary clinics/animal hospitals - - CUP(b) P - - P P
Commerciul - Service
Automatic teller machines - - P P - - P P
Bail bond facilities - - - - - - - - - - P
Barbershop and beauty shop - - P(e) P - - P P
Bicycle repair - - P P - - P P
Body art/tattoo/piercing salon - - - - CUP(f) - - CUP(f) P(f)
Carpentry shops - - - - - - - - - - P
Catering halls (with full-time, full-service
restaurants, operating after hours)
- - CUP(b) - - - - - - P
Check cashing establishments - - - - - - - - - - CUP
Cobbler - - P(e) P - - P P
Coin-operated laundry - - P(d) P - - P P
Day nursery - - CUP(b) P - - P P
Day spa - - P P - - P P
Drycleaners - - CUP(b) P - - P P
Electrician services - - CUP(b) - - - - - - P
Electronics repair - - CUP(b) - - - - - - P
Exterminating services - - - - - - - - - - P
Financial services (without drive-through access
onto Third Avenue)
- - P(e) P - - P P
Fortune-telling - - P P - - P P
Funeral parlors and mortuaries - - - - P - - P P
General contracting services - - P(b) CUP - - CUP P
Heating and cooling services - - CUP(b) - - - - - - P
Home appliance repair - - CUP(b) - - - - - - P
Home furnishing repair (up to 5,000 sq. ft.) - - P(e) - - - - - - P
Jewelry and watch repair - - P P - - P P
Locksmiths - - P(d) P - - P P
Manicure and pedicure shops - - P(e) P - - P P
Massage parlor - - - - - - - - - - P(h)
Pedi-cabs - - P P - - P P
Pet grooming - - P(e) P - - P P
Photocopying and blueprinting services (over
2500 sq. ft.)
- - CUP P - - P P
Photocopying and blueprinting services (up to
2500 sq. ft.)
- - P(e) P - - P P
Photography studios - - P P - - P P
Plumbing services - - CUP(b) P - - P P
Postal stores (over 2500 sq. ft.) - - CUP P - - P P
Postal stores (up to 2500 sq. ft.) - - P(e) P - - P P
Printing and publishing services - - P(b) P - - P P
Tailor shops - - P(e) P - - P P
Ticket agencies - - P P - - P P
Travel agencies - - P(e) P - - P P
Video/DVD rentals/sales (no adult rentals/sales) - - P(b) P - - P P
VI-7
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
Fg. 6.4
Land Use Matrix (Page 3 of 5)
CorrIdors
0IstrIct
Y·1
Y·2, Y·3,
Y·4
UC·1, UC·2,
UC·10, UC·12,
UC·13, UC·1S
UC·3, UC·6,
UC·B, UC·11,
UC·14, UC·11
UC·4, UC·S,
UC·1, UC·9,
UC·16, UC·
1B, UC·19
C·1, C·2,
C·3
Þ = ÞermItted
CUÞ = CondItIonal Use ÞermIt ÞequIred
· · = ÞrohIbIted
Iand Use HatrIx
Chula YIsta Urban Core SpecIfIc Þlan
YIllaee 0IstrIct Urban Core 0IstrIct*
Commerciul - Retuil
Adult book/video sales - - - - - - - - - - CUP(h)
Antique shops (not including secondhand stores) - - P P - - P P
Bait and tackle shops - - P P - - P P
Bookstore - - P P - - P P
Building material sales (indoor; up to 5,000 sqft) - - P P - - P P
Building material sales (indoor; over 5,000 sqft) - - - - - - - - - - P
Convenience stores - - - - P - - P P
Department stores - - CUP P - - P P
Drive-through retail sales - - - - - - - - - - P
Florist - - P P - - P P
Galleries (photography, art) - - P P - - P P
Hardware stores (up to 5,000 sq. ft.) - - P P - - P P
Hardware stores (over 5,000 sq. ft.) - - - - P - - P P
Home furnishing stores (up to 5,000 sq. ft.) - - P(e) P - - P P
Handicraft shops (up to 5,000 sq. ft) - - P P - - P P
Lumberyards - - - - CUP - - CUP CUP
Marine sales, supplies, and rentals - - - - CUP - - CUP P
Newstands - - P P - - P P
Pawn shops - - - - - - - - - - P
Pet shops - - CUP P - - P P
Pool and spa supplies - - CUP(b) - - - - - - P
Prescription pharmacy - - P P - - P P
Product wholesaling (50% of area must be
devoted to retail)
- - CUP P - - P P
Retail sales (over 5,000 sq. ft.) - - CUP P - - P P
Retail sales (up to 5,000 sq. ft.) - - P P - - P P
Secondhand stores - - P(g) - - - - - - P
Aotomotive und Bout
Automobile and recreational vehicle storage - - - - - - - - - - CUP
Automobile sales/leasing, new - - - - P - - P CUP
Automobile sales/leasing, new (indoor; under
5,000 sqft)
- - CUP P - - P P
Automobile sales/leasing, used - - - - - - - - - - CUP
Automobile dismantling - - - - - - - - - - - -
Automobile maintenance and repair, minor - - - - - - - - - - CUP
Automobile parts and accessories sales - - - - P - - P P
Automobile rental agencies - - - - P - - P CUP
Automobile salvage - - - - - - - - - - - -
Automobile service stations (with or without
convenience store)
- - - - - - - - - - CUP
Automobile towing services - - - - - - - - - - - -
Automobile paint and body shops - - - - - - - - - - - -
Boat and equipment sales and rentals - - - - - - - - - - CUP
Car washes, automated, drive-through - - - - CUP - - CUP CUP
Car washes, hand - - - - CUP - - CUP P
Parking structures and lots, commercial - - P(b) P - - P CUP
Parking structures and lots, public - - P(b) P - - P CUP
Motorcycle sales/leasing - - - - P - - P CUP
Specialty repair shops - - - - - - - - - - CUP
Taxi-cab services - - - - - - - - - - CUP
Truck and trailer sales and rentals - - - - - - - - - - CUP
Trucking yards, teminals, and distribution
operations
- - - - - - - - - - - -
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-8
Fg. 6.5
Land Use Matrix (Page 4 of 5)
CorrIdors
0IstrIct
Y·1
Y·2, Y·3,
Y·4
UC·1, UC·2,
UC·10, UC·12,
UC·13, UC·1S
UC·3, UC·6,
UC·B, UC·11,
UC·14, UC·11
UC·4, UC·S,
UC·1, UC·9,
UC·16, UC·
1B, UC·19
C·1, C·2,
C·3
Þ = ÞermItted
CUÞ = CondItIonal Use ÞermIt ÞequIred
· · = ÞrohIbIted
Iand Use HatrIx
Chula YIsta Urban Core SpecIfIc Þlan
YIllaee 0IstrIct Urban Core 0IstrIct*
Hospitulity
Adult-oriented entertainment - - - - - - - - - - - -
Amusement facilities - - CUP CUP - - CUP CUP
Athletic/health clubs - - P P - - P P
Bakery (less than 5,000 sq. ft.) - - P P - - P P
Bed and breakfast - - P P - - P P
Billiard and pool parlors - - CUP(b) CUP - - CUP P
Bowling alleys - - CUP P - - P P
Cardroom - - - - - - - - - - - -
Carnivals (temporary) - - CUP CUP - - CUP CUP
Catering services - - CUP CUP - - CUP P
Cocktail lounge - - CUP P - - P P
Coffeehouse/café - - P P - - P P
Commercial recreation facilities (indoor) - - CUP CUP - - CUP CUP
Commercial recreation facilities (outdoor) - - CUP CUP - - CUP CUP
Dairy sales - - P P - - P P
Dancehall - - P(h) P(h) - - P(h) P(h)
Delicatessen/sandwich shop - - P P - - P P
Drive-in theaters - - - - - - - - - - - -
Farmer's market CUP CUP CUP - - CUP CUP
Golf driving ranges (with or without lighting) - - - - - - - - - - - -
Grocery, fruit, or vegetable sales - - P P - - P P
Hotels/timeshares - - CUP P - - P P
Ice cream/yogurt shop - - P P - - P P
Ice skating rinks (indoor) - - - - CUP - - CUP P
Liquor stores (excluding specialty wine retail) - - - - CUP - - CUP CUP
Live entertainment (excluding adult-oriented
entertainment)
- - P P - - P P
Meat sales - - P P - - P P
Miniature golf course - - - - P - - P P
Motel - - - - - - - - - - - -
Produce stands (temporary) - - CUP P - - P P
Restaurants (with sale of alcoholic beverages) - - P P - - P P
Restaurants, drive-through - - - - P - - P P
Restaurants, fast food (non-formula franchise
without drive-through)
- - P P - - P P
Restaurants, full-service (outdoor dining on public
or private property)
- - P P - - P P
Roller and ice skating rinks (indoor) - - - - CUP - - CUP P
Shooting clubs (indoor) - - CUP CUP - - CUP CUP
Smokeshop - - P P - - P P
Snack bar - - P P - - P P
Specialty wine retail - - P P - - P P
Swimming pools - - CUP(d) P - - P P
Taverns - - CUP P - - P P
Tennis courts P P(d) P P P P
Theaters, live or movie (no adult theaters) - - P P - - P P
VI-9
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
Fg. 6.6
Land Use Matrix (Page 5 of 5)
CorrIdors
0IstrIct
Y·1
Y·2, Y·3,
Y·4
UC·1, UC·2,
UC·10, UC·12,
UC·13, UC·1S
UC·3, UC·6,
UC·B, UC·11,
UC·14, UC·11
UC·4, UC·S,
UC·1, UC·9,
UC·16, UC·
1B, UC·19
C·1, C·2,
C·3
Þ = ÞermItted
CUÞ = CondItIonal Use ÞermIt ÞequIred
· · = ÞrohIbIted
Iand Use HatrIx
Chula YIsta Urban Core SpecIfIc Þlan
YIllaee 0IstrIct Urban Core 0IstrIct*
Auricoltorul Lses
Animal grazing, breeding, boarding, and training
(including cattle, sheep, goats)
- - - - - - - - - - - -
Apiaries - - - - - - - - - - - -
Crop and tree farming - - - - - - - - - - - -
Equestrian facilities - - - - - - - - - - - -
Horse stables (commercial) - - - - - - - - - - - -
Horse stables (non-commercial) - - - - - - - - - - - -
Kennels (commercial) - - - - - - - - - - P
Kennels (non-commercial) - - - - - - - - - - P
Plant nurseries (up to 5,000 sq. ft.) - - - - - - - - - - P
Poultry farms - - - - - - - - - - - -
Accessory Lses
Caretaker units - - - - - - - - - - P
Employee units (detached) - - - - - - - - - - CUP
Home occupations P P P - - P P
Roof-mounted satellite dishes - - CUP CUP - - CUP P
Water reservoir - - - - - - - - - - - -
(h) Use subject to CVMC 19.58.024 provisions
*The Urban Core is a combination of the Boulevard and Promenade Visioning Areas.
(d) Prohibited in V-2 district
(c) Work-related component may include uses allowed in professional office, commercial-service, or commercial-retail and may require CUP
(b) Prohibited on groundfloor V-2 District
(a) Prohibited on groundfloor fronting Third Avenue
(f) Prohibited on groundfloor
(g) Maximum of 5,000 sq.ft.
(e) Limited to 15% of business mix of groundfloor shopfronts in V-2 District
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-10
C. Development Standards
1. Sub-district Zoning Sheets
The purpose of the subdistrict zoning sheets is to provide quick reference land
use and development requirements for each subdistrict. Proposed development
in the Specific Plan area shall comply with the development standards of the
applicable zoning sheets. Subdistricts labeled as “Neighborhood Transition
Combining Districts” or “Transit Focus Areas” should refer to Section D. Special
Provisions for Neighborhood Transition Combining Districts and Transit Focus
Areas for further requirements.
2. Floor Area Ratio
Floor Area Ratio (FAR) is a measure of the bulk of buildings on a lot or site.
FAR is calculated by dividing the gross floor area of all buildings on a lot or site
by the lot or site area. Gross floor area includes the total enclosed area of all
floors of a building measured from the exterior walls including halls, stairways,
elevator shafts at each floor level, service and mechanical equipment rooms,
balconies, recreation rooms, and attics having a height of more than seven feet
but excluding area used exclusively for vehicle parking or loading. For example,
a two-story building occupying one-half of a site has an FAR of 1.0. Any floor
area below finish grade does not count towards FAR. If floors are partially
above and partially below grade, then only the proportion of the floor above
grade is counted towards FAR. For example, if 5 feet of a 10-foot high floor
is below grade, then only 50% of the floor area will count towards FAR. (See
Figure 6.7 for example FAR diagrams.)
3. Lot Coverage
Lot coverage is the percentage of a lot or site covered by buildings. (See Figure
6.7 for example lot coverage diagrams.)
4. Building Height
Building heights are measured from finish grade to top of roof, not including
parapets or other architectural features. Minimum building heights in some
subdistricts ensure that the desired building heights are achieved.
VI-11
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
1.0 FAR
70% Lot Coverage
2.0 FAR
90% Lot Coverage
2.0 FAR
70% Lot Coverage
3.5 FAR
90% Lot Coverage
3.0 FAR
90% Lot Coverage
3.0 FAR
90% Lot Coverage
3.0 FAR
70% Lot Coverage
5.0 FAR
70% Lot Coverage
5.0 FAR
50% Lot Coverage
4.0 FAR
70% Lot Coverage
6.0 FAR
90% Lot Coverage
6.0 FAR
70% Lot Coverage
6.0 FAR
50% Lot Coverage
Fg. 6.7
Example FAR and lot coverage diagrams (These diagrams are provided for
illustrative purposes only and are not the only options for building form.)
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-12
5. Building Stepback
In some districts, the upper portion of a building must step back from the
lower portion of the building when located adjacent to major streets. The
stepback is a minimum horizontal distance, as measured from the street
property line, and must occur at or below the noted building height. At primary
gateways, as identified in this Specific Plan, stepback requirements may be
modified to allow significant architecture or design statements at these corner
locations. Subdistricts labeled as Neighborhood Transition Combining Districts
have additional stepbacks addressed in Section D. Neighborhood Transition
Combining Districts.
6. Street Wall Frontage
Street wall frontage is the percentage of street front that must be built to, with
the ground floor building façade at the minimum setback.
7. Setback
Setback is the distance between the property line and the building. Setback
is measured horizontally and perpendicular to the property line. Minimum
setbacks in some subdistricts ensure appropriate distances between land uses.
Maximum setbacks in some subdistricts ensure that the desired building line
is maintained, e.g. along certain streets. Subdistricts labeled as Neighborhood
Transition Combining Districts have additional rear and side yard setbacks which
are addressed in Section D. Neighborhood Transition Combining Districts.
8. Open Space Requirement
For the purposes of the open space requirement, the term “open space” refers
to any areas with minimum dimensions of 60 square feet (6’x10’) and devoted
to the following common, private, or public uses: patio, porch, balcony, deck,
garden, playground, plaza, swimming pool, sports court/field, recreation room,
gym, spa, community room, cultural arts, lawn/turf, pond, fountain, atrium,
sunroom, theater, amphitheater, band shell, gazebo, picnic area, shelter, roof,
or similar passive or active recreational/leisure use or facility that is not used
for enclosed dwelling unit floor area or commercial use space.
9. Primary Land Uses
Primary land uses define the character and function of each subdistrict but are
not intended to be the only uses that may be permitted. The primary land uses
designate the maximum percentages of floor area devoted to each use; there
are limited instances where a minimum percentage requirement applies. There
VI-13
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
are use requirements in certain districts at ground floor locations, such as for
ground floor retail uses in the V-2 subdistrict. General categories are noted
on each zoning sheet while specific uses, including permitted and conditional
uses, are listed in the Land Use Matrix.
Maximum percentage of land uses are intended to generally achieve on a
parcel basis the overall intent of land use mix that was envisioned on a district-
wide basis by the General Plan. For subdistricts with more than one primary
land use, the maximum FAR for each land use is calculated by multiplying the
primary land use percentage by the maximum FAR. For example:
V-2 Subdistrict
Example Lot Size: 10,000 sq.ft.
Max. FAR: 2.0 = 20,000 sq.ft. buildable area
Primary Land Use: Residential 40% Max. or 8,000 sq.ft. residential
Retail 40% Max or 8,000 sq.ft. retail
Office 20% Max or 4,000 sq.ft office
Total 20,000 sq.ft.
10. Parking Regulations
Development proposals within the Specific Plan area shall comply with the
type, location, and number of parking spaces established for residential and
non-residential land uses as specified herein. For residential uses, a minimum
amount of parking has been designated for use by the residents of the project.
In addition, an amount of guest parking has been planned. Guest parking is
arrived at by multiplying the cumulative total number of project dwelling units
by the guest parking ratio. A percentage of the required parking must be
provided onsite as indicated on the zoning sheets for each subdistrict. Parking
is onsite if it is within the project, provided on an adjacent site, and/or within
a comprehensive development/center. Parking is allowed offsite if it is within
500-feet of the project and/or provided as an alternative in lieu (e.g. transit,
ride-share, flex, etc.). Offsite parking must be accessible from publicly available
pedestrian access and assured in terms of reservation in perpetuity, for the use
it serves or an alternative replacement plan will be required.
11. Pedestrian Connections and Walkways
Additional side setbacks may be required for pedestrian connections such as
mid-block paseos.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-14
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Street
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Sidewalk
Mid Block
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Fg. 6.9 Plan View
Fg. 6.8 Section View
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
V-1 East Village
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 1.0 Max: 2.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 90%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 45’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 0’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
9. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 100% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Behind /Subterranean/Tuck Under
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 50%
VI-15
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
Fg. 6.11 Plan View
Fg. 6.10 Section View
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Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
V-2 Village
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 0.75 Max: 2.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 75% Max: 90%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 45’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 80% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 0’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 40% Max (Not allowed on
Third Avenue on ground floor, except for
access)
Retail: 40% Max
Office: 20% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Behind/Subterranean/Tuck Under
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: None
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: None
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-16
Fg. 1.2 Fg. 1.2 Fg. 6.12 Section View
Fg. 6.13 Plan View
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V-3 West Village
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 2.0 Max: 4.5
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 70% Max: 90%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 84’*
*Buidlings fronting Third Avenue between F
Street and Park Way are limited to 45’
4. Building Stepback:
Min: 15’ At Building Height: 35’
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 0’ Street Max: N/A
Neighborhood Transition: See Section D. for
additional setbacks for parcels adjacent
to R-1 and R-2 districts
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 100% Max (Not allowed on
ground floor of Third Avenue or E Street,
except for access)
Retail: 10% Max (North of E Street and west
of Landis Avenue - retail only)
Office: 10% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Behind/Subterranean/Tuck Under
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 50%
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: None
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
VI-17
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
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15’ Min Setback
Fg. 1.3 Fg. 1.3 Fg. 1.3 Fg. 6.15 Plan View
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Fg. 6.14 Section View
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
V-4 Civic Center
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 45% Max: 80%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 15’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 100 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 100% Max
Office: 100% Max
Public/Quasi-Public: 100% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Behind/Subterranean/Tuck Under
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 50%
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: None
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-18
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Fg. 6.17 Plan View
Fg. 6.16 Section View
15’ Min Stepback
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Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 2.0 Max: 4.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 45% Max: 80%
3. Building Height:
Min: 30’ Max: 84’
4. Building Stepback:
Min: 15’ At Building Height: 35’
5. Street Wall Frontage: 80% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 0’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 100 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 70% Max (Not allowed on Third
Avenue or H Street frontage on ground
floor, except for access)
Retail: 10% Max
Office: 20% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Structure/Subterranean/Behind/Tuck
Under
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 50%
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: None
UC-1 St. Rose
(Transit Focus Area)
VI-19
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
8
4


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
4
5


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
8’ Min Setback
Fg. 6.18 Section View
Fg. 6.19 Plan View
15’ Min Stepback
3
5

Street
P
l
a
z
a
Sidewalk
8


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
8


M
i
n

R
O
W
1
6


T
o
t
a
l

S
i
d
e
w
a
l
k
3
5

15’ Min Stepback
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
UC-2 Gateway
(Transit Focus Area)
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 2.5 Max: 5.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 45% Max: 80%
3. Building Height:
Min: 45’ Max: 84’
4. Building Stepback:
Min: 15’ At Building Height: 35’
5. Street Wall Frontage: 80% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 8’* Street Max: N/A
(*Along H Street only to provide total of 16’
sidewalk)
7. Open Space Requirement: 100 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 70% Max (Not allowed on
Third Avenue or H Street frontage on
ground floor, except for access)
Retail: 10% Max
Office: 20% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any location except in front of building
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 50%
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: None
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-20
6
0


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
3
0


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
15’ Min Setback
Fg. 6.20 Section View
Fg. 6.21 Plan View
1
5


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
Street
Sidewalk
Plaza
Rezone of this subdistrict
not adopted.
See CVMC 19.28 (R-3 zone)
and City Design Manual for
development regulations and
design guidelines.
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 1.0 Max: 3.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 15’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 100% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Anywhere on-site, except in front of building
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100%
UC-3 Roosevelt
VI-21
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
8
4


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
3
0


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
8’ Min Setback
Fg. 6.22 Section View
Fg. 6.23 Plan View
Street
Plaza
Sidewalk
8


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
8


M
i
n

R
O
W
1
6


T
o
t
a
l

S
i
d
e
w
a
l
k
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
UC-4 Hospital
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 2.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 50% Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 30’ Max: 84’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 8’ Street Max: N/A
(*Along H Street only to provide total of 16’
sidewalk)
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses:
Office: 100% Max
Retail: 20% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any
2. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 100%
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-22
6
0


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
3
0


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
8’ Min Setback
Fg. 6.24 Section View
Fg. 6.25 Plan View
Street
Plaza
Sidewalk
8


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
8


M
i
n

R
O
W
1
6


T
o
t
a
l

S
i
d
e
w
a
l
k
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 1.0 Max: 2.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: N/A
3. Building Height:
Min: 30’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 8’ Street Max: N/A
(*Along H Street only to provide total of 16’
sidewalk)
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses:
Retail: 50% Max
Office: 100% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any location except in front of building
2. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 50%
UC-5 Soho
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)
VI-23
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
6
0


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
1
8


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
15’ Min Setback
Fg. 6.26 Section View
Fg. 6.27 Plan View
1
5


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
Street
Sidewalk
15’ Min Stepback
3
0

Plaza
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
UC-6 Chula Vista Center Residential
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 2.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 80%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback:
Min: 15’ At Building Height: 30’
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 15’ Street Max: N/A
Neighborhood Transition: See Section
D. for additional setbacks for parcels
adjacent to R-1 and R-2 districts
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 100% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Structured
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100%
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-24
6
0


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
1
8


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
8’ Min Setback
Fg. 6.28 Section View
Fg. 6.29 Plan View
Street
Plaza
Sidewalk
8


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
8


M
i
n

R
O
W
1
6


T
o
t
a
l

S
i
d
e
w
a
l
k
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
UC-7 Chula Vista Center
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 25% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 8’* Street Max: N/A
(*Along H Street only to provide total of 16’
sidewalk)
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses:
Retail: 100% Max
Office: 25% Max (Not allowed on ground
floor facade, except for access)
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Anywhere on-site
2. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 100%
VI-25
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
4
5


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
1
8


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
15’ Min Setback
Fg. 6.30 Section View
Fg. 6.31 Plan View
1
5


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
Street
Sidewalk
Rezone of this subdistrict
not adopted.
See CVMC 19.26 (R-2 zone)
and City Design Manual for
development regulations and
design guidelines.
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 45’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 15’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 100% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Anywhere on-site except in front of building
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100%
UC-8 Otis
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-26
7
2


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
1
8


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
8’-16’ Min Setback
Fg. 6.32 Section View
Fg. 6.33 Plan View
Street
P
l
a
z
a
S
i
d
e
w
a
l
k
8


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
8


M
i
n

R
O
W
1
6


T
o
t
a
l

S
i
d
e
w
a
l
k
West of Broadway
East of Broadway
Street
P
l
a
z
a
Sidewalk
1
6


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k

a
n
d

T
o
t
a
l

S
i
d
e
w
a
l
k
3


M
i
n

R
O
W
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 1.0 Max: 2.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: N/A
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 72’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 70% Min
6. Setbacks:
H Street East of Broadway
Street Min: 8’ Street Max: N/A
H Street West of Broadway
Street Min: 16’ Street Max: N/A
Broadway
Street Min: 0’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses:
Retail: 100% Max
Office: 25% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any, except in front of building
2. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 50%
UC-9 Mid H Street
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
VI-27
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
7
2


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
1
8


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
16’ Min Setback
Fg. 6.34 Section View
Fg. 6.35 Plan View
Street
P
l
a
z
a
Sidewalk
3


M
i
n

R
O
W
1
6


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k

a
n
d

T
o
t
a
l

S
i
d
e
w
a
l
k
Rezone of portions of this
subdistrict not adopted.
See CVMC 19.24 (R-1 zone);
19.26 (R-2 zone); and 19.28
(R-3 zone) and City Design Manual
for development regulations and
design guidelines.
UC-10 Chula Vista Center West
(Transit Focus Area and
Neighborhood Transition Combining District)
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 2.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 80%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 72’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
H Street
Street Min: 16’ Street Max: N/A
Broadway
Street Min: 0’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 40% Max (Not allowed
within 500’ of the southwest corner of
Broadway and H Street intersection,
on any floor; Not allowed on Broadway
or H Street frontage on ground floor,
except for access)
Retail: 50% Max
Office: 30% Max (Not allowed on ground
floor facade, except for access)
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any, except in front of building
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 0 spaces
Onsite Min: 100%
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 100%
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-28
4
5


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
1
8


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
15’ Min Setback
Fg. 6.36 Section View
Fg. 6.37 Plan View
1
5


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
Street
Sidewalk
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 45’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 15’ Street Max: N/A
Neighborhood Transition: See Section D. for
additional setbacks for parcels adjacent
to R-1 and R-2 districts
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 100% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any, except in front of building
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100%
UC-11 Chula Vista Center West Residential
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)
Rezone of this subdistrict
not adopted.
See CVMC 19.24 (R-1 zone);
19.26 (R-2 zone); and 19.28
(R-3 zone) and City Design Manual
for development regulations and
design guidelines.
VI-29
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
2
1
0


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
4
5


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
16’ Min Setback
Fg. 6.38 Section View
Fg. 6.39 Plan View
Street
P
l
a
z
a
Sidewalk
3


M
i
n

R
O
W
1
6


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k

a
n
d

T
o
t
a
l

S
i
d
e
w
a
l
k
UC-12 H Street Trolley
(Transit Focus Area)
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 4.0 Max: 6.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 45% Max: 60%
3. Building Height:
Min: 45’ Max: 210’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
H Street
Street Min: 16’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 100 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 90% Max
Retail: 1% Min 10% Max
Office: 10% Max
Hospitality: 1% Min 10% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1 space/du
Guest: 0 spaces
Onsite Min: 100%
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 1 space/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: None
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-30
Fg. 6.40 Section View
6
0


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
1
8


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
0’ - 20’ Setback
Fg. 6.41 Plan View
0


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
2
0


M
a
x

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
Street
Sidewalk
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 2.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 50% Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 0’ Street Max: 20’
Neighborhood Transition: See Section D. for
additional setbacks for parcels adjacent
to R-1 and R-2 districts
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 70% Max (Not allowed on
Broadway or H Street frontage on
ground floor, except for access)
Office: 50% Max
Retail/Hospitality: 50% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Anywhere except in front of building
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 50%
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 50%
UC-13 Mid Broadway
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)
VI-31
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
8
4


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
3
0


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
15’ Min Setback
Fg. 6.42 Section View
Fg. 6.43 Plan View
15’ Min Stepback
3
5

1
5


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
Street
Sidewalk
Plaza
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
UC-14 Harborview
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 1.5 Max: 3.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 80%
3. Building Height:
Min: 30’ Max: 84’
4. Building Stepback:
Min: 15’ At Building Height: 35’
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 15’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential 100% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any, except in front of building
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100%
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-32
2
1
0


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
4
5


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
11’ Min Setback
Fg. 6.44 Section View
Fg. 6.45 Plan View
Street
Plaza
Sidewalk/
Parkway
1
1


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
2


M
i
n

R
O
W
1
3





T
o
t
a
l

S
i
d
e
w
a
l
k
/

P
a
r
k
w
a
y
Plaza
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 4.0 Max: 6.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 45% Max: 60%
3. Building Height:
Min: 45’ Max: 210’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 11’* Street Max: N/A
(*Applies only along E Street between I-5
and 300’ east of I-5)
7. Open Space Requirement: 100 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 90% Max
Retail: 1% Min 10% Max
Office: 10% Max (Not allowed on ground
floor facade, except for access)
Hospitality: 1% Min 10% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any, except in front of building
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1 space/du
Guest: 0 spaces
Onsite Min: 100%
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 1 space/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: None
UC-15 E Street Trolley
(Transit Focus Area)
Rezone of portions of this
subdistrict not adopted.
See CVMC 19.28 (R-3 zone)
and City Design Manual for
development regulations and
design guidelines.
VI-33
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
6
0


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
1
8


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
11’ - 20’ Setback
Fg. 6.46 Section View
Fg. 6.47 Plan View
2
0


M
a
x

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
1
1


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
Street
Sidewalk
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
UC-16 Broadway Hospitality
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 50% Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 11’* Street Max: 20’
(*Along E Street between I-5 and 300’ east
of I-5)
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses:
Retail: 50% Max
Hospitality: 100% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any, except in front of building
2. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 50%
VI-34
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Fg. 6.2 Section View
Fg. 6.3 Plan View
4
5


M
a
x

H
e
i
g
h
t
1
8


M
i
n

H
e
i
g
h
t
10’ - 20’ Setback
Fg. 6.2 Section View Section View Fg. 6.48 Section View
Fg. 6.3 Plan View Plan View Fg. 6.49 Plan View
2
0


M
a
x

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
1
0


M
i
n

S
e
t
b
a
c
k
Street
Sidewalk
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 1.0 Max: 2.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 80%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 45’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 10’ Street Max: 20’
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 100% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100%
UC-17 Harborview North
VI-35
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
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Fg. 6.50 Section View
Fg. 6.51 Plan View
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Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
UC-18 E Street Gateway
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 1.5 Max: 3.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 50% Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 45’ Max: 120’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 11’* Street Max: N/A
(*Applies only along E Street between I-5
and 300’ east of I-5)
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses:
Retail: 20% Max
Hospitality: 100% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any
2. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 100%
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-36
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Fg. 6.52 Section View
Fg. 6.53 Plan View
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Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 45’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 15’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses:
Public/Quasi-Public: 100% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Anywhere on-site
2. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 100%
UC-19 Feaster School
VI-37
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
Fg. 6.54 Section View
Fg. 6.55 Plan View
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Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
C-1 Third Avenue South
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 10’ Street Max: 20’
Neighborhood Transition: See Section
D. for additional setbacks for parcels
adjacent to R-1 and R-2 districts
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses:
Retail: 100% Max (West of Third Avenue)
Office: 100% Max (East of Third Avenue)
Residential: 40% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Anywhere on-site
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100%
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 50%
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-38
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Fg. 6.56 Section View
Fg. 6.57 Plan View
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Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 35% Max: 75%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 45’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 10’ Street Max: 20’
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses:
Retail: 50% Max
Office: 50% Max
Residential: 70% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Anywhere on-site
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100%
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 50%
C-2 Broadway South
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)
VI-39
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
Fg. 6.58 Section View
Fg. 6.59 Plan View
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Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
C-3 Broadway North
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 35% Max: 75%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 45’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 10’ Street Max: 20’
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses:
Retail: 50% Max
Office: 50% Max
Residential: 70% Max
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Anywhere on-site
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100%
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 50%
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-40
Fg. 6.60
Rear/side yard setback requirements for
Neighborhood Transition Combining District
Structure HeIeht IftJ Structure HeIeht IftJ Structure HeIeht IftJ Structure HeIeht IftJ HInImum Setback IftJ HInImum Setback IftJ HInImum Setback IftJ HInImum Setback IftJ
0<45 10
46<55 15
56<65 20
66<75 25
76<85 30
86<95 35
96<105 40
ÞearJSIde Yard Setback ÞequIrement ÞearJSIde Yard Setback ÞequIrement ÞearJSIde Yard Setback ÞequIrement ÞearJSIde Yard Setback ÞequIrement
Fg. 6.61
Additional building stepbacks may be
required in NTCDs
60
60
60
15’
Stepback
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R-1 or R-2
D. Special Provisions for Neighborhood Transition Combining
Districts and Transit Focus Areas
1. Purpose
The purpose of the Neighborhood Transition Combining District (NTCD) is to
permit special regulation to insure that the character of zones within the Specific
Plan area will be compatible with and will complement surrounding residential
areas. Neighborhood Transition Combining Districts apply to the subdistricts
adjacent to R-1 and R-2 zones: V-3, V-4, UC-5, UC-6, UC-8, UC-11, UC-13, C-
1, and C-2. Transit Focus Areas provide special regulations to encourage the
development and use of public transportation: UC-1, UC-2, UC-10, UC-12, and
UC-15.
2. Requirements
a. Figure 6.60 details required side and rear setbacks from the property
line that abuts an R-1 or R-2 zone. Where such yard is contiguous and
parallel with an alley, one-half the width of such alley shall be assumed
to be a portion of such yard. Within transit focus areas, provide a
minimum 15 feet of rear yard setback for structures up to and over 84
feet in height.
b. For every 35 feet in height, the
structure shall step back at least
15 feet on the side(s) of the
structure that abut an R-1 or R-2
district. Within Transit Focus Areas,
provide a building stepback of at
least 15 feet for every 35 feet in
height abutting residential uses. In
addition to meeting the stepback
requirements, no part of the building
shall be closer to the property line
than a 60-degree plane extending
from each stepback line.
c. A landscaping plan should include one
to three small shade tree(s) for every
3,000 square feet within the rear/side
yard and should be located on the site
to provide shade/heat gain reduction
effect (i.e. trees not to be planted on the
north facing facade of the building).
VI-41
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
Fg. 6.62
Trees should not be planted on the
north facing building facade
North
d. All exterior lighting shall focus internally within the property to decrease
the light pollution onto the neighboring properties.
e. Screening and/or buffers shall be required to obscure features such
as dumpsters, rear entrances, utility and maintenance structures and
loading facilities.
f. A six-foot solid or decorative metal fence shall be placed on the property
line. If the fence is solid, it shall have
design treatment and be articulated
every six to eight feet to avoid
presenting a blank wall to the street
or adjacent property.
g. Building design shall be cognizant of
adjacent low density uses (i.e. avoid
balconies overlooking rear yards).
h. As part of the project design and
submittal, developments within Transit
Focus Areas shall conduct studies to
assess the effects of light and solar
access, shadowing, and wind patterns
on adjacent buildings and areas.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-42
E. Special Provisions
1. Applicability
There are certain uses that, due to the nature of the use, deserve special
consideration and the application of limitations, design standards, and
operating requirements.
2. Live/Work Units
a. Purpose
Live/work units are occupied by business operators who live in the same
structure that contains the commercial activity. A live/work unit functions
primarily as a workspace with incidental residential accommodations that meet
basic habitability requirements.
b. Limitations on Use
The non-residential component of the live/work unit shall be a use allowed in
the applicable subdistrict. A live/work unit shall not be established or used in
conjunction with any of the following activities.
• Adult businesses
• Vehicle maintenance or repair
• Any H occupancy as classified by the California Building Standards
Code.
• Welding, machinery, or any open flame work; and
• Any other activity determined by the Community Development Director
to not be compatible with the residential activities and/or to have the
possibility of affecting the health or safety of residents, because of the
potential for the use to create dust, glare, heat, noise, noxious gasses,
odor, smoke, traffic, vibration, or other impacts, or would be hazardous
because of materials, processes, products, or wastes.
c. Density
One live/work unit shall be allowed for each 1,000 square feet of lot area.
d. Design Standards
1) Floor area requirements. The net total floor area of a live/work unit shall
be 1,000 square feet minimum and 3,000 square feet maximum. No
more than 60% shall be reserved for living space.
VI-43
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
2) Separation and access. Each live/work unit shall be separated from
other live/work units or other uses in the structure. Access to each live/
work unit shall be provided from shop fronts, directly from the street,
common access areas, corridors, or halls; and the access to each unit
shall be clearly separate from other live/work units or other uses within
the structure.
3) Facilities to accommodate “work” activities. A live/work unit shall
be designed to accommodate commercial uses as evidenced by the
provision of ventilation, interior storage, flooring, and other physical
improvements necessary for the commercial component of the live/
work units.
4) Building and fire code compliance. Any building, which contains a live/
work unit, shall comply with the latest edition of the California Building
Code (CBC) as adopted by the City of Chula Vista, and applicable building
and life safety policies for such units.
e. Operating Requirements
1) Notice to occupants. The owner or developer of any building containing
live/work units shall provide written notice to all live/work residents and
users that the surrounding area may be subject to levels of noise, dust,
fumes and other effects associated with commercial uses at higher
than would be expected in residential areas. State and Federal health
regulations notwithstanding, uses shall be subject to the performance
standards as provided in CVMC Section 19.66.
2) Non-resident employees. Up to two persons who do not reside in the
live/work unit may work in the unit unless this employment is prohibited
or limited by the subdistrict. The employment of three or more persons
who do not reside in the live/work unit may be permitted subject to
Conditional Use Permit approval based on the additional findings that
the employment would not adversely affect traffic and parking conditions
in the vicinity.
3) Client and customer visits. Client and customer visits to live/work units
are permitted subject to any applicable conditions placed upon them by
the City.
f. Required Findings
See CVMC Section 19.14.080.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-44
Fg. 6.63
Parking decks should be flat where
feasible
3. Mixed-Use Projects
A mixed-use project shall comply with the following design objectives:
a. Storefronts along street frontages must maintain a pedestrian orientation
at the street level.
b. Provide for internal compatibility between the different uses within the
project.
c. Minimize the effects of any exterior noise, odors, glare, vehicular and
pedestrian traffic, and other potentially significant impacts.
4. Parking Structures
a. Parking Structure Design
The following parking structure design standards shall apply to all parking
structures located in the Specific Plan area.
1) Parking decks should be flat where feasible. At a minimum, a majority
of both the ground floor and top parking decks should be required to be
flat, as opposed to continuously ramping.
2) External elevator towers and stair wells shall be open to public view, or
enclosed with transparent glazing.
3) Lighting shall meet the requirements of The Chula Vista Municipal
Code.
4) Parking structure top floor wall designs must conform to one or more of
the following options:
a) Top Floor Wall with Architectural Focal Point. A top floor wall focal point
refers to a prominent wall edge feature such as a glazed elevator
and/or stair tower, or top floor line trellis structure.
b) Top Floor Wall Line Variation.
i. Projecting Cornice. Top floor wall line
articulated through a variation or step
in cornice height or detail. Cornices
must be located at or near the top of
the wall or parapet.
ii. Articulated Parapet. Top floor wall line
parapets shall incorporate angled,
curved or stepped detail elements.
VI-45
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
Fg. 6.64
Incorporate intervals of architectural
variation in parking structures
5) Parking structures with building facades facing or visible from the public
right-of-way (ROW) shall use one or a combination of the following design
features:
a) The facade shall have the appearance of an office building or hotel
use.
b) Design features that would mask the building as a parking
structure.
Proposed design features shall be approved by the designated design review
authority.
b. Parking Structure Character and Massing
Parking structure facades over 150 feet in length shall incorporate vertical
and/or horizontal variations in setback, material or fenestration design along
the length of the applicable facade, in at least one or more of the following
ways:
1) Vertical Facade Changes. Incorporation of intervals of architectural
variation at least every 80 feet over the length of the applicable facade,
such as:
a) Varying the arrangement, proportioning and/or design of garage
floor openings,
b) Incorporating changes in architectural materials, and/or
c) Projecting forward or recessing back portions or elements of the
parking structure facade.
2) Horizontal Facade Changes. Designed differentiation of the ground floor
from upper floors, such as:
a) Stepping back the upper floors from
the ground floor parking structure
façade,
b) Changing materials between the
parking structure base and upper
floors, and/or
c) Including a continuous cornice line
or pedestrian weather protection
element between the ground floor
and upper floors.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-46
Fg. 6.65
Views into the upper floors of parking
structures should be screened
c. Minimizing Views Into the Parking Structure Interior
Façades of parking structures shall be designed without continuous horizontal
parking floor openings.
1) For portions of parking structures without a pedestrian level retail/
commercial use, the following building facade landscaping is required:
a) Five-foot wide façade landscape strip consisting of:
i. a mix of evergreen shrub groupings spaced no more than four
feet apart that do not exceed a height of six feet at maturity,
ii. groundcover, and
iii. seasonal displays of flowering annual bedding plants.
2) Any portion of a parking structure ground floor with exposed parking
areas adjacent to a public street shall minimize views into the parking
structure interior through one or more of the following methods which
are in addition to the above facade landscaping strip:
a) Decorative trellis work and/or screening as architectural elements
on the parking structure facade, without compromising the open
parking structure requirements of the Uniform Building Code.
b) Glass window display cases incorporated into pedestrian walls built
between two structural pillars. Glass window display cases shall be
at least 2 feet deep, begin 12 to 30 inches above the finished grade
of the sidewalk, and cover at least 60% of the area between two
pillars. The trellis work or window display cases may be waived if the
proponent can actually provide first floor retail or commercial uses
on the bottom floor adjacent to the sidewalk.
3) Upon conversion of portions of a
parking structure to a pedestrian retail/
commercial use, the Director of Planning
and Building or Community Development
may approve the removal of initially
installed pedestrian screening material
in order to allow maximum visibility and
access to the converted portions of the
parking structure.
VI-47
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
4) In addition to the above, views into the upper floors of parking structures
shall be minimized through one or more of the following methods:
a) the use of planters integrated into the upper floors of parking
structure facade design,
b) decorative trellis work and/or screening as architectural elements
on the parking structure upper floor facades, and/or
c) upper parking floors designed as a pattern of window-like openings
on the parking structure facade.
d. Parking Floors Located Under or Within Buildings
1) Parking located under or within buildings shall subordinate the garage
entrance to the pedestrian entrance in terms of prominence on the
street, location and design emphasis. No Parking Structure entry shall
be allowed on Third Avenue.
2) Parking at grade under a building shall be completely or wholly screened
through any combination of walls, decorative grilles, or trellis work with
landscaping.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-48
F. Urban Amenity Requirements and Incentives
1. Introduction
This section outlines requirements and incentives for urban amenities that will
enhance the quality of life within the Urban Core by encouraging pedestrian-
friendly design, amenities, beautification, sufficient parking, mixed-use districts,
preferred site location, affordable housing, and access to public transit, parks,
community facilities, and social services.
2. Incentive Zoning
The Urban Core Specific Plan regulates the development of property through
use and bulk restrictions. The tool selected for regulating density and intensity
in the Urban Core is a limitation on the allowable Floor Area Ratio. FAR is the
ratio between the size of the lot and the maximum amount of floor space that
a building constructed on that lot may contain.
Through incentive zoning, Chula Vista seeks to realize certain amenities or
design provisions related to a particular development project in exchange for
granting an increase in the FAR or FAR waiver for the property being developed.
Locations where the City may grant such incentives are clearly identified in this
chapter.
Bonus awards may be as “of right” or discretionary. Discretionary authority
to grant all FAR bonuses or fee waivers is delegated to the CVRC or Planning
Commission or City Council as necessary.
The amount of bonus awards Chula Vista will make available should take into
account the projected build-out that would occur if all of the bonus provisions
allowable under the program were actually awarded. This total should not exceed
the capacity of the land or the capacity of the City to provide infrastructure and
services to support the build-out.
To determine just how much additional FAR or FAR waiver should be granted,
the CVRC or Planning Commission should take into account the value added
to the property by the amenity or design, and a reasonable share of additional
FAR or FAR waiver that will proportionally compensate the developer for the
additional amenities or design provisions.
VI-49
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
3. Urban Amenities Table
The Urban Amenities Table presents a wide variety of urban amenities either
required or desired in the Urban Core. The table describes whether these
amenities are required through the Specific Plan (or other regulations) or
whether provision of these elements will be encouraged through incentives.
When an urban amenity is required, the specific responsibilities of the property
owner are identified in the Requirements column. In some cases, the applicant
should refer to other sections contained within the Specific Plan for particular
guidelines or regulations. When provision of an urban amenity results in
additional benefits to the property owner, the incentive for providing the amenity
is listed in the Incentives column. Incentives requests will be evaluated case-by-
case based on the degree of public benefit provided by the proposed project.
Several of the urban amenities may be both a requirement and an incentive;
in these cases, a certain portion of the amenity is required to be provided
and the property owner may also recognize additional benefits by providing
an additional portion of the amenity. The Urban Amenities Table also details
the subdistricts within the Specific Plan area in which provision of a particular
element is required or eligible for incentives. If no subdistricts are specified,
the amenity is applicable to all subdistricts.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-50
Fg. 6.66
Urban Amenities Table (Page 1 of 2)
tlement ÞequIrement IncentIve
Streetscape Improvements Development impact fee and/or
development requirements (Contained
in Chapter VI)
None
Paseos Public right of way, development
requirements (Contained in Chapter
VI), and/or development impact fee
None
Pedestrian Circulation (Onsite
and Offsite)
Design guidelines (Contained in
Chapter VII) and development
requirements (Contained in Chapter VI)
None
Streetfront Facades/Street
Wall
Design guidelines (Contained in
Chapters VI & VII) and development
regulations (Contained in Chapters VI &
VII)
None
Upper Level Setbacks Design guidelines (Contained in
Chapters VI & VII)
None
Landscaping Design guidelines (Contained in
Chapter VII)
None
Transit Station Improvements Design guidelines (Contained in
Chapter VII) and/or development
impact fee
Applicability: V-1, V-2, V-4, V-5, UC-1,
UC-2, UC-4, UC-5, UC-7, UC-9, UC-10,
UC-12, UC-13, UC-14, UC-15, UC-16,
UC-18, UC-19, C-1, C-2, and C-3
None
Cultural Arts (Public) Development impact fee Applicability:
V-1, V-2, V-3, V-4, UC-1, UC-2, UC-4,
UC-5, UC-7, UC-9, UC-10, UC-12, UC-
13, UC-15, UC-16, UC-18, UC-19, C-1,
C-2, and C-3
None
Site Access Design guidelines (Contained in
Chapter VII) and development
requirements (Contained in Chapter VI)
None
Vertical Mixed-Use
(Residential over Commercial
Projects)
Design guidelines (Contained in
Chapter VII) and development
requirements (Contained in Chapter VI)
Applicability: V-1, V-2, V-3, V-4, U-C1,
U-C2, UC-5, UC-10, UC-12, UC-13, UC-
14, UC-15, C-1, C-2, and C-3
None
Vertical Mixed-Use
(Residential over Commercial
Projects) within 500 feet of a
Transit Station
Design guidelines (Contained in
Chapter VII) and development
requirements (Contained in Chapter VI)
None
Urban AmenItIes Table
Chula YIsta Urban Core SpecIfIc Þlan
VI-51
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
Fg. 6.67
Urban Amenities Table (Page 2 of 2)
tlement ÞequIrement IncentIve
Urban AmenItIes Table
Chula YIsta Urban Core SpecIfIc Þlan
Parking Design guidelines (Contained in
Chapter VII) and development
requirements (Contained in Chapter VI)
and/or development impact fee for
parking district, including structured and
underground facilities Applicability: V-1,
V-2, V-3, V-4, UC-1, U-C2, UC-4, UC-5,
UC-7, UC-9, UC-10, UC-12, UC-13, UC-
15, UC-16, UC-18, C-1, C-2, and C-3
10% increase in the allowable
FAR and the allowable number of
residential units when all parking
is provided within the building,
entirely below grade, or in a
parking garage of at least two
levels and wrapped with uses or
architecturally concealed
Applicability: All subdistricts
Public Parks and Plazas,
including Sports/Recreation
Facilities, Play Lots, Water
Features, Trails, Par Courses,
Equipment, Gardens, Art
Works
Development impact fee and parkland
dedication
10% increase in the allowable
FAR when additional public
outdoor space is provided above
and beyond PAD requirements
and other than those identified in
Figure 8.64 is provided. The
public outdoor open space shall
have the following
characteristics: has an area
greater than 500 square feet with
a minimum depth of 30 feet;
provides tables and chairs;
provides pedestrian-scaled
lighting of at least 2 footcandles;
and has outdoor public art and
other desired amenities, such as
fountains.
Applicability: All subdistricts
Affordable Housing City inclusionary housing requirement
when applicable
As allowed by State Density
Bonus Law (Government Code
Section 65915)
Applicability: All subdistricts that
allow residential
Green Building LEED Scorecard submitted with Urban
Core Development Permit application
FAR increase (20% for LEED
Certification, 25% for LEED
Silver up to 35% for LEED
Platinum), also priority permit
review with LEED certification.
Applicability: All subdistricts
Historic or Architectural
Acquistion and Maintenance
None
FAR waiver: FAR for elements
not included in overall project
FAR
Applicability: All subdistricts
Community Services/Human
Services
None
FAR waiver: FAR for elements
not included in overall project
FAR
Applicability: All subdistricts
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-52
G. Signs
1. Applicability
For all signs within the Specific Plan Area, the Zoning Code shall apply with
respect to the size, type, location and illumination in the following manner.
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines provides additional design
requirements for signs within the Village, Urban Core, and Corridors Districts.
2. Village District
The provisions of Chapter 19.60 of the Chula Vista Municipal Code shall apply
to all signs in the Village Area of the Specific Plan. In particular, the provisions
of Section 19.60.520 (C-B zone provisions) shall apply to all commercial signs
in the area, subject to the following exceptions:
a. Illumination: No internally illuminated “can” signs or individually cut,
internally illuminated plastic letters shall be permitted in the Village
District.
b. No pole or ground signs shall be allowed in the Village District.
c. Awning signs shall be restricted to the awning valence (flap) only.
d. All window signs above the ground floor shall be prohibited.
e. No wall sign shall exceed one square foot per linear foot of building
frontage.
3. Urban Core District and Corridors District
The provisions of Chapter 19.60 of the Chula Vista Municipal Code shall apply
to all signs in the Urban Core and Corridors districts of the Specific Plan. In
particular, the provisions of Section 19.60.540 (C-C zone provisions) shall apply
to all commercial signs in the area, subject to the following exceptions:
a. Illumination: No internally illuminated “can” signs shall be permitted in
the Urban Core or Corridor Districts.
b. No pole signs shall be permitted shall be allowed in the Urban Core or
Corridor Districts.
c. All window signs above the ground floor shall be prohibited.
VI-53
Chula Vista
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
H. Other Regulations
1. Outdoor Storage
All uses shall be conducted wholly within a completely enclosed building, except
for outdoor restaurants, off-street parking and loading facilities, and other
open uses specified under conditional use permits as determined by the CVRC
or Planning Commission. Permanent and temporary outside sales and display
shall be subject to the provisions of Chula Vista Municipal Code 19.58.370.
2. Trash
Trash storage areas shall be provided in accordance with Chula Vista Municipal
Code 19.58.340.
3. Performance Standards
All uses developed pursuant to the Specific Plan shall be subject to initial and
continued compliance with the performance standards in the Chula Vista
Municipal Code 19.66.
4. Design Control
The exterior design and arrangement of all residential, commercial, and office
uses and mixed-uses and structures proposed for establishment, location,
expansion or alteration in the Specific Plan subdistricts shall be governed by the
goals, general objectives, statements of policy and principles, and standards of
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI-54
I. Development Exceptions
The land use and development regulations encourage the siting of a variety of
land uses in an urban environment that is both pedestrian and environmentally
sensitive. Where used in combination with the Urban Amenities Incentives, as
provided for in this chapter, the development regulations and urban amenities
incentives will encourage innovative design. To further achieve this goal, it may
be necessary to be flexible in the application of certain development standards.
As such, the Chula Vista Redevelopment Corporation or Planning Commission
may authorize exceptions to the land use and development regulations included
within this chapter through the issuance of an Urban Core Development Permit,
if all of the following findings are made:
1. The proposed development will not adversely affect the goals and
objectives of the Specific Plan and General Plan.
2. The proposed development will comply with all other regulations of the
Specific Plan.
3. The proposed development will incorporate one or more of the Urban
Amenities Incentives in section F - Urban Amenities Requirements and
Incentives, of this chapter.
4. The exception or exceptions are appropriate for this location and will
result in a better design or greater public benefit than could be achieved
through strict conformance with the Specific Plan development
regulations.
Consideration of a development standard exception shall be concurrent with
the review of the Urban Core Development Permit, as outlined in Chapter XI
- Plan Administration, Section C.1. Urban Core Development Permit and Design
Review Requirements, of this Specific Plan.
1
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista Chula Vista
VII. Development Design Guidelines
A. Introduction and Background VII-1
B. What is Urban Design? VII-4
C. How to Use the Design Guidelines VII-5
D. Village District VII-33
E. Urban Core District VII-79
F. Corridors District VII-107
G. Special Guidelines VII-139
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-1
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.1
This photo received favorable ratings
in the Visual Preference Survey
VII. Development Design Guidelines
A. Introduction and Background
Over the last few decades, Chula Vista has dramatically emerged as an
economic and population center for the San Diego region. Increasingly, the
City and the public have recognized the importance of fostering a strong Urban
Core that can accommodate further commercial and residential growth and
serve as the retail, office, and entertainment center of the community. The City
has established these design guidelines, which supplement the Specific Plan
and Zoning Ordinance, to provide Chula Vista with recommendations for the
preservation and aesthetic improvement of the Urban Core, which will, in turn,
enhance the overall vitality and economic stability of the broader community.
1. Purpose
The purpose of the design manual is to provide guidance for the construction,
conservation, adaptive use, and enhancement of buildings and street scenes
contained within Chula Vista’s Urban Core. The manual is intended to assist
many users (property owners, merchants, real estate interests, architects,
designers and building contractors, vendors and craftsmen, the City of Chula
Vista, and other interested persons and organizations) in being responsive to
City objectives. Each of these interests has
a vital and often related role to play in the
continued revitalization of the Urban Core.
The design standards in this manual are, by
specific intent, prescriptive. They describe
appropriate kinds of changes and improvements
that can be made to existing structures, as well
as recommend the incorporation of particular
design elements in new construction.
These guidelines, while attempting to be
comprehensive in scope, certainly are not
exhaustive in detail. The overall aim is to
encourage creative approaches and solutions
within a workable framework. The focus of the “form-based” design guidelines
is the relationship of development to the street, not a mandatory preference of
one architectural style over another architectural style.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-2
2. Applicability
This manual is to be used as a guide for new construction and for the renovation
of existing structures within the Urban Core and does not apply to existing
structures not undergoing any anticipated improvements. Any new residences,
buildings, additions, exterior alterations, or landscaping, and any modification
to an approved landscaping plan or parking lot design will adhere to these
Design Guidelines as applicable. The design guidelines are to be applied within
the confines of private property, with the exception of public parks, plazas, etc.,
that may be developed as part of individual projects. Refer to Chapter VIII -
Public Realm Design Guidelines for more information on the design of public
parks, plazas, etc. The guidelines are form based and should be applied to
projects regardless of the type of land use.
3. Goals
The following goals provide explanation of the design philosophy expressed
throughout subsequent sections of the Design Guidelines. This manual intends
to promote a desired level of future development quality in the Urban Core that
will:
• contribute to implementing the goals, objectives, and policies provided in
the General Plan and Urban Core Specific Plan;
• stimulate investment in and strengthen the economic vitality of the Urban
Core;
• contribute to a positive physical image and identity of the City;
• promote a visually attractive, safe and well-planned community through the
incorporation of sound design principles;
• create unique identities for each district;
• protect Urban Core residents from unsafe or unsightly conditions;
• minimize negative impacts of new development and redevelopment; and
• preserve and maximize the image, character, and history of Chula Vista’s
Urban Core.
4. Organization
The first three of the following four sections focus on three distinct districts or
development types within the urban core: the Village District, the Urban Core
District, and the Corridors District. All sections include guidelines with regard
to architecture, site planning, storefront design, landscape design, lighting,
parking and circulation, and signs. The fourth section focuses on guidelines for
special types of projects and special project features, including guidelines for
hotels and motels, mixed-use projects, and stand alone multi-familly residential
projects.
VII-3
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
a. Village District
The guidelines contained in this section aim to retain and enhance the small-
town, mixed-use ambience of the traditional Village through rehabilitation of
older structures and well-designed new development. Like those for the Urban
Core, the guidelines for the Village stress pedestrian-oriented site planning and
building design, including requiring upper floors to step back to allow sunlight
to reach the streets below. The section also concentrates on preserving the
historic fabric of the area, including providing guidance for those who wish to
renovate or add on to existing buildings and promoting design compatibility
between infill structures and surrounding buildings.
b. Urban Core District
The Urban Core District will serve as the primary business, commercial, and
regional center of Chula Vista. This section focuses on accommodating mid- to
high-rise development while encouraging an active street life. Specifically, the
design guidelines support the development of primarily ground floor retail uses
along Broadway and H Street. Such guidelines help ensure that the Urban Core
contains a comfortable environment for pedestrians to shop, dine, and recreate.
In light of the intensity of land uses and need for parking in the area, this section
contains a special section devoted to the design of parking structures.
c. Corridors District
In contrast with the Urban Core and the Village Districts, the Corridors District
is oriented towards the automobile rather than pedestrian traffic. Sections of
Broadway and Third Avenue are characterized by minimum ten-foot setbacks,
one or two-story structures, and a high percentage of retail, service, and office
development. The guidelines in this section focus on promoting quality and
diversity in new commercial and residential development and safe and efficient
parking and circulation.
d. Special Guidelines
This section provides supplemental guidelines for hotels and motels, mixed-
use projects, and multi-family residential projects to provide further site
design considerations based on their individual uses. Sustainable design
recommendations for all project types are also discussed.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-4
Fg. 7.2
Good urban design enhances the
vitality and character of a community
B. What is Urban Design?
In part, urban design is the “art” of enhancing the vitality, meaning, and form
of communities by ensuring quality, sensible design and development. Urban
design is but one of several factors that must
be considered in community design and
development. The others include economic
conditions, promotion, and marketing of
businesses, management, and maintenance.
For purposes of this manual, design guidelines
are presented that aim to foster an image
and character desired by the community and
supportive of the other factors pertaining to
different types of development.
VII-5
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
C. How to Use the Design Guidelines
People judge a place by the quality of the physical spaces they see around them
– in terms of function and attractiveness. The areas within the Urban Core are
not only places for residential, commercial, governmental, and employment
activities but also statements about the community. Many areas within the
Urban Core have either been neglected, poorly designed, or are outdated. The
role of the design guidelines is to help new and old development become points
of pride for Chula Vista residents.
These guidelines should be used to influence the design of development/
redevelopment of residential and non-residential land uses in the Specific Plan
area and apply primarily to on-site private development areas. The guidelines
are organized and written to help achieve an envisioned design quality through
Chula Vista’s Urban Core.
These guidelines should be used as a starting point for the creative design
process and should not be looked upon as the only solution for design. Owners
of properties should strive to be creative and innovative, and should be
encouraged to look beyond franchise or boilerplate architectural and landscape
architectural design treatments. It is encouraged that property owners involve
City staff, community groups, and affected merchants and business owners in
the design process prior to making a significant investment in design.
a. Harmonizing Change
Architects and designers should consider the importance of General Plan
Theme 8 - “Shaping the Future Through the Present and Past” when developing
any new or redevelopment project in the Urban Core. The following photo essay
provides a brief summary of the important design themes that have helped
shape the unique architectural character of the City. Important design cues
can be found in these examples and should be referenced in new development
in a way that reflects Chula Vista’s heritage and sense of place. The following
photo essay was compiled by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-6
Fg. 7.3
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 2 of 27
El Primero Hotel, 1930,
Designed by H.W. Whitsitt
416 Third Ave
Congregational Church, 1951
Historical Site #5 at 276 “F” Street
VII-7
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.4
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 3 of 27
Charles Smith Building, 1930
Zig Zag Moderne style
289 Third Avenue
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-8
Fg. 7.5
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 4 of 27
Relating architectural elements from El Primero Hotel,
Charles Smith Building and Congregational Church
VII-9
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.6
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 5 of 27
Vogue Theater (views circa 1945 and 2005)
Art Deco Moderne
226 Third Ave
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-10
Fg. 7.7
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 6 of 27
Bank of America Building, 1949
Mid-Century Moderne
253-257Third Ave
VII-11
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.8
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 7 of 27
Dyson Court Apartments
Streamline Moderne, circa 1928
516-518 Flower
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-12
Fg. 7.9
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 8 of 27
Burnett’s Furniture Store
Mid-Century Moderne 1952
345 “E” Street
Garden Farms Market
“E” Street Circa 1940s
Art Deco Commercial
Streamline Moderne Commercial Building
Circa 1930
45 Broadway
VII-13
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.10
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 9 of 27
“Highway 101” Vintage Neon
Broadway
Third Ave
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-14
Fg. 7.11
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 10 of 27
Logan’s Paint & Linoleum
Commercial Brick Building, 1926
277-279 Third Ave
VII-15
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.12
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 11 of 27
Flower Street Apartments, circa 1928
Tudor inspired with clinker bricks
500 Flower St
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-16
Fg. 7.13
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 12 of 27
Horace Nelson House, Historic Site #
Tudor Revival brick house, 1933
470 “E” St
Hadley Johnson House, circa 1950
Historic Site #58
7 Cresta Way
VII-17
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.14
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 13 of 27
Mae Edgecomb House
Tudor Revival, ca 1924
834 First Ave
“Zontek’s Café” 1953
Tudor Revival
230 Third Ave
Bay View Hospital
Tudor Revival, Third Ave at “L”
(half-timbers were stuccoed over)
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-18
Fg. 7.15
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 14 of 27
French Colonial Atherton House
Historic Site #59, 1950
415 Hilltop Dr.
George Sample House, Historic Site #
French Normandy Style, circa 1929
466 “E” Street
VII-19
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.16
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 15 of 27
First Baptist Church of Chula Vista, 1929
Spanish Colonial Style
“E” St & Fifth Ave
Woman’s Club Historic Site #12
Designed by Edgar Ullrich
357 “G” Street
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-20
Fg. 7.17
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 16 of 27
Sallmon House, 1916, Pueblo Revival Style
Designed by William Templeton Johnson in 1916
Historic Site #28
435 First Avenue
San Diego Country Club, 1984
Pueblo Revival Style
“L” Street Chula Vista
VII-21
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.18
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 17 of 27
Spanish Eclectic
Hacienda style Homes
447 “I” Street, ca 1930
Palomar Dr West, ca 1929
629 Del Mar Ave, ca 1932
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-22
Fg. 7.19
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 18 of 27
Spanish Eclectic Hacienda style, circa 1928
Hilltop and “F” Street
VII-23
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.20
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 19 of 27
Harry McCrea House
Spanish Eclectic, circa 1924
225 Garrett Ave
Spanish Eclectic, circa 1920s
Flower St at Fifth Ave
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-24
Fg. 7.21
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 20 of 27
Edmond Russ House, 1929
Mission Revival, Historic Site #47
200 “K” St.
Mission Revival Style
Circa 1920s
244 Elder St.
Elmer Kinmore House, 1926, Spanish Eclectic
230 Fifth Ave
VII-25
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.22
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 21 of 27
Chula Vista Library Civic Center
Designed by Tom Williamson
of Richard George Wheeler & Associates, 1976
365 “F” Street
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-26
Fg. 7.23
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 22 of 27
Jennie MacDonald House
Victorian, ca 1888
Historic Site #44
644 Second Ave
Garrettson-Frank House
Victorian ca 1889
Historic Site #43
642 Second Ave
James Johnson House
Victorian, ca 1891
Historic Site #6
525 “F” St
VII-27
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.24
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 23 of 27
Edward Gillette House
Victorian, ca 1894
Historic Site #30
44 North Second Ave
Cordrey House
Victorian, ca 1889
Historic Site #3
210 Davidson St
Mary Francisco House
Victorian, ca 1888
681 Del Mar Ave
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-28
Fg. 7.25
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 24 of 27
William Drew House
Craftsman, ca 1913
Historic Site #54
475 “E” Street
Greg Rogers House
Craftsman, ca 1910
Historic Site #1 and 42
616 Second Ave
Dupree-Gould House
Craftsman, ca 1921
Historic Site #22
344 Hilltop Drive
VII-29
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.26
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 25 of 27
Nadine Davies House, 1911
Craftsman Bungalow
Historic Site #41
614 Second Ave
Reginald Walters House, 1908
Folk Pyramidal
219 “F” Street
Edwin Smith Sr House, 1912
Craftsman (modified)
Historic Site #
616 Del Mar
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-30
Fg. 7.27
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 26 of 27
Memorial Bowl
Amphitheatre & Park
1939 W.P.A.
Parkway between Third & Fourth
VII-31
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.28
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 27 of 27
Norman Park Center
Designed by Visions Studio 1992
270 “F” St
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-32
Fg. 7.29
Community Character Photo Essay
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 28 of 27
South Chula Vista Library
Designed by Ricardo Legorreta 1992
389 Orange Ave
MAAC Community Charter School
Contemporary
Third Ave & Palomar
VII-33
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.30
Third Avenue is the heart of Chula
Vista
D. Village District
1. Introduction
The purpose of this section is to present design guidelines for new private
development and rehabilitation of older commercial structures in the Village
district. The guidelines seek to promote a blend
of high quality residential and commercial uses
within a small-town atmosphere. Guidelines
include groundfloor commercial with office and
residential above or single use structures where
the design focus is on entryways, access, and
pedestrian orientation. General architectural
guidelines should be followed regardless of the
internal use.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-34
Fg. 7.31
Infill should reflect the established
rhythm and scale of adjacent buildings
2. Design Principles
a. Promote Sound Architectural Practices
New infill development and renovation to existing
structures must respect sound architectural
design practices in order to create a positive
ambiance within the Village. The standards
contained in this section do not dictate the use
of any specific architectural style. Architectural
standards should guide the designer in massing,
proportion, scale, texture, pattern and line. New
creative interpretations of traditional design
variables are particularly encouraged.
b. Retain or Repeat Traditional Facade
Components
Changes to structures will, and need to,
occur over time. The concern is that these
changes do not damage the existing traditional
building fabric and that the results of building
renovation enhance the overall design integrity
of the building. New infill structures should
use traditional facade components, such as
bulkheads, arches, plazas, and balconies, to
create patterns and alignments that visually
link buildings within a block, while allowing
individual identity of each building. These
elements are familiar to the pedestrian and
help establish a sense of scale.
c. Develop a Steady Rhythm of Facade
Widths
The traditional commercial/mercantile lot
width in the Village area has given rise to
buildings of relatively uniform width that create
a familiar rhythm. This is particularly visible
on Third Avenue. This pattern helps to tie
the street together visually and provides the
pedestrian with a standard measurement of his
progress. Reinforcement of this facade rhythm
is encouraged, in all new buildings, even if a
singular structure.
VII-35
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.32
Ground floor sidewalk activity adds
human scale to the two-story building
Fg. 7.33
Storefronts with abundant glass
encourage pedestrian activity
d. Create a Comfortable Scale of Structures
All buildings must convey a scale appropriate for
pedestrian activity. Human-scaled buildings are
comfortable and create a friendly atmosphere
that respects the traditional scale of the Village
while also enhancing its marketability as a retail
and office area. For the most part, this means
two- to three-story development at the back of
the sidewalk, particularly along Third Avenue.
e. Support Pedestrian-Oriented Activity at
the Sidewalk and Amenity Areas
The activities that occur immediately inside
the storefront and along the building frontage,
particularly along Third Avenue, are an
important design consideration. Structures
can provide visual interest to pedestrians
through goods and outdoor activities. Therefore,
building design elements should be located
in a way that enhances pedestrian visibility of
goods and activities, and they should be kept
free of advertising and non-product related
clutter (e.g. backs of display cases, etc.), to
the greatest extent possible. Storefronts with
clear, transparent glass also instill a sense of
safety for pedestrians since they sense that
employees and patrons are monitoring the
sidewalk. In contrast, storefronts with blank or
solid opaque walls degrade the quality of the
pedestrian experience and are not permitted.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-36
Access
A
l
l
e
y
P
e
d
e
s
t
r
i
a
n

e
n
t
r
y
Fg. 7.34
Buildings should be sited next to the
street
Fg. 7.35
Corner buildings should continue
storefronts on side streets
Fg. 7.36
Paseos should be placed in the
middle one-third of a block
3. Site Planning
a. Introduction
New infill buildings should reinforce the
pedestrian-orientation of the Village by providing
storefronts next to the sidewalk and locating
parking areas away from the street.
b. Building Siting
1) The first floor of any new building should be
built at (or very close to) the front property
line, particularly on Third Avenue. The front
building facade should be oriented parallel
to the street. Buildings should also be
placed on the setback line along alleys.
2) Building indentations that create small
pedestrian plazas along the streetwall,
particularly along Third Avenue, are
encouraged.
3) Front setbacks should accommodate active
public uses such as outdoor dining and
therefore should use hardscape and limited
landscaping, such as potted plants and
flower beds. Provide additional setbacks at
public plaza areas.
4) Buildings on corners should include
storefront design features on at least 50%
of the side street elevation wall.
5) Entries that face onto an outdoor dining
opportunity are encouraged.
6) Retain existing paseos when possible. Create
additional pedestrian paseos and linkages
to parking lots, activity areas, or alleys
within the middle one-third of a block. In no
case should historic structures be modified
to achieve this particular guideline.
7) Buildings situated facing a plaza, paseo, or
other public space are encouraged.
VII-37
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Building
entrance
Fg. 7.38
Rear parking lots should be
contiguous
Fg. 7.37
Storefronts and building entries
should face the street
Fg. 7.39
Link parking areas to major building
rear entrances using textured paving
8) Loading and storage facilities should be
located at the rear or side of buildings and
screened from public view.
c. Street Orientation
1) Storefronts and major building entries
should orient to Third Avenue, F Street,
courtyards, or plazas, although minor side
or rear entries may be desirable.
2) Provide corner “cut-offs” for buildings on
prominent intersections.
3) Create continuous pedestrian activity
along public sidewalks in an uninterrupted
sequence by minimizing gaps between
buildings.
4) Any building with more than 75 feet of street
frontage should have at least one primary
building entry.
d. Parking Orientation
1) Locating parking lots between the front
property line and the building storefront is
prohibited. Instead, parking lots should be
located to the rear of buildings, subterranean,
or in parking structures.
2) Rear parking lots should be designed and
located contiguously so vehicles can travel
from one private parking lot to the other
without having to enter the street. This
may be achieved with reciprocal access
agreements.
3) Locate rear parking lot and structure entries
on side streets or alleys in order to minimize
pedestrian/vehicular conflicts along Third
Avenue and F Street.
4) Create wide, well-lit pedestrian walkways
from parking lots to building entries that
utilize directional signs.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-38
e. Refuse, Storage, and Equipment Areas
1) Trash storage must be fully enclosed and
incorporated within the main structures or
separate freestanding enclosures (CVMC
19.58.340). Where practical, storage
at each unit is preferred over common
enclosures. Trash storage cannot be placed
under stairways.
2) All trash and garbage bins should be stored
in an approved enclosure.
3) Trash enclosures should allow convenient
access for commercial tenants. Siting
service areas in a consolidated and
controlled environment is encouraged.
4) Trash enclosures should be located away
from residential uses to minimize nuisance
for the adjacent property owners. The
enclosure doors should not interfere with
landscaping, pedestrian, or vehicle path of
travel.
5) Trash enclosures should be architecturally
compatible with the project. Landscaping
should be incorporated into the design to
screen the enclosure from public view and
deter graffiti.
6) Refuse storage areas that are visible from
an upper story of adjacent structures
should provide an opaque or semi-opaque
horizontal cover/screen to reduce unsightly
views. The screening should be compatible
with the design of adjacent development.
7) Refuse containers and service facilities
should be screened from view by solid
masonry walls with wood or metal doors.
Use landscaping (shrubs and vines) to
screen walls and help deter graffiti.
VII-39
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
8) All mechanical equipment, whether mounted
on the roof, side of a structure, or on the
ground shall be screened from view (CVMC
15.16.030). Utility meters and equipment
should be placed in locations which are not
exposed to view from the street or should
be suitably screened. All screening devices
are to be compatible with the architecture,
material and color of adjacent structures.
f. Site Amenities
Site amenities help establish the identity of
a commercial area and provide comfort and
interest to its users. Individual site amenities
within a commercial setting should have
common features, such as color, material, and
design to provide a cohesive environment and a
more identifiable character.
1) Plazas and Courtyards
a) Plazas and courtyards are strongly
encouraged within commercial
developments over one acre .
b) Physical access should be provided from
shops, restaurants, offices and other
pedestrian uses to plazas.
c) A majority of the gross area of the plaza
should have access to sunlight for the
duration of daylight hours.
d) Shade trees or other elements providing
relief from the sun should be incorporated
within plazas.
e) Entries to the plaza and storefront entries
within the plaza should be well lighted.
f) Architecture, landscaping elements, and
public art should be incorporated into the
plaza design.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-40
g) Plazas and courtyards should include a focal
element of sculpture and/or water feature,
simple plants and simple sitting niches.
h) Seating should be provided in plazas. Where
applicable, plaza users should be provided
with a choice between active and passive
seating.
i) Courtyards should be designed to provide
both visibility and separation from the street,
parking areas, or drive aisles.
2) Site Furniture
a) Paving and furniture should complement
public streetscape elements when
appropriate.
b) Site furnishings should not create
pedestrian/vehicular conflicts.
c) Bicycle racks should be selected that
are durable and consistent with other
streetscape furnishings.
d) Based on their performance, “loop
rack” and “ribbon bar” bicycle racks are
recommended.
e) The design of newspaper boxes should be
consolidated into one rack. Racks should be
attractive on all sides.
VII-41
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Stepback
Balconies
Fg. 7.40
Structures that integrate a mix of
uses and vary heights are encouraged
Fg. 7.41
Building stepbacks are encouraged
4. Architectural Guidelines
a. Introduction
The design of an infill building in the Village,
particularly its front facade, should be
influenced by historically significant facades on
the street but should not attempt to copy them.
The contemporary infill structure should be
compatible with specific plan zoning regulations
in terms of height, facade rhythm, placement of
doors and windows, color and use of materials
without necessarily duplicating a “dated”
architectural style from the past.
b. Building Height, Form, and Mass
1) Multiple-use structures, with retail on
lower floors and residential or non-retail
commercial on upper floors, are required
along Third Avenue and encouraged
elsewhere within the Village District.
2) Horizontal building stepbacks are
encouraged to provide building articulation
, terrace space and other elements to soften
building facades. If a mid-rise building is
located on a corner site, increased stepbacks
from the street wall are encouraged along
both streets. Please also refer to Chapter VI
– Land Use and Development Regulations
for regulations regarding required minimum
building stepbacks for specific subdistricts
within the Specific Plan.
3) Building heights should vary and enhance
public views, and provide adjacent sites
with maximum sun and ventilation and
protection from prevailing winds.
4) Exceptions to building height may be
provided pursuant to 19.16.040.
5) Whenever a proposed infill building is
adjacent to a designated historic structure,
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-42
Articulate openings
Break up building mass
Increase opening sizes
Proportion of opening sizes
to building mass is too small
Fg. 7.42
Vertical and horizontal articulation
make buildings appear smaller in scale
Fg. 7.43
Upper stories should have smaller
window openings than the street level
consideration should be given to proposed
building height, mass and form to minimize
effects on the historic structure.
c. Facades and Rhythm
New structures should reflect the established
scale and rhythm suggested by the regulations
contained herein and the traditional lot
pattern.
1) The characteristic proportion (relationship
of height to width) of existing facades should
be reflected in new infill development.
2) Building facades should be detailed in such
a way as to make them appear smaller in
scale. The smaller scale can be achieved
through vertical and horizontal articulation
such as:
• breaks (reveals, recesses) in the surface
of the wall itself;
• placement of window and door openings;
or
• the placement of bay windows, balconies,
awnings, and canopies.
3) Bay windows and balconies that provide
usable and accessible outdoor space for
residential uses are strongly encouraged
and may encroach on the public right-of-
way, consistent with City policy.
4) Whenever a proposed infill building is wider
than the existing facades on the street,
the infill facade should be broken down
into a series of appropriately proportioned
“structural bays” or components such as a
series of columns or masonry piers to frame
window, door and bulkhead components.
5) The predominant difference between upper
story openings and street level storefront
openings (windows and doors) should
VII-43
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.44
Architectural details help maintain
horizontal rhythm along the street
be maintained. Typically, there is a much
greater window area (70%) at the storefront
level for pedestrians to have a better view
of the merchandise displayed. In contrast,
upper stories have smaller window openings
(approximately 40%).
6) Whenever an infill building is proposed that
has two adjacent commercial structures,
every attempt should be made to maintain
the characteristic rhythm, proportion,
and spacing of existing door and window
openings.
7) Whenever an infill building is proposed,
identify the common horizontal elements
(e.g. cornice line, window height/width
and spacing) found among neighboring
structures and develop the infill design
utilizing a similar rhythm or alignment.
8) Cornice lines of new buildings (a horizontal
rhythm element) should transition with
buildings on adjacent properties to avoid
clashes in building height.
9) If maintaining a horizontal rhythm or
alignment as a result of infill construction is
not feasible, the use of canopies, awnings, or
other horizontal devices should be included
to maintain a (shared) horizontal storefront
rhythm.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-44
Fg. 7.45
Upper floors step back from the street
d. Architectural Photographic Essay
The following pages provide photos illustrating
appropriate architectural bulk and massing
within the Village. These photos show buildings
with lower floors that are located at the front
setback line and upper floors that step back
from the street.
VII-45
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.46
Buildings have lower floors that are located at the front setback line
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-46
Fg. 7.47
Materials such as wood provide
visual appeal
e. Building Materials and Colors
Building Materials
The complexity of building materials should be
based on the complexity of the building design.
More complex materials should be used on
simpler building designs and vice versa. In all
cases, storefront materials should be consistent
with the materials used on the applicable
building and adjacent buildings. The number of
different wall materials used on any one building
should be kept to a minimum, ideally two. The
following materials, including but not limited to,
are considered appropriate for buildings within
the Village:
1) Approved Exterior Materials
Walls
• Stucco (smooth or textured)
• Smooth block
• Granite
• Marble
• New or used face-brick
• Terra Cotta
Accent Materials
Accent materials should be used to highlight
building features and provide visual interest.
Accent materials may include one of the
following:
• Wood
• Glass
• Glass block (storefront only)
• Tile (bulkhead)
• New or used face-brick
• Concrete
• Stone
• Copper
• Cloth Awnings
• Plaster (smooth or textured)
• Metal
• Wrought Iron
• Cut stone, rusticated block (cast stone)
• Terra cotta
VII-47
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.48
Contrasting colors should accent
entrances and architectural details
Rooftops
• Standing seam metal roofs
• Class “A” composition roof shingles
(residential application only)
• Crushed stone
• Built up roof system
• Tile
• Green roofs
2) Prohibited Exterior Materials
Walls and Accent Materials
• Reflective or opaque glass at ground floor
• Imitation stone (fiberglass or plastic)
• “Lumpy” stucco
• Pecky cedar
• Used brick with no fired face (salvaged from
interior walls)
• Imitation wood siding
• Plastic panels
• Heavily tinted glass
• Vinyl siding
3) Exterior Color
a) It is not the intent of these guidelines to
control color, however several general
guidelines should be applied:
• use subtle/muted colors on larger and
plainer buildings;
• use added colors and more intense
colors on small buildings or those with
elaborate detailing;
• encourage contrasting colors that accent
architectural details;
• encourage colors that accent
entrances;
• in general, no more than three colors
should be used on any given facade,
including “natural” colors such as
unpainted brick or stone, except for
Victorian and Craftsman era buildings.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-48
Fg. 7.49
“Natural” materials such as brick are
encouraged
Fg. 7.50
Arches should be semi-circular and
relate to the scale of the building
• caution should be exercised when using
more than one vivid color per building;
and
• avoid using colors that are not harmonious
with colors found on adjacent buildings.
b) Light colored base walls of buildings and
other large expanses are encouraged. Soft
tones ranging from white to very light pastels
are encouraged. Neutrals such as off-white,
beige and sand are also acceptable colors.
However, dark colors can be appropriate for
storefronts.
c) Finish material with “natural” colors such
as brick, stone, copper, etc., should be used
where practicable.
d) Exposure to the amount of sunlight can
change the appearance of a paint color;
therefore, paint chips should be checked on
both sunny and cloudy or foggy days.
e) The orientation of a building (north, east,
south, west) affects the appearance of
colors. Colors on south and west facades
appear warmer than if placed on north or
east sides.
f. Arcades and Columns
1) Arcades provide a dramatic architectural
element on many buildings in the Village,
particularly in the Civic Center area. Arches
should be semi-circular or slightly flat.
Parabolic arches are discouraged.
2) Care must be taken that arcades appear
authentic. The integrity of an arch is lost
when its mass is not proportional to its size.
Columns must relate in scale to that portion
of the building that they visually support.
3) Columns should be square, rectangular or
round, and appear massive in thickness.
The use of capitals and column bands are
VII-49
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Acceptable
Not acceptable
Parapet wall
Cornice
Flat roof
Equipment
Fg. 7.51
Roofs on infill buildings should
complement existing structures
Fg. 7.52
Rooftop screening
strongly encouraged. Faux columns should
be avoided.
4) A base should be incorporated at the bottom
of the column. The column height should be
four to five times the width of the column.
5) To enhance the pedestrian realm, arcades,
arches, and canopies are encouraged along
west and south facing facades.
g. Roofs and Upper-Story Details
1) No roofline ridge or parapet should run
unbroken for more than 75 feet. Vertical or
horizontal articulation is required.
2) The visible portion of sloped roofs should
be sheathed with a roofing material
complementary to the architectural style
of the building and other surrounding
buildings.
3) Radical roof pitches that create overly
prominent or out-of-character buildings
such as A-frames, geodesic domes, or
chalet-style buildings are discouraged.
4) Access to roofs should be restricted to
interior access only.
5) Rooftops can provide usable outdoor
space in both residential and commercial
developments.
6) Roof-mounted mechanical equipment
should be screened by a parapet wall or
similar structural feature that is an integral
part of the building’s architectural design.
7) Building vertical focal elements are
encouraged, especially at key intersections
such as Third Avenue and E Street, which
are primary entrances to the Village District.
Towers, spires, or domes become landmarks
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-50
Fg. 7.53
Features such as fountains attract
pedestrians
Fg. 7.54
Paseos encourage pedestrian activity
throughout the Village
Fg. 7.55
Franchise/corporate buildings should
complement surrounding buildings
and serve as focal/orientation points for the
community.
h. Plazas and Paseos
Plazas and paseos are a vital component of the
Village district and pedestrian activity is critical to
the success of both areas. The broad sidewalks
along Third Avenue provide the primary plaza
and pedestrian zone within infill development
off of Third Avenue.
1) Plazas and paseos should contain a visual
and somewhat audible feature such as
a sculpture, fountain, or a display pond
that attracts pedestrians and serves as a
landmark.
2) Any decorative paving used in plaza and
paseo areas should complement the paving
pattern and color of the pavers used in the
public right-of-way.
3) Furniture and fixtures used in the plaza and
paseo areas should complement those in
the public right-of-way. Furniture and fixtures
should be selected with maintenance
consideration in mind.
4) Ample seating in both shaded and sunny
locations should be provided in plaza and
paseo areas.
5) Link plazas and paseos to green spaces
such as Memorial Park where feasible
i. Franchise/Corporate Business
1) Architecture
a) The scale, design character, and materials of
franchise/corporate architecture should be
consistent with adjacent buildings. Natural
materials, such as brick, stone, or copper,
should be used where applicable.
VII-51
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.56
Neon should be used sparingly and be
reserved for detailing
2) Color and Lighting
The color(s) used by franchise/corporate
buildings should be considered carefully since
they may be inappropriate within the Village.
Below are standards that should be considered
when addressing appropriate color(s) and
lighting:
a) Use colors that complement colors found
on adjacent buildings or in the Village area.
b) Franchise/corporate colors should be
consistent with the architectural style or
period of the building.
c) Bright or intense colors are strongly
discouraged, unless used on appropriate
architectural styles and reserved for more
refined detailing and transient features.
d) The use of symbols and logos can be utilized
in place of bright or intense corporate
colors.
e) Lighting of logos should be compatible with
the primary building and respect adjacent
buildings. Bright and intense lighting is
strongly discouraged.
f) Neon outlining should be consistent with the
architectural style or period of the building
and should be reserved for detailing and
transient features. The use of bright and
intense neon outlining of windows is strongly
discouraged.
g) Vintage neon incorporated in signage on
both Third Avenue and Broadway should be
preserved.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-52
Cornice
Pier
Recessed entry door
Bulkhead
Display window
Transom window
Fg. 7.57
Storefront components
5. Storefront Design Guidelines
a. Introduction
The storefront is only one of the architectural
components of the commercial facade, but it is
the most important visual element for a building
in the Village. It traditionally experiences the
greatest degree of change during a building’s
lifetime and further holds the greatest potential
for creative or poor alterations affecting both the
character of the building and the streetscape.
Traditional storefronts are comprised of a few
decorative elements other than simple details
that repeat across the face of the building (e.g.,
structural bays containing window and door
openings, continuous cornice line, transoms,
bulkheads) and integrate the storefront into
the entire building facade. Windows and
facades that are open to the public realm are
also encouraged to take advantage of the nice
climate.
b. Storefront Composition
1) Entries and Doorways
a) The main entry to buildings in the Village
should be emphasized by utilizing one or
more of the following design elements or
concepts:
• Flanked columns, decorative fixtures
or other details, including a recessed
entryway within a larger arched or cased
decorative opening. The recessed
entryway should be continuously and
thoroughly illuminated.
• Entryways should be covered by a portico
(formal porch) projecting from or set into
the building face, and distinguished by a
change in roofline, a tower, or a break in
the surface of the subject wall.
b) Height exceptions may be allowed consistent
with CVMC 19.16.040.
c) All entryways should be equipped with
a lighting device providing a minimum
VII-53
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.58
Awnings add pedestrian scale and
comfort
Fg. 7.59
Shed awnings are consistent with
rectilinear building forms
maintained one foot-candle of light at
ground level during hours of darkness.
Vandal resistant covers should protect
lighting devices.
2) Awnings and Canopies
Awnings, canopies, and other accessory shade
structures that are relatively open and do not
restrict pedestrian or vehicular movement
may encroach over the right-of-way. Awnings
provide excellent opportunities for color and
visual relief as well as protection for buildings
and pedestrians from the sun and rain. They
add pedestrian scale and visual interest to the
storefront design. The following criteria should
be considered when using awnings:
a) The most purposeful awnings are
retractable.
b) Awning shape should relate to the window
or door opening. Barrel-shaped awnings
are only to be used to complement arched
windows, while square awnings should be
used on rectangular windows.
c) Awnings should consist of a durable,
commercial grade fabric, canvas or similar
material.
d) Frames and supports should be painted or
coated to prevent corroding.
e) Awnings should have a single color or two-
color stripes. Lettering and trim utilizing
more colors is permitted, but will be
considered as a sign area.
f) Where the facade is divided into distinct
structural bays, awnings should be placed
between the vertical elements rather than
overlapping them. The awning design should
respond to the scale, proportion and rhythm
created by these structural bay elements
and “nestle” into the space created by the
structural bay.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-54
Fg. 7.60
Light fixtures can enhance a
storefront
g) Glossy, shiny plastic, or similar awning
materials are not permitted.
h) Aluminum awnings or canopies do not fit
the atmosphere of the Village and are not
permitted.
3) Storefront Accessories and Other Details
There are a number of design elements that
may be incorporated into the building design,
especially at street level, in order to add to the
experience of the pedestrian while meeting
important functional needs as well. The
following storefront accessories and details are
recommended:
a) Grillework/Metalwork and Other Details
There are a number of details, often
considered mundane, that may be
incorporated into the design to add
visual richness and interest while serving
functional needs. Such details include the
following items:
• light fixtures, wall mounted or hung with
decorative metal brackets;
• metal grille work, at vent openings or
as decorative features at windows,
doorways, or gates;
• decorative scuppers, catches, and down-
spouts;
• balconies, rails, finials, corbels, and
plaques;
• flag or banner pole brackets;
• fire sprinkler stand pipe enclosures and
hose bib covers, preferably of brass;
and
• permanent, fixed security grates or
grilles in front of windows are strongly
discouraged. If security grilles are
necessary, they should be placed inside
the building, behind the window display
area.
VII-55
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Storefront
window
display area
Roll-up
security
screen
Fg. 7.62
Side and rear entry treatments should
reflect the front facade treatment
Fg. 7.61
Security features should be placed
behind the window display area
b) Door and Window Design
• Doors can be accentuated with simple
details such as a handsome brass door
pull, brass kickplate, or an attractive
painted sign on glass (limited to 15% of
door glass area).
• Doors to retail shops should contain a
high percentage of glass in order to view
the retail contents. A minimum of a 50%
glass area is required.
• Use of clear glass (at least 88% light
transmission) on the first floor is
required.
• Traditional storefront windows should
be no closer than 18 inches from the
ground (bulkhead height). By limiting
the bulkhead height, the visibility to the
storefront displays and retail interior is
maximized. Maximum bulkhead heights
for new construction should be 36
inches.
c) Side and Rear Entrances
• Signs should be modestly scaled to fit
the casual visual character of the plaza,
paseo, alley, or rear parking area.
• An awning can soften rear and side
facades and provide a pleasant protected
space.
• The rear and side entry door design
should be compatible with the front
door. Special security glass (i.e. wire
imbedded) is allowed.
• Security lighting should be modest and
should focus on the side or rear entry
door.
• Selective use of tree planting, potted
plants, and other landscaping
complementary to the overall design
theme should be used to improve a side
and rear facade.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-56
Fg. 7.63
Appropriate storefront examples
c. Storefront Photographic Essay
The following photographic essay includes
photos of storefronts that would be appropriate
for the Village. While these photos provide a
variety of storefront styles, this essay is not
intended to be exhaustive. Creative use of
storefront components is encouraged.
VII-57
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Section View Fg. 1.2
Fg. 7.64
Appropriate storefront examples
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-58
Fg. 7.65
Building renovation and restoration
can enhance the Village’s character
Fg. 7.66
Every effort should be made to
preserve traditional storefront details
6. Building Additions and Renovation
Guidelines
a. Introduction
The renovation/restoration of older commercial
structures provides an excellent means of
maintaining and reinforcing the traditional
character of the Village. Renovation and
expansion not only increases property values
in the area but also serves as an inspiration to
other property owners and designers to make
similar efforts.
When an applicant proposes a renovation of
or addition to an existing structure, the work
should respect the original design character of
the structure. The appropriate design guidelines
in this section are to be implemented whenever
a structure is to be renovated or expanded. In
addition, renovation of all structures of historic
significance should follow The Secretary of
the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and
Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings,
published by the U.S. Department of the
Interior, National Park Service (available on the
web at: http://www.cr.nps.gov/hps/tps/tax/
rhb). When the City becomes a Certified Local
Government, the implementation procedures
should be applied as appropriate to new infill
development in the Village.
b. Preserve Traditional Features and
Decoration
Original materials, details, proportions, as well
as patterns of materials and openings should
be considered when any additions or building
renovations would affect the appearance of an
existing building’s exterior.
Many times during the remodeling of storefronts,
original decorative details are intact as visual
“leftovers” or simply covered up with previous
construction. If the building is to be refurbished,
these forgotten details should not be wasted. If
enough of them remain, they can be restored as
VII-59
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 1.1
Key Plan
Existing original facade
Existing “modernized” facade
Fg. 7.67
Restoration of original storefronts is
strongly encouraged
part of the original design. If only a few remain,
they can be incorporated as design features
in a new storefront. In either case, the design
of any improvements should evolve through
the remaining traditional details and create a
harmonious background that emphasizes the
improvements.
All existing historic decorations should be
preserved since they reinforce the Village’s
traditional character and adds a richness of
detail that is often irreplaceable at today’s
costs.
c. Removal of Elements Inconsistent with
Original Facade
Owners or shopkeepers alter buildings over time
in an effort to “keep up with changing times”
or to “update a tired image.” Unfortunately,
such changes often result in gradual but severe
erosion of the original character and cohesion
of the core area. Restoration of buildings that
have been substantially or carelessly altered is
strongly encouraged.
Existing building elements that are incompatible
with the original facade design of the building
should be removed. These include excessive use
of exterior embellishments and “modernized”
elements such as metal grilles or rusticated
materials.
d. Storefront Renovation
1) An original storefront with little or no
remodeling should be preserved and
repaired with as little alteration as possible.
2) Where only part of the original storefront
remains (limited remodeling has occurred),
the storefront should be repaired, maintaining
historic materials where possible, including
the replacement of extensively deteriorated
or missing parts with new parts based upon
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-60
Fg. 7.68
Windows are critical to establishing
the pattern of a traditional storefront
Fg. 7.69
Transom windows increase the
amount of natural light inside
surviving examples of transoms, bulkheads,
pilasters, signs, etc.
3) Where the original storefront is completely
missing (extensive remodeling has
occurred), the first priority is to reconstruct
the storefront based upon historical, pictorial
and physical documentation. If that is not
practical, the design of the new storefront
should be compatible with the size, scale,
proportion, material and color of the existing
structure.
e. Window Replacement
The impact of windows on the facade is
determined by the size, shape, pattern of
openings, spacing, and placement within
the facade. To retain the structure’s original
architectural balance and integrity, it is crucial
to consider these elements when altering or
reconstructing windows.
1) Wherever possible, the original window
openings should be retained. If the existing
ceiling has been lowered, the dropped
ceiling should be pulled back from the
original window.
2) If possible, the original windows and frames
should be saved and restored. Missing,
rotting or broken sash, frames, mullions
and muntins with similar material should be
replaced.
3) Where transom windows exist, every effort
should be made to retain this traditional
storefront feature. If the ceiling inside the
structure has been lowered, the ceiling
should be sloped up to meet the transom
so that light will penetrate the interior of the
building.
VII-61
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 1.1
Key Plan
Original Not acceptable -
aluminum casement
Original Not acceptable -
aluminum frame
with framed bulkhead
Not acceptable -
blocked-up with
stone veneer
Not acceptable -
blocked-up
Fg. 7.70
Window openings should be restored
to the original configuration and detail
Fg. 7.71
Traditional storefronts typically
employ slanted awnings
4) If the original window openings have been
altered, the openings to their original
configuration and detail should be restored.
Blocking or filling window openings that
contribute to the overall facade design
should be avoided.
5) When replacing windows, consideration
should be given to the original size and
shape detailing and framing materials.
Replacement windows should be the same
operating type and materials as the original
window.
f. Door Replacement
1) Original doors and door hardware should be
retained, repaired and refinished provided
they can comply with ADA requirements or
conform to the Historical Building Code.
2) If new replacement doors are necessary, they
should be compatible with the traditional
character and design of the structure.
g. Awnings
1) Original awning hardware should be used if
it is in working order or is repairable.
2) The traditional canvas, slanted awning is
most appropriate for older storefronts and
is encouraged over contemporary hooped
or box styles.
h. Painting
Painting can be one of the simplest and most
dramatic improvements that can be made to a
facade. It gives the facade a well-maintained
appearance and is essential to the long life of
many traditional materials.
1) All the facade materials to be painted
should be catalogued. Materials of different
properties may require different paints
or procedures. Consult a local expert for
advice.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-62
2) Any necessary repairs should be made
to surfaces before painting (e.g., replace
rotten wood, repoint masonry mortar joints,
remove rust from metal).
3) Each surface should be carefully prepared
according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
This will include scraping, sanding, and
thorough cleaning. This surface preparation
is an extremely important step toward a
good finish job.
4) Paint should be applied per the
manufacturer’s instructions. Paint only in
satisfactory weather and use a primer as a
first coat for better surface adhesion. Follow
with two coats of the final color.
i. Repair and Cleaning
1) Surface cleaning should be undertaken with
the gentlest means possible. Sandblasting
and other harsh cleaning methods that may
damage historic building materials is not
permitted.
2) Waterproofing and graffiti proofing sealers
should be used after cleaning and repair.
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Chula Vista
j. Seismic Retrofitting
Where structural improvements for seismic
retrofitting affect the building exterior, such
improvements should be done with care and
consideration for the impact on appearance of
the building. Where possible, such work should
be concealed. Where this is not possible, the
improvements should be planned to carefully
integrate into the existing building design.
Seismic improvements should receive the same
care and forethought as any other building
modification. An exterior building elevation may
be required with seismic retrofit submittals,
showing the location and appearance of all
such improvements. When retrofitting historic
buildings, refer to the Secretary of Interior
Standards.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-64
Fg. 7.72
Courtyards should include both
hardscape and softscape materials
Fg. 7.73
Landscaping is critical to creating a
pedestrian-friendly atmosphere
7. Landscape Guidelines
a. Landscape plans should consider the scale
and mass of a building and its relationship
to the scale of the street and neighboring
properties.
b. Emphasis should be placed on California and
Mediterranean landscaping. Indigenous,
ornamental planting, vines, flowering plants,
arbors, trellises and container planting are
encouraged.
c. Expansive horizontal or vertical surfaces
comprised of a single material can be
segmented or interrupted with vines or
foliage. Vines can be used to dramatize
a building’s architecture or soften hard
materials. Vines can also be used to enhance
or screen fences and trash enclosures.
d. Courtyards, gardens, and fountains are
very desirable in the Village. Landscaping
within courtyards should include a balance
of hardscape and softscape materials and
provide shaded seating areas.
e. Boxed and container plants in decorative
planters of ceramic, terra cotta, wood, or
stucco should be used to enhance public
areas in the Village.
f. Large planters may also be incorporated
into seating areas. Such planters should be
open to the earth below and be provided
with a permanent irrigation system.
g. All trees in paved areas should be provided
with “Deep Root” barriers automatic
irrigation and metal grates.
h. Freestanding planters may also be
incorporated into public spaces. Size, shape,
color, and texture should complement the
overall design theme. Such planters should
be provided with a permanent irrigation
system.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.74
Outdoor lighting can highlight
significant features
Fg. 7.75
Light fixtures should be located in
plazas and other activity areas
8. Lighting
a. Specialty lighting in trees near or within
outdoor patios and restaurants helps create
a festive atmosphere and encourages
nighttime use by pedestrians.
b. All exterior doors, aisles, passageways and
recesses should be equipped with a lighting
device providing a minimum maintained one
foot-candle of light at ground level during
hours of darkness. Vandal resistant covers
should protect lighting devices.
c. Decorative accent lighting and fixtures above
the minimum one foot-candle illumination
levels of surrounding parking lots should be
provided at vehicle driveways, entry throats,
pedestrian paths, plaza areas, and other
activity areas.
d. Lighting fixtures should be attractively
designed to complement the architecture of
the project.
e. Lighting should improve visual identification
of residences and businesses and create an
inviting atmosphere for passersby.
f. Lighting sources should be shielded, diffused
or indirect to avoid glare for pedestrians and
motorists.
g. Wall mounted lights should be used to the
greatest extent possible to minimize the total
number of freestanding light standards.
h. Lighting should encourage the use of open
spaces and plazas.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-66
Fg. 7.76
Parking lot design should address
possible vehicle-pedestrian conflicts
Fg. 7.77
Shade is an important feature of
parking areas
9. Parking and Circulation
a. Introduction
The following factors should be considered
in the design and development of off-street
parking in pedestrian-oriented areas:
• ingress and egress with consideration
to possible conflicts with vehicular and
pedestrian traffic;
• pedestrian and vehicular conflicts within
parking lots and structures;
• reinforcing the street edge and a pedestrian
environment;
• on-site circulation and service vehicle
zones;
• overall configuration and appearance of the
parking area;
• minimizing opportunities for crime and
undesirable activities through natural
surveillance, access control and activity
support;
• shading parking lots by means of canopy
trees and other landscaping; and
• creating a sense of spatial organization and
experiential meaning through the layout of
the design of parking lots and structures.
b. General Considerations
1) Shared parking is strongly encouraged
whenever practical.
2) Parking areas should be separated from
buildings by a landscaped strip. Conditions
where parking stalls directly abut buildings
should be avoided.
3) Lighting, landscaping, hardscape, fencing,
parking layout and pedestrian paths
should all assist drivers and pedestrians
in navigating through parking lots and
structures.
4) Bicycle parking should be provided at each
development and should be easily accessible
and integrated into the overall site design.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
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Fg. 7.78
Parking structures should be
integrated with commercial uses
Fg. 7.79
Features such as a trellis can accent
a pedestrian entrance
5) Parking structures below or above ground
level retail or commercial uses are
encouraged since they allow for pedestrian
activity along the street while providing
parking convenient to destinations within
the Village.
c. Access and Entries
1) Locate parking area entries on side streets
or alleys to minimize pedestrian/vehicular
conflicts along Third Avenue and F Street.
2) Parking lots and structures adjacent to a
public street should provide pedestrians
with a point of entry and clear and safe
access from the sidewalk to the entrance of
the building(s).
3) Pedestrian and vehicular entrances must
be clearly identified and easily accessible
to create a sense of arrival. The use
of enhanced paving, landscaping, and
special architectural features and details is
required.
4) Where possible, use alleys or side streets
for access to parking areas. The use of
alleys for parking access must be balanced
with other common uses of alleys, including
service, utilities, and loading and unloading
areas.
d. Parking Lot Lighting
Lighting for a parking lot or structures should
be evenly distributed and provide pedestrians
and drivers with adequate visibility at night.
e. Circulation
1) The layout of parking areas should be
designed so that pedestrians walk parallel
to moving cars.
2) Access by disabled persons should be
incorporated into the overall pedestrian
circulation system.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-68
Landscape planter is bounded on three
sides by parking space or parking aisle
Elevation of staggered wall
Elevation of planters/wall
Elevation of wall with breaks
Fg. 7.80
Preferred parking area landscaping
Fg. 7.81
Types of screening for parking areas
Fg. 7.82
Parking structures should
complement surrounding structures
f. Landscaping
1) Surface parking facilities should be
landscaped with the following objectives:
• maximize distribution of landscaping;
• promote compatibility and function as a
“good neighbor;” and,
• strive to achieve shade over 50 percent
of the asphalt area within five years from
time of installation.
2) Parking lots adjacent to a public side street
should be landscaped to soften the visual
impact of parked vehicles from the public
right-of-way. Screening should consist of
a combination of low walls (a maximum of
three feet high) and landscape materials at
the setback line.
3) A well thought-out selection and composition
of hardscape materials can help order space
and reinforce the relationship of the parking
lot to its surroundings and to the buildings
it serves. Entrance and exit areas, areas
that are the central focus of the parking lot
design, major axis and areas that act as
forecourts for entrances may be suitable
locations for special paving materials such
as brick or stamped concrete.
g. Structured Parking
1) Due to the more intense nature of
development in the Village, structured
parking which promotes compatibility, safety
and pedestrian activity is anticipated and
encouraged.
2) Where structured parking is provided, the
following design and operational features
should be considered to optimize public
safety:
• the design of parking structures should
permit maximum opportunities for
natural surveillance into the structure;
• the public realm begins where the stairs
end in a structural parking and should
be treated accordingly;
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
P
r
o
p
e
r
t
y

l
i
n
e
Retail
Fg. 7.83
Incorporate retail uses on the ground
floor of parking structures
• where possible, elevators and stairs
should be located on the perimeter
of parking structures with natural
surveillance from exterior public areas
via glass-back elevators and glass at
stairs and elevator lobbies;
• elevator lobbies and stairs in open
parking garages should be open to the
parking areas, except at roof levels
where glass or other visually penetrable
enclosures may be provided.
• elevator cabs should be provided with
glass-back cabs where those elements
are above grade;
• all parking structures should have lighting
in conformance with IESNA (Illuminating
Engineering Society of North America)
standards;
• interior walls of parking structures should
be painted a light color (e.g., white or
light blue) to improve illumination;
• if applicable, the parking structure should
be designed to integrate into existing or
proposed developments to allow direct
access from different levels;
• coordinated signs, color, or features
between developments should be used
for wayfinding purposes;
• signs should be posted to inform users
whether security escort service is
available;
• emergency buzzers and telephones
should be installed in easily accessible
places on each level, in elevators and in
stairwells; and
• directional arrows and signs indicating
exits, elevators, and emergency buzzers/
telephones should be visibly displayed
on walls.
3) Activities such as shops, offices or other
commercial space should be incorporated
along the ground level of structured parking
street frontage. In addition, parking
structures should provide landscaping
along blank walls on side streets and upper
levels.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-70
Fg. 7.84
Signs should accommodate
pedestrians
Fg. 7.85
Simple color schemes enhance a
sign’s readability
10. Signs
a. Introduction
In contrast to highway commercial areas,
pedestrian oriented commercial areas such
as the Village were designed to accommodate
shoppers and residents strolling along
sidewalks, and motorists driving at slower
speeds. Considerations such as size, utility,
location, lettering style, color and illumination
are very important in designing an attractive,
functional sign.
The guidelines that follow address these issues
and others, and are intended to help business
owners provide quality signs that add to and
support the character of the Village District.
They are not intended to supersede any existing
City sign ordinances. All signs must comply with
the regulations contained in the Chula Vista
Municipal Code unless as indicated within the
specific plan, in which case the specific plan will
take precedence.
b. General Guidelines
1) Color and Contrast
Color and contrast are the most important
aspects of visual communication and can be
used to catch the eye or to communicate ideas
or feelings. The following general guidelines
should be considered prior to developing signs
for any project.
a) Contrast is an important influence on
the legibility of signs. Light letters on a
dark background or dark letters on a light
background are most legible.
b) Limit the total number of colors used in any
one sign. Small accents of several colors may
make a sign unique and attractive, but the
competition between large areas of many
different colors decreases readability.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.86
Colors on buildings and signs should
be complementary
Fg. 7.87
High-density pre-formed foam material
can complement surrounding buildings
c) Bright day-glo (fluorescent) colors are
strongly discouraged. They are distracting
and do not blend well with other background
colors.
d) Sign colors should complement the colors
used on the structures and the project as a
whole.
2) Materials
a) The following materials are suitable for signs
in the Village:
• wood (carved, sandblasted, etched, and
properly sealed, primed and painted, or
stained);
• metal (formed, etched, cast, engraved,
and properly primed and painted
or factory coated to protect against
corrosion);
• high-density pre-formed foam or similar
material (New materials may be very
appropriate if properly designed in a
manner consistent with these standards
and painted or otherwise finished to
complement the architecture.); and
• custom neon tubing in the form of
graphics or lettering (may be incorporated
into several of the above permitted sign
types).
b) Sign materials should be compatible with
the design of the facade.
c) The selected materials need to contribute to
the legibility of the sign. For example, glossy
finishes are often difficult to read because
of glare and reflections.
d) Paper and cloth signs are appropriate for
interior temporary use only.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-72
Fg. 7.88
Backlit letter signs are encouraged
3) Sign Illumination
Illumination of a sign should be considered
carefully. Like color, illumination has
considerable value for visual communication.
a) First, consider if the sign needs to be
lighted at all. Lights in the window display
may be sufficient to identify the business.
Often, nearby streetlights provide ample
illumination of a sign after dark.
b) If the sign can be illuminated by an indirect
source of light, this is usually the best
arrangement because the sign will appear
to be better integrated with the building’s
architecture. Light fixtures attached to the
front of the structure cast light on the sign
and the face of the structure as well.
c) Individually illuminated letters should be
backlit. Signs comprised of individual letters
mounted directly on a structure can often
use a distinctive element of the structure’s
facade as a backdrop, thereby providing
a better integration of the sign with the
structure.
d) Whenever indirect lighting fixtures are used
(fluorescent or incandescent), care should
be taken to properly shield the light source
to prevent glare from spilling over into
residential areas and any public right-of-
way.
e) Backlit plastic box signs are prohibited.
c. Private Wayfinding
Good sign design can be critical to helping people
move easily through an unfamiliar environment.
Private signs throughout the Village should be
conspicuous, easy to read, and convey clear
messages. As a result, visitors will enjoy their
time in the Village and want to return.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.89
Make certain that signs are visible
from different angles
Fg. 7.90
A sign’s message should be brief
1) Sign Visibility
Signs should be free of any obstruction, such
as landscaping, when viewed from different
angles.
2) Sign Legibility
An effective sign should do more than attract
attention; it should communicate its message.
Usually, this is a question of the readability
of words and phrases. The most significant
influence on legibility is lettering.
a) Use a brief message whenever possible.
Fewer words help produce a more effective
sign. A sign with a brief, succinct message
is easier to read and looks more attractive.
Evaluate each word.
b) Avoid spacing letters and words too close
together. Crowding of letters, words or lines
will make any sign more difficult to read.
Conversely, over-spacing these elements
causes the viewer to read each item
individually, again obscuring the message.
As a general rule, letters should not occupy
more than 75% of the sign panel area.
c) Limit the number of lettering styles in order
to increase legibility. A general rule to follow
is to limit the number of different letter
types to no more than two for small signs
and three for large signs.
d) Use symbols and logos in the place of words
whenever appropriate. Pictographic images
will usually register more quickly in the
viewer’s mind than a written message.
e) Avoid hard-to-read, overly intricate typefaces
and symbols. Typefaces and symbols that
are hard to read reduce the sign’s ability to
communicate.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-74
Fg. 7.91
Intricate typefaces can cause
confusion and misunderstanding
Fg. 7.92
Directional signs should contrast
background and foreground colors
f) Avoid faddish or bizarre typefaces if they
are difficult to read. These typefaces may
be in vogue and look good today, but soon
may go out of style. The image conveyed by
the sign may quickly become that of a dated
and unfashionable business.
3) Business Directional Signs
a) Business directional signs should be provided
near vehicle and pedestrian entrances.
They should not obstruct pedestrian flow or
negatively impact sight lines at entrances.
b) Use consistent names for all buildings,
services and destinations.
c) Maps should correspond to the building
layout so, for example, up on the map is
straight ahead for the viewer. Provide
markers to indicate where the person is
currently located and identify areas by using
color and memorable graphics.
d) Number floors in relation to the building’s
main entry so that directories will clearly
designate which floors are above or below
grade.
e) Location of directional signs should not
encroach on the public right-of-way.
f) Business directional signs should be easily
read during the day and evening. Illumination
of some type may be necessary at night.
g) Contrast is important for effectiveness of
directional signs. A substantial contrast
should be provided between the color and
material of the background and the letters
or symbols to make it easier to read.
d. Wall Signs
1) Definition: A wall sign is any sign that is
attached or erected on the exterior wall of
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Permitted wall sign location
Fg. 7.93
Wall sign location
Fg. 7.94
Wall signs of consistent size and
placement establish facade rhythm
a building including the parapet, with the
display surface of the sign parallel to the
building wall, and which does not project
more than 12 inches from the building
or project above the height of the wall or
parapet.
2) Signs should be placed consistent with the
proportion and scale of the elements within
the structure’s facade. A particular sign
may fit well on a plain wall area, but might
overpower the finer scale and proportion of
a lower storefront. A sign that is appropriate
near an entry may look tiny and out of place
above the ground level.
3) Look at the facade of the structure. Are
there any architectural features or details
that suggest a location, size, or shape for
the sign? These elements could be bands or
frames of brickwork or stone, indentations
in the face material, gaps between columns,
or other permanent features. If these details
exist, use them to locate the sign.
4) Look at the facade of the structure in
relation to where adjacent businesses have
placed their signs. There may already be an
established pattern of sign locations. This
can establish visual continuity among the
storefronts, and at the same time provide
uniform sight lines for viewers. Alignment
makes all signs more readable at a glance
and is encouraged.
5) If aligning signs is not possible, look for
other features to determine placement of
the sign. Each sign may relate directly to
the store entrance in a similar fashion, or all
signs may be displayed within the windows.
Since the Village is a pedestrian-oriented
area, signs should relate to the sidewalk
instead of motorists. In this case, small
projecting signs or signs under awnings are
most appropriate.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-76
Fg. 7.95
Messages should be proportional and
located only on the valence flap
e. Awning Signs
1) Definition: An awning sign is a sign on or
attached to a temporary retractable shelter
that is supported from the exterior wall of a
building.
2) Sign copy should be centered on the awning
to achieve symmetry.
3) Message should be limited to the business
name and logo, sized to be proportional with
the awning, and located only on the fabric
valance flap of the awning.
4) When initially installed, awnings should be
provided with removable valances and end
panels to accommodate future changes in
sign copy. Painting cloth awnings in order to
change sign copy is prohibited.
5) Back-lit internally illuminated awnings are
strongly discouraged.
6) The shape, design, and color of fabric
awnings should be carefully designed to
coordinate with, and not dominate, the
architectural style of the building.
7) Where other fabric awnings are used on the
building, the design and color of the sign
awnings and all other awnings should be
coordinated.
f. Canopy Signs
1) Definition: A canopy sign is any sign attached
to the underside of a projecting canopy or
protruding over a sidewalk or right-of-way
2) Canopy signs provide pedestrian scale and
can enhance building fronts.
3) The bottom of the sign should maintain at
least eight feet pedestrian clearance from
the sidewalk level.
VII-77
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.96
Canopy signs are often used for
pedestrian-oriented uses
Fg. 7.97
Small projecting signs reinforce a
pedestrian-scale
3’ Max.
6” Min.
8


M
i
n
.
Fg. 7.98
Guidelines for projecting signs
g. Projecting Signs
1) The distance between projecting signs
should be at least 25 feet for maximum
visibility.
2) On a multi-storied building, the sign should
be suspended between the bottom of the
second story windowsills and the top of the
doors or windows of the first story. On a one-
story building, the top of the sign should be
in line with the lowest point of the roof.
3) The bottom of the sign should maintain at
least eight feet pedestrian clearance from
the sidewalk level.
4) The sign should be hung at a 90-degree
angle from the face of the building. It should
be pinned at least 6 inches away from the
wall for best visibility but should not project
beyond a vertical plane set 3 feet from the
facade.
5) Decorative iron and wood brackets that
support projecting signs are strongly
encouraged. The lines of the brackets should
harmonize with the shape of the sign.
6) To avoid damaging brick and stucco work,
brackets should be designed so that they
can be bolted into masonry joints whenever
possible.
h. Window Signs
1) Definition: A window sign is any sign in which
the name, logo, address, phone number, or
hours of operation are applied directly to
the window of a business or placed on a
sign hung inside the window.
2) Interior signs should be within 36 inches of
the window so as to be readable from the
exterior.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-78
Fg. 7.99
Gold leaf paint is recommended for
window signs
Fg. 7.100
Example of a figurative sign
3) Sign area should be less than 15% of the
total window area.
4) Window signs should be geared to the
pedestrian and be at eye level.
5) Window signs should be designed to be
pleasing and to aesthetically enhance
storefronts.
6) Letters applied to the glass may be vinyl or
painted. Glass-mounted graphic logos may
also be applied as long as they comply with
the 15% area limitation. White and gold leaf
paint is recommended.
i. Figurative Signs
Signs that advertise the occupant business
through the use of graphic or crafted symbols,
such as shoes, keys, glasses, books, etc.
are encouraged. Figurative signs may be
incorporated into any of the allowable sign types
identified previously.
j. Temporary Signs
Posting of handmade window signs is not
permitted. Refer to Chula Vista Municipal Code
19.60 for further regulations on temporary
signs.

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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
E. Urban Core District
1. Introduction
This section presents design guidelines for private sector projects in the Urban
Core district, which will serve as the primary business, commercial, and regional
center of Chula Vista. These guidelines focus specifically on accommodating mid-
and high-rise commercial and residential development while also developing
an active street life. Design guidelines for public areas will be considered in
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-80
Fg. 1.1
Key Plan
Fg. 7.101
Buildings should form a continuous
streetwall while upper floors step back
Fg. 7.102
Retail uses can promote a vibrant
street life
2. Design Objectives
a. Create a Comfortable Scale of Structures
A critical step in ensuring pedestrian scale in the
Urban Core district is by encouraging uniform
front façade heights that form a continuous
streetwall. Upper floors should step back from
the streetwall so that pedestrians feel enclosed
by the surrounding buildings but not confined.
b. Maintain Sunlight Exposure and Minimize
Wind on the Street Level
Building stepbacks allow sunlight to reach the
ground and prevent the building from deflecting
wind towards the street as well as helping
to create a pedestrian-scaled environment.
Such measures will allow pedestrians to feel
comfortable and therefore permit them to
spend more time on the street.
c. Distinguish Between Upper and Lower
Floors
Through use and design, the ground floor should
welcome the public. Retail, dining, or active
residential uses can help create a vibrant street
life while greater use of transparent materials
(windows) rather than solid materials (wall)
encourage pedestrians to glance at storefronts
and linger on the street. Upper floors are
more likely to contain residential or non-retail
commercial uses and contain less window
space.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Plaza area created in
the building’s setback
area
Majority of building wall
located on front property line
Fg. 7.103
Preferred building siting in the Urban
Core
3. Site Planning
a. Introduction
Siting involves a project’s relationship to the
property, the street, and adjacent buildings. In
the Urban Core, buildings should be sited in ways
that provide a comfortable and safe environment
for pedestrians while accommodating vehicles.
b. Building Siting
1) Most of the building “streetwall” should meet
the front setback lines, except for special
entry features, architectural articulation,
and plaza areas or other public spaces.
2) Setbacks should be dedicated to plazas that
focus on hardscape rather than landscaping
and should be of sufficient size to increase
function and accessibility.
3) Locate loading and storage facilities away
from the street and screen from public
view.
4) Walls and fences should be integrated with
the overall building design.
c. Street Orientation
1) Storefronts and major building entries should
orient to Broadway, H Street, courtyards, or
plazas, although minor side or rear entries
may be desirable.
2) Any building with more than 125 feet of
street frontage should have at least one
primary building entry.
3) All uses with street level, exterior exposure
should provide at least one direct pedestrian
entry from the street.
4) Any drop-off areas along Broadway, E Street
and H Street should be limited.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-82
Plaza
Street
S
t
r
e
e
t
S
t
r
e
e
t
Fg. 7.104
Parking lot entries should be located
along side streets or alleys
d. Parking Orientation
1) Parking lots should not be located along
the frontage of primary streets such as
Broadway and H Street.
2) When off-street parking in the rear is not
possible, parking should be screened from
view by landscaped berms and/or low
walls.
3) Locate rear parking lot and structure entries
on side streets or alleys in order to minimize
pedestrian/vehicular conflicts along
Broadway or H Street. Driveways should
be kept to the minimum number and width
required for the project.
4) Create wide, well-lit pedestrian walkways
from parking lots and structures to building
entries that utilize directional signs.
5) Access from side streets and alleys should
minimize impacts on surrounding residential
neighborhoods.
e. Refuse, Storage, and Equipment Areas
1) Trash storage must be fully enclosed and
incorporated within the main structures or
separate freestanding enclosures (CVMC
19.58.340). Where practical, storage
at each unit is preferred over common
enclosures. Trash storage cannot be placed
under stairways.
2) All trash and garbage bins should be
stored in an approved enclosure. Refuse
containers and service facilities should be
screened from view by solid masonry walls
with wood or metal doors. Use landscaping
(shrubs and vines) to screen walls and help
deter graffiti.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
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3) Trash enclosures should allow convenient
access for commercial tenants. Siting
service areas in a consolidated and
controlled environment is encouraged.
4) Trash enclosures should be located away
from residential uses to minimize nuisance
for the adjacent property owners. The
enclosure doors should not interfere with
landscaping, pedestrian, or vehicle path of
travel.
5) Trash enclosures should be architecturally
compatible with the project. Landscaping
should be incorporated into the design to
screen the enclosure from public view and
deter graffiti.
6) Refuse storage areas that are visible from
an upper story of adjacent structures
should provide an opaque or semi-opaque
horizontal cover/screen to reduce unsightly
views. The screening should be compatible
with the design of adjacent development.
7) All mechanical equipment, whether mounted
on the roof, side of a structure, or on the
ground, shall be screened from view (CVMC
15.16.030). Utility meters and equipment
should be placed in locations that are not
exposed to view from the street or be suitably
screened. All screening devices are to be
compatible with the architecture, material,
and color of adjacent structures.
f. Site Amenities
Site amenities help establish the identity of
a commercial area and provide comfort and
interest to its users. Individual site amenities
within a commercial setting should have
common features, such as color, material, and
design to provide a cohesive environment and a
more identifiable character.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-84
1) Plazas and Courtyards
a) Plazas and courtyards within commercial
developments over one acre are strongly
encouraged.
b) Physical access should be provided from
retail shops, restaurants, offices and other
pedestrian activity generating uses to
plazas.
c) A majority of the gross area of the plaza
should have access to sunlight for the
duration of daylight hours.
d) Shade trees or other elements providing
relief from the sun should be incorporated
within plazas.
e) Entries to the plaza and storefront entries
within the plaza should be well lighted.
f) Architecture, landscaping elements, and
public art should be incorporated into the
plaza design.
g) Plazas and courtyards should include a focal
element of sculpture and/or water feature,
simple plants and simple sitting niches.
h) Seating should be provided in plazas. Where
applicable, plaza users should be provided
with a choice between active and passive
seating.
i) Courtyards should be designed to provide
both visibility and separation from the street,
parking areas, or drive aisles.
j) Common open space should be provided
in large, meaningful areas and should not
be fragmented or consist of “left over” land.
Large areas can be imaginatively developed
and economically maintained.
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2) Site Furniture
a) Paving and furniture should complement
public streetscape elements when
appropriate.
b) Site furnishings should not create
pedestrian/vehicular conflicts.
c) Bicycle racks should be selected that
are durable and consistent with other
streetscape furnishings.
d) Based on their performance, “loop
rack” and “ribbon bar” bicycle racks are
recommended.
e) The design of newspaper boxes should be
consolidated into one rack. Racks should be
attractive on all sides.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-86
Stepback
Balconies
Fg. 7.105
Retail on lower floors and residences/
offices above is encouraged
Fg. 7.106
Required stepbacks in the Urban
Core
4. Architectural Guidelines
a. Introduction
New development in the Urban Core district should
carefully blend two different yet compatible
qualities: high allowable building heights and a
bustling pedestrian street life. These elements
can be combined by encouraging a continuous
street wall with ground floor retail and other
active uses while upper floors of mid- and high-
rise buildings step back to allow sunlight to
reach the street below.
b. Building Height, Form, and Mass
1) Multiple-use structures, with retail on
lower floors and residential or non-retail
commercial on upper floors, are encouraged,
particularly along Broadway and H Street.
2) Where buildings with towers have frontages
on multiple streets, the towers are
encouraged to orient towards the primary
street such as Broadway and H Street.
3) Horizontal building stepbacks are
encouraged to provide building articulation,
terrace space and other elements to soften
building facades. If a mid-rise or high-
rise building is located on a corner site,
increased stepbacks from the street wall
are encouraged along both streets. Please
also refer to Chapter VI – Land Use and
Development Regulations for regulations
regarding required minimum building
stepbacks for specific subdistricts within the
Specific Plan.
4) Building heights should enhance public
views, and provide adjacent sites with
maximum sun and ventilation and protection
from prevailing winds.
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Fg. 7.107
Desirable building massing has both
horizontal and vertical articulation
Fg. 7.108
Smaller architectural elements on
large buildings add pedestrian scale
Fg. 7.109
Design projects to facilitate social
support and effective surveillance
c. Facades
1) The physical design of buildings facades
should vary at least every 200 linear feet
(half block). This can be achieved through
such techniques as:
• division into multiple buildings,
• break or articulation of the façade,
• significant change in facade design,
• placement of window and door openings,
or
• position of awnings and canopies.
2) Bay windows and balconies that provide
usable and accessible outdoor space for
residential uses are strongly encouraged
and may project beyond building setback
lines.
3) Awnings and overhangs should be used
in conjunction with street trees to provide
shade for pedestrians.
4) The predominant difference between upper
story openings and street level storefront
openings (windows and doors) should
be maintained. Typically, there is a much
greater window area at the storefront level
while upper stories have smaller window
openings.
5) Residential buildings should have entrances
from the street to facilitate pedestrian
activity and increase security through more
“eyes on the street.”
d. Building Materials and Colors
1) Building Materials
Building materials will incorporate two aspects:
color and texture. If the building’s exterior
design is complicated with many “ins and outs”
(extensions of wall façade, etc.), columns, and
design features, the wall texture should be
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-88
Fg. 7.110
Masonry is appropriate for buildings
in the Urban Core
Fg. 7.111
Subtle/muted colors complement
larger and plainer buildings
simple and subdued. However, if the building
design is simple, a finely textured material, such
as patterned masonry, should be used to enrich
the building’s overall character.
The following lists suggest those materials that
are “encouraged” and “discouraged” for use in
the Urban Core:
a) Approved Exterior Materials
• Masonry, including granite, marble,
brick, terra cotta, and cast stone
• Glass, which must be transparent on
ground floors
• Architectural metals, including metal
panel systems, metal sheets with
expressed seams, and cut, stamped or
cast, ornamental metal panels.
• New or used face-brick
• Copper
• Painted Metal
• Wrought Iron
b) Discouraged Exterior Materials
• Imitation stone (fiberglass or plastic)
• Textured, treated, decorative concrete
• “Lumpy” stucco
• Rough sawn or "natural" (unfinished)
wood
• Used brick with no fired face (salvaged
from interior walls)
• Imitation wood siding
• Plastic panels
2) Exterior Color
a) The type of color depends on the size of
the building and level of detail. Larger and
plainer buildings should have subtle/muted
colors while smaller buildings or those
with elaborate detailing should have more
intense colors.
b) Stronger colors should emphasize
architectural details and entrances.
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Fg. 7.112
Visible utility and communication
devices are discouraged
Fg. 7.113
Plazas should provide ample seating in
shade and sun and landmark features
e. Roofs and Upper-Story Details
1) Additional sunlight should be brought into
large developments through the use of
atriums and skylights.
2) Any office and residential tower over
seven stories should have articulated and
varied roof shapes to add interest to the
architecture of the Urban Core and serve as
a landmark.
3) Slope roof shapes on one-story commercial
buildings, gable-end roofs, single pitch (shed)
roofs, false mansard roofs and curving roofs
are inconsistent with the character of the
Urban Core.
4) Access to roofs should be restricted to
interior access only.
5) Roof-mounted utility and communication
devices equipment should be screened by
structural features that are an integral part
of the building’s architectural design.
f. Plazas
Plazas allow additional sunlight to be brought
into large developments. Plazas should be
located at transit focus areas and other
areas where large assemblages of people are
expected, such as the Chula Vista Center.
1) Plazas should contain a visual and audible
feature such as a sculpture, fountain, or a
display pond that attracts pedestrians and
serves as a landmark.
2) Furniture and fixtures should be selected
with maintenance consideration in mind.
Ample seating in both shaded and sunny
locations should be provided in the plaza
areas.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-90
Fg. 7.114
Tree grates are important in high-
traffic areas
g. Site Furniture
1) Site furniture, including benches, bollards,
trash receptacles, bicycle racks, newspaper
racks, and kiosks should complement
existing development.
2) Site furniture should maintain a clear
passage for pedestrians and avoid
obstructing walkways and sidewalks.
3) Furnishings should be placed to eliminate
clutter and any potential pedestrian/
vehicular conflict.
4) Kiosks/directories should be provided
adjacent to vehicular and pedestrian
entrances and pedestrian nodes. Kiosk
siting should maximize visibility and minimize
traffic hazards or obstructing views.
5) Tree grates should be utilized at passages
to provide a continuous walking surface.
Tree grates should be a minimum of 4 feet
in width and a minimum of 36 square feet
for private areas and a minimum of 6 feet in
width for public areas.
6) Tree guards should be provided to protect
trees in high activity areas. Tree guard design
should be consistent with the adjacent
development and should coordinate with
street furnishings located either onsite or
within the public right-of-way.
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Fg. 7.115
Buildings at prominent corners
should have prominent entrances
Fg. 7.116
Awnings should nestle into the space
created by a structural bay
5. Storefront Design
a. Introduction
Ground floors have typically been designed to
be what is now referred to as a “traditional”
storefront and sales floor. Upper floors commonly
were used for office space, residential units,
or storage. If retail uses are not appropriate
for a particular building, ground floors should
contain other active uses such as a health club,
community center, or residential common areas.
The ground floor should have transparent and
open facades and avoid blank walls wherever
possible.
b. Storefront Composition
1) Entries and Doorways
a) The main entry to buildings should be
emphasized through flanked columns,
decorative fixtures, a recessed entryway
within a larger arched or cased decorative
opening, or a portico (formal porch).
b) Buildings situated at a corner along
Broadway and H Street should provide a
prominent corner entrance to street level
shops or lobby space.
2) Awnings and Canopies
a) Awnings or arcades should be provided
along south and west facing buildings to
enhance the pedestrian experience.
b) Where the facade is divided into distinct
structural bays, awnings should be placed
between the vertical elements rather than
overlapping them. The awning design
should respond to the scale, proportion,
and rhythm created by the structural bay
elements and should “nestle” into the space
created by the structural bay.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-92
Fg. 7.117
Balconies and planters embellish a
storefront
Fg. 7.118
A storefront should contain a high
percentage of clear glass
c) Awnings should have a single color or two-
color stripes. Lettering and trim utilizing
other colors is permitted, but will be
considered as a sign area.
d) Frames and supports should be painted or
coated to prevent corroding.
3) Storefront Accessories and Other Details
a) Recommended storefront details include
the following items:
• light fixtures, wall mounted or hung with
decorative metal brackets;
• decorative scuppers, catches and
downspouts;
• balconies, bay windows, rails, finials,
corbels, plaques, etc.;
• flag or banner pole brackets;
• fire sprinkler standpipe enclosures and
hose bib covers, preferably of brass;
and
• permanent, fixed security grates or
grilles in front of windows are strongly
discouraged. If security grilles are
necessary, they should be placed inside
the building, behind the window display
area.
b) Door and Window Design
• Doors to retail shops should contain a
high percentage of glass in order to view
the retail contents. A minimum of a 50%
glass area is required.
• Use of clear glass (at least 88% light
transmission) on the first floor is
required.
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Fg. 7.119
Potted plants can enhance a
streetscape
Fg. 7.120
Trees can provide needed shade for
outdoor seating areas
6. Landscape Guidelines
Landscaping within the Urban Core should be
different than typical suburban commercial
and residential settings. These guidelines
emphasize the use of potted plants, trees, and
landscaping within the structure.
a. Landscape plans should consider the scale
and mass of a building and its relationship
to the scale of the street and neighboring
properties.
b. Emphasis should be placed on California and
Mediterranean landscaping. Indigenous,
ornamental planting, vines, flowering plants,
arbors, trellises, and container planting is
encouraged.
c. Large planters may also be incorporated
into seating areas. Such planters should be
open to the earth below and be provided
with a permanent irrigation system.
d. All trees in paved areas should be provided
with “Deep Root” barriers, automatic
irrigation, and metal grates and have
adequate size, soil mix, and soil ventilation.
e. Freestanding planters may also be
incorporated into public spaces. Size, shape,
color, and texture should complement the
overall design theme. Such planters should
be provided with a permanent irrigation
system.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-94
7. Onsite Lighting
a. Lighting fixtures within developments
should be attractively designed to
complement the architecture of the project
and surrounding development and improve
visual identification of residences and
businesses.
b. All exterior doors, aisles, passageways and
recesses should be equipped with a lighting
device providing a minimum maintained one
foot-candle of light at ground level during
hours of darkness. Vandal resistant covers
should protect lighting devices.
c. Decorative accent lighting and fixtures above
the minimum one foot-candle illumination
levels of surrounding parking lots should be
provided at vehicle driveways, entry throats,
pedestrian paths, plaza areas, and other
activity areas.
d. Lighting sources should be shielded, diffused
or indirect to avoid glare for pedestrians and
motorists.
e. On each project site, all lighting fixtures
should be from the same family of fixtures
with respect to design, materials, color,
fixture, and color of light.
f. When placing lighting fixtures and luminaries,
consideration should be given to the extent
of landscape growth affects the function of
lighting. Landscaping such as trees and
shrubs should be placed and maintained so
that it does not obscure or deteriorate on-
site illumination.
g. Neon and other specialized lighting
effects that enhance the attractiveness
of commercial streets, restaurants, and
entertainment venues for pedestrian traffic
is encouraged within the Urban Core.
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Fg. 7.121
Lighting effects can make a
commercial area pedestrian-friendly
h. Decorative up lighting that enhances
landscape features and building architecture
is encouraged as long as it does not compete
with street lighting and signs.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-96
Fg. 7.122
Parking facility design should
strengthen the street edge
8. Parking and Circulation
a. Introduction
The following factors should be considered
in the design and development of off-street
parking in pedestrian-oriented areas:
• ingress and egress with consideration
to possible conflicts with vehicular and
pedestrian traffic;
• pedestrian and vehicular conflicts within a
parking lot or structure;
• reinforcing the street edge and a pedestrian
environment;
• on-site circulation and service vehicle
zones;
• overall configuration and appearance of the
parking area
• minimizing opportunities for crime and
undesirable activities through natural
surveillance, access control, and activities;
• shading parking lots by means of canopy
trees and other landscaping; and
• creating a sense of spatial organization and
experiential meaning through the layout of
the parking facility.
b. General Considerations
1) Shared parking between adjacent
businesses and/or developments is strongly
encouraged whenever practical.
2) Parking areas should be separated from
buildings by a landscaped strip. Conditions
where parking stalls directly abut buildings
should be avoided.
3) Lighting, landscaping, hardscape, fencing,
parking layout and pedestrian paths
should all assist drivers and pedestrians in
navigating through parking areas.
4) Bicycle parking should be provided at each
development and should be easily accessible
and integrated into the overall site design.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
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Fg. 7.123
Special architectural features should
help identify vehicular entrances
5) Parking structures below or above ground
level retail or commercial uses are
encouraged since they allow for pedestrian
activity along the street while providing
parking convenient to destinations within
the Urban Core.
c. Access and Entries
1) Locate parking lot and structure entries on
side streets or alleys to minimize pedestrian/
vehicular conflicts along Broadway and H
Street. If this is not possible, use patterned
concrete or pavers to differentiate the
primary site entry from the sidewalk. Effects
on adjacent residential neighborhoods also
need to be considered in site access and
entries.
2) Parking lots and structures adjacent to a
public street should provide pedestrians
with a point of entry and clear and safe
access from the sidewalk to the entrance of
the building(s).
3) Pedestrian and vehicular entrances must
be clearly identified and easily accessible
to create a sense of arrival. The use
of enhanced paving, landscaping, and
special architectural features and details is
required.
4) Where possible, use alleys or side streets for
access to parking areas. However, effects
on adjacent residential neighborhoods
must be considered. The use of alleys for
parking access must be balanced with other
common uses of alleys, including service,
utilities, and loading and unloading areas.
d. Lighting
Lighting for parking lots and structures should
be evenly distributed and should provide
pedestrians and drivers with adequate visibility
at night.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-98
Accent trees
delineate aisles
Canopy shade trees
located throughout
parking lot
Low hedge or
screen wall
Landscape
buffer
Accent
trees and
enhanced
paving
define
entry
Property line/
wall with vines
Fg. 7.124
Landscaping provides visual relief
within parking facilities
Fg. 7.125
Preferred landscaping within a
parking lot
e. Circulation
1) Separate vehicular and pedestrian
circulation systems should be provided
whenever feasible. The layout of parking
areas should be designed so that pedestrians
walk parallel to moving cars.
2) Pedestrian linkages between adjoining
compatible uses should be emphasized.
Parking lot and structure designs should
include walkways and planting that help
direct pedestrians comfortably and safely to
their destinations.
3) Access by disabled persons should be
incorporated into the overall pedestrian
circulation system.
f. Landscaping
1) Parking facilities should be landscaped with
the following objectives in mind:
• visually break up large paved areas with
landscaping;
• maximize distribution of landscaping;
• promote compatibility and function as a
“good neighbor;”
• consider the use of trees planted at
regular distances as a grove; and,
• strive to achieve 50% shade of the
asphalt area within five years from time
of installation.
2) Parking lots adjacent to a public street
should be landscaped to soften the visual
impact of parked vehicles from the public
right-of-way. Screening should consist of
a combination of low walls (a maximum of
three feet high) and landscape materials at
the setback line.
3) Use of a trellis situated above a wall or fence
can visually maintain the street wall and
improve the pedestrian environment along
the street.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
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Fg. 7.126
Open lobbies and stairs promote
safety in parking structures
4) A well thought-out selection and composition
of hardscape materials can help order space
and reinforce the relationship of the parking
lot to its surroundings and to the buildings it
serves. Entrances, exits, and areas that act
as forecourts for entrances may be suitable
locations for special paving materials such
as brick or stamped concrete.
g. Structured Parking
1) Due to the more intense nature of
development in the Urban Core, structured
parking which promotes compatibility, safety
and pedestrian activity is encouraged.
2) Where structured parking is provided, the
following design and operational features
should be considered to optimize public
safety:
• The design of parking structures should
permit maximum opportunities for
natural surveillance into the structure;
• Where possible, elevators and stairs
should be located on the perimeter
of parking structures with natural
surveillance from exterior public areas
via glass-back elevators and glass at
stairs and elevator lobbies;
• Elevator lobbies and stairs in open
parking garages should be open to the
parking areas, except at roof levels
where glass or other visually penetrable
enclosures may be provided.
• Elevator cabs should be provided with
glass-back cabs where those elements
are above grade;
• All parking structures should have lighting
in conformance with IESNA (Illuminating
Engineering Society of North America)
standards;
• Interior walls of parking structures should
be painted a light color (e.g., white or
light blue) to improve illumination;
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-100
Parking Structure
Fg. 7.127
Development should wrap the garage
to maintain positive street frontage
• The parking structure should be
designed to integrate into existing or
proposed developments to allow direct
access from different levels;
• Coordinated signs, color, or features
between developments should be used
for wayfinding purposes.
• Signs should be posted to inform users
whether security escort service is
available;
• Emergency buzzers and telephones
should be installed in easily accessible
places on each level, in elevators and in
stairwells; and
• Directional arrows and signs indicating
exits, elevators, and emergency buzzers/
telephones should be visibly displayed
(painted) on walls.
3) Activities such as shops, offices or other
commercial space should be incorporated
along the ground level of structured parking
street frontage. In addition, parking
structures should provide landscaping
along blank walls on side streets and upper
levels.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
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Fg. 7.128
This highly effective sign uses a light
background with dark lettering
Fg. 7.129
External fixtures are an effective
method for illuminating signs
9. Signs
a. Introduction
Design, color, materials, and placement
are all important in creating signs that are
architecturally attractive and integrated into the
overall site design. Signs that are compatible
with the surroundings and which effectively
communicate a message promote a quality
visual environment.
The guidelines that follow address these issues
and others, and are intended to help business
owners provide quality signs that add to and
support the character of the Urban Core District.
They are not intended to supersede any existing
City sign ordinances. All signs must comply with
the regulations contained in the Chula Vista
Municipal Code unless as indicated within the
specific plan, in which case the specific plan will
take precedence.
b. General Design Guidelines
Good signs communicate their message well, are
easily seen by people, and relate harmoniously
to the building they are placed on or near. The
following guidelines give criteria for creating
well-designed signs.
1) Sign color should be compatible with building
colors. A light background matching the
building with dark lettering is best visually.
While no more than two primary colors
should be used on a sign, a third color can
be used for accent or shadow detail.
2) Signs should be consistent with the
proportion and scale of building elements
within the façade. The placement of signs
provides visual clues to business location
and affects the design integrity of the entire
building.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-102
Fg. 7.130
Private signs should guide people
through an unfamiliar environment
3) Ground level signs should be smaller than
those on higher levels. Pedestrian-oriented
signs should be smaller than automobile
oriented signs.
4) There are two methods of illuminating signs:
internal with the light source inside the sign
and external with an outside light directed at
the sign. Internal illumination is permitted
on channel letters only.
5) Signs must be lighted with continuous light
sources.
6) Whenever indirect lighting fixtures are used
(fluorescent or incandescent), care should
be taken to properly shield the light source
to prevent glare from spilling over into
residential areas and any public right-of-
way.
7) Paper and cloth signs are appropriate for
interior temporary use only.
8) Backlit plastic box signs are prohibited.
c. Onsite Wayfinding
Good sign design can be critical to helping people
move easily through an unfamiliar environment.
Private signs throughout the Urban Core should
be conspicuous, easy to read, and convey clear
messages. Signs should be located so as not to
block the pedestrian realm.
1) Sign Visibility
Signs should be free of any obstruction, such
as landscaping, when viewed from different
angles.
2) Sign Legibility
An effective sign should do more than attract
attention; it should communicate its message.
Usually, this is a question of the readability
of words and phrases. The most significant
influence on legibility is lettering.
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Fg. 7.131
Limiting the number of lettering
styles increases legibility
a) Use a brief message whenever possible.
Fewer words help produce a more effective
sign. A sign with a brief, succinct message
is easier to read and looks more attractive.
Evaluate each word.
b) Avoid spacing letters and words too close
together. Crowding of letters, words or lines
will make any sign more difficult to read.
Conversely, over-spacing these elements
causes the viewer to read each item
individually, again obscuring the message.
As a general rule, letters should not occupy
more than 75% of the sign panel area.
c) Limit the number of lettering styles in order
to increase legibility. A general rule to follow
is to limit the number of different letter
types to no more than two for small signs
and three for large signs.
d) Use symbols and logos in the place of words
whenever appropriate. Pictographic images
will usually register more quickly in the
viewer’s mind than a written message.
e) Avoid hard-to-read, overly intricate typefaces
and symbols. Typefaces and symbols that
are hard to read reduce the sign’s ability to
communicate.
f) Avoid faddish or bizarre typefaces if they
are difficult to read. These typefaces may
be in vogue and look good today, but soon
may go out of style. The image conveyed by
the sign may quickly become that of a dated
and unfashionable business.
3) Business Directional Signs
a) Business directional signs should be provided
near vehicle and pedestrian entrances.
They should not obstruct pedestrian flow or
negatively impact sight lines at entrances.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-104
Fg. 7.132
Directional signs should be easy to
locate
Fg. 7.133
Wall signs should be located on
prominent architectural features
b) Use consistent names for all buildings,
services and destinations.
c) Maps should correspond to the building
layout so, for example, up on the map is
straight ahead for the viewer. Provide
markers to indicate where the person is
currently located and identify areas by using
color and memorable graphics.
d) Number floors in relation to the building’s
main entry so that directories clearly
designate which floors are above or below
grade.
e) Location of directional signs should not
encroach on the public right-of-way.
f) Business directional signs should be easily
read during the day and evening. Illumination
of some type may be necessary at night.
g) Contrast is important for effectiveness of
directional signs. A substantial contrast
should be provided between the color and
material of the background and the letters
or symbols to make it easier to read.
d. Wall Signs
1) Definition: A wall sign is any sign that is
attached or erected on the exterior wall of
a building including the parapet, with the
display surface of the sign parallel to the
building wall, and which does not project
more than 12 inches from the building
or project above the height of the wall or
parapet.
2) Signs should be placed consistent with the
proportion and scale of the elements within
the structure’s facade.
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Fg. 7.134
Attached light fixtures are preferred
for illuminating awnings
Fg. 7.135
Example of a marquee sign
Fg. 7.136
An example of a projecting sign
3) Bands or frames of brickwork or stone,
indentations in the face material, gaps
between columns, or other permanent
features should be used to locate the sign.
4) If applicable, follow an already established
pattern of sign locations.
5) If aligning signs is not possible, look for
other features to determine placement of
the sign. Each sign may relate directly to
the store entrance in a similar fashion, or all
signs may be displayed within the windows.
e. Awning Signs
1) Definition: An awning sign is a sign on or
attached to a temporary retractable shelter
that is supported from the exterior wall of
a building. Marquee signs are affixed to a
permanent projection extending from the
building or beyond the wall of a building.
2) Sign copy should be centered on the awning
to achieve symmetry.
3) Painting cloth awnings in order to change
sign copy is strongly discouraged.
4) Back-lit internally illuminated awnings are
strongly discouraged.
5) The shape, design, and color of fabric
awnings should be carefully designed to
coordinate with, and not dominate, the
architectural style of the building.
6) Where other fabric awnings are used on the
building, the design and color of the sign
awnings and all other awnings should be
coordinated.
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VII-106
Fg. 7.137
Figurative signs promote a festive
atmosphere
f. Projecting Signs
1) The distance between projecting signs
should be at least 25 feet for maximum
visibility.
2) The bottom of the sign should maintain at
least 15 feet pedestrian clearance from the
sidewalk level.
3) The sign should be hung at a 90 degree
angle from the face of the building. It should
be pinned at least 1 foot away from the wall
for best visibility but should not project
beyond a vertical plane set 6 feet from the
facade.
4) To avoid damaging masonry, brackets should
be designed so that they can be bolted into
joints whenever possible.
g. Figurative Signs
Signs that advertise the occupant business
through the use of graphic or crafted symbols,
such as shoes, keys, glasses, books, etc.
are encouraged. Figurative signs may be
incorporated into any of the allowable sign types
identified previously.
h. Temporary Signs
Posting of handmade window signs is not
permitted. Refer to Chula Vista Municipal Code
19.60 for further regulations on temporary
signs.
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F. Corridors District
1. Introduction
In contrast with the Urban Core District and the Village District, the Corridors
District contains four separate and distinct areas along Broadway and Third
Avenue that are more oriented towards automobile than pedestrian traffic. The
district is characterized by low-rise structures with retail, service, office, and
residential uses lining the peripheral ends of Broadway and Third Avenue. The
guidelines in this chapter focus on developing a cohesive blend of high quality
new commercial and residential development. Design guidelines for the public
realm are contained in Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-108
Fg. 7.138
Development in the Corridors District
should provide variety in architecture
Fg. 7.139
Different forms of transportation
should be able to function together
2. Design Principles
a. Promote Sound Architectural Practices
Commercial and residential development
along major streets often includes repetitive
architecture and favors automobiles over
pedestrian and bicycle traffic. These standards
encourage architectural quality, variety in
building form, facades, and features, and
development that accommodates different
forms of transportation.
b. Ensure Compatibility Between Different
Uses
New development in the Corridors District
should consider the area’s scale and character
and demonstrate sensitivity to surrounding
uses. Such efforts should include limiting
building massing, providing project amenities
such as landscaping, seating, and plazas, and
screening parking and equipment areas.
c. Encourage Safe and Logical Parking and
Circulation
The north and south segments of Broadway
and southern end of Third Avenue serve as
critical transportation corridors for automobiles,
public transit, bicycles, and pedestrians. Site
access, parking, and circulation within private
developments should be logically organized
and ensure that all forms of transportation are
able to coexist safely.
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Fg. 7.140
Discouraged layout- development
lacks connections to adjacent areas
Fg. 7.141
Encouraged layout - development
connects to adjacent uses
3. Site Planning
a. Introduction
Site planning is an important facet of the
look and feel of the Corridors District. The
guidelines encourage new development that
maintains a healthy interaction with the major
street, whether Broadway or Third Avenue,
and surrounding uses by minimizing harmful
external effects and providing strong transit,
automobile, and pedestrian connections.
b. Site Character
1) Natural amenities unique to the site such
as mature trees should be preserved and
incorporated into development proposals.
2) Structures that are distinctive because of
their age, cultural significance, or unique
architectural style should be preserved and
incorporated into development proposals.
3) Design public and private outdoor spaces to
provide sunny and shaded areas.
c. Compatibility with Adjacent Uses
1) Link compatible residential and non-
residential uses by utilizing access roads,
walkways, common landscape areas,
building orientation, and unfenced property
lines.
2) Additional setback areas and upper floor
setbacks are encouraged when commercial
and residential areas are adjacent to each
other.
3) When commercial buildings back up to
common open spaces or residential projects,
the rear setback area should be landscaped
and should appear to be functionally and/or
visually shared open space.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-110
Fg. 1.1
Key Plan
Fg. 7.142
Loading, trash, and storage areas
should be located at the rear or side
Fg. 7.143
Corner buildings should feature
angled entrances and plazas
4) Avoid public access to the rear of commercial
structures when adjacent to potentially
incompatible uses.
5) Building orientation and landscaping
commercial buildings should minimize a
direct line of sight into adjacent residential
private open space.
6) Loading areas, access and circulation
driveways, trash and storage areas, and
rooftop equipment should be located at the
rear or side of buildings and screened from
public view.
7) Employ landscaping to screen parking lots
from adjacent residential uses and streets.
d. Building Siting
1) Any building with more than 125 feet of
street frontage should have at least one
primary building entry.
2) Use paving materials that differentiate the
setback area from the sidewalk.
3) Corner buildings should have a strong tie
to the front setback lines of each street.
Angled building corners or open plazas are
encouraged at corner locations.
4) When designing large commercial centers,
create inward-focused arrangement of
buildings to create a “village” feeling and
encourage multiple shopping stops. Plazas
and pedestrian areas are encouraged within
shopping centers.
5) Provide a “Main Street” for larger centers
with pedestrian connections to the major
street and parallel parking that promotes
pedestrian activity.
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Residential Residential
Fg. 7.144
Cluster buildings to develop a
“village” atmosphere
Fg. 7.145
Plazas can be used for casual seating
and outdoor dining
6) Anchor stores should be sited in the middle
of the shopping center to increase visibility
for other stores.
7) When possible, freestanding buildings
should be sited along street frontages to
help screen parking areas.
8) Recognize the importance of spaces
between buildings as “outdoor rooms” on
the site. These spaces should be utilized as
open space.
9) Small open space areas should be grouped
into larger, prominent public spaces.
Hardscape and vegetation should be
combined to create plazas that people can
use for rest, congregating, recreation, and
dining.
11) On sites with multiple structures, buildings
should be linked visually and physically.
These links can be accomplished through
architecture and site planning, such
as trellises, colonnades or other open
structures combined with landscape and
walkway systems).
12) Decorative walls and/or enhanced
landscaping should be used at main
entrances. Special paving, raised medians
and gateway structures should also be
considered.
13) Developments should provide safe
pedestrian passage between building
entrances and bus stops.
14) Siting service areas in a consolidated and
controlled environment is encouraged.
Avoid service areas that are too expansive,
underutilized, and require heavy landscape
screening.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-112
Fg. 7.146
Service areas should be compact and
organized
Fg. 7.147
Landscaping and a trellis feature can
create an attractive trash enclosure
e. Refuse, Storage, and Equipment Areas
1) All trash and garbage bins should be stored
in an approved enclosure.
2) Trash storage must be fully enclosed and
incorporated within the main structures or
separate freestanding enclosures (CVMC
19.58.340). Where practical, storage
at each unit is preferred over common
enclosures. Trash storage cannot be placed
under stairways.
3) Trash enclosures should allow convenient
access for commercial tenants. Siting
service areas in a consolidated and
controlled environment is encouraged.
4) Trash enclosures should be located away
from residential uses to minimize nuisance
for the adjacent property owners. The
enclosure doors should not interfere with
landscaping, pedestrian, or vehicle path of
travel.
5) Trash enclosures should be architecturally
compatible with the project. Landscaping
should be incorporated into the design to
screen the enclosure from public view and
deter graffiti.
6) Refuse storage areas that are visible from
an upper story of adjacent structures
should provide an opaque or semi-opaque
horizontal cover/screen to reduce unsightly
views. The screening should be compatible
with the design of adjacent development.
7) Refuse containers and service facilities
should be screened from view by solid
masonry walls with wood or metal doors.
Use landscaping (shrubs and vines) to
screen walls and help deter graffiti.
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Fg. 7.148
Plazas should include a focal element
such as a fountain or sculpture
8) All mechanical equipment, whether mounted
on the roof, side of a structure, or on the
ground, shall be screened from view (CVMC
15.16.030). Utility meters and equipment
should be placed in locations that are not
exposed to view from the street or be suitably
screened. All screening devices are to be
compatible with the architecture, material,
and color of adjacent structures.
f. Site Amenities
Site amenities help establish the identity of
a commercial area and provide comfort and
interest to its users. Individual site amenities
within a commercial setting should have
common features, such as color, material, and
design to provide a cohesive environment and a
more identifiable character.
1) Plazas and Courtyards
a) Plazas and courtyards within commercial
developments over two acres are strongly
encouraged.
b) Physical access should be provided from
retail shops, restaurants, offices and other
pedestrian activity generating uses to
plazas.
c) A majority of the gross area of the plaza
should have access to sunlight for the
duration of daylight hours.
d) Shade trees or other elements providing
relief from the sun should be incorporated
within plazas.
e) Entries to the plaza and storefront entries
within the plaza should be well lighted.
f) Architecture, landscaping elements, and
public art should be incorporated into the
plaza design.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-114
Fg. 7.149
“Ribbon bar” is one of the
recommended types of bicycle racks
g) Plazas and courtyards should include a focal
element of sculpture and/or water feature,
simple plants and simple sitting niches.
h) Seating should be provided in plazas. Where
applicable, plaza users should be provided
with a choice between active and passive
seating.
i) Courtyards should be designed to provide
both visibility and separation from the street,
parking areas, or drive aisles.
2) Site Furniture
a) Paving and furniture should complement
public streetscape elements when
appropriate.
b) Site furnishings should not create
pedestrian/vehicular conflicts.
c) Bicycle racks should be selected that
are durable and consistent with other
streetscape furnishings.
d) Based on their performance, “loop
rack” and “ribbon bar” bicycle racks are
recommended.
e) The design of newspaper boxes should be
consolidated into one rack. Racks should be
attractive on all sides.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
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Fg. 7.150
Varying building heights and
setbacks create visual interest
Fg. 7.151
Plazas serve as an effective
transition from the public right-of-way
4. Architectural Guidelines
a. Introduction
There are no specific architectural styles
required for commercial buildings. However,
innovative and imaginative architecture is
encouraged. The guidelines seek quality and
complete design that will contribute to the
overall quality of built environment.
b. Building Height, Form and Mass
1) Building heights and setbacks should vary
from adjacent or adjoining buildings to
ensure diversity in building type.
2) One-story buildings along Broadway and
Third Avenue should be placed close to the
sidewalk to reinforce a pedestrian scale.
Two-story buildings should be located
farther away from the sidewalk and use a
plaza as a transition from the right of way to
the building.
3) Building heights should enhance public
views and provide adjacent sites with
maximum sun and ventilation and protection
from prevailing winds.
c. Facades
1) The physical design of facades should utilize
such techniques as:
• Break or articulation of the façade;
• Vertical and horizontal offsets to
minimize large blank walls and reduce
building bulk;
• Significant change in facade design;
• Placement of window and door openings;
and
• Position of awnings and canopies.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-116
Fg. 7.152
Building entries should be easily
identified
2) Design features must be consistent on all
elevations of a structure. Side and rear
elevations should not be minimized because
they are oriented away from public view.
3) Primary building entries should be easily
identified and provide a prominent sense
of entry. The use of projections, columns,
towers, change in roofline, entry lobbies,
or other design elements are strongly
encouraged.
4) The size and location of doors and windows
should relate to the scale and proportions of
the overall structure.
5) Clear windows should be provided at
storefront locations.
d. Roofs and Upper Story Details
1) Roofs should be given design considerations
and treatment equal to that of the rest of
the building exteriors.
2) Roofs and rooflines should be continuous
in design throughout a commercial
development. Full roofs are strongly
encouraged due to proximity to residential
areas.
3) Roofline elements should be developed
along all elevations.
4) No roofline ridge should run unbroken for
more than 75 feet. Vertical or horizontal
articulation is required.
5) Slopes of roofs should range between 4:12
and 6:12. Slopes greater than 6:12 are
discouraged, except on certain architectural
elements and towers.
6) Radical roof pitches that create overly
prominent or out-of-character buildings
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
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Vented
screen wall
Equip.
Sloping wood trellis
Tile roof
Fg. 7.153
An appealing roof design should be
used to screen mechanical equipment
Fg. 7.154
Vertical elements such as a tower are
encouraged
such as A-frames, geodesic domes, or
chalet-style buildings are not permitted.
7) Roofs with large overhangs featuring open
rafters/tails are encouraged.
8) The visible portion of sloped roofs should
be sheathed with a roofing material
complementary to the architectural style
of the building and other surrounding
buildings.
9) Access to roofs should be restricted to
interior access only.
10) Screening for roof-mounted mechanical
equipment should be an integral part of the
building’s architectural design.
11) Building vertical focal elements are
encouraged. Towers, spires, or domes
become landmarks and serve as focal/
orientation points for the community.
e. Walls and Fences
1) Walls and fences should be kept as low as
possible while performing their functional
purpose to avoid the appearance of being a
“fortress”.
2) Colors, materials and appearance of
walls and fences should be compatible
with surrounding development. Opaque
materials, such as plywood boards, and
sheet metal, are not permitted. Also, chain
link fences are not permitted.
3) Perimeter walls should be constructed
of decorative masonry block or similar
material. The use of chain link fencing is not
permitted.
4) Landscaping, particularly vines, should be
used to soften otherwise blank wall surfaces
and to help reduce graffiti.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-118
Fg. 1.1
Key Plan
Fg. 7.155
Vines enhance otherwise blank walls
Fg. 7.156
Natural materials such as brick add to
the quality of franchise buildings
5) Walls should be offset every 50 feet and
architecturally designed to reduce monotony.
Landscape pockets along the wall should be
provided at regular intervals.
f. Building Materials and Colors
1) Exterior materials, textures and colors
should compliment the architectural style
or theme of a building.
2) Colors and materials should be durable and
weather resistant.
3) The use of natural stone is encouraged.
High quality man-made material may be
permitted.
4) Buildings with strong facade articulation
should contain wall texture that is simple
and subdued. If the building design is
simple, a finely textured material, such as
patterned masonry, should be used to enrich
the building’s overall character.
5) Building colors should be predominately
neutral colors, off-white, cream, or light
pastels.
6) Accent colors may be used to impart a
festive quality to the buildings, especially in
commercial areas.
g. Franchise/Corporate
The scale, design character, and materials of
franchise/corporate architecture should be
consistent with adjacent buildings. Natural
materials, such as brick, stone, and copper,
should be used where applicable
1) Color and Lighting
Choice of color(s) for a franchise/corporate
building is critical since they may be
inappropriate in certain environments. The
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
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Fg. 7.157
Use of corporate logos, instead of
bright or intense colors, is encouraged
standards below should be considered when
addressing appropriate color(s) and lighting:
a) Use colors that complement colors found
on adjacent buildings.
b) Franchise/corporate colors should be
consistent with the architectural style or
period of the building.
c) Bright or intense colors are prohibited, unless
used on appropriate architectural styles
and reserved for more refined detailing and
transient features.
d) The use of symbols and logos can be utilized
in place of bright or intense corporate
colors.
e) Finish materials with natural colors, such
as brick, stone, and copper, should be used
where applicable.
f) Lighting of logos should be compatible with
the primary building and respect adjacent
buildings. Bright and intense lighting is
prohibited.
g) Neon outlining should be consistent with the
architectural style or period of the building
and should be reserved for detailing and
transient features. The use of bright and
intense neon outlining of windows is strongly
discouraged.
h. Security
1) If security grilles are necessary, they should
be placed inside the building behind the
window display area.
2) Electronic surveillance equipment or
alarm hardware should be as invisible and
unobtrusive as possible.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-120
Fg. 1.1
Key Plan
Fg. 7.158
Lighting should satisfy functional and
decorative needs
3) The use of scissor grilles is strongly
discouraged since they communicate a
message of high crime and cannot be
integrated visually into the overall design of
a building or storefront.
4) Lighting should be designed to satisfy both
functional and decorative needs. All security
lighting should be designed as part of an
overall lighting plan rather than as single
stand-alone elements.
5) Safety behind buildings should be ensured
through use of:
• Adequate security lighting for parking
areas and pedestrian ways;
• Limited access (walls, fences, gates,
shrubs);
• Signs;
• Introduction of activities (e.g., rear
entrances for commercial activities) that
increase surveillance;
• Surveillance through windows or with
cameras;
• Ongoing maintenance of storage areas
and alleys.
6) Lighting, particularly at all building
entrances, should be adequate but not
exceedingly bright. Light fixtures should
serve as an attractive element in isolation.
7) Storefront lighting should complement the
architectural style of the building while
providing illumination of building facades
and entrances.
8) Any window signs should be so placed as
to provide a clear and unobstructed view of
the store interior from the sidewalk.
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Fg. 7.159
Landscaping can soften and frame
structures
Fg. 7.160
Existing mature trees should be
integrated into new development
5. Landscape Guidelines
a. Standard Design Concepts
Landscape areas are used to frame and
soften structures, to define site functions, to
enhance the quality of the environment, and to
screen undesirable views. Landscaping should
express the three dimensions of the project and
should continue patterns of landscaping in the
surrounding area.
1) Emphasis should be placed on California
and Mediterranean landscapes and
gardens. Indigenous, ornamental planting,
vines, flowering plants, arbors, trellises and
container planting is encouraged.
2) Existing mature trees should be preserved
and incorporated into landscape plans.
3) Landscaped areas should generally
incorporate planting utilizing a three tiered
system: (1) grasses and ground covers, (2)
shrubs and vines, and (3) trees. All areas
not covered by structures, service yards,
walkways, driveways, and parking spaces
should be landscaped, consistent with the
following guidelines:
Trees
• 20% 36-inch box
• 30% 24-inch box
• 50% 15-gallon
Groundcover
• 100% coverage within 1 year
Shrubs and Vines
• 100% 5 & 15 gallon
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-122
Fg. 7.161
Specimen trees should be used at
major focal points
4) The following design concepts should be
utilized in all project design:
• Specimen trees (36-inch box or larger)
used in groupings and rows at major
focal points, such as project entries and
pedestrian gathering areas;
• Use of flowering vines on walls and
arbors where appropriate;
• Use of planting to create shadow and
patterns against walls.
5) New development should look established
as quickly as possible. Planting new trees
that are older, better developed, and
properly grown is preferred to planting small,
underdeveloped, and juvenile planting
stock.
6) Trees should be placed as follows:
• A minimum of 8 feet between the center
of trees and the edge of the driveway,
6 feet from water meter, gas meter, and
sewer laterals.
• A minimum of 25 feet between the center
of trees and the point of intersection of
driveways and streets or walkways.
• A minimum of 15 feet between the
center of the trees or large shrubs to
utility poles/street lights.
• A minimum of 8 feet between the center
of trees or large shrubs and fire hydrants,
fire department sprinkler, and standpipe
connections.
• No species of tree or large shrub should
be planted under overhead lines or over
underground utilities if plant growth
will interfere with the installation or
maintenance of these utilities.
• In addition to trees, other plant
materials should be spaced so that they
do not interfere with the lighting of the
premises or restrict access to emergency
apparatus such as fire hydrants or fire
alarms boxes.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
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Fg.7.162
Climbing vines on structures are
encouraged
Fg. 7.163
Landscaping can contribute to the
overall appearance of a building
• Plant spacing should also ensure
unobstructed access for vehicular and
pedestrians in addition to providing
appropriate lines of site at any
intersection.
7) All new trees should be double staked and
secured with a rubber or plastic strip, or
other approved commercial tie material.
Wire ties should not be used.
8) Use of vines and climbing plants on buildings,
trellises, and privately owned perimeter
walls is encouraged.
9) Landscaping should be in scale with
adjacent buildings and be of appropriate
size at maturity to accomplish its intended
goals.
10) Landscaping should work with the buildings
and surroundings to make a positive
contribution to the aesthetics and function
of both the specific site and the area.
11) Landscaping should be protected from
vehicular and pedestrian encroachment by
raised planting surfaces. Concrete mow
strips separating turf and shrub areas
should be provided.
12) Landscaping around the entire base of
buildings is encouraged to soften the edge
between parking lot and the structure. This
should be accented at entrances to provide
focus.
13) One tree should be planted for every six
parking spaces.
b. Irrigation
1) Permanent and automatic landscape
irrigation systems should be provided for all
landscape material.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-124
Fg. 7.164
Groundcover and trees prevent
extensive erosion on steep slopes
Fg. 7.165
Trees protect pedestrian and
landscaping
2) The landscape irrigation system should be
designed to prevent run-off and overspray.
3) All irrigation systems should be designed to
minimize vandalism.
4) Deep root irrigation is required for all trees
whose top of root crown is higher than any
adjacent paved areas. A separate bubbler
head to each tree is recommended.
5) Reclaimed water irrigation systems should
be clearly identified and separated from
potable water irrigation systems.
c. Tree Grates/Guards
1) Tree grates should occur along the edges
of internal streets and in plazas where a
continuous walking surface is needed.
2) Narrow openings should radiate from the
center. Grates sizes should be a minimum
of 4 feet in width and a minimum of 36 feet
for private areas and a minimum of 6 feet
in width for public areas. Knockouts must
be provided to enlarge inside diameter for
supporting a larger tree trunk as the tree
grows.
3) Tree guards should extend vertically from
tree grates, and serve to protect trees in
highly active areas. Tree guards should be
narrow, painted in a similar color, and relate
to other site furnishings. Tree guards should
be attached to the tree grate and welds
should not be visible.
d. Pots and Planters
1) Planters and pots should be located where
pedestrian flow will not be obstructed.
Consider placing pots in locations where
deep building recesses exist, where access
is discouraged, to provide definition to
spaces, and adjacent to blank walls.
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Fg. 7.166
Planters should complement the
overall site architecture
2) Group similar sized planters in clusters to
enrich streetscapes and plazas.
3) Planter materials should be durable and
have natural earth tones that compliment
site architecture. Materials should consist
of cast stone, masonry, or stucco materials.
4) Planters should be at least three feet in
diameter.
5) Planters should be simple in form; round
and square types are recommended.
6) Large planters may also be incorporated
into seating areas. Such planters should be
open to the earth below and be provided
with a permanent irrigation system.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-126
Fg. 7.167
Minimize light glare onto an adjoining
property with fixture type and location
Fg. 7.168
Lighting can highlight amenities such
as large trees
6. Lighting
a. The type and location of lighting should
minimize direct glare onto adjoining
properties. Lighting should be shielded to
confine all direct rays within the property.
b. Site lighting should not exceed more than 5
foot-candles of illumination with 50 feet of a
property used as or zoned residential.
c. Lighting should be designed to satisfy
function as well as contribute to overall
design quality.
d. Light fixtures and structural supports should
be architecturally compatible with the theme
of the development.
e. Wall mounted lights should be utilized to the
greatest extent possible to minimize the total
number of freestanding light standards.
f. Wall mounted lighting should not extend
above the height of the wall or parapet to
which they are mounted.
g. Lighting should be used to accent on-site
public art, specimen trees, and architectural
features.
h. Accent lighting, when provided, should
compliment exterior color and materials.
i. Lighting should be provided in a relatively
even pattern with ground level foot-candle
illumination levels not varying by more than
four to eight footcandles.
j. Security lighting should be designed as part
of a comprehensive lighting plan.
k. Vehicle entrances, driveways, parking
and service areas, pedestrian entrances,
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Fg. 7.169
Light fixtures should have pedestrian
scale
walkways, and activity areas should have a
sufficient level of lighting to provide security
and safety. A minimum of 1 foot-candle
should be provided.
l. Lighting should improve visual identification
of residences and businesses.
m. Parking lot lighting fixtures should not
exceed 35 feet in height. When within
50 feet of residentially zoned properties,
fixtures should not exceed 20 feet.
n. Light standards within parking lots should
be designed with raised bases to protect
them from damage by vehicles.
o. Pedestrian-scaled lighting for sidewalk and
street illumination is encouraged.
p. Lighting should not be animated.
q. Overhead service wires or exposed conduit
should be avoided.
r. Lighting fixtures with exposed bulbs are
prohibited.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-128
Fg. 7.170
Shared parking and access
agreements are encouraged
7. Parking and Circulation Guidelines
a. Introduction
Properly functioning parking areas are beneficial
to property owners, tenants, and customers
and they contribute to the design success of
a facility. Parking lots need to allow customers
and deliveries to reach the site, circulate
through the parking lot, and exit the site easily.
The following guidelines should be incorporated
into the design of commercial projects in the
Corridors District.
b. General Considerations
1) Commercial development should incorporate
internal parking to minimize the negative
impact on the street.
2) Avoid placing parking lots along Broadway
and Third Avenue so that the development
maintains a defined street edge.
3) Parking areas that accommodate a
significant number of vehicles should be
divided into a series of connected smaller
lots. Landscaping and offsetting portions of
the lot are effective in reducing the visual
impact of larger parking areas.
4) Shared parking between adjacent
businesses and/or developments is strongly
encouraged.
5) When possible, non-residential parking lots
should be designed and located contiguous
to each other so that vehicles can travel
from one private parking lot to the other
(reciprocal access) without having to enter
major streets.
6) Parking lots should be designed with a clear
hierarchy of circulation: major access drives
with no parking; major circulation drives
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Enhanced paving provides a sense of
arrival into a parking area
with little or no parking; and then parking
aisles for direct access to parking spaces.
7) Parking areas should be separated from
buildings by a landscaped strip. Conditions
where parking stalls directly abut buildings
should never be permitted.
8) Lighting, landscaping, hardscape, fencing,
parking layout and pedestrian paths should
all contribute to the strength and clarity of
the parking lot.
9) Bicycle parking should be provided at each
development and should be easily accessible
and integrated into the overall site design.
c. Access and Entries
1) Locate parking lot entries on side streets
to minimize pedestrian/vehicular conflicts
along Broadway and Third Avenue.
However, effects on adjacent residential
neighborhoods must be considered.
2) Parking lots adjacent to a public street
should provide pedestrians with a point of
entry and clear and safe access from the
sidewalk on Broadway, Third Avenue, or side
street to the entrance of the building(s).
3) Pedestrian and vehicular entrances must
be clearly identified and easily accessible
to create a sense of arrival. The use
of enhanced paving, landscaping, and
special architectural features and details is
encouraged.
4) Developments should have shared entries
when the lot is less than 75 feet wide.
5) Where possible, use alleys or side streets
for access to parking areas. The use of
alleys for parking access must be balanced
with other common uses of alleys, including
service, utilities, and loading and unloading
areas.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-130
Fg. 7.172
Pedestrian access to building
entrances should be clearly defined
d. Lighting
1) Parking lots should utilize pedestrian-scaled
rather than high mast light fixtures.
2) Lighting systems should be designed for two
levels, one during normal operations hours
and another reduced intensity level during
late non-operational hours (for security
purposes).
3) Lighting for a parking lot should be evenly
distributed and provide pedestrians and
drivers with adequate visibility.
e. Circulation
1) Separate vehicular and pedestrian
circulation systems should be provided
whenever feasible. Design parking areas
so that pedestrians walk parallel to moving
cars in parking aisles to minimize the need
for the pedestrian to cross parking aisles
and landscape islands to reach building
entries.
2) Clearly defined pedestrian access should
be provided from parking areas to primary
building entrances.
3) All commercial projects should connect
onsite pedestrian circulation system to
offsite public sidewalks.
4) Access by disabled persons should be
incorporated into the overall pedestrian
circulation system.
5) Decorative paving treatments should be
incorporated into parking lot design, driveway
entries, and pedestrian crosswalks.
6) Screen walls or landscaping should not
be located where they block the sight
lines of drivers entering, leaving or driving
throughout the site.
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Fg. 7.173
Landscaping provides needed shade
in parking areas
Fg. 7.174
Decorative pavers improve the
appearance of parking areas
Fg. 7.175
Loading zones should integrate into
surrounding development
f. Landscaping
1) Parking lots adjacent to Broadway, Third
Avenue, or a major side street should be
landscaped to soften the visual impact of
parked vehicles from the public right-of-way.
Screening could consist of a combination of
low walls (a maximum of three feet high) and
landscape materials at the setback line.
2) Parking lots should include landscaping
that accents the importance of driveways
from the street, frames the major circulation
aisles, and highlights pedestrian pathways.
3) Provide one regularly spaced tree for every
six parking spaces to provide shade and
avoid long rows of parked cars.
4) Provide continuous landscape planting
strips or triangles between every row of
parking and large planting islands at the
ends of a row.
5) The use of stamped concrete, stone, brick
or granite pavers, exposed aggregate,
or colored concrete should also be used
to minimize the negative impact of large
expanses of black asphalt pavement.
g. Loading and Delivery
1) Loading and unloading zones should be
located to minimize interference with traffic
flow.
2) Loading and unloading zones should
provide adequate space for maneuvering
into and out of a loading position. These
areas should be designed to integrate with
the entire development.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-132
Fg. 7.176
Oversized signs that project over the
roof area are not allowed
8. Signs
a. Introduction
These design guidelines are intended to ensure
that the Corridors District contains quality signs
that communicate their message in a clear
fashion and integrate into the surrounding area.
Unlike the Village District, signs along Broadway
should be directed towards vehicles rather than
pedestrians.
The guidelines that follow address these issues
and others, and are intended to help business
owners provide quality signs that add to and
support the character of the Corridors District.
They are not intended to supersede any existing
City sign ordinances. All signs must comply with
the regulations contained in the Chula Vista
Municipal Code unless as indicated within the
specific plan, in which case the specific plan will
take precedence.
b. General Design Guidelines
1) Consider the need for signs and their
appropriate locations early in the design
process; and
2) The location and size of signs on any building
should be proportioned to the scale and
relate to the architecture of that particular
structure.
3) Oversized and out-of-scale signs are not
permitted.
4) Sign colors and materials should be selected
to contribute to the sign’s legibility.
5) Excessive use of colors is discouraged.
6) Placement
a) Signs should not project above the edge of
the rooflines.
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Painted signs should not cover
existing architectural elements
b) Signs used for business identification on
the primary business frontage should be
placed near the main business entrance
in a location that does not cover doors,
windows, or architectural details.
7) Materials
a) Routing, carving or sandblasting the surface
of wooden signs can obtain the effect of
raised letters.
b) Different applications of metal on signs
include: applying raised letters, on a metal
band, or applying paint and lettering.
Galvanized or baked enamel finish should
be used to avoid rusting.
c) Sign materials should be compatible with
the building facade upon which they are
placed.
d) Painted signs are encouraged, but should
not be painted over existing architectural
elements
e) The selected materials should contribute to
the legibility of the sign. For example, glossy
finishes are often difficult to read because
of glare and reflections.
f) Precast letters (e.g. molded plastic or brass)
applied to a building surface can be an
effective signing alternative.
8) Color
a) Colors should relate to and complement the
materials or paint scheme of the buildings,
including accenting highlights and trim
colors. The number of colors on any sign
should be limited to three. This heightens
readability (visibility), especially when one
color is a dark hue, the second a medium
hue, and the third a light accent color.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-134
Fg. 7.178
Easy to read, simple typefaces and
symbols are encouraged
Fg. 7.179
Lettering on signs should be kept
simple to increase legibility
Fg. 7.180
Backlighting of signs is preferred
b) Contrast is an important influence on
the legibility of signs. Light letters on a
dark background or dark letters on a light
background are most legible.
c) Fluorescent colors should not be used.
9) Sign Legibility
a) An effective sign should be legible. The most
significant influence on legibility is lettering
style.
b) Lettering styles used on signs should be
highly legible. It is in the best interest of the
business establishment to have signs read
clearly and attractively to the passer-by.
c) Limit the number of lettering styles in order
to increase legibility. A general rule to follow
is to limit the number of different letter
styles to no more than two for small signs
and three for larger signs.
d) Avoid spacing letters and words too close
together. Crowding of letters, words or lines
will make any sign more difficult to read.
Conversely, overspacing these elements
causes the viewer to read each item
individually, again obscuring the message.
e) Use symbols and logos in the place of words
whenever appropriate. These images will
usually register more quickly in the viewer’s
mind than a written message.
10) Sign Illumination
a) Signs should have the capacity of being lit
externally for evening visibility.
b) Individually illuminated letters, either
internally illuminated or back lighted solid
letters (reverse channel), are a preferred
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Fg. 7.181
Choose light fixtures that are
compatible with the building facade
Fg. 7.182
Wall signs in a shopping center should
be located in a consistent place
alternative to internally illuminated signs.
Avoid illuminating an entire sign.
c) Indirect external illumination fixtures should
complement the surface of the sign.
d) Whenever external lighting fixtures are used,
care should be taken to properly shield the
light source to prevent glare from spilling
over into residential areas and any public
right-of-way.
e) Backlit plastic box signs are prohibited.
c. Wayfinding
1) Placement of on-site kiosks and electronic
bulletin boards should be obvious. Directories
should be provided near the vehicular and
pedestrian entrances of commercial centers
to assist visitors in orienting themselves.
2) Information contained on the signs should
be legible. Directories should be easily
readable during day and night.
3) Contrast is important for the effectiveness of
on-site directional and informational signs.
Light letters on a dark background are most
legible.
4) Electronic bulletin boards are not
permitted.
5) Kiosks may serve as information booths and/
or shelter for small vendors. Kiosks should
be consistent with surrounding buildings
and other streetscape furnishings.
d. Wall Signs
Wall signs are attached parallel to or painted on
a wall surface. The following guidelines apply to
wall signs:
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-136
Fg. 7.183
Freestanding/monument signs
should be surrounded by landscaping
Fg. 7.184
Pole or pylon signs, such as the one
above, are not permitted
1) Wall signs should not project from the
attached surface more than required for
construction purposes and, in no case, more
than 6 inches.
2) Wall signs should be applied horizontally
directly above the storefront.
3) When a building contains two or more
businesses, wall signs should complement
one another in color and shape and be
located in the same position over the
storefronts.
4) Wall signs should be centered above
the store or building entrance within an
architecturally established area or unbroken
area of the building facade.
5) A wall sign should be located where
architectural features or details suggest
a location, size or shape for the sign. The
best location for a wall sign is generally a
band or blank area above the first floor of a
building.
e. Freestanding and Monument Signs
A freestanding sign is any sign permanently
attached to the ground and which does not have
a building as the primary structural support.
Monument signs are freestanding low-profile
signs where the sign width is greater than the
sign height..
1) Freestanding and monument signs should
be located away from the public right-
of-way where they are not obstructed by
landscaping and can be easily viewed by
pedestrians and motorists.
2) Freestanding and monument signs are
required to be located in a landscaped
planter away from a driveway or other vehicle
access point.
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Fg. 7.185
Window signs should be limited to the
business name and brief messages
3) Freestanding and monument signs should
be placed perpendicular to the street.
4) Freestanding and monument signs should
be on ground. Pole or pylon signs are not
permitted.
5) Signs should provide solid architectural
bases and should complement the
architectural elements of the development
it serves.
6) Avoid placing more than 8 items of text or
graphics on a single sign.
f. Window Signs
Window signs are located within a window area
of a business. Window signs may be consist
of permanent materials affixed to a window,
or text and graphics painted directly onto the
window surface. The following guidelines apply
to window signs:
1) Window signs should not exceed 20 percent
of the window area, and only one window
sign per frontage is allowed.
2) Lighted signs, flashing signs or any other
sign not applied directly to a windowpane
are not permitted.
3) The text or sign copy of a window sign should
be limited to the business name and brief
messages.
g. Temporary Signs
Posting of handmade window signs is not
permitted. Refer to Chula Vista Municipal Code
19.60 for further regulations on temporary
signs.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-138
h. Figurative Signs
Signs that advertise the occupant business
through the use of graphic or crafted symbols,
such as shoes, keys, glasses, books, etc.
are encouraged. Figurative signs may be
incorporated into any of the previously identified
allowable sign types.
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G. Special Guidelines
1. Introduction
From a design perspective, hotels and motels and mixed-use projects are two of
the more challenging commercial development types in the Chula Vista Urban
Core. Sections on these two specialized project types focus on site organization
and building design. In addition, multi-family residential design guidelines for
stand alone residential projects are provided to supplement the Village District
and Urban Core District design guidelines.
Basic design principles and tools for designing and building sustainably in a
mixed-use development market are also presented and are strongly encouraged
for all project types. The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
(LEED) Rating System is the “green” standard for buildings in the United States.
Consult a LEED Accredited Professional for design assistance.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-140
Fg. 7.186
Hotel and motel facades should be
located along the primary street
2. Hotels and Motels
a. Description
Due to their location near Interstate 5, hotels
and motels provide visitors with a strong first
impression of Chula Vista and therefore deserve
special attention. They are also quasi-residential
uses and should be designed and sited to
minimize the effect of noise from Interstate 5
and major roads. The scale of and activities
associated with hotels and motels often make
them problematic neighbors for adjacent
residential properties. In addition, hotel and
motel architecture is often thematic, which
presents a strong temptation to exaggerate
the design of the building front and to neglect
side and rear facades. However, all sides of a
building should be stylistically consistent.
b. Site Organization
1) The primary presence along the major
street frontage should be the building and
driveway approach, not the parking lot.
2) Some short-term parking spaces should be
provided near the office for check-ins.
3) Delivery and loading areas should be
screened to minimize impact on sensitive
uses. Loading and unloading areas should
be located in the rear.
4) Recreational facilities such as swimming
pools should be designed to offer privacy to
facility users. They should not be exposed
to public streets to function as advertising.
5) Avoid locating driveway, garage ramps,
or loading and service areas where they
interfere with the flow of pedestrian
movement or impact the privacy of guest
rooms.
6) Utilize parking lots and open spaces on the
site to help buffer the hotel or motel from
any adjacent incompatible/sensitive uses.
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Fg. 7.187
Masonry or natural stone are the
preferred building materials
c. Building Design
1) All sides of a building should be architecturally
consistent.
2) At least 25% of the total exterior surface
area of the hotel or motel building should
be surfaced in masonry or natural stone.
3) Masonry or stone should be applied to
logical places on each of the building’s
facades, and should begin and end at
logical breaks related to the structure of the
building. A single, one-story high, horizontal
“banding” of masonry or stone is strongly
discouraged.
4) The remainder of the exterior may be
surfaced in stucco, water-managed Exterior
Insulation and Finish Systems (EIFS), or
integrally-dyed decorative concrete or
ceramic masonry units. Metal or vinyl siding
is prohibited.
5) Significant departures from standardized
architectural “themes” intended to market
or brand a hotel or motel building, such as
Swiss chalets or castles, is prohibited.
6) Public or semi-public spaces (lobbies,
restaurants, meeting rooms, and banquet-
facilities) sited at ground level adjacent
to a pedestrian walkway or a major street
should use glass and transparent materials
between the height of three feet (3’) and
eight feet (8’) above the walkway or street
grade.
7) Noise attenuation techniques should be
included in the design of buildings near
major noise generators (e.g., major streets
and I-5 freeway). Techniques may include:
double pane glass, berms or lowering the
grade of the subject building below the
roadway elevation.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-142
Fg. 7.188
Designs for open space should
encourage activity
8) The scale of buildings should transition
to adjacent existing developments not
anticipated to redevelop pursuant to the
Specific Plan.
9) Walkway, stairway and balcony railings
and other similar details should be visually
substantial and stylistically consistent with
the basic building design.
10) Mechanical equipment of all types, including
swimming pool equipment, should be
located to minimize impacts on adjacent
uses. Air conditioning units should not be
visible from public streets.
11) Exterior corridors and stairwells on multi-
level buildings are strongly discouraged and
should not be located adjacent to residential
uses.
12) Guest rooms should be accessible from
hallways within hotels over two stories.
Avoid room entrances directly adjacent to
parking lots or exterior walkways.
13) Roof terraces and gardens augment open
space. Their design and location should
encourage human occupation and use.
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Residential
structure
Residential
parking and
circulation
Gate
Commercial
structure
Common
open space
Commercial
parking
Residential
structure
Residential
access
Parking
access
Parking and
service access
Fg. 7.189
Example of a vertical mixed-use
project
Fg. 7.190
Conceptual layout for a small
horizontal mixed-use project
3. Mixed Use Projects
a. Description
For the purpose of these guidelines, mixed-
use projects are defined as developments
that combine both commercial/office and
residential uses or structures on a single lot or
as components of a single development. The
uses may be combined either vertically within
the same structure or spread horizontally on
the site in different areas and structures.
The primary design issue related to mixed use
projects is the need to successfully balance
the requirements of residential uses, such
as the need for privacy and security, with the
needs of commercial uses for access, visibility,
parking, loading, and possibly extended hours
of operation. There are two basic types of
mixed-use projects. The first type is vertical
mixed use, which is typified by residential use
over commercial uses in the same building. The
second, called horizontal mixed use, combines
residential and commercial uses on the same
site but in separate buildings.
b. Site Organization
1) Primary business and residential entrances
should be oriented to the commercial street,
though each use should have a separate
entrance.
2) Separate site access drive and parking
facilities should be provided for residential
uses and commercial uses.
3) Projects should provide for connections with
existing and future streets.
4) Principal access roads into new mixed-use
development areas should be of similar
scale as streets in adjacent residential
neighborhoods.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-144
Fg. 7.191
A variety of architectural details
provide interest on the second level
5) Site access drives should incorporate
distinctive architectural elements and
landscape features that help to differentiate
access to commercial parking areas from
residential areas. Security gates should
be considered for access to residential
uses and residential parking areas, as well
as to securing commercial parking areas
when businesses are closed, except when a
shared parking arrangement is in effect.
6) Private drives should be designed as
pedestrian-friendly streets that are a
natural extension of the surrounding
neighborhood.
7) Minimize driveway width and pedestrian
crossing distance at sidewalks.
8) If enclosed parking is provided for the entire
complex, separate levels should be provided
for residential and commercial uses with
separate building entrances.
9) Outdoor dining, kiosks, benches, and other
street furniture are encouraged to enhance
street activity and interest.
10) Bike facilities should be designed into the
development.
c. Building Design
1) The architectural style and use of materials
should be consistent throughout the entire
project. Differences in materials and/or
architectural details should only occur
where the intent is to differentiate between
scale and character of commercial and
residential areas.
2) Residential units should also be shielded
from illuminated commercial signs.
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Fg. 7.192
Outdoor dining provides activity for
pedestrian connections
3) Pedestrian connections between commercial
and residential developments should be
active and friendly.
4) Large blank walls should not be allowed.
d. Special Requirements
1) Neighborhood-serving uses (such as
full-service grocery, drug, and hardware
stores) are encouraged in mixed-use
developments.
2) Loading areas and refuse storage facilities
should be located as far as possible from
residential units and should be completely
screened from view from adjacent residential
portions of the project. The location and
design of trash enclosures should account
for potential nuisances from odors.
3) All roof-mounted equipment should be
screened. Special consideration should be
given to the location and screening of noise
generating equipment such as refrigeration
units, air conditioning, and exhaust fans.
Noise reducing screens and insulation may
be required where such equipment has the
potential to impact residential uses.
4) Open space intended for use by “residents
only” may not be accessible from commercial
areas. Open space and courtyards in
commercial areas may be accessible to
residential occupants and visitors.
5) Parking lot lighting and security lighting for
the commercial uses should be appropriately
shielded so as not to spill over into the
residential area.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-146
Fg. 7.193
Residential buildings should create a
consistent urban street wall
Fg. 7.194
Upper floor balconies and windows
overlooking the street are provided
Fg. 7.195
Roof form should complement building
mass and articulation
4. Multi-Family Residential Projects
a. Description
Multi-family developments are higher density
residential buildings, such as apartments,
condominiums or townhomes. These types
of developments are typically comprised of
attached units with common facilities such as
parking, open space, and recreation areas.
This section provides general guidelines for
the design of multi-family developments. The
following guidelines supplement the design
guidelines for the Village District and Urban
Core District for instances where stand alone
residential projects, as opposed to mixed-use
projects, are allowed.
b. Site Planning and Design
1) Internally focused residential developments
are discouraged. Residential buildings
should create a consistent urban street wall
that defines the street edge, including street
elevations that are especially visible and
attractive.
2) Upper floor balconies, bays, and windows
should be provided that overlook the
street, enliven the street elevation, and
communicate the residential function of the
building.
3) Three dimensional design features, such as
balconies and bays should be incorporated
into the building design. Windows other
than bays should be recessed behind the
plane of the building to create shadow lines.
Balconies should also be recessed and
should have a minimum depth of six feet.
4) Roof form and height should complement
a residential building’s mass and
articulation.
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Fg. 7.197
The preferred location for parking is
at the rear of lots
Fg. 7.196
A shallow setback and minor grade
separation may be appropriate
Fg. 7.198
Pedestrian connections should be
easily identifiable from the street
5) Where residential uses occupy the first
floor, a shallow setback and minor grade
separation between the first floor and
sidewalk should be provided to promote
privacy and to accommodate entry porches
and stoops.
6) Consideration should be given for privacy
relative to adjoining properties. Orient
buildings and decks to maximize views while
preserving the privacy of the surrounding
neighbors.
7) Intensified landscaping, increased setbacks
adjacent to other uses, and appropriate
building orientation should be used to
buffer or transition residential uses from
incompatible adjacent uses.
8) Unless impractical due to physical
constraints, alleys should be used for access
to garages, parking spaces, and for other
functions such as garbage pick-up.
9) The preferred location of parking is at the
rear of lots, accessible from alleys or single-
width driveways extending along the side of
the lots.
10) Parking areas should be screened from
public street views and surrounding
residential areas.
11) Alternatives to solid paved driveways, such
as brick, cobblestone, or interlocking pavers,
should be encouraged.
12) Easily identifiable pedestrian connections
should be provided from the street/sidewalk
to key areas within or adjacent to the site.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-148
Fg. 7.199
Entry porches and stoops should be
provided
Fg. 7.200
Exterior stairways should be
integrated into the building design
Fg. 7.201
Front and side yard landscaping is
highly desirable
c. Entries and Facades
1) Multiple residential building entrances
oriented toward the street should be provided
in order to activate the streetscape. Main
building entrances should be bold and easy
to see and should provide transition from
the public to private realm.
2) Entry porches and stoops should be
provided as transitional spaces between the
public sidewalk and the residential building
and/or dwelling entrances; porches or
stoops should not encroach upon a public
sidewalk.
3) A combination of ornamental landscaping,
water features, architectural elements,
decorative walls, signs and/or enhanced
paving should be incorporated into the
project entry as accent features.
4) Exterior stairways should be architecturally
integrated into the design of the building.
Prefabricated stairs or railings are
discouraged.
5) Contrasting colors may be used to accentuate
building entry features and architectural
details.
d. Landscaping
1) Landscaping should be used to:
• Define areas such as building entrances,
key activity hubs, focal points, and the
street edge;
• Provide screening for unattractive/
unsightly service areas; and
• Serve as buffers between neighboring
uses.
2) Front and side yard landscaping is highly
desirable; additional paving in the front and
side yard areas should be avoided whenever
possible.
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Fg. 7.202
Flowering trees can provide color and
accentuate entrances
Fg. 7.203
Common mailboxes should
complement the residential buildings
Fg. 7.204
Trash enclosures should be
decoratively screened from view
3) Specimen (36-inch box or larger) trees
should be planted to assist new development
in looking “established” as quickly as
possible.
4) Flowering trees should be used to provide
color and accentuate entryways.
e. Utilitarian Areas
1) Transformers should be placed underground
to maximize safety and minimize visual
impacts. When this location cannot be
achieved, the transformers should be well
screened and placed in the rear or side yard
area, minimizing visibility from the public
right-of-way.
2) Mechanical equipment, including gas and
electrical meters, cable boxes, junction
boxes and irrigation controllers, should be
located within a utility room, along with the
fire riser and roof access ladder. When this
location cannot be achieved, these features
should be designed as an integral part of
the building on a rear or side elevation and
screened from public view.
3) Common mailbox enclosures should be
designed to be similar or complementary in
form, material, and color to the surrounding
residential buildings.
4) Enclosures should be unobtrusive and
conveniently located for trash disposal
by tenants and for collection by service
vehicles. Enclosures should not be visible
from primary entry drives.
5) Where feasible, a pedestrian entrance to
the trash enclosure should be provided so
that large access doors do not have to be
opened.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-150
Fg. 7.205
Wall with columns and cap detailing
is encouraged
f. Walls and Fences
1) A combination of elements, including
decorative masonry walls, berms, and
landscaping, should be used to screen
objects at the ground plane.
2) Walls and fences should be designed with
materials and finishes that complement
project architecture, should be architecturally
treated on both sides, and should be planted
with vines, shrubs and trees.
3) Fences and walls should be constructed
as low as possible while still performing
screening, noise attenuation, and security
functions.
4) Similar elements, such as columns, materials,
and cap details, should be incorporated on
perimeter walls that transition from one
development to another.
5) All fences and walls required for screening
purposes should be of solid material.
Chain link fencing with inserts is strongly
discouraged and should not be used.
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Fg. 7.206
Green building - many windows
provide daylight and recycled linoleum
Image provided by KEMA
5. Environmental Sustainability Goals
a. Purpose
The City of Chula Vista prides itself on taking
steps toward environmental stewardship. The
Specific Plan sets forth goals for preserving and
improving the natural and built environment,
protecting the health of residents and visitors,
and simultaneously fostering vibrant economic
centers in the City. The purpose of this section
is to enhance the public welfare and assure
that further commercial and civic development
meets the city’s sustainability goals by
incorporating green building measures into
the design, construction, and maintenance
of buildings. These green building practices
should be used to help guide the transformation
of aging and blighted areas and infrastructure
into sustainable neighborhoods and villages.
These transformed sustainable neighborhoods
and villages should build on and compliment
the positive components of each area’s existing
character and integrate these features into an
environmentally and economically sustainable
Chula Vista community.
b. What is Green Building?
“Green Building” means a whole systems
approach to the design, construction, and
operation of buildings that encompasses
the environmental, economic, and social
impacts of buildings. Green building practices
recognize the relationship between natural and
built environments; seek to minimize the use
of energy, water, and other natural resources;
and provide a healthy, productive, indoor
environment.
Green building design, construction, and
operation can have a significant positive effect
on energy and resource efficiency, waste and
pollution generation, and the health and
productivity of a building’s occupants over the
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-152
life of the building. Green building benefits are
spread throughout the systems and features of
the building. Strategies may include the use
of recycled-content building materials, designs
that consume less energy and water, designs
that have better indoor air quality, and the use
of less wood fiber than conventional buildings.
Construction waste is often recycled and
remanufactured into other building products.
In recent years, green building design,
construction, and operational techniques
have become increasingly widespread. Many
homeowners, businesses, and building
professionals have voluntarily sought to
incorporate green building techniques into their
projects. A number of local and national systems
have been developed to serve as guides to green
building practices. At the national level, the US
Green Building Council (USGBC), developer of
the Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design (LEED™) Green Building Rating System,
has become a leader in promoting and guiding
green building.
c. The LEED™ Rating System
The LEED Green Building Rating System
is a voluntary, consensus-based, market-
driven building rating system that is based
on commonly held environmental principles.
The USGBC evaluates building environmental
performance through the LEED rating system
from a whole-building perspective, providing
a standard for what constitutes a “green
building”. Established and implemented by the
USGBC, LEED provides a series of best practice
strategies that are undertaken by project teams
in an effort to achieve formal certification.
LEED attempts to strike a balance between
established practices and emerging concepts
and is thus a continuously evolving rating system.
The system focuses on five main categories
within which projects can earn credits toward
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.207
Low flow water fixtures can be
sustainable elements of buildings
Image provided by KEMA
becoming certified: Sustainable Sites, Water
Efficiency, Energy and Atmosphere, Materials
and Resources, and Indoor Environmental
Quality.
1) Sustainable Sites
The intent of the Sustainable Sites section
of LEED has two parts. First, the issue of
where a building is located is considered.
Sites that are preferred include urban infill
sites; sites not located near threatened
areas, greenfields or wetlands; habitats for
endangered species; or sites that remediate
brownfield sites. The second focus deals
with ways to protect the site from future
development, erosion, invasive species, and
stormwater pollution. Other objectives of
this section include strategies to minimize
disruption of construction practices, reduce
light pollution, provide alternatives to
automobile use for commuters, and protect
and/or restore sites.
2) Water Efficiency
Water quality and conservation are regulated
by federal, state and local regulations, such
as monitoring lead levels in drinking water
and setting standards for low-flow water
fixtures in buildings. The objectives of the
Water Efficiency section of LEED are to push
conservation to the next level by rewarding
further reductions in municipally supplied
potable water and minimizing landscaping
irrigation.
3) Energy and Atmosphere
Commercial buildings consume 60% of the
electricity generated in the US and account
for approximately 40% of our total energy
load and the associated green house gas
emissions. The Energy and Atmosphere
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-154
Fg. 7.208
Cellulose is a green building material
used in wall construction
Image provided by KEMA
recommendations in LEED include
establishing energy efficiency and system
performance goals, optimizing energy
efficiency, supporting ozone protection
protocols, and encouraging renewable
and alternative energy sources. Projects
that have incorporated these methods are
proving that buildings can operate more
efficiently (saving energy) and pollute less
(emissions reductions), while at the same
time providing pleasant, cost effective, and
healthy spaces.
4) Materials and Resources
Building materials affect the environment
throughout the material’s life cycle, from
extraction to installation and disposal. LEED
sets recommendations in the Materials and
Resources section to reduce the amount of
wasted materials in buildings, use materials
with less environmental impacts, and
recycle or reuse construction and demolition
waste.
5) Indoor Environmental Quality
According to the US EPA, Americans
spend an average of 90% of their time
indoors; therefore, the quality of the
indoor environment is crucial. Strategies
recommended by LEED to improve the
indoor environment include: establishing
good ventilation; eliminating, reducing, and
managing the sources of indoor pollutants;
ensuring thermal comfort and system
controllability; and providing for occupant
connection to the outdoor environment
through daylighting and individual controls.
d. Economics of Green Building
Green buildings are designed and operated
to create healthier and more productive work,
VII-155
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.209
Integrate extra windows to provide
daylight into the building design
Image provided by KEMA
learning, and living environments through
the use of natural light and improved indoor
environmental quality. From a fiscal perspective,
sustainable buildings are cost-effective, saving
taxpayers money by reducing operations and
maintenance costs.
The cost to “green” a building can depend upon a
variety of factors and assumptions, including:
• type and size of project,
• timing of introduction of green
methods/techniques as a design goal or
requirement,
• composition and structure of the design
and construction teams,
• experience and knowledge of designers
and contractors or willingness to learn,
• clarity of the project implementation
documents, and
• base case budgeting assumptions.
In addition, the costs will vary, depending upon
whether only capital costs are considered
or if costs are calculated over the life of the
building. Many building industry professionals
maintain that if the stakeholder is committed
at the project conception and the design and
construction team has moderate sustainable
design and construction experience, greening
a building can be achieved on a conventional
building budget. Projects throughout North
America have already proven that taking an
integrated approach to design can actually
reduce construction and operating costs.
e. Integrated Design
Green building is a whole-systems approach
to the design, construction and operation of
buildings. This approach benefits building
industry professionals, residents, and
communities by improving construction
quality, increasing building longevity, reducing
utility and maintenance costs, and enhancing
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-156
Fg. 7.210
Solar panels are encouraged
Image provided by KEMA
comfort and livability. Too often, design and
building disciplines remain highly fragmented:
developers and financers select (or are given) a
site, architects design the building, mechanical
and electrical engineers design HVAC and
lighting, etc.
Integrated design aims to connect as many
members of a project team as possible. At a
certain critical point, it is possible to achieve
significant cost savings compared to standard
practice if integrated design is used. The
options available during schematic design can
easily include strategies such as simplifying
a building’s wall structure by changing the
wall articulation to a flat wall with bolted-on
overhangs and thick trim. Such a change can
often save money and a lot of wood but would
be costly to accomplish once construction
documents were underway.
Integrating the design process on green
buildings allows for creative solutions to
complex problems. Questions can be raised
and answered openly through a team meeting.
New technologies or practices can be explored
as a group, allowing enthusiasm, skepticism,
and solutions to surface at the same time.
Misconceptions can be cleared up, and changes
to standard practice can be highlighted as a
learning experience.
Some green building measures do cost more
initially, but this additional cost needs to be
evaluated in the context of the longer-term
benefits provided, such as utility cost savings,
better indoor air quality for residents, healthier
job sites for workers, and longer building life.
When considering green building measures,
it is very important to balance upfront design,
product and construction costs with these other
significant benefits; this process of evaluating
the long-term costs of design decisions is often
referred to as “lifecycle cost analysis”.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.211
Avoiding continuous paving is a
sustainable landscaping design
Image provided by KEMA
f. Green Building Goals for Chula Vista
All newly constructed City-sponsored building
in the Urban Core should incorporate sufficient
green building methods and techniques to
qualify for the equivalent of LEED Silver. City
staff should work with residents, businesses,
and other members of the community, including
architects, builders, and contractors, to
encourage private development within the City
that uses green building methods and practices.
Private developments are strongly encouraged
to utilize green building practices through the
use of established rating systems or guidelines.
Recommended guidelines are:
• Commercial offices (LEED-NC)
• Existing building renovations and
ongoing maintenance (LEED-EB)
• Multifamily and mixed-use developments
(StopWaste.org Multifamily Green
Building Guidelines)
• Residential single-family developments
(GreenPoints or NAHB)
g. Design Principles
The Design Principles below will assist builders
and developers to achieve the Specific Plan’s
sustainability goals. Appropriate application of
these Principles will help builders or developers
to distinguish their projects in the marketplace,
save money, reduce plan processing and review
time, and waste fewer resources, all while
helping to preserve the environment.
1) Make Appropriate Use of Land
a) Prioritize site selection, orientation
and development, with consideration
for alternative transportation access,
open space, landscaping, workplaces,
schools, libraries, shopping centers and
other community service infrastructure.
b) Locate and orient buildings to maximize
solar gain and control of heating,
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-158
Fg. 7.212
A vegetated swale is a stormwater
best management practice
Image provided by KEMA
cooling and lighting. Each façade should
respond to its respective solar and wind
orientation. The north, east, south and
west facades should not be identical in
design.
c) Make sustainable building
recommendations part of the schematic
design process and initial project cost
model. Use a cost estimator or contractor
knowledgeable about sustainable design
elements.
d) Use Whole Building Design and
factor the synergistic relationships
between building systems and building
envelopes.
e) Use the greater of LEED or City facility
policies as a guide, considering the
future market value of the LEED label.
f) Make LEED Accredited Professionals,
US Green Building Council membership/
participation/experience, Savings
By Design and other environmental
certifications, successful projects,
experience or past proposals a part of
the design staff and/or subcontractor
evaluation process.
g) Establish cost of meeting LEED Certified
and LEED Silver certifications along with
associated payback periods. The rate of
return on LEED or sustainable costs and
outcomes should be compared to other
cost centers and value engineering
decisions.
h) Locate buildings and mix uses in a
pattern that will enhance the symbiotic
sharing of water, energy, flexible space,
and transportation modes.
i) Utilize the building site as a functional
and visible portion of sustainable
design. Consider features such as rain
water collection to be used for irrigation,
stormwater detention and treatment,
aesthetic trellises, etc.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Fg. 7.213
Providing daylight in a company
workspace can enhance productivity
Image provided by KEMA
j) Maximize passive heating and cooling
through solar orientation, optimum
building sizes, and room layouts.
k) Locate buildings to mitigate noise
pollution and/or adjacent air pollution.
2) Use Water, Energy, Lumber, Concrete/
Asphalt, and Other Resources Efficiently
a) Incorporate water, energy, and material
conservation strategies.
b) Give preference to reusable, recycled
and rapidly renewable material choices
in the pre-construction, construction,
and occupancy phase of the building.
c) Strive for a self-sustaining property that
is a net positive or zero consumer of
natural resources over its lifetime.
d) Use water conserving plumbing fixtures
that exceed current code standards by
20%.
3) Enhance Human Health and Productivity
• Design for the health and productivity
of occupants with consideration for
maximizing natural light acoustics and
indoor air quality, electromagnetic fields,
access to alternative transportation,
exercise, natural habitats, and
other complimentary land uses and
infrastructure.
4) Strengthen Local Economies and
Communities
• Promote mixed-use, clustering,
symbiotic commercial land uses;
distributed generation and district utility
services; and technology infrastructure
improvements.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-160
Fg. 7.214
Landscaped roofs, terraces, and
courtyards help manage stormwater
Image provided by KEMA
5) Restore and Protect Plants, Animals,
Endangered Species and Natural Habitats
a) Consider landscaped roofs, terraces,
courtyards and street parking strips.
b) Consider vegetated swales and other
stormwater best management practices
that go beyond local code and seek to
detain and treat stormwater prior to
entering storm drains and/or water
bodies.
6) Protect Agricultural, Cultural, and
Archaeological Resources
7) Enhance Quality of Life
a) Make sustainable methods visible as an
educational tool and brand opportunity.
b) Develop a maintenance strategy to
keep all building mechanical, lighting
and monitoring systems at optimal
performance.
c) Promote healthy, productive and nurturing
workplace and living spaces through the
introduction of quality daylighting and by
using low-toxic materials.
d) Provide access to the best available
communications and transportation
technology options.
8) Be Economical to Build, Operate and Occupy
- Consumer Choice-Consumer Protection
a) Take a holistic approach to design so
that buildings spaces are multi-purposed
and serve many functions.
b) Limit risk through Future Proofing.
Create buildings that will respond to
rapid change in our society, including
volatile energy and water costs.
c) Use attractive and durable natural
surfaces that demonstrate life cycle cost
effectiveness.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
d) Whenever possible, establish a design
that provides each tenant or occupant
with control over their energy, water and
trash costs.
e) Whenever possible, provide “smart,”
individual meters or sub-meters and fee
policies that reward water conservation,
source reduction, reuse and recycling.
f) Use metered water, electricity and gas
for all tenancies. Create awareness of
energy use through a graphic display
system providing real-time readouts
in homes or in multi-family building
lobbies.
g) Reduce demand first. Prioritize
expenditures to reduce demand for
energy, water and materials.
h) Brand and market the project’s
sustainable environmental benefits to
occupants: operational savings, lifecycle
affordability, health and productivity
benefits.
i) Provide “Welcome Package and
Sustainable Operator’s Manual” to
explain green systems, material care,
cleaning products, etc. to all tenants
and building operators
j) Develop a “Green Housekeeping”
Janitorial Program for all tenant spaces
and buildings, utilizing environmentally
sensitive materials and methods (City
has a toxic free policy that could be used
as a model).
k) Design real estate marketing materials to
highlight sustainable features and their
contribution to livability and operational
efficiencies.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-162
In short, all projects should strive for Future
Proof Buildings that have the capacity to
respond to rapid changes in our society such
as volatile energy and water costs, changing
transportation demands, and emerging
mixed residential and commercial land uses.
Create a green building brand that markets
sustainability as a quality of life component,
and where operational cost effectiveness
benefits can build on the existing neighborhood
character and integrate these buildings into one
environmentally and economically sustainable
Chula Vista community.
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Chapter VII Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
6. Site Design Considerations Adjacent to
Interstate 5
The smart growth principles of the Specific
Plan have focused a majority of potential new
housing and mixed-use areas in close proximity
to the two trolley stations within the Urban Core
District. While this location provides significant
benefits by reducing long commute trips to
other residential areas of the City, it also results
in housing adjacent to Interstate 5, a heavily
traveled freeway.
Significant mobile source emission reductions
mandated by the federal and state government
are expected to occur over the next 5 to 15
years. However, due to the concern over health
impacts to residents from highly traveled roads,
the California Air Resources Board (CARB)
issued the Air Quality and Land Use Handbook
(2005) which provides guidance to land use
decision-making bodies relative to siting new
uses near various air pollution sources, such as
freeways. The Handbook recommends a 500-
foot separation between freeways and “sensitive
receptors” such as homes and schools. This
recommendation is based on scientific studies,
which found that the highest emissions were
in the area within approximately 350 feet of a
freeway and that the emissions had dispersed
to background level by about 1000 feet.
However, the Handbook also acknowledges
that land use authorities need to balance this
recommendation with a myriad of other issues
such as provision of housing, transportation
needs, economic development priorities, and
other quality of life issues.
The following site design measures must be
considered in conjunction with the advisory
recommendations in the Handbook and
implemented where possible.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII-164
• Siting of new or expansion of existing
schools or day care centers within 500
feet is not allowed in accordance with
existing State law.
• Siting of new residential uses within
350 feet of the centerline of the
freeway should be avoided to the extent
possible.
• In mixed-use areas, where possible
“non-sensitive uses” (e.g., commercial,
retail, and office) should be sited closest
to Interstate 5. Residential uses should
be located on the upper stories and
tiered back from Interstate 5 and should
preferably be outside the area within 350
feet of the centerline of the freeway.
• For proposed residential uses in the area
between 350 feet and 500 feet from the
centerline of the freeway, every effort
should be made to consolidate parcels
to create more flexibility in site design
with a goal of minimizing residential
uses within this area.
• In the event that such design cannot be
achieved or parcel size does not allow
flexibility in site design (e.g. biophilic
design), mechanical and structural
measures, such as air conditioning
with special filters, etc., should be
incorporated into building design and
construction techniques.

Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
Chula Vista
VIII. Public Realm Design Guidelines
A. Introduction VIII-1
B. Purpose VIII-2
C. UrbanDesignTreatment VIII-3
D. VillageTheme VIII-5
E. UrbanCoreTheme VIII-12
F. UrbanAmenities,TheUnifyingElements VIII-27
G. LandscapeTreatment VIII-30
H. SidewalksandPedestrianImprovements VIII-34
I. LightingConcepts VIII-37
J. StreetFurnishings VIII-39
K. KeyIntersections VIII-43
L. GatewaysandWayfnding VIII-44
M. PublicArt VIII-50
N. Parks,Plazas,Paseos,andPublicSpaces VIII-52
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.
Simulation of H Street public realm at near build-out conditions
VIII. Public Realm Design Guidelines
A. Introduction
ThePublicRealmDesignGuidelinesfortheUrbanCorefocusonimprovements
topublicrights-of-way,sidewalks,publicopenspace,andkeyintersections.The
intentofthischapteristoprovideguidanceincreatingaunifedandvisually
attractiveenvironmentthatsupportsthespecifcplangoalsforbeautifcation
oftheUrbanCore.AstheUrbanCoreaddsnewresidentsandbusinesses,the
provisionofamenitiesisneededtoachievethevisionforawell-balancedurban
environment.Improvingthepublicrealmwith“urbanamenities”isdesigned
tocreateasenseofplace,encouragingpeopletogatherandstayawhile.The
conditionofthepublicrealmisimportantforcreatingthedesiredimageand
identityoftheUrbanCoreandtoprovideaunifedbackdropforthedesignof
variousbuildingstylesandtypes.Publicrealmimprovementsservetoimprove
anarea’svisualqualityandactasaninvestmentcatalyst,encouragingprivate
propertyupgradesandnewdevelopment.Theimprovementswillbeimplemented
over the term of the Specifc Plan and may occur as comprehensive street
improvementsormaybeimprovedinphasesaspartofprivateredevelopment.
Where no immediate private development is likely to occur, the city may
undertakeimprovementsandseekreimbursementfromfuturedevelopment.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-2
B. Purpose
ThePublicRealmDesignGuidelinesfortheUrbanCorefocusonurbanamenities
andimprovementstopublicrights-of-way,includingkeyintersections,streets,
alleysanddrives,parks,plazas,andgateways.Itidentifespublicstreetdesign
elements, landscaping, intersection enhancements, entry treatments, public
openspace,right-of-waydetail,andotheruniquepublicrealmfeatureswithin
theUrbanCoreinvariousdistricts.Focusingonthepublicright-of-way,these
guidelines attempt to balance pedestrian needs with vehicular and bicycle
needs.Itisnottheintentofthischaptertoprovidespecifcstreetgeometric
designstandardsbutrathertosuggestdesignorientedtreatmentsofthestreet
environment.StreetandintersectiongeometricdesignisprovidedinChapter
V-Mobility.
Theguidelinesinthischapterareintendedtobeusedasaplanningtoolforpublic
projectsandtoguidedevelopmentconditionsofapprovalforprivateprojects.
These guidelines contain concepts, graphic material, recommendations and
design guidance that will aid in near-term implementation of public area
improvements.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-3
Chula Vista
C. Urban Design Treatment
TheurbandesigntreatmentappliedwithintheSpecifcPlanareaisanimportant
factorinreinforcingthedesiredfutureurbanenvironmentasexpressedinthe
plans vision. There are two primary urban design themes, see Figure 8.2.
StreetscapeThemesMap,establishedforthespecifcplanarea:
• The Third Avenue “Village” area which consists of an Art Deco/Art
Moderne theme intended to support the special pedestrian oriented
“café”environmentofthetraditionalDowntownarea.Itappliesonlyto
ThirdAvenue.
• The Urban Core area which consists of a contemporary design theme
intended to support a more urban and marine oriented character. It
appliestoallstreets,intersectionsandfeatureswithintheUrbanCore,
exceptThirdAvenue.
Inadditiontodesigntreatmentasdescribedabove,aseriesofgatewayshave
been identifed to further reinforce the urban core of the City and provide a
senseofarrivalandidentity.Therearebothmajorandminorgatewayseach
withadifferentpurposeandscale.
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Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
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Chula Vista
Fg. 8.3
Example of a Third Avenue Village
branding image that will unify the area
D. Village Theme
1. Description
WithintheThirdAvenuearea,includingportions
intheVillage,UrbanCoreandCorridorsDistricts,
anartistic“café”imageisdesired.(SeeFigure
8.2StreetscapeThemesMap).TheDowntown
Association recently completed a branding
campaign to create a unifed design theme
which emphasizes a village character where
residents and visitors will have access to an
arrayoffnedining,retailshops,outdoorcafes,
coffee houses, specialty stores, boutiques
and entertainment venues. Within the Third
Avenuearea,apredominatearchitecturalstyle
resemblesthatoftheperiodsfromArtDecoto
Art Modern, thus the expressive, artistic, and
café related theme has a distinctive Parisian
infuencesupportiveofthelivelydayandnight
time dining and retail environment. All street
furnishings and design amenities have been
recommended for their support of this theme
such as Art Deco patterns in special paving,
benches, planters, street lights and banners.
(SeeFigure8.4VillageStreetscapesTheme.)
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Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
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Chula Vista
Fg. 8.7
Jacaranda mimosifolia could also be
used as an accent tree on Third Avenue
Fg. 8.6
Bauhinia variegata, or Purple Orchid
Tree, could be used as an accent tree
Fg. 8.5
Quercus ilex, or Holly Oak, could be
used along the street edge
2. Landscape Palette
The Landscape Palette has been assembled
to support the Art Deco/Art Moderne design
characterofthe3rdAvenueVillage.Ingeneral,
specieshavebeenchosenfortheircleanliness,
abilitytosurviveinanurbanenvironment,and
appropriatescaleinjuxtapositionwithadjacent
structures. As buildings within the Village are
intended to be relatively low in comparison
to the balance of the Urban Core area, trees
can accordingly be smaller in scale allowing
them to relate more readily to the pedestrian
dynamic occurring here. Street Edge trees
have been selected for their ability to provide
dense canopies—cooling the Village area and
reducingperceivedstreetwidths.Accenttrees
are to be used to call attention to important
intersections,districtorcityentries,andother
keylocations.
Thefollowingstreettreerecommendationsare
applicabletoThirdAvenue.
a. Street Edge
Quercusilex HollyOak
MagnoliagrandiforaSouthernMagnolia
PlatanusacerifoliaLondonPlaneTree
GeijeraparviforaAustralianWillow
b. Accent
Jacarandamimosifolia ncn
ArecastrumromanzoffanumQueenPalm
BauhiniavariegataPurpleOrchidTree
Oleaeurpopaea‘Fruitless’Olive
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-8
Fg. 8.8
Example of Third Avenue Village
branding image
3. Streetscape Treatments for Third Avenue
Third Avenue is intended to function as a destination shopping and Village
orientedvenuewhereanumberofactivitiescantakeplace.Thestreethasthe
followingsegments:
a. E Street to G Street
ThisportionistheheartofthetraditionalVillagearea.Withinthissegmentthe
street will be designed to have one or two travel lanes in each direction with
diagonalparking.Thedesignofthissectionwillprovidemid-blockpedestrian
crosswalks,curbextensionsatmid-blockandintersectionsandwidesidewalks
throughout.
b. G Street to K Street
ThisportionofThirdAvenueprovidesanopportunitytoexpandthetraditional
village and improve the village pedestrian environment. This segment will
haveparallelparkingonbothsides,twotravellanesineachdirection,anda
centerleftturnlane.Thedesignofthissegmentwillprovideoccasionalmid-
block crossings, curb extensions at mid-block
crossingsandintersections,andwidesidewalks
throughoutthelengthofthesection.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-9
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.9
Third Avenue Section from E Street to F Street (with diagonal parking)
Fg. 8.0
Third Avenue Plan from E Street to F Street (with diagonal parking)
Note:
Laneconfgurations
areconceptualandare
shownforillustrative
purposesonly.For
laneconfguration
recommendations
pleaserefertoChapter
V-Mobility.
Note:ExistingmediansouthofFStreetwillremain
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-0
Fg. 8.2 Third Avenue Plan from E Street to F Street (without diagonal parking)
Note:
Laneconfgurations
areconceptualandare
shownforillustrative
purposesonly.For
laneconfguration
recommendations
pleaserefertoChapter
V-Mobility.
Fg. 8.
Third Avenue Section from E Street to G Street (without diagonal parking)
Note:Depictsmid-blockcrossingandspeedtable
Not Approved
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.3
Third Avenue intersection typical streetscape treatment
Note:
Exactdimensionsofspecifcdesignelementswillbedetermined
throughfuturedesigndevelopment.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-2
E. Urban Core Theme
1. Description
Within the Urban Core, excluding Third Avenue, a Contemporary Streetscape
AmenitiesPalettewillcelebratethetwodefningforcesbehindthedevelopment
ofChulaVista’sUrbanCore:theurbancharacterofamaturingmetropolitan
centerandtheproximitytothemarineenvironmentofChulaVista’sBayfront.
(SeeFigure8.2.StreetscapeThemesMap.)
All street furnishing elements and amenities have been selected for their
useofurbanmaterials suchasstainlesssteel,glassandconcreteinvarious
formsandstyles.Selectedstreetfurnishingshavebeendesignedtomatchthe
gatewayfeaturesatHStreet,EStreet,andFStreet;stayingtruetoanurban
contemporarytheme,thestreetamenitiesfortheUrbanCorethemeshouldbe
simpleinformwithcleanlinesandareputationfordurability.(SeeFigure8.15
UrbanCoreStreetscapeTheme.)
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-3
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.6
Goldenrain Tree can be used as an
accent tree
Fg. 8.5
Platanus acerifolia, or London Plane
Tree, can be used on the street edge
Fg. 8.4
Magnolia grandifora, or Southern
Magnolia, can be used in medians
2. Landscape Palette
The landscape palette was assembled to
complimentthecontemporarydesigncharacter
of the Urban Core. In general, these species
were chosen for cleanliness, ability to survive
in an urban environment, and appropriate
scaleinjuxtapositionwithadjacentstructures.
Given the relatively tall buildings envisioned
withintheUrbanCorearea,thesespeciescan
be larger in scale and can be used to ground
thebuildingstothestreetsurface.Streetedge
trees were selected for the ability to provide
densecanopiestocoolthecoreandtoreduce
perceived street widths. Trees placed within
mediansshouldbeslightlymoreshowythanthe
trees placed along the street edge, providing
visualrelieffromthepavedstreet.Plantspecies
provide “showy” qualities through variations in
leaf texture, seasonal color changes, and/or
colorful fower blooms. Accent trees should
call attention to important intersections,
districtorcity entries,and otherkeylocations.
The following street tree recommendations
are applicable to E Street, F Street, H Street,
BroadwayandWoodlawnAvenue.
a. Median
Phoenixdactylifera DatePalm
Jacarandamimosifolia* ncn
BauhiniavariegataPurpleOrchidTree
MagnoliagrandiforaSouthernMagnolia
b. Street Edge
MagnoliagrandiforaSouthernMagnolia
TabebuiachrysotrichaGoldenTrumpetTree
Brachychitonpopulneus BottleTree
PlatanusacerifoliaLondonPlaneTree
Ficusrubiginosa RustyleafFig
c. Accent
Jacarandamimosifolia* ncn
Albiziajulibrissen SilkTree
Koelreuteriapaniculata GoldenrainTree
Lagerstroemiaindica CrepeMyrtle
*Requiresminimumplanterwidthof8’-10’.
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Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-5
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.8
E Street from Third Avenue to Broadway
3. Streetscape Treatments
a. E Street (Third Avenue to Broadway)
ThesectionofEStreetfromThirdAvenuetoBroadwayisdesignedtofunction
as a primary arterial the Urban Core and serves both as a thoroughfare and
street with access to a range of land uses. It is important to maintain wide
sidewalksspacefortransitfacilitiesandamplestreetlandscapingintheform
ofstreettreesanddecorativeurbanfurnishings.Theprimarygoalistobeautify
this street through the installation of street trees and furnishings. The fgure
below provides guidance for the development of street improvements for E
Street.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-6
Fg. 8.9
E Street from 300’ east of I-5 to I-5
b. E Street (Broadway to I-5)
ThesectionofEStreetfrom300feeteastofI-5toI-5isdesignedtoserveas
a connection to the Chula Vista Bayfront area and a gateway into the Urban
Core. This section will accommodate higher traffc volumes and function as
a primary arterial for the Urban Core. Therefore it is important to maintain
widersidewalks,spacefortransitfacilitiesandamplestreetlandscapinginthe
form of street trees and decorative urban furnishings. The primary goal is to
beautifythisstreetthroughtheinstallationofstreettreesandfurnishings.The
fgurebelowprovidesguidanceforthedevelopmentofstreetimprovementsfor
EStreet.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-7
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.20
F Street from Third Avenue to Garrett Avenue
c. F Street (Third Avenue to Fourth Avenue)
ThesectionofFStreetfromThirdAvenuetoFourthAvenuetraversestheCivic
Center area and is designed to represent the Civic image of the Urban Core.
Widersidewalks,specialpaving,maintainingtheexistingraisedplantedmedian
with palm trees and Civic Center monuments at the intersection of Fourth
AvenueandFStreetarealldesignedtocallattentiontothisspecialarea.The
primarygoalistobeautifythisstreetandenhancethepedestrianexperience
throughtheinstallationofaplantedmedianandinstallationofstreettreesand
furnishings. The newly reconfgured and landscaped improvements between
FourthandGarrettAvenuesarenotexpectedtobemodifed.Thefgurebelow
provides guidance for the development of street improvements along this
segmentofFStreet.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-8
Fg. 8.2
F Street from Fourth Avenue to I-5
d. F Street (Fourth Avenue to I-5)
ThissectionofFStreettraversesbothpredominatelyresidentialneighborhoods
andcommercialareasandisdesignatedastheprimarypedestrianpromenade
and bike corridor linking the urban core from Third Avenue to the Bayfront.
ThecharacterofFStreetwillsupporttheresidentialscaleandfeelofthearea
andprovidewelllitwidesidewalksandaClassIbikepathforpedestrianand
bicycleconvenience.Thesidewalksinthissectionwillbeseparatedfromthe
parallelparkinglanewithalandscapedparkway.ExistingtreesbetweenFourth
Avenue and Broadway will be preserved and integrated into the streetscape
theme where possible. A primary goal is to create a pedestrian promenade
andbicyclefacilityalongthisstreet.Thefgurebelowprovidesguidanceforthe
developmentofstreetimprovementsforFStreet.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-9
Chula Vista
102’-0”
PROPOSED STREET RIGHT-OF-WAY
Travel Way Travel Way Travel Way Travel Way
70’-0”
Street Width
14’-0”
Planted Median
8’-0” 12’-0” 12’-0” 12’-0” 12’-0”
Parking
MEDIAN WIDTH VARIES FROM 4’ TO 14’ AND IS NOT
PROVIDED IN ALL LOCATIONS
6’-0” 6’-0”
16’-0” 16’-0”
5’-0” 5’-0” 5’-0” 5’-0”
Bike Bike
Path Path
Side-
walk
Side-
walk
Side-
walk
Side-
walk
Fg. 8.22
H Street from Third Avenue to Broadway
e. H Street (Third Avenue to Broadway)
ThesectionofHStreetfromThirdAvenuetoBroadwayisdesignedtofunction
asthemainboulevardfortheUrbanCore.Thereforeitisimportanttomaintain
widersidewalks,spaceforpedestrians,bicycles,andtransitfacilitiesandample
streetlandscapingintheformofstreettreesanddecorativeurbanfurnishings.
Theprimarygoalistobeautifythisstreetthroughtheinstallationofaplanted
median and installation of street trees and furnishings. The fgure below
providesguidanceforthedevelopmentofstreetimprovementsforHStreet.
Analternativedesigntreatmenttoaggregatethepedestrianzonesandminimize
bicycle/pedestrian interactions would be to locate the bike lane adjacent to
the curb and combine sidewalk areas to create a 10-foot wide consolidated
furnishings/sidewalk/browsing zone for pedestrians. Such a design could be
pursuedduringdevelopmentofprecisestreetscapeplans.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-20
Fg. 8.23
H Street typical streetscape treatment
Note:
Exactdimensionsofspecifcdesignelements
willbedeterminedthroughfuturedesign
development.
Placingstainlesssteelsitefurnishings,suchas
trashreceptacles,benches,andlightfxtures,
intheFurnishingszonecreatesoutdoor
gatheringspaces.
Circulartreegrateswithsimplistic
ornamentationprovideacontemporary
character.Treesarespaced40’oncenter.
Scoringandcoloringofconcreteisusedto
delineatethePedestrian,Browsing,Bicycle,
andFurnishingszoneswhilestayingconsistent
withthecontemporarycharacter.
H

S
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f. H Street (Broadway to I-5)
HStreetisenvisionedasthekeytransitboulevardintheUrbanCore.Itserves
toconnecttheCityeastoftheI-805totheBayfrontacrosstheI-5.Thesection
ofHStreetfromBroadwaytoI-5isdesignedtoserveasasix-lanegatewaytothe
UrbanCoreandwillbewidertoaccommodateheavypedestrian,bicycle,transit,
and traffc operations. The primary goal is to beautify this street through the
installationofaplantedmedianandinstallationofstreettreesandfurnishings.
Recognizing the recent streetscape improvements made along this segment
ofHStreet,thefguresbelowprovideguidanceforthedevelopmentofstreet
improvementsforHStreetinthemidtolong-term.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-2
Chula Vista
Travel Way Travel Way
36’-0” 36’-0”
118’-0”
86’-0”
PROPOSED STREET RIGHT-OF-WAY
Street Width
14’-0”
Planted
Median
6’-0” 6’-0”
16’-0” 16’-0”
5’-0” 5’-0” 5’-0” 5’-0”
Bike Bike
Path Path
Sidewalk Sidewalk Sidewalk Sidewalk
Fg. 8.24
H Street Section from Broadway to I-5
Fg. 8.25
H Street Section from Broadway to I-5
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-22
Fg. 8.26
Broadway typical streetscape treatment
Note:
Exactdimensionsofspecifcdesignelementswill
bedeterminedthroughfuturedesigndevelopment.
g. Broadway
BroadwayisintendedtofunctionasaheavilyusedUrbanCorearterialstreet.
Theprimarygoalistobeautifythisstreetthroughtheinstallationofaplanted
median and installation of street trees and furnishings. The fgures below
provide guidance for the development of street improvements for Broadway.
ExistingmaturetreesalongBroadwaywillberetainedandwillbeaugmented
withstreettreessuchasthetreesidentifedinthelandscapepalette.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-23
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.27
Broadway Section from C Street to L Street
Fg. 8.28
Broadway Plan from C Street to L Street
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-24
Fg. 8.29
Woodlawn Avenue
h. Other Primary Streets
The remaining streets in the Urban Core area (Woodlawn Avenue, G Street, I
Street,JStreet,KStreet,LStreet,FourthAvenue,FifthAvenue,etc.)shouldbe
designedtosupportthedesiredpedestrianenvironmentthroughbeautifcation
and installation of street trees, landscaping, special paving and furnishings.
Figure8.29illustratesatypicalviewofWoodlawnAvenue.Refertothedesign
treatmentandelementsfortheUrbanCoreareashownabove.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-25
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.30
Neighborhood Streets
i. Neighborhood Streets
Typical neighborhood streets in the Urban Core are intended to reinforce the
qualityneighborhoodsthatexist,calmtraffc,beautifyandprovideshadefrom
newstreettreesandlandscaping.Theprimarygoalistoimprovethecondition
ofsidewalks,plantnewstreettreesandmakeimprovementstothepedestrian
systemsuchascrosswalksandpedestrianlighting.Thefgurebelowprovides
guidanceforthedevelopmentofstreetimprovementsforNeighborhoodStreets
suchasDelMarAvenue,ChurchStreet,LandisAvenue,andGarrettAvenue.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-26
j. Alleys
The purpose of the alley system is to increase access within the urban core.
The urban core benefts from increased access for delivery services, as well
asforresidentialandcommercialparkingareas,throughalleys.Whilealleys
should contain trees, the trees should not interfere with delivery and other
servicefunctions.Adequatelightingofalleywaysisalsoimportant.Alleyswill
beconnectedtostreetswithpaseosorotherpedestrianwalkways.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-27
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.3
Urban greening is the number one
improvement priority for the Urban Core
Fg. 8.32
Special accent paving can be used on
sidewalks
F. Urban Amenities, The Unifying Elements
Thissectiondescribestheimprovementsthathelpincreatingaspecialidentity
for a particular area. Elements are selected for their ability to create visual
appeal, upgrade the function and attractiveness of the urban environment
andtoassistinenvironmentalenhancement.Streettrees,landscaping,and
other design treatments are intended to reduce solar heat gain, calm traffc,
andimprovethequalityofpedestrianspace.Theseareprincipalgoalsofthe
specifc plan and key ingredients, along with land use patterns, in changing
thepredominantcharacteroftheareafromanauto-orientedenvironmenttoa
pedestrian-orientedurbanvillage.
1. Landscaping
Landscaping includes street trees, parkways,
sidewalk landscaping, and other accent
plants. Urban “greening” is a key feature in
redevelopment activities, and while it is not
always “green” in the traditional sense, the
focus is to create comfortable and attractive
pedestrian spaces, i.e. plazas, courtyards,
paseos,pocketparks,widesidewalks,etc.The
addition of street trees alone in many cases
can be the single biggest improvement to a
revitalizingcommunity.
2. Sidewalk Treatment
Providing a smooth and attractive sidewalk is
criticalinattractingpedestrianuse.Sidewalks
need to be designed with enough width to be
comfortable to stroll down, smooth paving
and special accent paving in select locations
and buffered from fast and noisy vehicular
traffc.Specialattentionalsoneedstobepaid
tocrosswalks.Properlocation,traffccontrol
devices,andvisualmarkersallareimportantin
encouragingusebypedestriansandincreasing
safety.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-28
Fg. 8.34
Signs reinforce the identity of an
area
Fg. 8.35
Public art is a desirable element that
personalizes the urban environment
Fg. 8.33
Furnishings attract pedestrians and
help to defne an area’s character
3. Furnishings
Furnishings consist of amenities such as
decorativestreetlightswithbanners,benches,
trash and recycling containers, bollards to
defne special edge conditions, newspaper
racks,bicycleracksandparkingmeters,transit
shelters,specialattractionsatselectlocations
such as public art, fountains, and other focal
elements. It is the collection of these urban
amenitiesthathelptodefnethecharacterof
anareaandservetoattractpedestriansthere
by supporting the adjacent retail shops and
offces.
4. Signs
Signs are an effective method to reinforce
the identity of an area through graphic arts.
Distinctive logos, catch words, colors, and
imagescanbedisplayedinaneffectivemanner
toadvertisethedesiredimage.Signsalsoare
critical in providing consistency in message
anddirectionstodestinationswithinanarea
such as public parking, public facilities, key
retailcenters,parks,andplazas.
5. Public Art
Publicartisoneofthemostdesirableelements
to personalize an urban environment and
connect it to a communities own unique and
specialcharacter.Artcanbeintegraltoother
publicimprovementssuchasuniquebenches
and trash containers, decorative street lights,
signsandpavingpatternsoritcanbeusedas
a special placemaking feature and integrated
intogatewaysandotherelements.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-29
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.37
Intersections can be emphasized in a variety of ways
Fg. 8.36
Special paving and a mini-plaza
enhance this intersection
6. Intersections
Special paving, sidewalk extensions, gateway
elements, public art, mini-plazas, information
kiosks, enhanced crosswalks, and other
features are elements that can be used to
emphasizeselectedintersections.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-30
Fg. 8.38
Trees can be placed in landscaped
parkways
G. Landscape Treatment
1. Street Trees
Street trees are a key element to create unifed street scenes and soften
otherwise discordant arterials. Adding scale, comfort, foliage colors, and
textures contribute to the Urban Core’s unique identity and help improve air
quality.Followingaregeneralguidelinesforstreettreeplantingandplacement.
(ForalistofrecommendedstreettreesforThirdAvenueandtheUrbanCore
area,seeSectionD.VillageThemeandSectionE.UrbanCoreTheme.)
a. Foreachblockonastreet,nomorethanthreespeciesarerecommended.
Mixedspeciesresultinbetterlong-termmanagementbecausetheyare
less prone to diseases and insects than use of a single species; not
allthetreeswillbelostifacatastrophicdiseaseorinfestationshould
occur.Contrarily,toomanyspeciescreatealackofvisualunityalongthe
street.
b. Installstructuralsoilsystemstodirectnewrootgrowthdownwardbelow
hardscape areas. This helps to postpone root damage caused to the
surroundinghardscapeandstructures.Byprovidingdeepwateringand
airtorootsystemsasappropriatewhentreesareplantedwithinfvefeet
ofanypermanentstructure/paving/curbservicelifemaybeachieved.
Structuralsoilsystemsarepreferredoverrootbarriersastheyareoften
moreeffective.
c. Aminimumofsixfeetofstructuralsoildepthshouldbeprovidedfortrees.
Thestructuralsoilcanbeprovidedundertreegratesandpavement.
d. Trees that provide attractive fall colors, seasonal fowers, or large
amountsofshadearepreferredfortheUrbanCore.Inaddition,species
native or naturalized to the region are also encouraged. They tend to
be easier to maintain as their needs match those of trees occurring
naturally in the region, and their appearance
blends better with that of the surrounding
regionalvegetation.
e. Treegrateswithaminimumwidthofsixfeet
are required within sidewalks and plaza
spaces as the grates allow for improved
accessibility, increased sidewalk usability
area, and are consistent with the desired
urban character. The ultimate size of the
tree trunk should be considered when
choosinggrates;thegrateopeningshould
be appropriately sized to accommodate a
maturetree.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-3
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.39
Medians should provide a
maintenance strip as a buffer
f. Within landscape parkways and on neighborhood streets (such as F
StreetbetweenFourthAvenueandBroadway)useat-gradeplantersand
decomposed granite tree wells instead of tree grates. This treatment
supportsalessformaldesignandismoreresidentialinnature.Generally
thesestreetshavewiderpedestrianzonesandarelikelytohaveroomto
incorporatetreesintotheparkwayplantingareaorinat-gradeplanters
ortreewells.
g. Streettreeplacementshouldbecarefullyconsideredtoavoidconficts
withfunctionsofadjacentbusinesses.Basedonmaturegrowthofeach
species, avoid conficting with overhead power lines, utility lines, and
structures. The trees should align with property lines and not block
viewsofstorefrontsbusinessorsignstothegreatestextentpossible.
h. Streettreesshouldbespacedapproximately30feetto50feetoncenter
dependingonthespecifcrequirementsofeachindividualspecies.
2. Medians
Mediansandpedestrianrefugeislandsfunctionassafetyfeaturesandtraffc
calmingmeasureswhilealsoprovidingopportunitiestoaestheticallyenhance
thestreetsintheUrbanCore.Landscapedmediansprovideavisualseparation
between oncoming traffc and create a narrowed lane perception that slows
traffc and channels cross traffc turn movements. The medians also create
opportunities to provide pedestrian refuges across wide traffc rights-of-way.
Locatedwithinthedriver’sprimarylineofsight,medianscangreatlyinfuence
howpassingmotoristsperceivethecommunity.
Following are guidelines that give general
directionformedians.
a. Select median trees that have high,
upright branching structure to avoid
interference with truck and vehicle
traffc, provide safe sight lines, and
minimizeconfictsinmaintainingmedian
trees.Keepplantmaterialsunderthree
feettalltomaintainsightdistancelines
forpassingvehicles.Atcrosswalksand
pedestrian refuge islands, keep plant
materialbelow18inchesforpedestrian
visibility.
b. Choose species that need minimal
maintenance to ensure a clean and
healthyappearance.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-32
Fg. 8.40
Medians with tapered ends should be
enhanced with special paving
c. Provideaminimum18-inchpavingstripattheperimeterofthemedian
areaformaintenanceworkerstowalkonandtoprovideabufferbetween
plantmaterialsandtraffclanes.
d. Avoid plants that are easily hedged. Avoid trimming plants into box
hedges or geometric shapes. This maintains the original intent of the
plantingdesignandavoidsahomogenouscharacter.
e. Select materials that have a strong color contrast with the driving
lanes.Integralcolorinthemedianscanhelpminimizethemaintenance
associatedwithstains,fading,anddirt.Warmearthtonesinthebrick
redtoterracottarangeprovideanexcellentcontrasttoblackasphalt.
Thesecolorsarecommoninclayandconcretepavingunits.Avoidpavers
inthegrayrangewithblueorviolettones.
f. Intersection design should incorporate a
medianwidthnolessthanfourfeetwhen
combined with a left-turn lane. Minimally,
this leaves suffcient room for pedestrian
refugeislandanddirectionalsigns.
g. Consistentmediantreatmentshelpcreate
an identity that unites the Urban Core
through the use of paving, directional
signs, architectural features, and plant
materials.
h. Medianswithturninglanesortaperedends
shouldbeenhancedwithspecialpaving.
3. Sidewalk Landscaping
Sidewalk area planting in the Specifc Plan area should include planter pots,
landscaped planters/parkways, raised planters on selected streets, plaza
landscaping,andparkinglotscreeningandshading.Inanefforttoconstruct
public right-of-way improvements that achieve a cohesive appearance and
maintain an urban atmosphere, joint participation between private property
ownersandtheCitywillberequired.Someofthebeautifcationeffortscanbe
implementedbytheCityasfundingissecured.Cooperationandparticipationby
individualpropertyowners,merchants,specialinterestgroups,andotherswill
berequiredwithfuturepropertydevelopment.Thismaybeanopportunityfor
entitiessuchasaBusinessImprovementDistrictoraMainStreetOrganization
to facilitate public/private cooperation. Following are general guidelines for
sidewalklandscapetreatment.
a. Theuseofaccentplantswithspecialqualities(e.g.springfowersand/or
goodfallcolor)shouldbeusedtoaccententrydrivesandintersections
tounifytheUrbanCoreandidentifyitasaplaceofspecialdestination.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-33
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.4
Raised planters with seating help
buffer pedestrians from vehicles
b. Selected streets in the Specifc Plan area should include landscaped
planters/parkways between the sidewalk and street. Streets such as
Broadway, H Street, and E Street should have raised planters in the
furnishing zone with seating incorporated. This will help buffer the
pedestriantraffcfromvehiculartraffc.
c. Choose species that are hardy and not easily affected by varying
temperatures,wind,watersupply,orhandling.Nearpedestriantraffc,
it is important to anticipate some amount of damage to plants and
irrigation,andtougherplantmaterialswillhelptomaintainanattractive
streetscapeappearance.
d. Choose ornamental and interesting
species for highly visible areas such
as near seating areas, gateways and
intersections(refertoKeyIntersections
sectionofthischapter).Useplantswith
contrasting foliage, color, and texture,
scentedvarieties,orthosethathavean
especiallyinterestingbloom.
e. Be aware of necessary sight distance
lines for passing traffc and safety
issues. At crosswalks and driveways,
keepplantmaterialbelow18inchesfor
pedestrianvisibility.
f. Choose species that need minimal
maintenance and tend to look good
all year to ensure a clean and healthy
appearance.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-34
Fg. 8.42
Sidewalks should have unobstructed
“through pedestrian zones”
H. Sidewalks and Pedestrian Improvements
1. Sidewalks
Sidewalks are the key component of the Urban Core pedestrian circulation
network. Sidewalks provide pedestrian access to virtually every activity, and
provide critical connections between other modes of travel, including the
automobile, public transit, and bicycles. The pedestrian experience plays a
veryimportantpartinthefunctionalityandtheeconomichealthofanurban
environment. Wide sidewalks, street trees and landscaping, and consistent
streetfurnishingsallcontributetoadesirablepedestrianstreetscene.Following
aregeneralguidelinesforsidewalkandpedestriantreatments.
a. Designfeaturessuchasenhancedpavingonwalkways,trellisesorother
decorative structures, landscaping, and low level decorative lighting
should be used to distinguish the pedestrian route from the vehicular
route.
b. On-streetparallelordiagonalparking,raisedplanters,andlandscaped
sidewalkplantingstripsshouldbeusedtodefnethesidewalkedgeand
provideabufferbetweenpedestriansandmovingvehicles.
c. Newspaperracksshouldbeclusteredingroupsofdispenserstominimize
a cluttered sidewalk appearance. Permanent decorative newspaper
enclosures to house these racks will also help minimize a cluttered
appearance.
d. Sidewalks should have a “through pedestrian zone” that is kept clear
of any fxtures and/or obstructions. A minimum of four feet, although
preferably eight feet, should be reserved to
allow for two people to walk comfortably side
by side in accordance with the American
DisabilitiesAct(ADA)requirements.
e. Sidewalk surface should be stable, frm,
smooth,andslip-resistant.
f. Planting areas, bike racks, street lighting,
transit furnishings, newspaper racks, and
otherstreetfurnitureshouldbecontained
inthefurnishingszonelocatedbetweenthe
sidewalksandstreettokeepthe“through
pedestrianzone”freeforwalking.
g. Where appropriate, seating and outdoor
diningopportunitiescanbeaccommodated
instreetsetbackareasintheareabetween
the through pedestrian zone and the face
of adjacent retail buildings, i.e. browsing
zone.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-35
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.43
Incorporate accent paving in
crosswalks at key intersections
Fg. 8.44
Speed tables slow traffc and
enhance the pedestrian experience
Fg. 8.45
“Bulb-outs” or “curb extensions”
increase visibility of crosswalks
2. Crosswalks
Pedestrian crossings are critical components
of the pedestrian mobility in the Urban Core.
On high volume streets such as Broadway, H
Street and portions of E Street and F Street,
pedestrian crossings should be located at
signalized intersections. Mid-block crossings
with speed tables are proposed along lower
volumeandslowerspeedstreetssuchasThird
Avenue to further enhance the pedestrian
experience.
Incorporate accent paving and/or “tabletop”
crossingsatkeyintersections.Keyintersections
include:
• BroadwayatGStreet,HStreet,EStreet,
andFStreet
• H Street at I-5, Woodlawn Avenue,
Fourth Avenue, Fifth Avenue and Third
Avenue
• Third at E Street, F Street, G Street, H
StreetandIStreet
• Other crossings that may need
to facilitate and announce heavy
pedestriantraffc.
Followingaregeneralguidelinesforcrosswalktreatment.
a. Crosswalksshouldbeaminimumofsixfeetinwidth.Widercrosswalks
shouldbeconsideredinareasofhighpedestrianvolumes.
b. Crossingdistancesshouldbeminimizedtothegreatestextentpossible.
Uninterrupted pedestrian crossings without a central refuge island
shouldbelimitedtomaximum50feet.
c. Extensions of the sidewalk into the
roadway at crosswalks are called
“bulb-outs” or “curb extensions” and
are designed to give pedestrians
greater visibility as they approach
the crossing. Bulb-outs decrease the
distance users must cross as well as
slow traffc. Sidewalk bulb-outs should
beusedwherefeasibleconsideringthe
requirements of traffc volumes and
specifcstormdrainageconditions.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-36
Fg. 8.46
Refuge islands create a protected
area in the middle of the street
d. Turningradiusofcornersatintersectionsshouldbereducedinorderto
minimizethecrossingdistanceofpedestriansandhelpslowtraffc.The
presenceofbuses,trucks,andotherlargevehiclesmustbeconsidered
indesigningturningradii.
e. Pedestriancrosswalksshouldbeadequately
lit,haveclearsightdistances,andbefree
from view-hindering obstructions such as
foliageandpolesatcrosswalkentriesand
medianrefugeislands.
f. In-pavement fashers in conjunction with
signmountedfashersshouldbeconsidered
at mid-block crossing areas such as the
ThirdAvenuemid-blockcrossing.
g. Countdown pedestrian walk-signals should be employed where high
pedestrianandtraffcvolumesoccursatpedestriancrossings.
3. Refuge Islands
Refuge islands are extensions of the median that create a protected area in
the middle of the street. Following are general design guidelines for refuge
islands.
a. Minimally,pedestrianrefugeareasshouldbefourfeetinwidthtoreduce
thepossibilityofislandusers,particularlythoseinwheelchairspropelled
byattendants,fromprojectingintothetraffclanes.Thewidthofarefuge
islandwalkwayshouldnotbelessthanwidthofthecrosswalk.
b. The median be extended a short distance beyond the edge of the
crosswalkinordertoensurethatturningvehiclesdonotencroachon
themedianpedestrianrefugearea.
c. Refugeareasshouldbelevelwiththecrosswalkandhaveanaccented
pavingsurfacedifferentincolorandtexturetosurroundingsurfaces.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-37
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.48
Typical Third Avenue Village
pedestrian light
Fg. 8.47
Typical Urban Core pedestrian light
I. Lighting Concepts
1. Lighting Style
TwolightingstyleshavebeenselectedfortheSpecifcPlanarea.Oneisamore
traditionalstylewhiletheotherismorecontemporary.Toreinforcetheurban
coreandmarineenvironmentimage,themorecontemporarylightingstyleis
tobeusedinalldistrictsexcepttheThirdAvenueVillagearea.TheVillagearea
lendsitselftoastyleoflightingthatwillcomplementolderstructuresaswellas
newarchitecturewithanArtDeco/ArtModernestyle.
2. Lighting Guidelines
Street lighting plays both an aesthetic and
safety role in urban areas. The guidelines
encouragelightingthat:
• contributestothesafeandeffcientuse
ofUrbanCorestreets,
• enhancessecurity,
• helpsunifytheSpecifcPlanarea,
• avoids casting glare onto adjacent
streetsinsuchamannerastodecrease
thesafetyofvehicularmovement,
• enhances and encourage evening
activities,and
• uses full or partial cut-off lighting
fxtures to minimize light pollution and
addresses“darkskies”goals.
Following are general guidelines for street
lightingintheSpecifcPlanarea.
a. Pedestrian street lighting should be
providedalongsidewalksandpedestrian
pathways in addition to the existing
taller streetlights, particularly in areas
where street beautifcation and higher
pedestrianuseisdesired,suchasThird
Avenue, H Street, Broadway, E Street
and F Street. (Third Avenue currently
hasdecorativestreetlights.)
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-38
b. Additional pedestrian-scaled street lights should be provided at bus
stops,inadditiontotheexistingtallerstreetlights,toprovideadditional
securityfortransitusers.
c. Adual-levellightingsystemshouldbeprovided.Onelevelwillfunction
during normal operating hours and another one will project reduced
intensitylightlevelsthroughoutlate(1:00PM–daylight)non-operational
hours,forsecuritypurposes.
d. The style of lighting in a public parking lot should relate to the overall
architectural design of the surrounding commercial uses, should not
exceed25feetinheight,andshouldminimizeglareintothenightsky
andadjacentareas.
e. Accentlightingandup-lightingonarchitecturalandlandscapefeatures
shouldbeincludedtoaddinterestandfocalpoints.
f. Electrical service for seasonal/event lighting in all street lights should
beprovided.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-39
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.49
This Art Deco theme kiosk provides
City information
J. Street Furnishings
Street furnishings serve an aesthetic as well as utilitarian function and can
enliven and provide variety to outdoor spaces used for public interaction.
Street furniture includes all items placed within the public right-of-way, such
asbenches,busshelters,trashreceptacles,plantcontainers,treegratesand
guards,bicycleracks,bollards,kiosks,newspaperracks,andfountains.Proper
design and placement of such amenities will reinforce a unifed Urban Core
designthemeandcreatealivelyandfestiveatmosphere.Whereabenchand/
orotherstreetfurnishingissponsoredbyagroupordonatedbyanindividual,
a small plaque may be attached to the seating to memorialize that donation
or sponsorship. Following are guidelines that should be considered when
selectingandlocatingtheseamenities.
1. General Guidelines
a. The design and selection of street
furnitureshouldincludeconsiderations
for the security, safety, comfort, and
convenience of the user. Prior to fnal
selection of street furniture, the Public
Works Department should review
choices for durability of materials and
easeofmaintenanceafterinstallation.
b. Street furniture should be located
along street edge of sidewalk in the
furnishings zone and maintain a clear
width suffcient to accommodate
pedestrianfows.
c. Tocreateamoreorganizedandeffcient
use of sidewalk space, furnishings
shouldbegroupedtogetherratherthan
scattered. Trash and recycling cans
should be located near benches. A
greaternumberandtypeoffurnishings
should be located in higher-use
pedestriantraffcareas.
d. Items should be securely anchored to
the sidewalk, and a graffti-resistant
coating should be applied to street
furnitureelementstoensureagoodlonger-termappearance.
e. Provisions to accommodate persons with disabilities should be
incorporatedintothedesignandlocationoffurnishings.Thisincludesa
provisionforspaceadjacenttowalkwaysforwheelchairand/orstroller
parking.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-40
Fg. 8.50
Example Third Avenue Village area
bench
Fg. 8.5
Example Urban Core bench
Fg. 8.52
Example Urban Core tree grate
2. Benches and Trash Receptacles
Twodifferentstyleshavebeenselectedforthe
benchestobeconsistentwiththelightingstyles
selected.Aswiththelighting,oneisatraditional
styleandoneismorecontemporary.
A six-foot bench, as well as trash and
recycling receptacles, should be placed
approximatelyevery100feetonThirdAvenue
andapproximatelyevery200feetonHStreet,
Broadway,EStreet,FStreet,andotherUrban
Core streets and should be clustered at
transitstops.Wherepublictrashreceptacles
need replacing, they should be replaced with
furnishingsidentifedinthisplan.
3. Tree Grates
Theuseoftreegratesisrequiredwherestreet
treesareproposedtobelocatedinthesidewalk
area.Treegratesshouldhaveaminimumwidth
of six feet. Tree grates provide more area for
pedestrians on the sidewalk while reinforcing
the desired urban character. Tree grates for
the Urban Core must comply with American
DisabilityAct(ADA)regulations.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-4
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.53
Example Urban Core bike rack
Fg. 8.54
Example Urban Core bus shelter
Fg. 8.55
Newspaper racks should be carefully
located throughout the Urban Core
4. Bike Racks
Bikeracksshouldbelocatedneartransitstops,
throughout commercial areas, event areas,
parking lots, and employment centers as well
as incorporated in the site design of private
projects. Well placed and secure bike racks
will encourage bicycle rider ship and provide
an attractive alternative to locking bicycles to
treesandlightpoles.AlongUrbanCorestreets
bike racks are required at key locations on
every block. The “U” shape style rack works
wellinanurbansettingbecauseitallowsbikes
to be parked parallel to the sidewalk, which
keeps them out of the pedestrian zone of the
sidewalk.Italsoisapreferreddesignbycyclists
duetoitsfunctionalityandeaseofuse.
5. Bus Shelters
Bus shelters and transit stops are a critical
elementforChulaVista’sUrbanCorecirculation
needs and are key facilities to transporting
people to and around the downtown area
and the Bayfront. Bus shelters should be
convenientlylocatednearparkingareas,transit
focusareas,shoppingareas,eventareas,and
public facilities through coordination with the
City Transit Manager. Because bus shelters
and stops are located throughout the Urban
Core, they need to have a unifying, clean and
uncluttered appearance. Transit stops should
provide benches and lighting for the comfort
of passengers waiting for their transit vehicle
and should take the needs of disabled users
into consideration. Bus shelters should be
designed to be consistent with the design
theme of the area in which the shelters are
placed,i.e.Villageareavs.UrbanCorearea.
6. Newspaper Racks
Newspaper racks should be designed to
house multiple publications in one screened
enclosure. Enclosures should be screened
fromviewonvehiclesidesandshouldopento
the sidewalk. Enclosures should be carefully
locatedinthe“furnishings”zone.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-42
Fg. 8.57
Bollards help to delineate the
vehicular and pedestrian zones
Fg. 8.58
Banners help to unify an area
Fg. 8.56
A typical contemporary theme kiosk
appropriate for key plaza location
7. Additional Street Furnishings
Drinkingfountains,bollards,kiosks,andother
street furnishings should also be carefully
located throughout the Urban Core. Waist-
high safety bollards should be used to defne
selected sidewalk extensions, public plazas
and paseos. Properly placed, bollards help
to delineate between vehicle and pedestrian
zones creating a safe walking environment.
Kiosks should be located at key locations
between parking and shopping areas, at
selectedplazas,andpaseoentries.Kioskscan
effectivelydisplayinformationanddirectionsto
visitorsforrestrooms,plazas,shoppingareas,
parking, and other public facilities and can
facilitate in moving people through the Urban
Corefromonedistricttoanother.Otherstreet
furniture (banners, telephone boxes, and
informationaldisplays)shouldbeincorporated
into streetscape improvements at appropriate
locations. Precise locations should be
determinedthroughtheimplementationofthis
SpecifcPlanandreviewofpublicimprovement
design plans. Some of the envisioned public
improvements will require private property
ownerparticipationand/orcooperationatthe
time of project development. Others may be
implementedbytheCityasfundingissecured
and programmed as a part of the community
beneftsprogram.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-43
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.59
Example intersection
Accessramps
Highlyvisible,
decorative
Crosswalks
Roundedcurb
Return
Sidewalkwith
accentpaving
Streettrees
K. Key Intersections
Duetotheirhighvisibilityandsubstantialvehicularandpedestrianinteraction,
keyintersectionsplayavitalroleinbeautifcationoftheUrbanCore.Intersections
havethehighestpotentialforimpactingvisitorsduetotheirfrequentuseand
role of stopping both vehicular and pedestrian traffc. Therefore, these key
intersectionsprovideanopportunityforvisuallyenhancingthestreetwithaccent
pavingandcreatingpedestrian-friendlycrossings.Inaddition,improvements
to intersections intended to enhance traffc fow are described in Chapter V -
Mobility.
Improvements should consist of accent paving, additional landscaping, at
corners,directionalsignswhereappropriate,sidewalkextensions,andselected
urbanstreetfurnishingsconsistentwithdistrictguidelines.
The following key intersections within the Specifc Plan area warrant
improvements:
• ThirdAvenueand:D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,andLStreets
• H Street and: I-5, Woodlawn Avenue, Broadway, Fifth Avenue, Fourth
Avenue,andThirdAvenue
• Broadwayand:D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,andLStreets
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-44
L. Gateways and Wayfinding
Astronggatewayandwayfndingprogramisoneofthefastestwaystomake
animmediateimpactand“brand”anurbanarea.Alogoandsignsprogram
shouldbeestablishedtohelpdistinguishtheUrbanCorefromotherareasof
town.Thelogoshouldbeplacedongateways,signs,andbannerstodevelop
bothasenseofplaceandanidentityfortheUrbanCore.
1. Gateways
Gatewayswillbeinstrumentalinprovidingasenseofarrivalandtransitioninto
ChulaVista’sUrbanCore.Thesevisualgatewayfeaturesarecivicinemphasis
andservetoidentifyandpromotethedistinctidentityoftheUrbanCore.
In addition to serving as entryways, gateways are important places for
directionalandinformationalsignstoguidemotoriststotheirdestinations.The
visualdesignofgatewaysshouldbeattractiveaswellasfunctional,conveyinga
ceremonialsenseofentrythatrefectsthetraditionalimportanceofadowntown
andconveystheuniqueidentityoftheUrbanCoreSpecifcPlanarea.
Physical elements of the entry, including medians, signs, archways, paving
materials, and landscape planting materials, should function together to
physicallydefnetheentryandestablishapositivefrstimpressionoftheVillage
andUrbanCore.Increasedlandscapingatgatewayswillhelpemphasizethat
oneisenteringaspecialplace.Bothprimaryandsecondarygatewayelements
areenvisionedfortheSpecifcPlanarea.
Aseriesofprimaryentrancefeatures/gatewaysshouldbelocatedat:
• I-5/HStreet
• I-5/EStreet
• FourthAvenue/CStreet
• ThirdAvenue/EStreet
The primary entries are located at signifcant entrance points along the I-5
corridor and at the entrance into the Village. The design of these gateways
callsforagrandscale,moredesignimagery,bolddisplayoftheCitylogo,and
textdescribingdirectionstokeylocationswithintheSpecifcPlanarea.
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Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-46
Fg. 8.6
Kites represent the pacifc fyway
theme
Aseriesofsecondaryentrancefeatures/gatewaysshouldbelocatedat:
• HStreet/ThirdAvenue
• I-5/FStreet
Thesesecondaryentrancesaretobesmallerinscale,moresimpleindesign,
and incur less of a visual impact, as these areas are located adjacent to
residentialneighborhoods.Careshouldbetakenduringthedesignprocessto
ensurethattheHStreetandThirdAvenueentrancefeaturedoesnotinterfere
withtheexistingThirdAvenuevillagearchway.
2. Gateway Design Guidelines
Thefollowingguidelinesaretobeusedindevelopingtheexactdesignsforboth
theprimaryandsecondaryentrancefeatures.Designelementsandmaterials
shouldbeconsistentalthoughnotnecessarilyexactindesignandtreatment.
TheseguidelinesweredevelopedinconjunctionwiththeUrbanCoreAdvisory
CommitteeandcommunityrepresentativesduringtheSpecifcPlanpreparation
process:
a. Urban Core Gateways
1) Gateways and entryway areas should assist and enhance the visitors’
experience when entering into the Urban Core area. These features
serveaslandmarksandshouldbeofqualitydesignandmaterials.
2) UsesimilartreatmentalongI-5gatewaysandprovideauniquetieinand
transitiontotheBayfrontarea.
3) Incorporate the pacifc fyway theme
representing birds, fight, wings, kites,
aviation.
4) ExploreChulaVista’searlyCaliforniaranch
and lemon groves/citrus history in the
designtheme.
5) IncorporatetheCitylogo.
6) Design for extended durability, low
maintenance, and resistance to
vandalism.
7) Gateways can provide an opportunity for
architectural features, monuments, public
art,banners,signs,andlightingfeatures.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-47
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.62
Historic citrus
crate logo
Fg. 8.64
City of Chula Vista logo
Fg. 8.63
Existing Third Avenue archway
8) The design should incorporate appropriate streetscape design
elements,suchasspecialpaving,decorativelighting,andlandscaping,
asrecommendedfortheDistrictinwhicheachgatewayislocated.
9) Incorporatepublicartandlocalartisticexpression.
10)The design of entry and way-fnding features should be unique to the
UrbanCorearea.
11)Coloranddesignshouldtieintofuturemarketingmaterials,
banners,etc.
12)The words “Chula Vista” should be the largest font and
dominantwordonthegatewaymonument.
b. Third Avenue and E Street Gateway
1) Establishanindividual/differentthemeforThirdAvenue.
2) IncorporatesomeArtDeco/ArtModerne
infuences.
3) Tie in with existing Village branding
efforts.
4) The gateway monument design should
exemplify a traditional downtown
archway to complement the existing
archway located at G Street and Third
Avenue.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-48
Fg. 8.65
Example of a wayfnding sign
3. Wayfnding Signs
OfkeyimportanceintheUrbanCoreisaclearandattractivewayfndingsystem
to provide direction to important services and destinations such as public
parking,theciviccenter,library,performancevenues,parks,andtransportation
facilities.Followingareguidelinesforthedevelopmentofawayfndingprogram
forboththeThirdAvenueVillageareaandthe
UrbanCorearea.
a. Thesignprogramshouldincludeacommon
directionalsignwitharrowsandlabelingto
denotethelocationsofkeyshoppingareas,
public parking, civic buildings, and tourist
attractions.
b. Wayfnding signs should be oriented to
vehicular traffc. Selected signs should
be lighted, landscaped, and placed
permanently at roadsides or within
mediansatkeylocationsaroundtheUrban
Core. These signs should be smaller than
theCitygatewaysbutsimilarinstyle.
c. Thewayfndingsignsshouldrefectdesign
materialsandcomponentsofthegateways
andstreetsignstoprovideconsistencyand
unity.
4. Street Signs
Street signs are one of the best opportunities to provide a unifying element
intheurbanenvironment.Inthelong-term,considerationshouldbegivento
developingauniquestreetsignprogramfortheurbancoreconsistentwithCity
streetsignpolicy.Streetsignsshouldexhibitthefollowing:
• acoloruniquetotheparticulardistrict,
• afontselectionconsistentwithdesiredcharacterofeacharea,
• alogo;thismaysimplybetheawordsuchas“DowntownChulaVista”or
“TheVillage”inthesamefontasthegatewaysigns,and
• design components that are refective of the gateway and directional
signs.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-49
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.66
Example of Third Avenue Village
street banner
Fg. 8.67
Example of a street banner
5. Street Banners
Bannersorfagsforuseonarealightstandards
shouldbeincludedinthewayfndingprogram.
Cross street banners may be appropriate in
theVillagearea.Bannerswithappropriatelogo
and graphic representing a community-wide
special event or festival should be developed.
Banners may be changed periodically to
provide advertisement for special events and
promotions,consistentwithCVMC19.60.050.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-50
M. Public Art
Display of public art is an important way of expressing the personality and
characterofacommunity.Anartsprogramtoengagelocalartistsinrepresenting
variousaspectsoftheCitygreatlypersonalizescommunity.TheCityhasinitiated
anArtsMasterPlanwhichwillestablishguidelinesfordesignandplacementof
artinChulaVista.Thepublicartsprogramshouldprovidevariousmethodsto
incorporatearteitherasstandaloneindividualpiecesorincorporatedintothe
designofotherurbanimprovementssuchasgatewaysandentrymonuments,
paving, benches,andstreetlights. Incorporationofpublic artis anintriguing
way to enhance the pedestrian environment of sidewalks, plazas, paseos, or
otherpedestrianspaces.Locationsforpublicartpiecesaresuggestedatmost
publicspacessuchasstreets,plazasoralongpedestrianpassageways.
1. Publicartcanbeusedinavarietyoflocations.Itcanbecreatedinsmall
elementssuchastilebandingonastairriser,orlargerpiecessuchas
interpretivesculpturesandfunctionalart.
2. Itcanbeaninteractivemedia,suchasvideoprojectionsoraclimbing
structure,orcanincluderandomlytimedwaterfeatures.
3. Publicartcanbeusedasaway-fndingfeaturetoattractpedestriansto
keylocationslikeaplazaorpaseoordevelopedasmuralsrepresenting
theareasuniquehistoryandculture.
4. Art can be in the form of decorative tiles integrated into paving on
benches,walls,stairs,andentries.
5. Seatingareasandsignsarealsoopportunitiesforpublicart.
6. Publicartcanbeintegratedintootherfeatureslikefountainsorwater
elements.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-5
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.68
Examples of public art
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-52
N. Parks, Plazas, Paseos, and Public Spaces
PerhapsoneofthemostimportantimprovementsthatcanbemadetotheUrban
Coreistheadditionofurban“green”spacesintheformofparks,plazas,paseos
andinformalpedestrianspaces.Theseimprovementsincludeimprovingand
expandingexistingparkspacetomakethespacesmoreusable.AstheUrban
Core adds new residents and businesses, opportunity for convenient urban
recreationinvariousformsmustbeprovided.Thefollowingsectiondescribes
the urban gathering space network that is proposed by the specifc plan. It
includes a system of parks and other gathering spaces that are located in
proximitytoexistingandnewresidentialareasandareinterconnectedthrough
bothapedestrianandbicyclesystem.(SeeFigure8.64.Parks,Plazas,Paseos,
andPublicSpaces.)
The City of Chula Vista is currently preparing an update to the Parks and
Recreation Needs Assessment (PRNA). The information gathered from the
updated PRNA will be used in the upcoming “Parks and Recreation Master
PlanUpdateandtheWesternChulaVistaParksImplementationPlan,andwill
include:
• inventoryexistingparkspace,
• assesstheneedsforupgradingexistingandaddingnewfacilities
• determinetheneedforadditionalspace
• evaluatetheoptionallocationsfornewfacilities,
• prepareconceptualdesignsforallfacilities,and
• research the opportunities for joint use of existing school sites as
neighborhoodparks.
ThisparkplanningstudyandanalysiswillusetheWesternChulaVistaPublic
Facilities Assessment prepared in January of 2005 by Economic Research
Associatesasabaselinestudy.
Throughout the Specifc Plan area, plazas of a variety of sizes should be
incorporated to accommodate different types of activities. These public
gatheringspacesshouldservetoestablishasenseofplaceandidentityand
providespaceforprivateoutdoordining,events,andstreetsideentertainment.
Well-designed public space in the form of both parks and plazas should
provide ongoing opportunities for human activities that create an interactive
environment,buildasenseofcommunity,andcreateopportunitiesforevents,
entertainment, and gatherings. Public parks and plazas in the Urban Core
shouldadheretothefollowingguidelines.
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Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-54
Fg. 8.70
Park promenade
1. Parks
a. Guidelines
1) All park space shall contain elements that provide green areas for
relaxation,picnics,informalfeldspace,andareasforfamilygatherings
withampleshadetreesandlandscaping.Wherespacepermitsmore
formal play structures, fountains, covered seating, and other active
facilities may be designed. Parks should also include formal and
informalhardscapeareasforgatheringandcourtspaces.
2) All parks shall be designed to support Crime Prevention through
EnvironmentalDesign(CPTED)principles.
3) All parks shall be designed to minimize water use and support City
sustainabilitygoals.
4) New parks should be located within close proximity to all existing and
newresidentialneighborhoods.
5) Existing parks
shallbeevaluated
and upgraded as
appropriate to
enhance usability
and provide safe
play equipment
for children of all
ages.
6) The Urban
Core park system
should include
pocket parks and
ne i g h b o r h o o d
park space
distributed evenly
through all
districts.
b. Recommended Park Facilities
ThefollowingarespecifcparkfacilitiesthatshouldbedevelopedintheSpecifc
Planarea.
1) One park of approximately 12-15 acres, or several parks with an
aggregated total of approximately 12-15 acres, should be provided
west of Broadway between H Street and E Street. This facility should
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-55
Chula Vista
Fg. 8.7
Community Park
Fg. 8.72
Plaza
include formal areas for sports, informal multi-use feld space, picnic
areas,children’splayequipment,walkingtrailsandpaths,afountain,
plazas,benches,shadetrees,ornamentallandscapedareas,i.e.arose
garden, community garden, restroom facility, park offce and storage,
and urban features such as a pond or
otherwaterfeature.Programelements
are to be determined by the proposed
ParkMasterPlanupdateprocess.
2) Acommunityparkbetween15-20acres
should be provided in the Northwest
Planning Area in the area of “Lower
Sweetwater”. This community park is
intended to serve the residents of the
urbancore.Thisfacilityshouldinclude
all elements identifed in the proposed
Parks and Recreation Master Plan
update.
3) ExistingCityparksshouldbeevaluated
toassessoptimumuseofthefacilities.Potentialfutureparkcomponents
will be identifed in the proposed Parks and Recreation Master Plan
update.
4) MemorialParkshouldbeexpandedbybetween3-5acresandupgraded
suchthattheparkismademoreusableandattractivetoarearesidents.
AsmallplazaalongtheThirdAvenuefrontageshouldbeconsideredin
theredesign.Connectionsandrelationshiptotheexpandedciviccenter
shouldalsobeconsidered.Potentialfutureparkcomponentswouldbe
identifedintheproposedParksandRecreationMasterPlanupdate.
2. Plazas
a. Guidelines
1) Plaza spaces should be designed
with fexibility for physical use and be
designed to accommodate a range
of desired activities such as outdoor
seating, entertainment (bandstands),
and festivals. These spaces should
contributetorealandperceivedpublic
safety. The plaza spaces should be a
minimum of 5,000 square feet in size
and may be as large as one acre in
size.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-56
Fg. 8.74
H Street Plaza
Fg. 8.73
Retail plaza
2) Public spacelighting should
be low in height with a
maximum height of 16 feet.
Lighting in plazas should
average two foot candles
and incorporate pedestrian
oriented lights, such as
light bollards, pole lights,
and wall-mounted lights.
Uplightingoftreesandother
site features or elements is
alsoencouraged.
3) Plazas should have an
articulated edge (buildings,
benches, and landscaping)
wherefeasibletodefnethe
plazaandcreatecomfortable
space.
4) Plazaedgeswhichopentopedestrianthrough-traffcshouldbedefned,
withoutimpedingtraffcfow,withaplanterorlowseatingwall,apergola
withvines,awaterfeature,orasculpture.
5) Providepedestrianamenitieslikeseating,decorativelighting,planters,
fountains,drinkingfountains,distinctivepaving,decorativetiles,public
art,landscaping,andbicycleracks.Theyshouldalsoincorporatefocal
pointssuchasarchitecturalstructures,sculpturesandinteractivewater
features,andcommunityfountains.
6) Covered areas along the perimeter of plazas, such as a vine-covered
pergola, are strongly encouraged to provide protection from the
elements.
7) S o f t
l a n d s c a p i n g
and shade
trees as well as
hard surfaced
areas should be
incorporated into
the overall plaza
design. Color,
form, and texture
are an integral
partofthedesign
of these public
spaces.
Chapter VIII Public Realm Guidelines
VIII-57
Chula Vista
b. Recommended Plaza Locations
The following are generalized vicinities of plaza locations that should be
developedintheSpecifcPlanarea.
1) ThesouthwestcornerofThirdAvenueandFStreet.
2) AdjacenttotheThirdAvenuestreetfrontageatexistingMemorialPark.
3) The southwest corner of Third Avenue and H Street adjacent to the
CountyCourthouse(enhanceuseofexistingurbanplaza).
4) ThesouthsideofHStreetacrossfromScrippsHospital.
5) TheintersectionofHStreetandFifthAvenue.
6) ThesoutheastcornerofHStreetandBroadway.
7) ThesouthsideofHStreetattheintersectionofWoodlawnAvenue.
8) ThewestsideofBroadwaybetweenEStreetandHStreet.
9) TheovercrossingsofI-5atEStreet,FStreet,andHStreet.Theplazaat
theFStreetovercrossingshouldbemoreextensivethanplazasatthe
EStreetandHStreetovercrossings, asFStreetprovidesasignifcant
connectiontotheBayfrontforpedestriansandbicyclists.
10)Thethreetransitfocusareas:onHStreetbetweenThirdAvenueand
FourthAvenue;HStreetTrolley:EStreetTrolley.
Itshouldbenotedthattwoadditionalurbanplazasarecurrentlylocatedwithin
theCivicCentercomplex,atCityHallandthePoliceHeadquarters.
c. Plaza Corridor
A special “Plaza Corridor” is designated along Third Avenue and is unique to
theUrbanCore.AcontinuouslywidesidewalkcharacterizesthePlazaCorridor
withenhancedamenitiestolandscaping,lighting,signage,andart.Detailsof
improvements to the Plaza Corridor will be further refned through the Third
Avenue Streetscape Master Plan and is a priority implementation project
followingadoptionoftheSpecifcPlan.
3. Paseos
a. Guidelines
1) Paseosshouldprovidelinkagesbetweenpublicparkingandthestreet
environment,linkagesbetweenresidentialprojectsandadjacentstreets
andplazas/parksandshouldbedesignedwithconsiderationfor“safe
routestoschool”forarearesidents.
2) Providepedestrianamenitieslikeseating,decorativelighting,planters,
fountains,drinkingfountains,distinctivepaving,decorativetiles,public
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VIII-58
Fg. 8.76
Paseo
Fg. 8.75
Paseo
art, landscaping, and bicycle racks. They
should also incorporate focal points such
asarchitecturalstructures,sculpturesand
interactivewaterfeatures.
3) Paseos should be well lit and include
directionalsigns.
4) Paseosshouldbeaminimumofeightfeet
wide, with a variety of widths to provide
spaces for landscaping, benches, outdoor
dining,focalpoints,andwaterfeatures,as
describedabove.
5) Paseosshouldbeincorporatedintoprivateprojectsinordertoprovide
pedestrianconnectionsandspacebetween:
• residentialprojectsandadjoiningretailstreets,i.e.ThirdAvenueand
HStreet,BroadwayandHStreet;
• public parking facilities and adjoining residential projects, retail
streets,andpublicbuildings;and
• parksandadjoiningresidentialneighborhoods.
6) Thedesignofabuildingshouldnotpresentablankfacetothepaseo
butshouldbeasarchitecturallydetailedasthefrontofthebuilding.
b. Recommended Paseo Locations
Thefollowingaregenerallocationswherepublicpaseosshouldbeconsidered
asredevelopmentoccursintheSpecifcPlanarea.
1) AlongThirdAvenuebetweenEStreetandH
Street,connectingthestreetscapeofThird
Avenue with public parking, residential,
andoffceprojectstotheeastandwest.
2) AlongWoodlawnAvenuebetweenEStreet
and H Street, connecting residential
neighborhoods to the east and west to
WoodlawnAvenue.
3) Along Broadway, connecting residential
neighborhoodstotheeastandwesttothe
transitfocusareasandtothecommercial
servicecorridor.
4) Along H Street, connecting the streetscape of H Street to adjoining
offce,retail,andresidentialareastothenorthandsouth.

Chapter IX Infrastructure
Chula Vista
IX. Infrastructure and Public Facilities
A. Introduction IX-1
B. GrowthForecasts IX-2
C. Water,Sewer,DrainageandSolidWaste IX-3
D. LawEnforcement,FireProtectionandEmergencyServices IX-13
E. Schools IX-19
F. ParksandRecreation IX-23
G. EnergyandTelecommunications IX-30
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Chula Vista
IX-
Chapter IX Infrastructure
IX. Infrastructure and Public Facilities
A. Introduction
Thepurposeofthischapteristodescribetheinfrastructureandpublicfacilities
applicable to the Specifc Plan, including water supply, sewer, drainage, solid
wastedisposal,lawenforcementandemergencyservices,schools,parksand
recreationfacilities,andenergyandtelecommunications.Aspartofitsoverall
facilitiesplanningandmaintenanceactivities,theinfrastructurerelatedtothe
Specifc Plan area has been studied during the City’s General Plan effort. Since
the Specifc Plan implements the General Plan, these studies provide the basis
of utilities and services needed for the Urban Core. Information from these
studies and the corresponding city-wide implementation strategies are relied
upon in large part for this chapter and have been brought forward into the
Specifc Plan for reference.
The Public Facilities and Services Element of the City’s General Plan establishes
a comprehensive strategy to provide and maintain infrastructure and public
servicesforfuturegrowthwithoutdiminishingservicestoexistingdevelopment.
Publicfacilitiescollectivelyrefertoutilitiessuchaswater,sewer,drainage,power
andtelecommunicationsservices.Publicservicescollectivelyrefertoschools,
library, law enforcement and fre protection. The City of Chula Vista includes
publicfacilities andservicesintheGeneralPlanthatsupportandenrichthe
community including parks and recreation centers, art and cultural facilities
andprograms,childcare opportunitiesandhealthandhumanservices.This
chapter of the Specifc Plan focuses on the General Plan proposals and criteria
thathaveparticularrelevancetotheUrbanCorearea.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-2
B. Growth Forecasts
Based on the City of Chula Vista’s General Plan, the City’s population is projected
toreachapproximately300,000bytheyear2030.TheGeneralPlan(2005)
includes intensifcation of retail, offce and residential uses with relatively lower
emphasis on industrial uses in western Chula Vista, as compared to the previous
version. The General Plan also proposes the replacement of a signifcant
amount of existing lower density commercial and residential development in
western Chula Vista with mixed use and higher density residential types.
Within the Specifc Plan area, the implementation of the General Plan will
result in a net increase of 7,100 dwelling units, an increase of commercial
retail development by 1,000,000 square feet, increase of commercial offce
development by 1,300,000 square feet and the introduction of 1,300,000
square feet of visitor serving commercial use. The net increase in dwelling
unitswouldresultinapopulationincreasefortheplanareaof18,318persons
(usingafactorof2.58personsperhousehold).
The foregoing calculation of population relies largely on historic family size
information. The changing form of western Chula Vista may alter these
forecasts signifcantly. The population projection will be affected by any change
innationalandregionaldemographicsbroughtaboutbyratesofimmigration,
aginginthepopulationandalterationsinbirthrates.Moreover,thekindand
intensity of development proposed for the focus areas of the Specifc Plan and
the pace of development within the Specifc Plan area may result in changes to
thehistoricallyobservedfamilysizeandmakeup.
Historically, smaller attached dwellings in multi-family developments have
historically had lower family sizes than single family housing. Recent infll
and urban core neighborhood developments in the San Diego region refect
even lower household populations and fewer minors per dwelling, with many
developments predominantly occupied by childless couples of all ages.
Calculating and tracking trends in the occupancy of the planned multi-family
dwellings of the Urban Core will be critically important to correctly plan and
programforfacilitiessuchasparksandschools.
Chula Vista
IX-3
Chapter IX Infrastructure
C. Water, Sewer, Drainage and Solid Waste
1. Water Supply
Chula Vista has historically received the majority of its water supply from the
San Diego County Water Authority (CWA). The CWA generally imports from
75 to 95 percent of this water from the Metropolitan Water District (MWD)
of Southern California. The Sweetwater Authority provides water service to
western Chula Vista, including the Specifc Plan area. The Sweetwater Authority
assures conformance to the same quality and service standards established
bytheStateDepartmentofHealthServices(DHS)andthefederalCleanWater
Act.Inadditiontoprovidingwatersupplies,theSweetwaterAuthorityprovides
emergencystoragesystemsandimplementsconservationefforts.
SweetwaterAuthorityindicatesapproximately$5millioninincrementalcapital
costs for system improvements to serve western Chula Vista per General Plan
projections. Approximately $3 million of this amount will be for pipeline needs
and the remaining $2 million will go toward increasing treatmentcapacity at
the Perdue Treatment Plant. These amounts refects capital costs in excess of
what is currently planned to accommodate growth under the 1989 General
Plan.ThesecapitalimprovementsareaddressedbytheSweetwaterAuthority
through its development impact fee structure, which is subject to ongoing
reviewduringthe30-yearplandevelopmentperiod.
2. Sewer
Sewer services are essential for public health, safety and welfare. The City
maintains and operates sewer facilities in the form of wastewater/sewer
pipelines. These facilities feed into the larger regional system for treatment
anddisposal.
The City is already engaged in planning and upgrading improvement projects
andwillcontinuetodosoinaphasedmannerunderanadoptedwastewater
master plan. Connection fees are the primary funding source for capital
improvementcosts.
The City of Chula Vista purchases wastewater treatment capacity from the City
of San Diego’s Metropolitan Wastewater System (METRO). This allows the City
to treat and dispose of wastewater fows at METRO facilities. The City’s future
wastewater fows will exceed the current treatment capacity necessitating the
needtopurchaseadditionalcapacity(inaphasedmanner).TheCityofChula
Vista has purchased 19.8 million gallons per day (MGD) of capacity rights in
the METRO Sewage System. Based on existing conditions in 2004, the City
discharges approximately 16.6 MGD into the METRO Interceptor. Based on
fow analyses, it is estimated that by the year 2030, the City will generate
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-4
approximately 6.4 MGD of additional sewage. The General Plan (2005) projects
an additional treatment capacity need of 1.57 MGD at buildout in western
Chula Vista, which includes the projected demand of approximately 0.88 MGD
for the Specifc Plan area. These needed improvements equate to a cost of
approximately $20.4 million.
Itisimportanttonotethatthesearebroadandpreliminaryestimatesandare
based largely on the wastewater generation rates stated in the Wastewater
Master Plan, which will be subject to periodic update and review throughout the
life of the Specifc Plan. The City currently operates and maintains approximately
400 miles of sewer pipelines, ranging in size from 6 inches to 48 inches in
diameter,aswellasanextensivenetworkofmanholes,meteringstations,pump
lifts and lift stations (See Figure 9.1 Backbone Infrastructure for Wastewater
Collection.)
The system is the subject of ongoing review and wastewater master plans. An
updateoftheplanhasbeenpreparedinsupportoftheGeneralPlanUpdate
(2005).Inadditiontomaintainingtheexistingsystemsandreplacingoutdated
components,theCitymustalsoaddresssystemupgradesandexpansionsto
accommodatenewsewerconnections,especiallyintheeasternportionofthe
City.Thecostsofsystemupgrades,capacityandinfrastructuremanagement
and planning is refected in connection fees and sewer rates.
3. Drainage Infrastructure
Drainagefacilitiesarepublicimprovementstocontrolstormwaterrunoffsothat
peak runoff does not threaten public health or safety in the form of fooding and
erosion.TheCitymaintainsstrictrequirementsforsedimentcontrolfromwater
runoff, which are reviewed and applied to new development on a project-by-
project basis. These requirements are found in various programs and policies,
including the City of Chula Vista Grading Ordinance, Subdivision Manual,
StormWaterManagementStandardsRequirementsManual,developmentand
redevelopment projects and “best management practices” (BMP) requirements
forconstructionsites.
The condition of the overall drainage system is the subject of a Drainage Master
Plan, which is undertaken and continually monitored for any major defciencies
or problems. (See Figure 9.2 Drainage Channels.) Within already urbanized
areassuchastheUrbanCore,mostneededdrainagefacilitiesarealreadyin
place, and since runoff is largely not changed by the redevelopment of one
landuseintoanother,thesystemoffacilitiesforstormwaterrunoffareequally
largely in place. With the monitoring and review of construction and water
quality practices conducted for each development project, the City, working
throughitsDrainageMasterPlanhasaprograminplacetocontrolrunoffand
meetapplicablewaterqualitystandards.
Chula Vista
IX-5
Chapter IX Infrastructure
Fg. 9.
Backbone Infrastructure for Wastewater Collection (Source:
City of Chula Vista)
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-6
Fg. 9.2
Drainage Channels (Source: City of Chula Vista)
Chula Vista
IX-7
Chapter IX Infrastructure
Chula Vista is part of the San Diego watershed area. The San Diego watershed
area’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit requires
that all runoff be treated so that pollutant levels at the storm water outfalls
are minimized to the maximum extent practicable. Subsequently, drainage
infrastructure may need to be constructed or modifed to insure that “frst fush”
pollutants are captured through the Chula Vista Storm Water Management
Unit. Typically, NPDES on-site detention/desiltation facilities will be required
on development projects. The City will maintain its ability to enforce adequate
maintenance of these facilities. The Environmental Element of the General
Plan(2005)alsoaddressesdrainageissuesthroughouttheCityastheyrelate
towaterquality.
4. Solid Waste Infrastructure and Operations
The City of Chula Vista has established an exclusive franchise collection
agreement with Pacifc Waste Services for the removal, conveyance, and
disposalofanynon-recyclablewaste.TheagreementisineffectthroughJune
2028 with extension clauses for both City and Pacifc Waste Services. The
agreementincludesanumberofprogramsandincentivesforthefranchiseand
the public to maximize recycling and other forms of landfll diversion. Pacifc
Waste’s parent company, Allied, owns and operates both the Otay Landfll and
the Sycamore Canyon Landfll located further north in San Diego County. Most
of the solid waste generated in the City is disposed at the Otay Landfll.
The Otay Landfll is estimated to reach capacity in the year 2028. In south San
Diego County, an area in East Otay Mesa was previously identifed by the County
as a tentative site. However, the County is no longer pursuing landfll siting at
this location and there are no private siting efforts currently proposed. Once the
Otay Landfll is closed, it is anticipated that a portion of the site could be used
for a trash transfer facility and/or a Material Recovery Facility (MRF) where
recyclables are prepared for secondary markets. The City has also acquired
rights to approximately 30 acres of space at the Otay Landfll for a composting
facility when the landfll closes. Therefore, continued efforts to expand recycling
andtoaccommodatecompostablematerialswillreducefuturewastetransfer
costs.
TheCityhastheabilitytocontrolwasteproductionwithinitsgeneralplanarea,
includingtheUrbanCore.Currentsolidwastemanagementstrategiesinclude
source reduction, recycling and composting to decrease the waste stream
impacting landflls.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-8
5. Objectives and Policies
Objectives and policies directing water, sewer and drainage facilities are
arranged around specifc topics or issues. The following pages describe an issue
or topic and how the City has planned for adequate service for the Specifc Plan
through the General Plan policies. Supporting objectives and policies follow the
discussion.
a. General Plan Discussion: Keeping Pace with Growth and Maintenance
Needs (Water, Sewer, Drainage) (PFS 1)
TheCityanditsservicingdistrictsstrivetomaintainexistingwater,sewerand
drainagefacilitiestomeetcurrentandfuturedemandandtocomplywithfederal,
state, and local requirements. The challenge posed by density increases in
older parts of the City system is to repair existing defciencies and maintain and
possibly upsize older infrastructure. Over time, as the City continues to expand
andadditionalwater,seweranddrainagefacilitiesareadded,thedemandfor
maintenance, along with associated fscal impacts, will also grow.
Recentassessmentshavebeencompletedtoaddresswatersupply,wastewater
and drainage facilities. The Water Supply Assessment prepared by the
Sweetwater Authority dated June 8, 2005 evaluates existing conditions and
future water needs for the Specifc Plan. Existing average water demand for
the Specifc Plan area is cited as 1.96 MGD with a projected average water
demand of 3.54 MGD at 2030 buildout. The Sweetwater Authority, Metropolitan
WaterDistrictofSouthernCaliforniaandSanDiegoCountyWaterAuthorityare
implementing plans that include projects and programs to help ensure that the
existing and planned water users within Sweetwater Authority’s service area
haveanadequatesupply.Byusingavarietyofwatersupplysources,including
importation, the Sweetwater Reservoir, National City Wells, and Reynolds
Desalination, and by implementing conservation programs, suffcient water
supply will be available for anticipated development under the Specifc Plan.
The Wastewater Master Plan, prepared by PBS&J for the City of Chula Vista
anddatedMay2005,providesacomprehensivereviewandevaluationofthe
City’s wastewater collection, conveyance, and treatment capacity requirements
under existing and ultimate buildout conditions. Specifc recommendations
aremadefortherepair,upgrading,andbuildoutofwastewatercollectionand
pumping facilities. The City currently has capacity rights in the METRO system
(comprised of conveyance, treatment, and disposal facilities) equal to 19.8
MGDandwillsoonbeallocatedadditionalcapacitythroughare-ratingprocess
currentlyunderway.
Chula Vista
IX-9
Chapter IX Infrastructure
Wastewater facility improvements recommended for the Specifc Plan area
include:
• Colorado Street Sewer Main (replace 1,314 feet of pipe between K Street
andJStreet)
• Center Street Main (replace 630 feet of pipe between Fourth Avenue
andGarrettAvenue)
• Police Station Department (SPS-01) New Pump Station
• G Street (SPS-02) New Pump Station
TheWastewaterMasterPlanalsoprovidessewersystemdesignstandardsand
capital improvements program recommendation,s as well as a capacity fee
update and facilities fnancing plan for both METRO facilities and Chula Vista
pipelines, to ensure adequate wastewater facilities are provided for the Specifc
Planarea.
The 2004 Drainage Master Plan prepared by PBS&J for the City of Chula
Vista consists of a city-wide hydrologic analysis and an updated version of the
City’s storm water conveyance system GIS database. The Drainage Master
Plan includes 21 stand-alone technical appendices, each one with hydraulic
calculationsandaccompanying200-scaleworkmaps.Thehydraulicanalyses
were prepared for the 50-year and, where required, 100-year storm events
for existing and projected conditions. Recommendations are provided for
replacement of corrugated metal pipe (CMP) storm drain facilities as well as
othercapitalimprovementstrategies.Additionalupdatesandrecommendations
will be available upon the County of San Diego’s completion of a calibration
studytosupplementtheexistingHydrologyManual.
GeneralPlanPoliciesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
1) “For new development, require on-site detention of storm water fows
such that, where practical, existing downstream structures will not be
overloaded. Slow runoff and maximize on-site infltration of runoff.”
(PFS 1.4)
DevelopmentwithintheUrbanCorewillbereviewedwithinthecontext
ofthedrainagemasterplanandwaterqualityrulesapplicabletothe
development, on a project-by-project basis.
2) “To avoid recently improved streets from being torn up repeatedly,
maintain a comprehensive facility phasing and capital improvement
program.Theprogramshouldbebasedonanticipatedlanddevelopment
and be conducted in coordination with all utilities.” (PFS 1.6)
The Urban Core facilities program, summarized in the following
chapter,setsouttimeframesfortheimprovementofstreets,sidewalks
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-0
andotherimprovements.Thesetimeframeswillbecoordinatedwith
themasterplansforseweranddrainagetominimizedisruptionof
publicstreets.
3) “Identify ways to obtain timely funding for public facility and service needs.
Upon request by community representatives, facilitate the possible
formation of assessment districts to fnance public infrastructure,
upgrades and maintenance.” (PFS 1.7)
The criteria are largely applicable to eastern territories, where
master planned communities can facilitate the implementation of
suchdistricts.TheimplementationprogramfortheUrbanCorewill
actinasimilarfashiontoprogramandtimefacilitieswithneed.
Theabove-describedWaterSupplyAssessment,WastewaterMaster
Plan and Drainage Master Plan analyze the existing and future
facilities needs for Chula Vista, including the Specifc Plan area. With
implementation of recommended improvements and programs,
adequatefacilitieswillbeprovidedtoservetheUrbanCoreasrelates
towater,wastewaterandstormwaterdrainage.
b. General Plan Discussion: Meeting Demand Through Alternative
Technologies (PFS 2)
Growthwill generateincreaseddemandforwaterdeliveryandforsewerand
drainage systems throughout the City. Water will continue to be a limited
resourceinsemi-aridsouthernCalifornia.Theabilitytotreatwastewaterwillbe
affectedbythelimitationsoftheSanDiegoMetrosystem.Drainagefacilities
will need to handle increased storm water runoff and potential pollutants in
thefaceofincreasedgrowthanddiminishingsuppliesofland.Buildingmore
infrastructureandacquiringmorecapacitycanandshouldbeoffsetbyusing
alternativetechnologiestohandledemandbothintheolderestablishedpartsof
the City and in the newly developing areas. The following objective and policies
address meeting resource and service demands through use of alternative
technologies.
GeneralPlanPoliciesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
1) “As part of project construction and design, assure that drainage facilities
in new development incorporate storm water runoff and sediment
control, including state-of-the-art technologies where appropriate.” (PFS
2.2)
TheCityconductsandmaintainsaStormWaterMasterPlan.Italso
reviewsnewdevelopmentinamannerconsistentwiththeapplicable
waterqualitystandards.
Chula Vista
IX-
Chapter IX Infrastructure
c. General Plan Discussion: Long-Term Water Supplies (PFS 3)
TheCaliforniaWaterCoderequiresallurbanwatersupplierswithinthestateto
prepare urban water management plan(s) and update them every fve years,
in years ending in fve or zero. The plans are to identify supply and demand,
infrastructure and funding. In accordance with the Act, the County Water
Authority(CWA)adoptedanUrbanWaterManagementPlanin2000andwill
be updating it in 2005. The 2000 Plan forecasts total projected water demand
fortheentireareaservedbytheCWAas813,000acre-feelofwaterintheyear
2020. This fgure includes municipal, industrial and agricultural demand and
is adjusted for conservation savings. The report estimates total projected local
water supplies in the year 2020 as 223,500 acre-feet. Local water supplies
includesurfacewater,waterrecycling,groundwaterandseawaterdesalination.
Through a shortage contingency analysis, the report also concludes that the
CWA and its member agencies, through Emergency Response Plans (ERP)
and Emergency Storage Projects (ESP), are taking actions to prepare for and
appropriatelyhandleacatastrophicinterruptionofwatersupplies.
WhiletheCWAreliesalmostentirelyonwaterimportedfromoutsidetheregion,
the Sweetwater Authority has historically imported less than half of its water
to meet demand. The Authority’s remaining supply has been from two large
localsurfacewaterreservoirs,SweetwaterandLoveland,whichstoresurface
runofffromtheSweetwaterRiver.TheAuthorityalsoadherestodevelopment
ofadditionallocalresourcessuchasgroundwaterpumpingandgroundwater
desalination. As the City grows, the need to identify the long-term supply of
watercontinues.
The Water Supply Assessment prepared by the Sweetwater Authority dated
June 8, 2005 evaluates existing conditions and future water needs for the
Specifc Plan. Existing average water demand for the Specifc Plan area is cited
as 1.96 million gallons per day (MGD) with a projected average water demand
of 3.54 MGD at 2030 buildout. The Sweetwater Authority, Metropolitan Water
District of Southern California and San Diego County Water Authority are
implementing plans that include projects and programs to help ensure that the
existing and planned water users within Sweetwater Authority’s service area
haveanadequatesupply.Byusingavarietyofwatersupplysources,including
importation, the Sweetwater Reservoir, National City Wells, and Reynolds
Desalination, and by implementing conservation programs, suffcient water
supply will be available for anticipated development under the Specifc Plan.
GeneralPlanPoliciesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
1) Assist the water agencies (Sweetwater Authority) in preparing and
maintainingUrbanWaterManagementPlansthatidentifywaterdemand
anticipatedbyexistingandnewdevelopment.(PFS3.1)
This activity will largely occur through city-wide development
monitoringandreporting.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-2
d. General Plan Discussion: Long-Term Sewer Capacities (PFS 4)
The Citymaintains andregularly updatesaWastewaterManagementPlanto
evaluatetheadequacyoftheexistingwastewatercollectionsystemtosustain
thelong-termgrowthoftheCity.TheWastewaterManagementPlanhelpsthe
City budget for Capital Improvement Projects (CIP), allocate resources for the
acquisition of additional sewage capacity, and determine the short and long-
termsewercapacityneedsoftheCity.
GeneralPlanPoliciesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
1) “Continually monitor wastewater fows and anticipate future wastewater
increases that may result from changes in adopted land use patterns.”
(PFS 4.1)
As cited above, the City’s Wastewater Master Plan is undertaken to
identify needed expansions, which are paid for by connection and
servicefees.
e. General Plan Discussion: Providing for Solid Waste Disposal (PFS 24)
The following objective and policies address the effcient handling of solid waste
throughouttheCity.Theimportantandrelatedtopicsofreducingoverallsolid
waste and of handling hazardous wastes are addressed in the Environment
Element, Chapter 9 of the City of Chula Vista’s General Plan. The Otay Landfll
isestimatedtoreachcapacitywithinthenext23years,requiringclosureofthe
facility.Meetingfutureneedsoftheplanningareamayrequirethecreationofa
regionaltransferstation,wheresolidwastecollectedfromindividualcollection
routesistransferredintolargetrucksfordisposal.Thetransportationofsolid
waste to an alternate site must occur in an effcient manner that restricts
adversecirculation,visual,andnoiseimpacts.
GeneralPlanPoliciesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
1) “Plan for adequate systems and facilities to manage the City’s solid
waste generation, treatment and disposal.” (PFS 24.1)
Solidwasteprogramsandrecyclingareaddressedthroughcity-wide
programs. Design Guidelines are provided in the Specifc Plan for
future development which refect the ability to service for trash and
recyclingcollection.
Chula Vista
IX-3
Chapter IX Infrastructure
D. Law Enforcement, Fire Protection and Emergency
Services
1. Facilities and Services
In the City of Chula Vista, fre protection and emergency medical services are
provided by the Chula Vista Fire Department. Law enforcement services are
provided by the Chula Vista Police Department. Fire stations are dispersed
throughouttheCity,whilepolicefacilitiesarecenteredinheadquarterslocated
in downtown Chula Vista (See Figure 9.4 Police and Fire Station Locations.)
The current Fire Station Master Plan calls for nine fre stations, eight of which
have been constructed. The Master Plan is being updated to refect changes
to General Plan and to respond to a revised set of performance criteria as
proposedintheFireDepartmentStrategicPlan.Therefore,thenumberand
location of future fre stations, along with how the stations are equipped, is
subject to change.
To maintain the high level of dependable, competent fre protection and
emergency medical services the City enjoys, several strategies will continue to
beemployed.TheCitywillcontinuetouseagrowth-relatedservicestandard,
through its Growth Management Ordinance and program, to help determine if
public safety is adequately protected. Fire Department staffng and equipment
willcontinuetobeexpandedasneededtomeettheservicestandardandto
minimize hazards to the frefghters and public, in conformance with changes
totheupdatedFireDepartmentMasterPlan.TheFireDepartmentwillcontinue
to enhance its capabilities and staffng through mutual aid agreements with
fre departments in the surrounding communities.
Similar strategies also facilitate the provision of law enforcement services
that meet the City’s needs. The Department will continue to monitor calls for
service,analyzecrimestatisticsandresidentsurveydata,andmakechanges
in staffng and patrols to refect the growing community’s needs.
Effective fre protection, emergency medical, and law enforcement services
require two-way relationships with the community. The unique needs and
conditions in the community must be understood and the community must
lend support to the various programs and efforts of the Police Department
andFireDepartment.TheCityencouragesactiveparticipationbytheFireand
Police Departments in all facets of community life, including involvement in
areabusiness,senior,andyouthactivities.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-4
2. Disaster and Emergency Response Program
StateregulationsestablishtheStandardizedEmergencyManagementSystem,
or SEMS. The system includes requirements for incident command systems,
multi-agency coordination systems, mutual aid agreements and the “operational
area” concept. As an agency (municipality) with emergency response capability
within the state, Chula Vista is required to use the SEMS system.
Chula Vista provides for the preparation and carrying out of plans for the
protectionofpersonsandpropertywithintheCityintheeventofanemergency
(Municipal Code, Chapter 2.1.4 Emergency Organization Department). The
Coderequires coordinationofthe emergency functions of the City with other
publicagencies,corporations,andorganizations.
There may be occasions when a limited scale evacuation is the appropriate
response to an emergency situation. Under these circumstances, people
shouldbeevacuatedtoneighborhoodandcommunityschools,hospitalsand
publicfacilities,wheretheycouldreceiveadequatecareandtreatment.Inthe
event of a major disaster, where a large part of the City may require evacuation,
the circulation routes serving the Specifc Plan area are:
• I-5, I-805, and SR-54
• EStreet,HStreet,JStreet,andLStreet
• Broadway,FourthAvenue,HilltopDrive,andThirdAvenue
TheDisasterManagementActof2000requiresthat,inordertoremaineligible
forpost-disasterFederalEmergencyManagementAgency(FEMA)fundingafter
November 2004, every jurisdiction in the United States must have an approved
Hazard Mitigation Plan (HAZMIT Plan) to address the management of and
response to emergency situations. In addition, to be eligible for pre-disaster
FEMA funding for use in hazard mitigation, each jurisdiction’s approved HAZMIT
Plan must include the planned uses of these funds. The City of Chula Vista
adopted a HAZMIT Plan in May 2004 to help mitigate impact to the City in the
event of a natural or man-made disaster. The City’s HAZMIT Plan was included
in the San Diego County Multi-Jurisdictional HAZMIT Plan submitted to FEMA
forapprovalincompliancewithFederalLaw.
Chula Vista
IX-5
Chapter IX Infrastructure
Fg. 9.3
Police and Fire Station Locations (Source: City of Chula Vista)
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-6
3. Objectives and Policies
Objectives and policies directing law enforcement, fre protection and emergency
responses are arranged around specifc topics or issues. The following pages
describeanissueortopicandhowtheCityhasplannedforadequateservicefor
the Specifc Plan through the General Plan. Supporting objectives and policies
followthediscussion.
a. General Plan Discussion: Keeping Pace with Growth (Police, Fire Protection
& Emergency Medical Service) (PFS 5)
The City of Chula Vista has experienced signifcant residential growth over
the last decade. The majority of new growth has occurred in the east, where
continued relatively high growth is expected in the coming years, along with
densityincreasesinthewest.Fireprotection,emergencymedicalserviceand
police services will need to expand to match the demand brought on by this
anticipatedgrowth.
While fre stations are located throughout the City, the Police Department
maintainsonepoliceheadquarters,locatedinthewesternportionoftheCity.
The police headquarters is suffcient to accommodate the growth projected in
the Specifc Plan.
GeneralPlanPoliciesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
1) “Continue to adequately equip and staff the Fire Department to ensure
that established service standards for emergency calls are met.” (PFS
5.1)
2) “Upgrade fre and emergency medical equipment as required to protect
the public from hazards and to ensure the safety of the fre fghters.”
(PFS5.2)
b. General Plan Discussion: Emergency Response and Development (PFS 6)
GeneralPlanpoliciesandGrowthManagementstandardstienewdevelopment
andredevelopmenttotheprovisionofadequatepublicfacilitiesandservices,
including police and fre protection. Some design characteristics, such as
narrowstreetwidths,aimtocreatewalkablecommunities,servetoestablishan
overall neighborly atmosphere, and tend to reduce traffc speeds. In mixed use
neighborhoods,densityincreasesmayresultintallerbuildings.Theevolving
urbanformandthecumulativeincreaseindevelopmentwillaffectemergency
service response times as well as the equipment, facilities and personnel
needed for fre and police services.
“Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design” (CPTED) is a method of
incorporating design techniques into projects to help reduce the potential for
Chula Vista
IX-7
Chapter IX Infrastructure
crime.CPTEDisusedinthedevelopmentofparks,residentialandcommercial
projects, schools, transit stations and parking lots to reduce the number of calls
for service. The reduced call volume may favorably impact response times.
CPTEDincludestheuseoffourprimarystrategies:
• Providingnaturalaccesscontrolintoareas,
• Improving natural surveillance (i.e., increasing “eyes on the street”),
• Maintaining and managing a property to reduce crime and disorder,
and
• Usingterritorialreinforcementtodistinguishprivatespacefrompublic
space.
GeneralPlanPoliciesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
1) “Continue to require new development and redevelopment projects to
demonstrate adequate access for fre and police vehicles.” (PFS 6.1)
2) “Require new development and redevelopment projects to demonstrate
adequate water pressure to new buildings.” (PFS 6.2)
3) “Encourage Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED)
techniques in new development and redevelopment projects.” (PFS
6.3)
Project review within the Specifc Plan shall include the above-
listed criteria. Design requirements and recommendations found
in Chapter VII - Design Guidelines require future projects within the
Specifc Plan area to incorporate CPTED principles.
c. General Plan Discussion: Emergency Response Program (PFS 7)
A city-wide emergency response program provides the framework for
responding to any type of emergency or disaster that might occur in Chula Vista.
Accomplishing effcient emergency response involves coordination with other
agenciesregardingdisasterpreparedness,preparationandregularupdateof
the emergency response plan, education of residents and businesses about
the plan and about evacuation routes, and periodic training of City staff and
otheremergencyresponsestafftoeffectivelyimplementtheplan.
GeneralPlanPoliciesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
AllGeneralPlanpolicieswithinthiscriterionareimplementedcity-wide.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-8
d. General Plan Discussion: Post Emergency Response (PFS 8)
In the event of disasters and emergencies, a swift and effcient response
minimizes injuries, casualties and property damage. Planning post-disaster
operationsensuresthesafety,healthandwelfareofourresidentsbyallowing
critical operations to continue as expeditiously and effciently as possible
followingacatastrophicevent.Post-disasteranalysiswillhelptheCityimprove
safetyplansandresponses.
GeneralPlanPoliciesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
AllGeneralPlanpolicieswithinthiscriterionareimplementedcity-wide.
Chula Vista
IX-9
Chapter IX Infrastructure
E. Schools
1. School Facilities
Excellentschoolsareassetstoanycommunity.Twoschooldistrictsservethe
City. Chula Vista Elementary School District (CVESD) operates kindergarten
throughsixthgrade;SweetwaterUnionHighSchoolDistrict(SUHSD)operates
junior and senior high schools and ancillary programs. Higher education is
availablethroughSouthwesternCommunityCollege.
As of 2004, the CVESD operates 42 schools and the SUHSD operates 26
schools, both within and outside the boundaries of the City of Chula Vista.
(See Figure 9.4 Existing Primary and Secondary Schools Serving Chula Vista.)
Both districts actively plan for modernization and expansion of campuses
to accommodate anticipated increases in enrollments. The districts have
completedimprovementsthroughmodernizationprogramsandbondissuesor
preparedmodernizationplansinpreparationforconstruction.
2. Objectives and Policies
Objectives and policies impacting schools are arranged around specifc topics
orissues.ThefollowingpagesdescribeanissueortopicandhowtheCityhas
planned for adequate service for the Specifc Plan through the General Plan.
Supporting objectives and policies follow the discussion.
a. General Plan Discussion: Keeping Pace with Growth and Technology
(School Facilities) (PFS 9)
Population growth in western Chula Vista may impact existing, older school
facilities. Modernization of school campuses is expected to continue as the
schooldistrictsplanforfacilityimprovements.Technologycontinuestochange
theworkplaceandthesocialandculturalenvironmentsofourcommunity.The
schoolsystem,whichhelpsshapeourchildrenandourfuture,mustkeeppace
with development. While siting of schools falls under the jurisdiction of the
local school districts, not the City, it is the City’s intent to facilitate the district’s
effortstoprovideschoolservices.
GeneralPlanPoliciesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
1) Continue coordinating with local school districts during review of
land use issues requiring discretionary approval to provide adequate
school facilities, to meet needs generated by development, and to
avoidovercrowdinginaccordancewithguidelinesofGovernmentCode
65996(b).(PFS9.1)
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-20
Fg. 9.4
Existing Primary and Secondary Schools Serving Chula Vista
(Source: City of Chula Vista)
Chula Vista
IX-2
Chapter IX Infrastructure
2) Encourage the consideration of new approaches to accommodate
student enrollments, including alternative campus locations and
educationprograms.(PFS9.2)
3) Assist school districts in identifying and acquiring school sites for new
constructioninneededtimeframes.(PFS9.3)
4) Assist school districts in identifying sources of funding for the expansion
of facilities in western Chula Vista as needed based on growth. (PFS
9.4)
5) Workcloselywiththeschooldistrictstoidentifyneedsforpubliceducation
facilities and programs, including developing and expanding extra-
curricularrecreationandeducationalprogramsforprimary,secondary,
andadulteducation,andprovidingstate-of-the-artinformationservices.
(PFS9.5)
The foregoing policies refect the need to plan and implement
schoolsovertherelativelylongperiodofdevelopmentimplementing
the Specifc Plan. Cooperation in projecting growth and monitoring
new development and the resulting demographics will assure that
existingschoolsareexpandedornewschoolsarebuiltatthetime
ofneed.
b. General Plan Discussion: Site Location and Design (School Facilities)
(PFS 10)
Schooldistrictscontrolsiteselectionandschooldesign.Inallinstances,safe
pickup and drop-off of students is a primary concern. Schools are generally
designedwiththeintentofaddingmodularunitstoaccommodatetemporary
spikes in student enrollment. While both Chula Vista school districts use this
strategy,drawbacksincludethefactthattheunitsdisplaceparking,openspace
and recreation areas. Some schools in western Chula Vista are already running
out of limited buildable space and have no room to expand the campuses
horizontallyinthecurrentlandlockedlocations.
GeneralPlanPoliciesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
1) “Continue to coordinate and make recommendations to the school
districtsandpropertyownersanddevelopersonthelocation,sizeand
design of school facilities relative to the location in the community.
Encourage school districts to consider joint use and alternative structural
design such as multi-story buildings where appropriate.” (PFS 10.1)
Alternativestructuraldesignswillbeespeciallyimportantwithinthe
UrbanCoreduetolandavailability.
2) “Encourage the central location of new schools within the neighborhoods
orareastheyservesoastofurthercommunitydevelopmentandenhance
the quality of life.” (PFS 10.4)
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-22
3) “Coordinate with the school districts on the design of school grounds
and felds to provide for use of these facilities by the City’s Youth Sports
Council leagues.” (PFS 10.5)
JointuseoffacilitiesbytheCityandtheSchoolDistrictcanmaximize
thepublicuseofschoolandparksites.
Chula Vista
IX-23
Chapter IX Infrastructure
F. Parks and Recreation
1. Facilities and Programs
Parks and recreation facilities and programming are essential to the health
and welfare of the individuals living and working in the City of Chula Vista.
Parks can provide a relief from the stress of daily life and can contribute
to neighborhood engagement, economic development and community
revitalization. The different types of parks and recreation facilities found in
Chula Vista are described below. (See Figure 9.5 Existing and Proposed Public
ParksandRecreationFacilities.)
Communityparks,designedtoservemorethanoneneighborhood,areideally
30ormoreacresandprovideawidevarietyoffacilities,includingswimming
pools, playing felds, recreation centers, cultural centers and picnic areas.
Neighborhood parks are intended to serve local residents; range in size from
5 to 15 acres; and include open play space, playing felds, play equipment and
picnicareas.Miniparksconsistofbothpublicandprivatefacilities,aretypically
lessthanfouracresinsize,serveasmallnumberofhomes,andcontainvery
limitedfacilitiessuchasatotlotorplaystructureandsomegrassplayarea.
PublicminiparksaretypicallylocatedintheolderwesternportionoftheCity.
Urbanparksaregenerallylocatedinurbandowntownareasandmaycontain
facilities such as public plazas, tot lots, play structures, public art features,
sports courts (such as basketball or tennis), walking/jogging trails, dog walk
areas,picnicorseatingareas,somegrassplayarea,andtrees.Urbanparks,
which will occur where infll and redevelopment activity is likely to occur, may be
consideredforpublicparkcreditasanecessarycomponentofanoverallpark
servicesolutionwhereavailableandaffordablelandisscarce.Similartomini
parks,urbanparksmayserveasmallernumberofhomesthanneighborhood
parks, depending on the ultimate housing density within the service areas.
Urbanparkswilltypicallybelessthanfouracresinsize.Recreationfacilities
aregenerallylocatedwithincommunityparksandincludecommunitycenters,
gymnasiums,swimmingpools,youthcenters,andseniorcenters.
Severalrelateddocumentsaddressthedevelopmentofparksandrecreation
facilities in the City. The Chula Vista Parks and Recreation Master Plan, adopted
in November 2002, contains an inventory of existing parks and recreations
facilities,aneedsassessment,andpoliciestoimplementtheGeneralPlan.The
Master Plan envisions the City’s park and recreation facilities as an integrated
systemofamenities,programsandservicesinterwoventhroughoutover700
acresofparklandtomeettheexpressedneedsofthecommunity.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-24
The Greenbelt Master Plan identifes segments of an overall backbone system
of28linearmilesofopenspaceandparksthatencircletheCity.Itdiscusses
uniqueopportunitiesforacontinuoustrailsystemtolinkCityparksandother
resourcesoutsideoftheCityboundary.
2. Objectives and Policies
Objectives and policies directing parks and recreation facilities and programs
are arranged around specifc topics or issues. The following pages describe
an issue or topic and how the City has planned for adequate service for the
Specifc Plan through the General Plan. Supporting objectives and policies
followthediscussion.
a. General Plan Discussion: Keeping Pace with Growth (Parks and Recreation)
(PFS 14)
The City strives to maintain existing parks and recreation facilities, to offer
recreationalprogramstomeetcurrentdemand,andtoplanandconstructnew
parksandfacilitiesanddevelopnewprogramstomeetfuturedemanddueto
growth. The majority of residential growth in the last decade has occurred in
eastern Chula Vista; however, it is anticipated that signifcant growth will occur
inboththeeastandthewestinthefuture.
The Parks and Recreation Master Plan and Public Facilities Development
Impact Fee program provide direction and fnancing for the size and location
of parks and recreation facilities, based on population, density and land use
designation.
Timely development and the provision of facilities, staffng, and equipment
that is responsive to growth and community demands and expectations are
important.
GeneralPlanPoliciesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
1) “Maximize the use of existing parks and recreation facilities through
upgradesandadditions/changestoprogramstomeettheneedsofthe
community.“ (PFS 14.1)
2) “Construct new parks and recreation facilities that refect the interests
and needs of the community.” (PFS 14.2)
3) “Continue to maintain and update the Chula Vista Parks and Recreation
Master Plan, the Greenbelt Master Plan, the Park Dedication Ordinance
and the recreation component of the Public Facilities Development
Impact Fee, as needed.” (PFS 14.3)
Chula Vista
IX-25
Chapter IX Infrastructure
Fg. 9.5
Existing and Proposed Parks and Recreation Facilities (Source: City of
Chula Vista)
Map does not include future potential urban plaza
locations;theseareasareshowninFigure8.69
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-26
4) “Use park dedication, location, site design and acceptance standards
as provided in the Chula Vista Parks and Recreation Master Plan, the
Park Dedication Ordinance and the Recreation DIF, as may be amended
from time to time.” (PFS 14.4)
5) “Work with proponents of new development projects and redevelopment
projects at the earliest stages to ensure that parks, recreation, trails
andopenspacefacilitiesaredesignedtomeetCitystandardsandare
built in a timely manner to meet the needs of residents they will serve.”
(PFS 14.5)
6) “Design recreation programs to refect the interests and recreation
needsofthechildren,teens,adults,andseniorslivinginourethnically
diverse city.” (PFS 14.6)
7) “Explore opportunities for collaborations and partnerships with local
organizations, expand use of volunteers, and develop commercial
recreational facilities that meet public demand and need.” (PFS 14.7)
8) “Continue to provide adequate park maintenance, park ranger service
recreation services, staffng, and equipment to ensure safe, well-
maintained facilities.” (PFS 14.8)
The foregoing policies will apply to recreation and park facilities
withintheUrbanCore.TheParksandRecreationMasterPlanand
developmentimpactfeeprogramswillbemonitoredduringthelife
of the Specifc Plan and updated to meet service and demographic
needsofthecommunity.
b. General Plan Discussion: Meeting Park Demand (PFS 15)
Historic park development in western Chula Vista has been impacted by several
factors: pre-existing park development standards that differ from current
City standards, the Quimby Act - state legislation limiting park dedication
requirements for new development, and Proposition 13- state legislation
limiting property tax revenues. Increased residential densities and intensity
ofdevelopmentwillcreateacorrespondingincreaseindemandforrecreation
facilities and programs. The current city-wide standard for new development
provides for either the dedication or development of 3 acres of parkland for
every 1,000 residents or the payment of in-lieu fees. The City’s Recreation
Development Impact Fee provides a funding mechanism for development
of new recreation facility requirements. City-wide parkland and recreation
development policies to guide future ordinances and master planning are
identifed below.
Scarcelandtendstomakeparklandacquisitioncosts(intermsofcostofland
and displacement) in western Chula Vista signifcantly higher compared to
Chula Vista
IX-27
Chapter IX Infrastructure
the City’s eastern territories. While future growth will result in the need and
requirement for additional parklands and recreational facilities, there will be
increased diffculty in securing appropriate park and recreation sites in western
Chula Vista where land is largely built out. Lack of vacant and underutilized land,
and/orcompetingdemandsandusesforlandinthewestprovidechallengesto
increasingtheparkandrecreationfacilityinventory.Maximizingtheutilityof
existingparksandrecreationfacilitiesthroughrenovationandexpansionand
considerationofnon-activerecreationaluseswithinexistingrecreationneeds
isimportantinthewesternportionoftheCity;whilethisstrategywillnotprovide
additionalparkacreage,itwillpartiallymeettheneedsoffutureresidents.In
additiontoparklandacquisitionefforts,potentialsolutionsfornewparksites
includethecoveringofportionsofI-5tocreateparkandopenspaceareasand
joint-use of school classrooms, playing felds and sports courts by the public
via joint-use agreements. The provision of a community center within urban
development areas should be considered, possibly within a new mixed-use
environment.
AnoverallcombinationofparkandrecreationfacilitiesthatwillserveallChula
Vista residents is planned. While a majority of the future demand for facilities
maybemetwithinplannedpublicparksites,therewillcontinuetobeaneedto
rely on quasi-public park sites and joint-use facilities to increase the recreation
facilityinventoryintheCity.Detailsandstrategiesformeetingparkdemand
willbeaddressedfurtherthroughcomprehensiverevisionstotheexistingParks
andRecreationMasterPlan.
GeneralPlanPoliciesPolicesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
1) Continuetopursueacity-widestandardfortheprovisionofdeveloped
parkland for new development projects on a basis equivalent to three
acresperestimatedonethousandnewresidents.(PFS15.1)
2) Consider a combination of land dedication, improvements, and/or in-
lieu fees for park development improvements in the Northwest and
SouthwestPlanningAreastobetterservethepublicparkandrecreation
needsoffutureresidents.(PFS15.2)
3) Considerabroadmixofparktypesandfacilitiestowardmeetingpark
requirements in the Northwest and Southwest planning areas in response
to existing development conditions and lack of land availability. Such
facilities could include urban parks, plazas, neighborhood parks and
communityparkstomeettheparklanddedicationrequirementsofnew
developmentinthewest.(PFS15.3)
4) Promote the inclusion of park and recreation facilities in or near
redevelopment areas to both serve the new development and to
contribute to meeting existing park and recreation needs. (PFS 15.4)
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-28
5) Useparkdedication,locationandsitedesignandacceptanceofdedication
standards as provided in the Chula Vista Parks and Recreation Master
Plan, the Park Dedication Ordinance and the Recreation Development
ImpactFee(DIF)program,asmaybeamendedfromtimetotime.(PFS
15.5)
6) Amend the Parks and Recreation Master Plan to add a new “urban park”
defnition for parks that may be developed within western Chula Vista,
subject to specifc siting, design and park dedication and credit criteria.
(PFS15.8)
7) Pursue the funding, design and development of a connected park as
part of the Civic Center complex which links Will T. Hyde/Friendship
Park,theCivicCenterandParkwayMemorialPark.(PFS15.10)
8) Consider the design of non-traditional, uniquely themed parks in
the Urban Core and Bayfront that are “stand-alone” attractions or
destinations,havinguniquecharacterandfeatures.(PFS15.11)
Theforegoingpoliceswillguideimplementationofparksandfacilities
withintheUrbanCore.
The Specifc Plan area is expected to have a system of public parks, plazas,
promenades, and paseos that will contribute to the parks and recreation
facilitiesthatcurrentlyexistintheCity.Thefollowingparksandopenspaces
exist or are expected to be constructed in the Specifc Plan area.
Existing:
• EucalyptusPark,approximately18acres
• Will T. Hyde/Friendship Park, approximately 4 acres
• Norman Park & Community Senior Center, approximately 1.5 acres
Proposed:
• LowerSweetwater,approximately15to20acres
• MemorialParkAnnex,approximately3to5acres
• PromenadeParkwestofBroadway,approximately12to15acres
Inaddition,aseriesofurbanplazasareenvisionedalongThirdAvenue,HStreet,
andBroadway,aswellasapedestrianpromenadealongFStreetconnecting
downtownThirdAvenuewiththebayfront,whichwillalsoaddrecreationalvalue
tourbanlife.
Chula Vista
IX-29
Chapter IX Infrastructure
c. General Plan Discussion: Joint Use of Park and School Facilities (PFS
18)
Increased intensity of development in western Chula Vista and lack of vacant
andunderutilizedlandforparkfacilitieswillresultinanincreaseddemandon
parksandschoolsforrecreationalfacilities.Jointuseoffacilitiesprovidesan
opportunity for the school children and the general public to mutually beneft.
Public demand for feld space for youth leagues exceeds the City’s supply
of sports felds in City parks, due to competing demands with adult athletic
leaguesandthesheernumberofyouthsportsteamstoaccommodate.The
Citycurrentlyreliesonindividualelementary,middle,andhighschoolstoallow
use of the schools’ felds by Youth Sports Council leagues.
GeneralPlanPoliciesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
1) Promote the City Council and the Boards of the two School Districts
entering into long-term master agreements to allow allocation of
school felds to the City’s Youth Sports Council leagues via a process
administeredbytheCity,andtoallowafter-schooluseofclassroomsat
differentschoolsforrecreationclasses.(PFS18.1)
2) Coordinate with the School Districts on the design of school grounds
and felds to provide for use of these facilities by the City’s Youth Sports
councilleagues.(PFS18.2)
3) Consider siting elementary schools adjacent to neighborhood parks,
where feasible, to allow for expanded use of the school grounds and
classrooms by the general public and the park area by the school
children.(PFS18.3)
The foregoing polices will guide the City in discussions with the
School Districts on possible joint use of facilities within the Urban
Core.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-30
G. Energy and Telecommunications
1. Energy
SanDiegoGasandElectric(SDG&E)owns,operatesandmaintainsthepipes,
wires and appurtenances needed to transport natural gas and transmit and
distribute electricity to Chula Vista residential, commercial, industrial and
institutionalfacilities.Thesetwoformsofenergyareessentialtoeverydaylife
in Chula Vista. SDG&E estimates that additional infrastructure may be needed
to deliver energy, serve a growing population, maintain local and regional
reliability,andmoveenergythroughthewesternregionalU.S.system.SDG&E
projects that infrastructure may include new electricity distribution substations
in the western part of the City. The following objective and policies relate to the
provision of energy to the City. A discussion and related policies addressing
energyconservationarecontainedintheEnvironmentalElement,Chapter9of
the City of Chula Vista’s General Plan.
2. Telecommunications
Telecommunications services in Chula Vista include telephone, cable and
wireless communication services and are provided by several companies.
Future communication technologies may expand into other felds. Infrastructure
upgrades are being made by private providers to facilitate high-speed data
transmissionandinteractivevideocapabilities.TheCityencouragesconstructing
new offce and industrial buildings with state-of-the-art telecommunication
circuitstoutilizetheseupgrades.
3. Objectives and Policies
Objectives and policies directing the generation and delivery of energy are
arranged around specifc topics or issues. The following describes an issue
or topic and how the City has planned for adequate service for the Specifc
Plan through the General Plan. Supporting objectives and policies follow the
discussion.
a. General Plan Discussion: Powering Chula Vista (PFS 22)
Population growth in Chula Vista will increase demand for energy and power.
Inresponsetoenergyneeds,theCityembarkedonamissiontoidentifyviable
options to control the City’s energy future. On May 29, 2001, the City Council
adopted the City of Chula Vista Energy Strategy and Action Plan (Energy Strategy)
andadoptedanordinancetoinvestigatethepossibilityofcreatingamunicipal
utility.
Chula Vista
IX-3
Chapter IX Infrastructure
The Energy Strategy identifes recommended actions, including monitoring the
energymarketandlegalrestrictions,beingpreparedtoenterintoanElectrical
ServicesContractwithanEnergyServicesProviderorpowergeneratorasallowed
by law, partnering with a third party to build and operate power generation
facilities, developing an emissions offset program based on mobile sources,
becoming a municipal “aggregator” and acquiring electricity at negotiated rates
forCityfacilitiesandparticipatingresidentsandbusinessowners,expanding
energy conservation projects for City facilities and promoting energy effcient
andrenewableenergyprogramsforbusinessesandresidents,anddeveloping
and implementing a legislative strategy that facilitates the City’s overall energy
plan.
GeneralPlanPoliciesRelatedtotheUrbanCore
Allpoliciesregardingenergyandtelecommunicationsareimplemented
on a city-wide basis. The Specifc Plan does provide for the review of
buildings for greater energy effciency and promotes standards for
sustainability in Section 4. Special Guidelines of Chapter VII - Design
Guidelines.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IX-32
1
Chapter X Plan Implementation Chapter X Plan Implementation
Chula Vista
X. Plan Implementation and Community Benefits
Program
A. Introduction X-1
B. Regulatory Framework X-2
C. Visualization X-4
D. Long Term Implementation Process X-9
E. Description of Improvements X-11
F. Mobility Improvements X-12
G. Urban Amenity Improvements X-17
H. Additional Community Improvements X-20
I. Key Short-Term Demonstration Projects X-22
J. Infrastructure Financing Mechanisms and Funding Sources X-24
K. Community Benefit Analysis X-28
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Chula Vista
X-1
Chapter X Plan Implementation
X. Plan Implementation and Community Benefits
Program
A. Introduction
The Plan Implementation and Community Benefits Program is a critical element
to realizing the desired improvements to Chula Vista’s Urban Core that are
outlined in the Specific Plan. The sole purpose of the Specific Plan is to improve
the quality of life for Chula Vista residents and visitors in general, with focus on
the west side in particular. The vision expressed in the Specific Plan includes
investments in streets, transit, parks, plazas, cultural facilities, protection of
historic resources, schools, and improvements to City services such as utilities,
police, fire, and health and human services. This investment will be supported
by a partnership between the City and the private sector as new development
occurs. Thus, this chapter of the Specific Plan contains information on and
forms a critical link between the improvements the City desires and how both
the City and private investment will contribute to make the improvements
happen.
The Specific Plan is the primary planning tool to initiate positive change and
enhance the western side of Chula Vista. The Specific Plan was prepared based
on the overarching policies outlined in the General Plan and refined based on
an analysis of important economic conditions. An intensive public involvement
program has also shaped the contents and outcome of the Specific Plan. The
result is a Specific Plan that is visionary, yet realistic, for the future of the
Specific Plan area.
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B. Regulatory Framework
The Specific Plan was developed to create a conducive development environment,
one that is responsive to the prevailing market demand. Some of the key policy
changes that have been incorporated in the Specific Plan include:
• Zoning that is responsive to market needs;
• Increased density allowed through specialized “form and standard based”
development standards encouraging underutilized and dilapidated
properties to redevelop;
• Streamlined permitting and entitlement processes;
• Area-wide infrastructure and “amenity” (e.g., streetscape and landscape)
investments;
• Marketing of the Specific Plan area to both consumers and prospective
business tenants;
• Technical assistance to Specific Plan area businesses; and
• Enhanced code compliance to improve the visual appeal and function of
the urban environment.
An effective Specific Plan needs to be based on a realistic understanding
of the market and demographic conditions affecting the Specific Plan area.
Simply changing zoning on a map will not attract development unless there is
an underlying market demand for a particular land use. On the other hand, if
there is immediate demand for a desirable land use that is not permitted under
existing zoning, a change in zoning can bring about very significant results.
Moreover, appropriate zoning changes can be made more effective if these
changes are coupled with regulations that address other potential barriers to
development (e.g., onerous parking requirements). With this approach, private
and public sectors work together to provide a synergy of uses as well as public
improvements and urban amenities.
The Specific Plan is the first large-scale development plan pursuant to the
adoption of the City’s General Plan in 2005. As such, it is a critical test of
the concepts within the General Plan, particularly as they relate to facilities
financing. This Specific Plan assesses the needs for facilities and tests those
needs against the funding which would be made available as a result of the
development its regulations would accommodate, to prove that the facilities
assumptions within the plan are reasonable and feasible. The Specific Plan
anticipates, however, that the facilities funding programs to implement and
construct public facilities will be a part of larger facilities financing plans which
will be prepared for the entirety of western Chula Vista. These plans provide
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for the coordinated provision of facilities to meet current deficiencies and the
demands of new infill development. Among such plans are the Parks Master
Plan and particular facilities implementation and fee programs related to
transportation, utilities and other public facilities. Over the life span anticipated
within the Specific Plan, these programs will be initiated, reviewed and revised
to keep pace with the amount, location and timing of development and need.
Public improvements are especially important, as these elements add value to
the area and signal to the private sector that the City is committed to improving
the Urban Core. Public improvements thus lay a foundation for future private
sector investment, in a sense “priming the pump”, encouraging property owners,
merchants, and investors to do the same.
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C. Visualization
To assist with the visualization of the benefits and amenities the Specific Plan
hopes to bring, photographic visualizations are presented to illustrate how the
Urban Core could be transformed in selected areas. Figures 10.1-10.4 show
existing conditions, simulations for interim conditions, and near buildout
conditions for areas along Third Avenue, F Street, H Street, and Broadway.
The rate of development is determined in large part by market forces and will
vary in architectural character and form, but the simulations demonstrate the
pedestrian improvements, public amenities, and anticipated private investment.
It is important to note that the simulations illustrate just one set, of an almost
infinite number, of possible scenarios.
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Fg. 10.1
Intersection of Third Avenue and Davidson Street - Existing Conditions,
Interim Conditions, and Near Build-out Conditions
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Fg. 10.2
F Street looking east - Existing Conditions, Interim Conditions, and Near Build-
out Conditions
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Fg. 10.3
H Street looking east towards Fifth Avenue- Existing Conditions, Interim
Conditions, and Near Build-out Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
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Fg. 10.4
Intersection of Broadway and D Street - Existing Conditions, Interim
Conditions, and Near Build-out Conditions
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Chapter X Plan Implementation
D. Long Term Implementation Process
From the beginning of the Specific Plan process, there has been a keen awareness
that the adoption and implementation of the plan will rest on the amenity value
that new development can bring. This value cannot be achieved by attractive
pictures and vague promises of future action. Among the key benefits of the
Specific Plan will be amenities and capacity enhancements, in the form of such
elements as parks, pedestrian spaces, utilities, transit accommodation and
roadway improvements. The effort to plan and program the delivery of these
essential public facilities within the Urban Core will be especially challenging. In
new communities, the City has assessed such matters through the preparation
of Public Facilities Finance Plans (PFFPs). These documents have served well
to address the extension of facilities coinciding with the relatively short-term
timing of new master planned neighborhoods and subdivision improvements.
However, the Urban Core presents a vastly different set of circumstances: the
placement or upgrading of public facilities within an existing neighborhood, in
support of infill and redevelopment over a period of perhaps decades.
For the reasons stated above, the Specific Plan relies on a systematic approach
to the delivery of public facilities. These facilities are designed to fulfill the
obligations and objectives handed down from the General Plan. The public
facilities program also fits well with the ongoing efforts of City construction
and operating departments as these departments pursue their own particular
studies, creative implementation approaches, and master plans.
The flow chart presented in Figure 10.5 was prepared to show how the Urban
Core project includes necessary components to inform the future citywide or
western Chula Vista Impact Fee, Facilities Master Plan, and Capital Improvement
Program processes. The key bridge from the plan and its regulations into public
facilities is the Facilities Implementation Analysis found in Appendix D.
The implementation of the Specific Plan is also seen as somewhat dynamic and
is subject to ongoing monitoring and priority-setting. While projects are assigned
priorities based on 2005 factors, the timing and location of development may
require that certain facilities be advanced in priority. This schedule assessment
will be accomplished through a review of facility performance as part of the
biannual review of the Citywide Capital Improvement Program (CIP) budget
and through the preparation and maintenance of the City’s facilities financing
and fee strategies, as these items may be adopted and amended from time to
time. Any change in priorities, timing and valuation from the facilities program
associated with the CIP or facilities program shall not require the amendment
of the Specific Plan, as long as such changes, additions or subtractions are not
in conflict with the applicable CEQA review documents for this Specific Plan.
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Fg. 10.5
Urban Core Specific Plan Implementation Process
URBAN CORE SPECIFIC PLAN
REGULATION AND INCENTIVE
[PRIVATE IMPLEMENTATION]
FACLITIES
[PUBLIC IMPLEMENTATION]
URBAN CORE SPECIFIC PLAN
Regulatory Requirements
Design Standards
Amenity Standards and Bonuses
Mitigation Measures
Facility List/Rough Costs/Fund Source
Capacity [Utilities, Schools, etc]
Amenity [Streetscape, Parks, etc]
Mobility [Streets, Transit, etc]
URBAN CORE SPECIFIC PLAN
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
REPORT
FACILITIES IMPLEMENTATION
ANALYSES
Facility Priority List by Type
Parks
Location 1
Location 2
Sidewalks
Location 1
Location 2
Other …
Location 1
Location 2
Funding Resources
Gen’l Fund
Location 1
Location 2
TI/Bonding
Location 1
Location 2
Impact Fee
Location 1
Location 2
INITIAL CIP
PROGRAM
Project Identification
Budget and Source
ONGOING REVIEW OF PERFORMANCE, PRIORITIES AND FEES
CONDUCTED AS A PART OF THE TWO-YEAR CITY CIP BUDGET PROCESS
AND FINANCING FEE PROGRAM UPDATES
MASTER PLANS
(i.e. – PARKS, FIRE)
West Side Evaluation
Program Proposals
IMPACT & PAD FEE
REVISIONS
Citywide Programs
Fee System
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E. Description of Improvements
The following components describe the general approach to achieve the vision
and fulfill the objectives for the Urban Core as outlined in the Specific Plan.
The following sections overview the factors and standards that have been
used to develop the facilities list for the Specific Plan. Appendix D - Facilities
Implementation Analysis is a complete listing of facilities, initial priority, order
of magnitude costs, and likely funding source for implementation.
• Mobility Improvements: This component describes various methods of
improving mobility in the Urban Core through investments in pedestrian,
bicycle, transit, street and parking systems.
• Amenity Improvements: This component describes various methods of
improving the quality of the urban environment through investments in
amenities such as street furnishings, gateways, wayfinding signs, public
art, and storefront facade upgrades.
• Additional Community Improvements: This component addresses the
method for investing in and improving existing and new community
facilities such as parks, plazas, schools, utilities, and infrastructure.
• Key Short-Term Demonstration Projects: This section describes a number
of selected short-term public improvement projects that the City should
undertake to demonstrate its commitment to revitalizing the Urban Core
and the potential for achieving the goals of the Specific Plan.
• Potential Funding Sources: The method to obtain the community benefits
listed above includes harnessing the power of private investment and
the strategic use of available public funds. This section outlines both
private investment obligations and the most likely sources of public
funds that are potentially available to the City.
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F. Mobility Improvements
The Specific Plan provides policy guidance on mobility systems with the primary
goal of achieving a balanced transportation system. Inherent in this goal are
initiatives that serve to calm traffic, create a friendlier pedestrian and bicycle
environment, and vastly improve the availability and service of public transit.
Also important to the Specific Plan are mobility connections to other areas of
the city, including the eastern Chula Vista and Bayfront areas.
1. Pedestrian Facilities – Capital Projects
The primary goal of pedestrian facilities is to provide logical, convenient,
and safe paths of travel throughout the Specific Plan area, making walking a
preferred method of travel.
a. Sidewalks on all streets throughout the planning area should be
improved to include adequate width, a safe and smooth walking surface,
and adequate lighting levels as specified in Chapter VIII - Public Realm
Design Guidelines. In some cases, additional right-of-way (ROW) or public
easements may be needed. Additional amenities such as directional
signs, benches, and shade trees are important elements that improve
the level of quality for pedestrian facilities. (See cross-sections and
intersections in Chapter V - Mobility.)
1) Third Avenue: special paving 14-foot or more wide, depending on
diagonal parking locations (between E Street and G Street)
2) E Street: standard paving, between 9-foot and 13-foot wide (need
additional 22 feet total, or 11 feet on each side, of easement between
I-5 and 300 feet east of ramp)
3) F Street: standard paving, 16-foot wide with a 6-foot wide Class I
bike path in the center of the sidewalk
4) H Street: special paving, 16-foot wide (need additional 38 feet total
of easement between I-5 and Broadway for sidewalk and additional
travel lane, need additional 8 feet total additional ROW of easement
between Broadway and Third Avenue for sidewalk)
5) Broadway: standard paving, 9-foot wide
6) Woodlawn Avenue: standard paving, 12-foot wide or 24 feet total
both sides
7) All other major streets: standard paving, minimum 10-foot wide
b. Crosswalks at all intersections throughout the planning area shall be
clearly marked and improved as specified in Chapter VIII - Public Realm
Design Guidelines.
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1) Special paving at all intersections in the Village District along Third
Avenue
2) Special paving at intersections along H Street at Third Avenue, Fourth
Avenue, Fifth Avenue, Broadway, Woodlawn Avenue, and I-5
3) Special paving at intersections along Broadway at E Street, F Street,
G Street, and H Street
c. Mid-block crosswalks at selected locations, as described in Chapter VIII
- Public Realm Design Guidelines, shall be installed.
• Mid-block with special paving and advanced crossing technology at
four locations along Third Avenue in the Village District
d. Paseos that connect residential areas, public parking lots, and other
facilities to adjacent streets and pedestrian destinations are a key
element in an enhanced pedestrian environment. Paseos should be
incorporated into private and public improvement projects as necessary
to provide exemplary pedestrian access.
2. Bicycle Facilities – Capital Projects
The primary goal of bicycle facilities is to provide logical, convenient, and safe
paths of travel throughout the Specific Plan area, making cycling a preferred
method of travel. To supplement the proposed actions, a bike users map will
be prepared to assist commuters and recreational riders in getting around the
Urban Core and finding directions to various destinations.
a. A boardwalk should be created along H Street and F Street that connects
the Urban Core to the Bayfront area. The boardwalk shall consist of an
elevated Class I bike path a minimum of 6-foot wide located in the center
of the sidewalk on each side of H Street and F Street. The bike paths
shall be marked with colored paving and signed to minimize conflicts
between pedestrians, vehicles, and bicyclists. Bicycle boulevards will
also be evaluated for Davidson Street and G Street.
b. Class II bicycle lanes, at a minimum of 6-foot wide, should be installed
on Broadway and along the segments of F Street where a Class I bike
path cannot be accommodated.
c. Class III bike routes should be established on the following streets:
Fourth Avenue, Fifth Avenue, Third Avenue, E Street, G Street, I Street, J Street,
K Street.
d. End of trip facilities, as specified in the updated City Bicycle Master Plan,
should include secured bike racks and bike lockers.
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3. Transit Facilities – Policy Initiatives and Capital Projects
The primary goal of transit facilities is to provide a convenient and dependable
alternative to automobile travel throughout the Specific Plan area.
a. Policy Initiatives
• Establish a West Side Shuttle with service on H Street, Third Avenue, E
Street or F Street, and Broadway with connections to the Bayfront and
Trolley stations at E Street and H Street. The West Side Shuttle should
have a relatively short headway of approximately 15 minutes and should
run in both directions.
b. Capital Projects
1) Purchase shuttle vehicles as specified in West Side Shuttle program.
2) Establish shuttle stations consisting of expanded curb and vehicle
pullout areas and signs at the following locations:
• Third Avenue at H Street, F Street and E Street
• E Street at Fifth Avenue, Broadway, Trolley station and Bayfront
• Broadway at F Street and G Street
• H Street at Fourth Avenue, Fifth Avenue, Broadway, Woodlawn
Avenue, Trolley station and Bayfront
3) Provide bus stops and shelters at each of the shuttle locations for use
by shuttle loop service and city-wide bus and transit service.
4. Intersection Improvements - Capital Projects
The primary goal of street improvements is to provide a safe and efficient driving
environment, quality road surfaces, and improved traffic operations through
lane configurations and intersection designs. Intersections at the following
locations will need to be improved to accommodate expected traffic demands.
These improvements will include upgraded traffic control, signals and signal
timing, turning lanes, and through lane configurations.
a. Priority of Intersection Improvements
Intersection improvements have been divided into three tiers based on priority,
with the most important and immediate improvements classified as Tier 1. In
each individual tier, the City’s existing monitoring program will determine exactly
which projects are implemented first during the biannual CIP program review.
The intersection numbers correspond to the numbering system provided in
Appendix B – Traffic Impact Analysis, prepared by Kimley-Horn and Associates,
Inc.
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Chapter X Plan Implementation
1) Tier 1 Improvements
• #1 Bay Boulevard/I-5 Southbound Ramp/E Street
• #2 I-5 Northbound Ramp/E Street
• #24 I-5 Southbound Ramp/H Street
• #25 I-5 Northbound Ramp/H Street
• #26 Woodlawn Avenue/H Street
• #27 Broadway/H Street
• #28 Fifth Avenue/H Street
• #29 Fourth Avenue/H Street
• #44 Fourth Avenue/SR-54 Eastbound Ramp
2) Tier 2 Improvements
• #34 Broadway/SR-54 Westbound Ramp
• #61 L Street/Bay Boulevard
• #63 Bay Boulevard/I-5 Southbound Ramp
• #64 Industrial Boulevard/I-5 Northbound Ramp
• H Street from four lanes to six lanes from I-5 to Broadway
3) Tier 3 Improvements
• #13 Broadway/F Street
• #45 Fourth Avenue/Brisbane Street
• #57 Second Avenue/D Street
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5. Parking Systems – Policy Initiatives
The primary goal of the parking policy is to provide ample, convenient and
dependable public parking facilities at three primary locations within the Urban
Core:
• The Village District
• H Street Transit Focus Area (TFA)
• E Street TFA
These areas will likely be parking districts designed to assist the private sector
in minimizing the provision of on-site parking and providing ample parking for
users in each of these areas.
a. In five years, or sooner upon identification of need, prepare an update
to the parking district in the Village District. This analysis shall address
the phased provision of additional public parking including:
1) Maintaining the equivalent of existing public spaces through shared
parking and parking management initiatives,
2) Provision of short-term off-street surface parking facilities,
3) Provision of selected long-term parking structures in this District,
and
4) Updating the in-lieu fee program.
b. In five years, or sooner upon identification of need, prepare a parking
analysis that addresses the following for the H Street and E Street
TFAs:
1) Maintaining the equivalent of existing public parking through shared
parking and parking management initiatives,
2) Provision of short-term off-street surface parking facilities,
3) Provision of selected long-term parking structures in this District,
and
4) Determining the appropriateness of an in-lieu fee program.
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G. Urban Amenity Improvements
The Specific Plan provides policy and design guidance on urban amenities with
the primary goal of achieving a physically enhanced and visually attractive
urban environment that is a desirable destination within Chula Vista.
1. Streetscapes - Capital Projects
a. Prepare streetscape master plans for selected streets in the Urban Core.
Master plans should be prepared with community involvement and
should be consistent with the guidelines and recommendations of the
Specific Plan. Streetscape master plans should address the following
elements:
1) Coordination with adjacent infill development in order that street
widening and urban design amenities can be incrementally
implemented, to the extent feasible, concurrent with new development
projects.
2) Coordinated design with street improvement projects, including
intersection, infrastructure, and mid-block and crosswalk designs.
3) Detailed designs and materials specifications for all sidewalk areas,
including paving, street furnishings, street trees, decorative street
lights and other elements.
4) Street master plans should be prepared for the following areas:
a) Third Avenue between E Street and H Street
b) Broadway between C Street and L Street
c) H Street between I-5 and Del Mar Avenue
d) F Street between I-5 and Del Mar Avenue
e) E Street between I-5 and Del Mar Avenue
b. Prepare plans for the I-5 overcrossings that include enhanced sidewalk
paving, decorative lighting, street furnishings, public art, and other
elements. Coordinate the designs with gateways and streetscape plans
for these areas. Plans should be prepared for the following locations:
1) H Street
2) F Street
3) E Street
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2. Gateways - Capital Projects
Prepare detailed design plans for selected gateways in the Urban Core.
Gateway plans should be prepared with community involvement and should
be consistent with the guidelines and recommendations of the Specific Plan.
The gateway plans may be developed and implemented as part of private
development occurring at gateway locations. Plans should be prepared for the
following locations:
a. Primary Gateways
1) I-5 and E Street
2) I-5 and H Street
3) Third Avenue and E Street
4) Fourth Avenue and C Street
b. Secondary Gateways
1) I-5 and F Street
2) Third Avenue and H Street
3. Wayfinding - Capital Projects
Prepare a wayfinding directional sign program for the Specific Plan area. The
program should include incorporation of the City logo or other Urban Core
identity brand, informational and directional sign designs to facilities such as
public parking, public facilities and other important destinations. The program
should include sign hierarchy and conceptual designs, should be prepared
with community involvement, and should be consistent with the guidelines and
recommendations of the Specific Plan. Actual capital projects will depend on
the resulting plan or sign program.
4. Public Art - Policy Initiatives
Complete the art in public places program and implement through project
review on individual developments and various public improvement projects.
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Chapter X Plan Implementation
5. Storefront/Facade Improvements – Policy Initiatives and
Capital Projects
a. Policy Initiatives
1) Update the storefront façade improvement program in the Village
District.
2) Prepare a new storefront façade improvement program for the Urban
Core District along Broadway.
b. Capital Projects
• Fund storefront and façade improvement projects through the provision
of grants in compliance with the adopted program.
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H. Additional Community Improvements
The Specific Plan provides policy guidance on a range of public facilities and
services with the primary goal of providing excellent facilities and services for
the Urban Core residents and visitors. Inherent in this goal are initiatives that
serve to produce additional park space; adequate and efficient use of public
schools, plazas, and paseo systems; and upgraded utilities and infrastructure.
1. Parks
Pursue park opportunity sites within the Urban Core. Each potential park site
should be located as specified in the updated Parks and Recreation Master Plan.
Each park should contain facilities as required by the Parks and Recreation
Master Plan update. The following are general areas for park improvements in
the Urban Core:
a. Lower Sweetwater Community Park (approximately 15 to 20 acres)
b. Memorial Park Annex (approximately 3 to 5 acres)
c. Park west of Broadway (approximately 12 to 15 acres)
2. Plazas - Capital Projects
Pursue plaza improvement projects, with amenities as outlined in this Specific
Plan, in conjunction with new development at the general locations shown on
Figure 8.69 of Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines.
3. Schools - Policy Initiatives
Coordinate with Chula Vista Elementary School District (CVESD) and the
Sweetwater Unified High School District (SUHSD) to determine the need for
additional school facility space as outlined Chapter IX – Infrastructure and
Public Facilities.
4. Sustainable Development - Green Building Demonstration
The recently established National Energy Center for Sustainable Communities
(NECSC) will serve as a tremendous resource to the City throughout the life of
the Specific Plan. In partnership with the NECSC, the City will look to generate
grant funding specific to the Urban Core that will support commitments
from developers to undertake a green building demonstration program.
Through existing agreements and future development programs, the City will
target the Urban Core to create an urban model for sustainable community
development.
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A new resource guide could be developed which includes expanded sustainability
goals, design principles and tools for designing and building in a mixed-use
or urban development market. A Resource Guide for Sustainable Urban
Development could expand upon the Environmental Sustainability Goals and
Design Principles included in Chapter VII - Design Guidelines and help establish
a framework for the creation of a sustainable Urban Core.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
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I. Key Short-Term Demonstration Projects
The following section identifies key short-term projects or programs that
should be undertaken to demonstrate the potential growth and improvements
facilitated by the Specific Plan. These particular projects/programs have been
selected to create a synergistic approach to revitalization in one of the most
critical areas within the Urban Core, the Village District. The projects/programs
address private investment in new urban infill residential development, public
investment along a major pedestrian and business corridor, and public/private
investments to enhance existing businesses that are expected to remain in the
short-mid term.
1. Pursue Immediate Redevelopment of Opportunity Sites
Redevelopment of key underutilized sites, particularly within the Village District,
with new mixed-use developments should be pursued immediately to set the
momentum for other new development in the Urban Core. This initial activity
would begin to put more “feet on the street” and create the catalyst necessary
for adjoining commercial uses to really thrive and allow an active urban
environment to evolve.
A number of sites have already been identified and may present unique
opportunities for public/private partnerships. Several of the sites are City
owned and are either vacant or used as surface parking lots, providing readily
available land resources, thus streamlining the development process. The
process, review, and development of these, or other sites, would demonstrate
the positive enhancements provided by key elements of the Specific Plan.
In addition, because the area is within a designated redevelopment project
area, the new development would provide an almost immediate enhanced
revenue stream through new tax increment. In return, this new revenue
could be invested in key public improvements and urban amenities within the
redevelopment project area. Focus on the Village District is critical in order to
realize the benefits of new tax increment within the limited timeframe remaining
for the existing Town Centre I Redevelopment Plan.
2. Third Avenue Streetscape Master Plan and Improvements
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines provides the more detailed
engineering design of physical streetscape improvements of major streets
throughout the urban core. A focused effort to develop a streetscape master
plan and improvement plans for Third Avenue between E Street and G Street
should be undertaken as a priority action. Third Avenue was selected as a
priority due to its location as the traditional center of the Urban Core and the
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ability to build upon and integrate the revitalization efforts described above
under Section 1. Pursue Immediate Redevelopment of Opportunity Sites. The
effort should include:
a. Involvement of the Downtown Business Association;
b. Development of a work program and request for proposals;
c. Using the public realm design guidelines in Chapter VIII as a basis,
further develop detailed design plans, localized pedestrian and vehicular
circulation, and street improvement plans;
d. Prepare Plans, Specifications and Estimates (PS&E) along with an
implementation/phasing strategy for improvements; and
e. Community participation with both area businesses and residents.
3. Improve Existing Storefront Renovation Program
Over the last several years, the City has implemented a storefront renovation
program that has had mediocre impacts on enhancing the existing and future
face of the Village District’s commercial corridor. While improvements were
made “one storefront at a time”, the results were often overshadowed by
adjoining properties that had not taken advantage of the program. Therefore,
it is recommended that the existing program be revamped to better leverage
public funds with private investments to promote business retention and growth
and augment other revitalization efforts..
The program could be redesigned to have a greater impact along the main
shopping corridor by instead improving a number of businesses located
cohesively or clustered together. By treating several properties in a row, the
architectural enhancements present a greater visual impact to pedestrians,
cyclists, and auto traffickers.
The initial pilot program should be focused on the Village District’s Third Avenue
commercial corridor and the Broadway commercial corridor. Improvements
that should be considered include new storefront signs, awnings, windows,
and paint. Restoration of vintage signs representative of significant periods of
history in the urban core may also contribute positively to the pedestrian and
vehicular streetscape. Program development and implementation should be
pursued and include incentivized financing options for participants.
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J. Infrastructure Financing Mechanisms and Funding
Sources
The following is a list of commonly used mechanisms to fund public facilities.
The City of Chula Vista may currently be utilizing some of these mechanisms,
but there may be opportunities for better leveraging of funding or for pursuing
new funding sources.
1. Redevelopment Funds.
The majority of the Urban Core includes areas within various Redevelopment
Project Areas.
a. Tax Increment Financing (TIF).
Tax increment financing is the increase in property tax revenues resulting from
an increase in assessed property values that exceed base year values. Within a
redevelopment project area, the Redevelopment Agency collects a substantial
majority of the tax increment financing monies accrued in the project area. All tax
increment monies generated and adopted in redevelopment project areas are
allocated among four basic public uses: schools, neighborhood improvements,
affordable housing, and other public agencies. This funding source provides a
critical means to revitalization and public improvement activities by enabling
redevelopment agencies to issue tax increment bonds without using general
fund monies or raising taxes.
b. Set Aside Funds.
State law requires that at least 20 percent of all tax increment financing dollars
accrued within a redevelopment project area must be set aside and “used
by the agency for the purposes of increasing, improving, and preserving the
community’s supply of low- and moderate-income housing …” (Health and
Safety Code §33334.2(a)). The set aside funds must be held in a separate
Low and Moderate Income Housing Fund until used, along with any interest
earned and repayments to the housing fund (§33334.3). The set aside funds
may be used inside or outside of the project area but must benefit the project
area. Use of set aside funds for the purposes of increasing, improving, and
preserving the community’s supply of low- and moderate-income housing may
include, but is not limited to, the following:
1) Acquisition and donation of land for affordable housing;
2) Construction and rehabilitation of affordable housing units;
3) Financing insurance premiums for the construction and rehabilitation of
affordable housing units;
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4) Providing subsidies to, or for the benefit of, extremely low, very low, and
lower income households as well as persons and families of low or
moderate income;
5) Paying principal and interest on bonds, loans, advances or other
indebtedness and financing or carrying charges;
6) Maintaining the supply of mobile homes; and
7) Preserving “at risk” affordable housing units threatened with imminent
conversion to market rate units.
2. Community Development Block Grants (CDBG)
CDBG are a Federal grant program administered by the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development. CDBG are administered on a formula
basis to entitled cities, urban counties and states to develop viable urban
communities by providing decent housing and a suitable living environment
and by expanding economic opportunities, principally for low- and moderate-
income individuals. The Urban Core includes areas within the required low and
moderate census tracts. Eligible activities that may be proposed for funding
include, but are not limited to, housing, economic development, and public
facilities and improvements.
3. Business Improvement Districts
Business Improvement Districts (BID) or Property and Business Improvement
Districts (PBID) are mechanisms for assessing and collecting fees that can be
used to fund various improvements and programs within the district. There are
several legal forms of BIDs authorized by California law. The most common types
are districts formed under the Parking and Business Improvement Act of 1989.
Business Improvement Areas (BIAs) formed under the 1989 law impose a fee
on the business licenses of the businesses operating in the area, rather than
the property owners. The collected funds are used to pay for the improvements
and activities specified in the formation documents. A similar assessment
procedure was authorized by the Property and Business Improvement District
(PBID) Law of 1994. The distinction is that the PBID makes the assessment on
the real property and not on the business. A PBID is currently in operation in
the Village area. Other areas of the Specific Plan may also be ideally suited for
BID funding.
The range of activities that can potentially be funded through BIDs and PBIDs
is broad, and includes parking improvements, sidewalk cleaning, streetscape
maintenance, streetscape improvements (i.e., furniture, lighting, planting,
etc.), promotional events, marketing and advertising, security patrols, public
art, trash collection, landscaping and other functions. Generally speaking, the
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
X-26
BID format works well for marketing and other programmatic activities that
serve to directly benefit area businesses (i.e., tenants), whereas a PBID may be
more appropriate for permanent physical improvements that stand to improve
property values in the area. Given the size and diversity of the Specific Plan
area, it may be appropriate for separate BIDs or PBIDs to be formed for different
regions within the plan area. In this way, the collected funding could be more
specifically targeted to the unique improvement and programmatic needs of
each district.
4. Development Impact Fees
Property tax limitations imposed by Proposition 13, resulting in the decline in
property taxes available for public projects, has led local governments to adopt
alternative revenue sources to accommodate public facility and infrastructure
demands resulting from growth. Development Impact Fees is one of those
sources. AB 1600 (Cortese), which became effective on January 1, 1989,
regulates the way that impact fees are imposed on development projects.
Impact fees are one-time charges applied to offset the additional public facility
provision costs from new development. This may include provision of additional
services, such as water and sewer systems, roads, schools, libraries, and parks
and recreation facilities. Impact fees cannot be used for operation, maintenance,
alteration, or replacement of existing capital facilities and cannot be channeled
to the local government’s discretionary general funds. Impact fees cannot be
an arbitrary amount and must be explicitly linked to the added cost of providing
the facility towards which it is collected.
The City of Chula Vista already has a range of impact fees that are updated
periodically. It is important, however, to realize that there are two primary
aspects of capital costs (based on which impacts fees are collected) – land costs
and building costs. Though the latter can be estimated at a citywide level and
adjusted periodically using appropriate inflation factors, land cost estimation is
more complicated, especially when one considers significant variations in land
values within the city and the necessity to provide land intensive public facilities,
such as parks. As a result the land acquisition component of a standardized
impact fee may not be consistent with the true costs involved.
5. TransNet
In 1987, voters approved the TransNet program − a half-cent sales tax to fund
a variety of important transportation projects throughout the San Diego region.
This 20-year, $3.3 billion transportation improvement program expires in 2008.
In November 2004, 67 percent of the region’s voters supported Proposition A,
which extends TransNet to 2048, thereby generating an additional $14 billion to
be distributed among highway, transit, and local road projects in approximately
Chula Vista
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Chapter X Plan Implementation
equal thirds. In addition, it will support a robust public transportation system,
including new Bus Rapid Transit services and carpool/managed lanes along
many of the major freeways. Two percent of the available funds will be
earmarked annually for bicycle paths and facilities, pedestrian improvements,
and neighborhood safety projects. The San Diego Association of Governments
(SANDAG) sets the priorities and allocates TransNet funds.
6. Grant Funding
A variety of funding options are available though Federal, state and local grant
programs. Many of the grant programs target urban revitalization efforts, smart
growth enhancements, and transportation planning and are provided on a
competitive basis. Current grant programs, such as the Smart Growth Incentive
Pilot Program administered through SANDAG, can provide significant funding
towards projects that result in furthering smart growth approaches, such as the
elements embodied in the principles of the Specific Plan.
7. General Fund
The City receives revenue from a variety of sources, such as property taxes, sales
taxes, fees for recreation classes and plan checking. Revenue can be generally
classified into three broad categories: program revenue, general revenue and
restricted revenue. Depending on the revenue source, the General Fund may be
used for a variety of purposes, such as capital improvement projects or streets,
sewers, stormdrains and other infrastructure maintenance improvements.
8. Other Funding Sources
Examples of other funding sources that may be considered to assist in the
implementation of the community benefits outlined in this chapter include Ad
Valorem Property Taxes, the Sales and Use Tax, the Business License Tax and
the Transient Occupancy Tax.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
X-28
K. Community Benefit Analysis
In addition to facilities and amenities outlined by this chapter, as development
proceeds in the Urban Core the specific contributions of each project to the
community shall be analyzed. Each discretionary project application shall be
accompanied by a memorandum form statement of the applicant outlining both
the obligatory contributions of the project (in the form of fees, revenue streams
and direct facilities construction), and any further voluntary contribution to the
community. Voluntary contributions may take the form of:
• Design features of the project, which meets some particular community
need or environmental goal
• Programs associated with the project which may benefit Chula Vistans
directly or indirectly
It is not the intent of this section that the Community Benefit Analysis be used
as criteria for approving or disapproving projects pursuant to this Specific
Plan. Rather, the analysis will provide an ongoing framework for citizens to
understand features of the project that positively contribute to Chula Vista in
ways beyond its physical design.
1
Chapter XI Plan Administration
Chula Vista
XI. Plan Administration
A. Introduction XI-1
B. Specific Plan Adoption XI-2
C. Specific Plan Administration XI-3
D. Specific Plan Amendment XI-9
E. Five Year Review XI-12
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Chula Vista
XI-1
Chapter XI Plan Administration
XI. Plan Administration
A. Introduction
This chapter describes the authority of a Specific Plan, the process which will be
used to consider development applications and the administrative procedures
required for amendments and/or modifications to the Plan.
A Specific Plan is a regulatory tool that local governments use to implement their
General Plan and to guide development in a localized area. While to the general
plan is the primary guide for growth and development throughout a community,
a Specific Plan is able to focus on the unique characteristics of a specialized
area by customizing the vision, land uses and development standards for that
area. This specific plan has been prepared and adopted pursuant to Section
65450 et seq of the California Government Code.
XI-2
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
B. Specific Plan Adoption
This Specific Plan has been adopted by City Council Ordinance. Adoption of this
Specific Plan followed soon after the adoption of a comprehensive General Plan
update. Upon adoption, the Specific Plan implements the adopted General Plan
by establishing the land uses, development standards and design guidelines
for the Specific Plan Focus Areas.
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Chapter XI Plan Administration
C. Specific Plan Administration
1. Urban Core Development Permit and Design Review
Requirements
The Design Review Process for future development projects is established for
the Specific Plan focus areas. Except as provided in paragraphs 3 and 4,
below, development projects within the Specific Plan Focus Areas will be subject
to a design review process to ensure consistency with the Specific Plan. In
addition, proposed developments would also be required to adhere to existing
CVMC regulations and processes for other discretionary review, such as those
for conditional use permits, variances, and subdivisions, as may be applicable.
(See CVMC 2.55, 19.14, and 19.54). All developments within the Specific Plan
Focus Areas require submittal and approval of an Urban Core Development
Permit (UCDP). The UCDP Review Process is illustrated in Figure 11.1. To be
approved, a development project must:
• comply with the permitted uses and development criteria contained in
Chapter VI - Land Use and Development Regulations of this Specific
Plan, and other applicable regulations contained in the CVMC; and,
• be found to be consistent with the design requirements and
recommendations contained in Chapter VII - Design Guidelines of this
Specific Plan.
For those projects which propose buildings that exceed 84 feet in height, the
further following findings will be required to be made:
• The building design reflects a unique, signature architecture and creates
a positive Chula Vista landmark;
• The project provides increased amenities such as public areas, plazas,
fountains, parks and paseos, extensive streetscape improvements,
or other public amenities that may be enjoyed by the public at large.
These amenities will be above and beyond those required as part of the
standard development approval process; and,
• The overall building height and massing provides appropriate transitions
to surrounding areas in accordance with the future vision for those areas,
or if in a Neighborhood Transition Combining District, the adjoining
neighborhood.
Except as provided in Section 3. Nonconforming Uses, Section 4. Exemptions,
and Section 5. Site Specific Variance below, all projects require a pre-submittal
meeting with staff to determine appropriate processing requirements and
preliminary issue identification. The UCDP will be issued if it is determined
that the project complies with the provisions of the Specific Plan, including the
XI-4
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Fg. 11.1
Urban Core Development Permit Design Review Process
Chula Vista
XI-5
Chapter XI Plan Administration
development regulations, standards and design guidelines. Approval of the
UCDP will include all conditions of approval ranging from design, environmental
mitigation measures, public improvements, and others as may be determined
upon review of the specific development project. The UCDP process will ensure
an enhanced level of review for major projects, while minimizing processing for
minor projects, as defined by CVMC Section 19.14.582(i).
The Specific Plan provides separate processes for design review for those
developments within established Redevelopment Project Areas and for those
developments located outside established Redevelopment Project Areas.
Figure 11.2 illustrates the boundaries of existing Redevelopment Project Areas,
which may be amended from time to time, within the Specific Plan boundaries.
Projects which include site areas within both areas shall be approved using the
process set forth for Redevelopment Project Areas.
a. Developments Within a Redevelopment Project Area
The Chula Vista Redevelopment Corporation (CVRC) has been established by the
City Council to assist with implementation and oversight of infill development in
the Redevelopment Project Areas within the Specific Plan, and elsewhere within
the City. The CVRC holds regularly scheduled meetings to review developments
and design proposals. The CVRC provides a vehicle for public participation
relating to the growth and redevelopment of the Chula Vista Urban Core, and
serves as a communications link between its citizens, the City Council and
Redevelopment Agency. In addition, the recently established Redevelopment
Advisory Committee will provide input on projects, early and often.
All developments within the Specific Plan Focus Areas that are all or in part
within a Redevelopment Project Area require submittal and approval of a UCDP.
The UCDP process requires review and approval by either the CVRC Executive
Director or the CVRC Board. For minor projects, design review will be subject to
review and approval by the Executive Director of the CVRC with the opportunity
for appeal to the CVRC. Design review of other projects will be conducted by
staff with recommendation to the CVRC.
b. Developments Not Within a Redevelopment Project Area
Projects within the Specific Plan area, but outside a Redevelopment Project
Area, will be subject to the City’s existing design review processes. Large-scale
projects, as defined above, will require review by the Design Review Committee.
Minor projects may be reviewed and approved by the Zoning Administrator, or
his/her designee in a manner consistent with CVMC Section 19.14.
XI-6
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XI-7
Chapter XI Plan Administration
c. Other Discretionary Approvals
The provisions of the Zoning Ordinance relative to other discretionary permits
or actions (e.g. Tentative Map, Conditional Use Permits) shall be applied as
required based on individual development projects.
2. Permitted Land Uses
Permitted land uses within the Specific Plan Focus Areas are identified in
the Land Use Matrix found in Figures 6.2-6.6 of Chapter VI – Land Use and
Development Regulations. The Community Development Director or his/her
designee may determine in writing that a proposed use is similar and compatible
to a listed use and may be allowed upon making one or more of the following
findings:
• The characteristics of and activities associated with the proposed
use is similar to one or more of the allowed uses and will not involve
substantially greater intensity than the uses listed for that District;
• The proposed use will be consistent with the purpose and vision of the
applicable District;
• The proposed use will be otherwise consistent with the intent of the
Specific Plan;
• The proposed use will be compatible with the other uses listed for the
applicable District.
The Community Development Director or his/her designee may refer the
question of whether a proposed use is allowable directly to the CVRC or
Planning Commission on a determination at a public hearing. A determination
of the Community Development Director or his/her designee, CVRC or Planning
Commission may be appealed in compliance with the procedure set forth in the
CVMC.
XI-8
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
3. Nonconforming Uses
Existing uses that are not listed in the allowable land uses table or determined
to be permitted pursuant to the findings and procedure above are declared
nonconforming uses. Refer to the CVMC Chapter 19.64 – Nonconforming Uses
for definitions and policies managing nonconforming uses such as:
• Continuances (continuing operation of nonconforming uses)
• Changing uses
• Terminations of nonconforming uses
A one time extension of up to six months, according to the provisions of CVMC
Chapter 19.64.070A, may be granted by the CVRC or Planning Commission, as
applicable, where undue economic hardship is demonstrated.
Standards contained within the Specific Plan are mandatory requirements that
must be satisfied for all new projects and building renovations except where
CVMC nonconforming regulations (Chapter 19.64) provide exemptions or
allowances.
4. Exemptions
Exemptions to Specific Plan requirements include minor modifications to existing
structures such as painting, maintenance or repair, re-roof, modifications that
increase the total building area by 200 square feet or less (within a 2-year
period) as well as other exceptions and modifications described in Chapter
19.16 of the CVMC.
5. Site Specific Variance
Standards contained within the Specific Plan are mandatory requirements
that must be satisfied for all new projects and building renovations except
where CVMC Variance regulations (Chapter 19.14.140 -- 19.14.270) provide
for a variation from the strict application of the regulations of a particular
subdistrict.
Chula Vista
XI-9
Chapter XI Plan Administration
D. Specific Plan Amendment
Over time, various sections of the Specific Plan may need to be revised, as
economic conditions or City needs dictate. The policies presented in the Specific
Plan contain some degree of flexibility, but any Specific Plan amendments
must be judged by relatively fixed criteria. The California Government Code
(§ 65453) clearly states that a Specific Plan “may be amended as often as
deemed necessary by the legislative body.” Amendments to this Plan may be
initiated by a developer, any individual property owner, by the CVRC or by the
City, in accordance with any terms and conditions imposed during the original
approval or in accordance with any terms and conditions pertaining to Chula
Vista Municipal Code. The Community Development Director or his/her designee
is responsible for making the determination of whether an amendment to the
Specific Plan text or maps is needed. Amendment procedures are described
below.
• Proposals to amend the Specific Plan must be accompanied by detailed
information to document the change required. This information should
include revised Specific Plan text (or excerpt thereof) and revised
land use diagram or map amendment, where relevant, depicting the
amendment requested.
• The City has conducted a comprehensive analysis and invested a
significant amount of time and money in the preparation of the Specific
Plan, therefore, any proposals to amend the Specific Plan must document
the need for such changes. The City and/or applicant should indicate
the economic, social, or technical issues that generate the need to
amend the Specific Plan. Costs incurred for the amendments shall be
the responsibility of the party requesting the amendment.
• The City and/or applicant must provide an analysis of the amendment’s
impacts relative to the adopted Environmental Impact Report. Depending
on the nature of the amendment, supplemental environmental analysis
may be necessary. The need for such additional analysis shall be
determined by the City of Chula Vista in accordance with the California
Environmental Quality Act (CEQA Guidelines § 15162).
1. Major Amendments
The Community Development Director, or his/her designee shall within 10
days of any submittal of a request to amend this Plan, determine whether
the amendment is “minor” (administrative) or “major”. Major amendments
(described below) require an advisory recommendation by the CVRC and Planning
Commission and approval by the City Council. If the amendment is determined
to be minor, the Community Development Director, or his/her designee, may
XI-10
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
approve or deny the application. Minor amendments must be determined by
the Community Development Director to be in substantial conformance with the
provisions of the Specific Plan and do not include any changes described below
for major amendments. Any decision of the Community Development Director,
or his/her designee, may be appealed to the CVRC and Planning Commission
and/or City Council, provided said appeal is initiated within 10 working days
of receipt by the applicant of written notice of the decision of the Community
Development Director, or his/her designee.
Examples of “major” amendments include:
• The introduction of a new land use designation not contemplated in the
Specific Plan, as may be amended from time to time.
• Changes in the designation of land uses affecting two acres or more
from that shown in the Specific Plan, as may be amended from time to
time.
• Changes to the circulation system or other community facility which
would materially affect a planning concept detailed in the Specific Plan,
as may be amended from time to time.
• Changes or additions to the design guidelines which materially alter
the stated intent of the Specific Plan, as may be amended from time to
time.
• Any change which would result in new significant, direct adverse
environmental impacts not previously considered in the EIR.
2. Necessary Findings
The Community Development Director, or his/her designee will review the request
for Specific Plan Amendment and all submitted supporting material and develop
a recommendation on the Specific Plan Amendment for consideration by the
CVRC, Planning Commission and City Council. The Community Development
Director, or his/her designee may also request further clarification and
submittal of additional supporting information, if necessary. The consideration
of any proposed amendment to the Specific Plan shall require that the following
findings be made:
• Changes have occurred in the community since the approval of the original
Specific Plan which warrant approving the proposed amendment.
• The proposed amendment is consistent with the General Plan for the
City of Chula Vista.
• The proposed amendment will result in a benefit to the area within the
Specific Plan.
Chula Vista
XI-11
Chapter XI Plan Administration
• The proposed amendment will not result in significant unmitigated
impacts to adjacent properties.
• The proposed amendment will enable the deliver of services and
public facilities to the population within the Specific Plan area.
XI-12
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
E. Five Year Review
Conducting periodic reviews of the Specific Plan is important to ensure
proper functioning and implementation over time. A five-year review will
offer an opportunity to make sure the Specific Plan is on track, check in on
the implementation process to ensure that the goals and objectives are being
achieved and make changes in case they are not. Over the life of the Specific
Plan, the changing landscape of the Urban Core may impact the effectiveness
of implementing actions. Thus, a five-year review cycle allows for adjustments
to the plan to be made as necessary.
Items of particular importance to consider are:
• Review the total amount of development against the thresholds
established in this Specific Plan
• Evaluate the need for planned improvements based on development
patterns and programs in the CIP
• Review the various Incentives Programs to evaluate if these elements
are providing the intended results
A Five-Year Progress Report will be prepared and may be included as part of
Budget Cycle or Strategic Plan Updates.
A Appendix
Appendix
Chula Vista
Appendices
Appendix A. Glossary
Appendix B. Traffic Impact Analysis
Appendix C. Market Analysis
Appendix D. Public Facilities and Services Program
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Chula Vista
A Appendix
Chula Vista
Appendix A. Glossary
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
A Appendix
A-1
Chula Vista
Appendix A. Glossary
The following glossary is provided primarily in support of the Urban Core Design
Guidelines. For further definitions, please refer to Chula Vista Municipal Code
Section 19.04.
#
360-degree Architecture
The full articulation of building facades on all four sides of a structure, including
variation in massing, roof forms, and wall planes, as well as surface articulation.
See four-sided architecture.
A
Access
An opening in a fence, wall or structure, or a walkway or driveway, permitting
pedestrian or vehicular approach to or within any structure or use.
Accessibility
A means of approaching, entering, exiting, or making use of; passage. The right
to approach, enter, exit, or make use of; often used in the form of disabled
accessibility.
Adaptive Reuse
The reuse of older structures that would have otherwise been demolished, often
involving extensive restoration or rehabilitation of the interior and/or exterior to
accommodate the new use. (See also Recycling)
Addition
Any construction that increases the size of a building, dwelling, or facility in
terms of site coverage, height, length, width, or gross floor area, occurring after
the completion of the original.
Aesthetics
Characterized by a heightened sensitivity or appreciation of beauty and often
discussed in conjunction with view impacts.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
A-2
Alignment (Architectural)
The visual alignment and subsequent placement of architectural elements such
as windows, cornice elements, soffits, awnings, from one structure to adjacent
structures in order to promote continuity along a block.
Alley
A narrow street or passageway between or behind a series of buildings which
affords only secondary access to abutting property.
Alteration
Any construction or substantial change in the exterior appearance of any
building or structure.
Amenities
Something that contributes to physical or material comfort. A feature that
increases attractiveness or value, especially of a piece of real estate or a
geographic location.
Arcade
A roofed passageway or lane. A series of arches supported by columns, piers,
or pillars, either freestanding or attached to a wall to form a gallery.
Arch
A curved structure supporting its weight over an open space such as a door or
window.
Articulation
Describes the degree or manner in which a building wall or roofline is made
up of distinct parts or elements. The small parts or portions of a building form
that are expressed (materials, color, texture, pattern, modulation, etc.) and
come together to define the structure. A highly articulated wall will appear to
be composed of a number of different planes, usually made distinct by their
change in direction (projections and recesses) and/or changes in materials,
colors or textures.
Asymmetry
Irregular correspondence of form and configuration on opposite sides
of a dividing line or plane or about a center or an axis; having unbalanced
proportions.
Atrium
A dramatic enclosed glass-roofed indoor space typically associated with high-
rise hotels and office buildings.
A Appendix
A-3
Chula Vista
Attached
Joined to or by a wall, especially by sharing a wall with another building; not
freestanding.
Awning
A fixed cover, typically comprised of cloth over a metal frame that is placed over
windows or building openings as protection from the sun and rain.
Awning Sign
A sign painted on, printed on, or attached flat against the surface of an
awning.
B
Balcony
A railed projecting platform found above ground level on a building.
Baluster
Any of the small posts that make up a railing, as in a staircase; may be plain,
turned, or pierced.
Balustrade
A series of balusters surmounted by a rail.
Barrel Tiles
Rounded clay roof tiles most often used on Spanish-style houses. Usually red
but are often available in may colors.
Bay (Structural)
A regularly repeated spatial element in a building defined by beams or ribs and
their supports.
Bay Window
A window that projects out from an exterior wall.
Beautification
The transformation of barren or uninteresting spaces, buildings, forms,
structures, into a comfortable or attractive place or environment.
Berm
An artificially raised area of soil or turf intended to screen undesirable attributes
of a project or site.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
A-4
Blockscape
The aggregated facade wall composed of uninterrupted placement of individual
urban oriented structures located side-by-side along an entire block as opposed
to individual buildings located within the block.
Bollards
A series of short posts of metal, concrete, or wood set at intervals to delineate
an area or to exclude vehicles from an area.
Breezeway
A roofed area usually found between a garage and house proper or between
commercial and industrial buildings and designed to provide shelter for outdoor
comfort.
Buffer
A term often applied to landscaped areas separating incompatible land uses.
Can also mean an area of a “transitional” land use that lies between two
incompatible land uses.
Building
Any structure having a roof supported by columns or walls, used or intended to
be used for the shelter or enclosure of persons, animals or property.
Building Frontage
The building elevation that fronts a public street where customer access to the
building is available.
Building Height
The building height as measured from finish grade to top of roof, not including
parapets or other architectural features.
Building Stepback
The minimum horizontal distance, as measured from the street property line,
that the upper portion of a building must step back from the lower portion of
the building; must occur at or below the noted building height.
Bulkhead
The space located between the pavement/sidewalk and the bottom of a
traditional storefront window.
A Appendix
A-5
Chula Vista
Business Frontage
The portion of a building frontage occupied by a single tenant space having a
public entrance within the building frontage. For businesses located on the
interior of a building without building frontage, the building elevation providing
customer access should be considered the business frontage.
C
Canopy
A protective roof-like covering, often of canvas, mounted on a frame over a
walkway or door or niche; often referred to as an awning.
Cantilever
A projecting element, such as a beam or porch, supported at a single point or
along a single line by a wall or column, stabilized by counterbalancing downward
force around the point of fulcrum.
Channel Letters
Three-dimensional individually cut letters or figures, illuminated or not
illuminated, affixed directly to a structure.
Clerestory Window
A window (usually narrow) placed in the upper walls of a room to provide extra
light.
Colonnade
A row of columns forming an element of an architectural composition, carrying
either a flat-topped entablature or a row of arches.
Column
A vertical support, usually cylindrical, consisting of a base, shaft and capital,
either monolithic or built-up, of drums the full diameter of the shaft.
Complement
In new construction, it means to add to the character of the area by attempting
to incorporate compatible architectural styles, setbacks, height, scale, massing,
colors, and materials.
Contextual
Relating to the existing built and natural environment.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
A-6
Coping (Cap)
A flat cover of stone or brick that protects the top of a wall.
Corbel
1) A projecting wall member used as a support for some elements of the
superstructure. 2) Courses of stone or brick in which each course projects
beyond the course beneath it. 3) Two such structures, meeting at the topmost
course creating an arch.
Cornice
The horizontal projection at the top of a wall or part of a roof which projects over
the side wall and serves as a crowning member.
Court
1) An extent of open ground partially or completely enclosed by walls or buildings;
a courtyard. 2) A short street, especially a wide alley walled by buildings on
three sides. 3) A large open section of a building. 4) A large building, such as a
mansion, standing in a courtyard.
Cupola
A small, dome-like structure, on top of a building to provide ventilation and
decoration.
Curb Cut
The elimination of a street curb to enable increased access to crosswalks/
sidewalks, entry driveways or parking lots.
D
Deciduous
Trees or shrubs, usually in temperate climates, that shed leaves annually.
Dentil
A band of small, square, tooth-like blocks forming part of the characteristic
ornamentation of the Ionic, Corinthian, and Doric orders.
Detached
Standing apart from others; separate or disconnected.
Detached Garage
A garage that is completely surrounded by open space or connected to a building
by an uncovered terrace.
A Appendix
A-7
Chula Vista
Detail
An element of a building such as trim, moldings, other ornamentation or
decorative features.
Dormer Window
A vertical window which projects from a sloping roof placed in a small gable.
Downspout
A vertical pipe used to conduct water from a roof drain or gutter to the ground
or cistern.
E
Eave
The projecting lower edge of a roof.
Eclectic
Selecting or employing individual elements from a variety of sources, systems,
or styles.
Elevation
An orthographic view of the vertical features of a building (front, rear, side,
interior elevation).
Enhancement
To make better either functionally or in appearance.
Espalier
A trellis of framework on which the trunk and branches of fruit trees or shrubs
are trained to grow in one plane.
Eyebrow Window
A small, horizontal, rectangular window, often located on the uppermost story
and aligned with windows below.
External illumination
The lighting of an object from a light source located a distance from the
object.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
A-8
F
FAR (Floor Area Ratio)
Floor Area Ratio (FAR) is a measure of the bulk of buildings on a lot or site.
FAR is calculated by dividing the gross floor area of all buildings on a lot or site
by the lot or site area. Gross floor area includes the total enclosed area of all
floors of a building measured from the exterior walls including halls, stairways,
elevator shafts at each floor level, service and mechanical equipment rooms,
balconies, recreation rooms, and attics having a height of more than seven feet
but excluding area used exclusively for vehicle parking or loading. (See Chapter
VI - Land Use and Development Regulations for example FAR diagrams.)
Façade
The exterior face of a building, which is the architectural front, sometimes
distinguished from other faces by elaboration of architectural or ornamental
details.
Fascia
The outside horizontal board on a cornice.
Faux
A simulation or false representation of something else, as in faux wood or
stone.
Fenestration
The stylistic arrangement of windows in a building.
Fieldstone
A stone used in its natural shape and condition.
Figurative Sign
A sign utilizing a three dimensional object to communicate the business product
or services.
Fixture
A design element considered to be permanently established or fixed in its built
or natural environment.
Focal Point
A building, object, or natural element in a street-scene that stands out and
serves as a point of focus, catching and holding the viewer’s attention.
A Appendix
A-9
Chula Vista
Four-sided Architecture
The full articulation of building facades on all four sides of a structure, including
variation in massing, roof forms, and wall planes, as well as surface articulation.
See 360-degree architecture.
G
Gable Roof
A ridge roof that slopes up from only two walls. A gable is the vertical triangular
portion of the end of a building from the eaves to the ridge of the roof.
Gambrel
A roof where each side has two slopes; a steeper lower slope and a flatter upper
one; a ‘barn roof’. Often found in Colonial revival houses in the “Dutch” style.
Glazed Brick
A brick that has been glazed and fired on one side.
Gutter
A shallow channel of metal or wood that is set immediately below and along the
eaves of a building for catching and carrying rainwater from the roof.
H
Hardscape
Areas which water does not easily penetrate; surfaces that are not landscaped,
i.e., sidewalks, streets, building pads, etc.
Hedge
A row of closely planted shrubs or low-growing trees forming a fence or
boundary.
Hipped (Hip Roof)
A roof with four uniformly pitched sides.
Historic
Having importance in or influence on history.
Homogeneity
The state or quality of being the same.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
A-10
I
Infill
A newly constructed building within an existing development area.
Internally Illuminated Sign
A sign whose light source is located in the interior of the sign so that rays shine
through the face of the sign, or a light source that is attached to the face of the
sign and is perceived as a design element of the sign.
J
K
Kicker
A piece of wood that is attached to a formwork member to take the thrust of
another member.
L
Landmark
A building or site that has historical significance, especially one that is marked
for preservation.
Landscaping
An area devoted to or developed and maintained with indigenous or exotic
planting, lawn, ground cover, gardens, trees, shrubs, and other plant materials,
decorative outdoor landscape elements, pools, fountains, water feature, paved
or decorated surfaces of rock, stone, brick, block, or similar material (excluding
driveways, parking, loading, or storage areas), and sculpture elements. Plants
on rooftops, porches or in boxes attached to buildings are not considered
landscaping for purposes of meeting minimum landscaping requirements.
Additional guidance regarding acceptable landscaping elements is provided in
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines.
Lattice
A grillwork created by crisscrossing or decoratively interlacing strips of
material.
A Appendix
A-11
Chula Vista
Level of Service (LOS)
A qualitative measure describing operational conditions within a traffic stream
in terms of speed and travel time, freedom to maneuver, traffic interruptions,
comfort and convenience, and safety. Labeled on a continuum from A to F, Level
A denotes the best traffic conditions while Level F indicates traffic gridlock.
Light Trespass
Extraneous light on adjacent property, typically produced by stray light from
outdoor lighting systems
Lintel
A horizontal support member that supports a load over an opening, as a
window or door opening, usually made of wood, stone or steel; may be exposed
or obscured by wall coverings.
Loading Space
An area used exclusively for the loading and unloading of goods from a vehicle
in connection with the use of the site on which such space is located.
Loft
A large, usually unpartitioned floor over a factory, warehouse, or other
commercial or industrial space. An open space under a roof; an attic or a
garret. This is also a type of housing product.
Lot
A piece or parcel of land occupied or intended to be occupied by a principal
building or a group of such buildings and accessory buildings, or utilized for a
principal use and uses accessory thereto, together with such open spaces, and
having frontage on a public or an approved private street.
Lot Coverage
Lot coverage is the percentage of a lot or site covered by buildings.
Lumen
The rate of flow of light used to express the overall light output of a lamp.
M
Maintenance
The work of keeping something in proper condition; upkeep.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
A-12
Mansard
Traditionally a hip roof, each face of which has a steeper lower part and a
shallower upper part. In contemporary commercial development, the second
portion of the roof is replaced with a flat roof or equipment well. These are
referred to as mansard roofs but bear little resemblance to the original.
Masonry
Wall construction of such material as stone, brick and adobe.
Mass
Mass describes three-dimensional forms, the simplest of which are cubes,
boxes (or “rectangular solids”), cylinders, pyramids and cones. Buildings are
rarely one of these simple forms, but generally are composites of varying types
of assets. This composition is generally described as the “massing” of forms in
a building.
Mixed-Use
Mixed-use developments combine different types of land uses or structures (such
as commercial/office and residential uses) on a single-lot, or as components
of a single development. The uses may be combined either vertically within
the same structure or spread horizontally on the site in different areas and
structures.
Monolithic
A single large flat surface (facade) without relief. A massive unyielding
structure.
Monument Sign
Permanent signs where the entire bottom of the sign is affixed to the ground,
not to a building.
Mullions
The divisional pieces in a multi-paned window.
Muntin
Wood or metal strips separating panels in a window.
N
Neon Sign
Glass tube lighting in which a combination of gas and phosphors are used to
create colored light.
A Appendix
A-13
Chula Vista
Newel
The terminating baluster at the lower end of a handrail.
Niche
A recess in a wall.
O
Open Space
For the purposes of the open space requirement, the term “open space” refers
to any areas with minimum dimensions of 60 square feet (6’x10’) and devoted
to the following common, private, or public uses: patio, porch, balcony, deck,
garden, playground, plaza, swimming pool, sports court/field, recreation room,
gym, spa, community room, cultural arts, lawn/turf, pond, fountain, atrium,
sunroom, theater, amphitheater, band shell, gazebo, picnic area, shelter, roof,
or similar passive or active recreational/leisure use or facility that is not used
for enclosed dwelling unit floor area or commercial use space.
Ornamentation.
Details added to a structure solely for decorative reasons (i.e. to add shape,
texture or color to an architectural composition).
Outbuilding
An auxiliary structure that is located away from a house or principal building
(e.g. garage, studio, guest house, shed).
P
Parapet
A low retaining wall at the edge of a roof, porch, or terrace.
Parking
An open area used for the purpose of storing an automobile, usually for a
temporary time period.
Parkway
The public area between the curbing and the sidewalk.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
A-14
Paseo
A place that allows for a pedestrian to take a slow, easy stroll or walk outdoors
and often between buildings; often covered or partially covered, the path, series
of paths, or walkway along which such a walk is taken.
Pattern
The pattern of material can also add texture and can be used to add character,
scale and balance to a building. The lines of the many types of brick bonds are
examples of how material can be placed in a pattern to create texture.
Pediment
The low triangular gable following the roof slopes over the front and rear of a
building; also used to crown features such as doors and windows.
Pergola
An arbor formed of horizontal trelliswork supported on columns or posts, over
which vines or other plants are trained.
Permeable Paving
Paving material that allows the passage of water between and through voids in
its surface.
Pedestrian-scale
Refers to building and landscape elements that are modest in size; suitable to
average human size.
Permanent Sign
A sign constructed of durable materials and intended to exist for the duration of
time that the use or occupant is located on the premises.
Pier
A vertical, non-circular masonry support, more massive than a column.
Pilaster
A rectangular column with a capital and base, set into a wall as an ornamental
motif.
Pillar
Similar to but more slender than a pier, also non-circular.
Pitch
The slope of a roof expressed in terms of ratio of height to span.
A Appendix
A-15
Chula Vista
Platted
A piece of land; a plot. A map showing actual or planned features, such as
streets and building lots.
Plaza
A public square with room for pedestrians and associated activities.
Pocket Park
A very small, lushly landscaped open space often nestled between residential
homes, and intended for limited use by local residents only.
Pole Sign
A sign mounted on a freestanding pole or other support so that the bottom
edge of the sign face is six feet or more above finished grade.
Pop-out
Applied to exterior walls, pop-outs create shadow patterns and depths on the
wall surfaces.
Porch
A covered entrance or semi-enclosed space projecting from the facade of a
building, usually having a separate roof. An open or enclosed gallery or room
attached to the outside of a building; a veranda.
Portico
A porch or vestibule (lobby or passage between entrance and lobby) roofed and
partly opened on at least one side.
Preservation
Places a high premium on the retention of all historic fabric through conservation,
maintenance and repair. It reflects a building’s continuum over time, through
successive occupancies, and the respectful changes and alterations that
are made. Standards focus attention on the preservation of those materials,
features, finishes, spaces, and spatial relationships that, together, give a
property its historic character.
Primary Building Façade
The particular facade of a building that faces the street to which the address of
the building pertains.
Project
Any proposal for new or changed use, or for new construction, alteration, or
enlargement of any structure that is subject to the provisions of this manual.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
A-16
Projecting Sign
A sign that protrudes horizontally from the facade of a building, usually at a 90-
degree angle to the building..
Promenade
A public place to take a leisurely walk for pleasure, such as an avenue.
Proportion
The relationship of size, quantity, or degree between two or more things or parts
of something. Proportion can describe height-to-height ratios, width-to-width
ratios, and width-to-height ratios, as well as ratios of massing. Landscaping
can be used to establish a consistent rhythm along a streetscape, which will
disguise the lack of proportion in building size and placement.
Public Art
Any sculpture, fountain, monument, mural or other form of art located in a
public space or private space open to public view.
Q
R
Recess
A hollow place, as in a wall.
Reconstruction
Establishes limited opportunities to re-create a non-surviving site, landscape,
building, structure, or object in all new materials.
Recycling
The reuse of older structures that would have otherwise been demolished, often
involving extensive restoration or rehabilitation of the interior and/or exterior to
accommodate the new use. (See also Adaptive Reuse.)
Refuge Island
A defined area between traffic lanes that provides a safe place for pedestrians
to wait when crossing the street.
A Appendix
A-17
Chula Vista
Rehabilitation
Emphasizes the retention and repair of historic materials, but more latitude
is provided for replacement because it is assumed the property is more
deteriorated prior to work. Standards focus attention on the preservation of
those materials, features, finishes, spaces, and spatial relationships that,
together, give a property its historic character.
Relief
Carving raised above a background plane, as in base relief.
Remodeling
Any change or alteration to a building that substantially alters its original
state.
Renovation
The modification of or changes to an existing building in order to extend its
useful life or utility through repairs or alterations.
Restoration
Focuses on the retention of materials from the most significant time in a property’s
history, while permitting the removal of materials from other periods.
Return
A surface turned back from a principal surface, such as the side of pilaster or
the jamb of a window or door opening.
Reuse
To use again, especially after salvaging or special treatment or processing.
Reveal
The vertical side section of a doorway or window frame.
Rhythm
In urban design, the regular recurrence of lines shapes, forms, elements, colors,
or other architectural or natural elements, usually within a proportional system,
such as even placing of trees down a street or similar widths and heights of
buildings in a street block.
Ridge
The horizontal line formed by the juncture of two sloping planes, especially the
line formed by the surfaces at the top of a roof.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
A-18
Right-of-way
Land that has been established by reservation, dedication, prescription,
condemnation, or other means and that is occupied by a road, walkway, railroad,
utility distribution or transmission facility, or other similar use.
Rise
The vertical distance from one stair tread to the next.
Riser
The vertical portion of a step. The board covering the open space between stair
treads.
Rooflines
Various forms to a roof, such as pitch, ridge, hip, etc., often at different
angles.
Roof Pitch
Degree of roof slant stated in inches rise per foot.
Roof Span
The distance equal to twice the roof run, or the horizontal distance between the
outside faces of bearing wall plates.
Roofscape
The collective image of rooflines and roof styles of adjacent buildings and
structures as seen against the sky.
Row Townhouse
An unbroken line of houses sharing one or more sidewalls with its neighbors.
Rustication
A method of forming stonework with recessed joints and smooth or roughly
textured block faces.
S
Sash
The framework into which windowpanes are set.
A Appendix
A-19
Chula Vista
Scale
The proportion of one object to another. “Pedestrian” or “human” scale
incorporates building and landscape elements that are modest in size.
“Monumental” scale incorporates large or grand building elements.
Screening
A method of visually shielding or obscuring a structure, or portion of, by a fence,
wall, berm, or similar structure.
Setback
The distance between the property line and the building, measured horizontally
and perpendicular to the property line.
Shed Roof
A roof shape having only one sloping pane.
Shutter
A movable cover for a window used for protection from weather and intruders.
Side Loading Garage
An accessory building or portion of a principal building, located and accessed
from the side of such and designed or used for the parking or temporary storage
of the motor vehicles of principal building occupants.
Sidewalk
A paved walkway along the side of a street.
Siding
The finish covering on the exterior of a frame building (with the exception
of masonry). The term cladding is often used to describe any exterior wall
covering, including masonry.
Skyline
The upper outline or silhouette of a building, buildings, or landscape as seen
against the sky.
Sill
The framing member that forms the lower side of an opening, such as a doorsill.
A windowsill forms the lower, usually projecting, lip on the outside face of a
window.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
A-20
Sign
Please refer to Chula Vista Municipal Code Section 19.04. Supplemental
definitions are provided in Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines.
Site
A lot, or group of contiguous lots not divided by an alley, street, other right-of-
way, or city limit that is proposed for development in accord with the provisions
of this manual, and is in a single ownership or has multiple owners, all of whom
join in an application for development.
Soffit
The underside of a beam, arch, eave, overhang, dropped ceiling, etc.
Spandrel Glass
Non-vision glass, available in reflective, patterned, and solid colors. Can be
used to give the appearance of having windows.
Spark Arrester
A device that is located at the top of a chimney used to prevent sparks, embers,
or other ignited material above a certain size from being expelled to the
atmosphere.
Stoop
A small porch, platform, or staircase leading to the entrance of a house or
building.
Storefront
The side of a store or shop facing a street. The traditional “main street” facade
bounded by a structural pier on either side, the sidewalk on the bottom and
the lower edge of the upper facade on top, typically dominated by retail display
windows.
Stormwater
Water running on the surface of the ground due to rainfall from a storm event.
Story
That portion of a building included between the surface of any floor and the
floor or ceiling next above it.
Streetscape
The overall appearance of a street or grouping of streets in an area and/or the
relationship of buildings to the surrounding sidewalk and streets.
A Appendix
A-21
Chula Vista
Street Wall
The edges created by buildings and landscaping that enclose the street and
create space.
Street Wall Frontage
The percentage of street front that must be built to, with the ground floor
building façade at the minimum setback.
Structure
Anything constructed, the use of which requires permanent location on the
ground, or attachment to something having a permanent location on the ground,
excluding swimming pools, patios, walks, access drive, or similar paved areas.
Stucco
A durable finish for exterior walls, usually composed of cement, sand, and lime
and applied while wet. A fine plaster for interior wall ornamentation, such as
moldings.
Surface Materials
Can be used to create a texture for a building - from the roughness of stone or
a ribbed metal screen to the smoothness of marble or glass. Some materials,
such as wood, may be either rough (such as wood shingles or re-sawn lumber)
or smooth (such as clapboard siding).
Surround(s)
The molding that outlines an object or opening.
Symmetry
Exact correspondence of form and configuration on opposite sides of a dividing
line or plane or about a center or an axis; having balanced proportions.
T
Temporary Sign
Any sign intended to be displayed for a limited period of time and capable of being
viewed from any public right-of-way, parking area, or neighboring property.
Texture
Texture refers to variations in the exterior facade and may be described in terms
of roughness of the surface material, the patterns inherent in the material or the
patterns in which the material is placed. Texture and lack of texture influence
the mass, scale, and rhythm of a building. Texture also can add intimate scale to
large buildings by the use of small detailed patterns, such as brick masonry.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
A-22
Tower
Any floor above the defined street wall height used for framing the street.
Traffic
The passage of people, vehicles, or messages along routes of transportation or
communication. Vehicles or pedestrians in transit.
Traffic Calming
Techniques that are used to reduce the speed of vehicular traffic, such as lane
narrowing, sharp offsets, sidewalk bulge-outs, speed bumps, and road surface
variations.
Transit
Conveyance of people or goods from one place to another, especially on a local
public transportation system.
Transition
A change from one place or state or stage to another. In an urban planning
context, a “transition” could describe a step in scale of one development to
another.
Transom
A small window just above a door.
Trash Receptacle
A fixture or container for the disposal of garbage. Sometimes ornamental in
nature.
Trellis
A system of horizontal joists supported on posts, often designed to support
growing plants.
Trim
The decorative finish around a door or window; the architrave or decorative
casing used around a door or window frame. Any visible woodwork or moldings
that cover or protect joints, edges, or ends of another material. Examples:
baseboards, cornices, door trim, and window trim.
Turf Island
A landscaped area located at the base of a building to buffer the hard edge of
a building from a paved surface.
A Appendix
A-23
Chula Vista
Turret
A small tower, often at the corner of a building.
U
Use
The purpose for which the land or a building is arranged, designed, or intended
to be used and for which it is or may be used.
V
Valley
A low region on a roof between gables.
Veneer
A thin facing of finishing material.
Veneer Wall
The covering of wall construction by a second material to enhance wall beauty,
i.e., brick or stone over frame, brick or stone over concrete block.
W
Wall Sign
A sign that is attached to or painted on the exterior wall of a structure with the
display surface of the sign approximately parallel to the building wall.
Window Sill
The flat piece of wood, stone, or the like, at the bottom of a window frame.
Window Sign
A sign posted, painted, placed, or affixed in or on a window exposed to public
view. An interior sign that faces a window exposed to public view that is located
within three feet of the window is considered a window sign for the purpose of
calculating the total area of all window signs.
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
A-24
Window Types
• Awning - Top hinged.
• Bay - Extends beyond the exterior face of the wall.
• Bow - Projected window with a curved surface often in the glass itself.
• Casement - Side hinged.
• Combination - The integration of two or more styles into one unit.
• Double Hung - Two sash, vertical sliding.
• Hopper - Bottom hinged.
• Horizontal sliding - Two or more sashes designed to slide over one
another.
• Jalousie - Glass slats (Venetian blind principle) with hand crank to
open.
• Oriel - Windows that project from an upper story, supported by a
bracket.
• Picture Window - Fixed sash.
X
Y
Z
Chula Vista
B Appendix
Chula Vista
Appendix B. Traffic Analysis
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
FINAL Traffic Impact Analysis
Chula Vista
Urban Core
October 2005
Prepared for:
RRM Design Group
Project No. 095413000
© Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. 2005
FINAL Traffic Impact Analysis
Chula Vista
Urban Core
October 2005
Prepared for:
RRM Design Group
31831 Camino Capistrano, Suite 200
San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675
Prepared by:
Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.
517 Fourth Avenue, Suite 301
San Diego, CA 92101
Project No. 095413000
© Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. 2005
i
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0 INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................................... 1-1
PROJECT DESCRIPTION ........................................................................................................................... 1-1
ANALYSIS SCENARIOS............................................................................................................................ 1-1
2.0 METHODOLOGY.............................................................................................................................. 2-1
STUDY INTERSECTIONS........................................................................................................................... 2-1
ANALYSIS PROCESS................................................................................................................................ 2-3
Analysis Software................................................................................................................................ 2-3
Signalized Intersections....................................................................................................................... 2-3
Effects of At-Grade Trolley Crossings.................................................................................................. 2-4
Roadway Segments.............................................................................................................................. 2-6
SIGNIFICANCE DETERMINATION.............................................................................................................. 2-7
3.0 EXISTING CONDITIONS.................................................................................................................. 3-1
ROAD NETWORK.................................................................................................................................... 3-1
TRAFFIC VOLUMES............................................................................................................................... 3-11
INTERSECTION ANALYSIS ..................................................................................................................... 3-21
ROADWAY SEGMENT ANALYSIS ........................................................................................................... 3-21
EXISTING TRANSIT SERVICE ................................................................................................................. 3-21
4.0 URBAN CORE TRAFFIC.................................................................................................................. 4-1
LAND USES............................................................................................................................................ 4-1
URBAN CORE TRAFFIC GENERATION ...................................................................................................... 4-2
TRANSPORTATION MODELING ................................................................................................................ 4-4
5.0 YEAR 2030 CONDITIONS................................................................................................................. 5-1
ROAD NETWORK.................................................................................................................................... 5-1
TRAFFIC VOLUMES................................................................................................................................. 5-1
INTERSECTION ANALYSIS ....................................................................................................................... 5-9
ROADWAY SEGMENT ANALYSIS ............................................................................................................. 5-9
FUTURE TRANSIT SERVICE ................................................................................................................... 5-15
6.0 YEAR 2030 WITH IMPROVEMENTS CONDITIONS .................................................................... 6-1
ROAD NETWORK.................................................................................................................................... 6-1
E Street Corridor ................................................................................................................................ 6-3
F Street Bike Lanes ............................................................................................................................. 6-4
H Street Corridor................................................................................................................................ 6-5
Broadway Corridor............................................................................................................................. 6-7
3
rd
Avenue Pedestrian Enhancements................................................................................................... 6-8
Woodlawn Avenue Couplet................................................................................................................ 6-11
ROADWAY SEGMENT ANALYSIS ........................................................................................................... 6-12
INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS............................................................................................................. 6-14
INTERSECTION ANALYSIS ..................................................................................................................... 6-15
WEST SIDE SHUTTLE SERVICE .............................................................................................................. 6-16
7.0 FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS..................................................................................................... 7-1
ii
List of Figures
Figure 1-1 Regional Vicinity Map .......................................................................................................1-2
Figure 1-2 Urban Core Specific Plan ...................................................................................................1-3
Figure 2-1 Study Intersections .............................................................................................................2-5
Figure 3-1 Existing Intersection Geometrics ........................................................................................3-4
Figure 3-2 Existing Roadway Geometrics .......................................................................................... 3-10
Figure 3-3 Existing Peak-Hour Traffic Volumes ................................................................................ 3-14
Figure 3-4 Existing ADT Volumes .................................................................................................... 3-20
Figure 4-1 Location of Urban Core Land Uses.....................................................................................4-3
Figure 5-1 Year 2030 Conditions Peak-Hour Traffic Volumes ..............................................................5-2
Figure 5-2 Year 2030 Conditions ADT Volumes .................................................................................5-8
Figure 5-3 Regional Transit Routes ................................................................................................... 5-16
Figure 6-1 Proposed Cross Section, E Street Between I-5 and 300’ East of I-5 N Ramp .......................6-3
Figure 6-2 Proposed Cross Section, E Street Between 3
rd
Avenue and Broadway.................................6-3
Figure 6-3 Proposed Cross Section, F Street Between Third Avenue and I-5 ........................................6-4
Figure 6-4 Proposed Cross Section, H Street Between Third Avenue and Broadway ............................6-5
Figure 6-5 Proposed Cross Section, H Street Between Broadway and I-5.............................................6-6
Figure 6-6 Proposed Cross Section, Broadway Between C Street and L Street .....................................6-7
Figure 6-7 Proposed Cross Section, 3rd Avenue With Diagonal Parking..............................................6-9
Figure 6-8 Proposed Cross Section, 3rd Avenue Without Diagonal Parking .........................................6-9
Figure 6-9 Proposed Cross Section, 3rd Avenue At Signalized Intersections ...................................... 6-10
Figure 6-10 Proposed Cross Section, Entire Length of Woodlawn Avenue.......................................... 6-11
Figure 6-11 Year 2030 With Improvements Intersection Geometrics.................................................. 6-17
Figure 6-12 Project Features/Improvements at Study Intersections..................................................... 6-19
Figure 6-13 Study Intersections Remaining at LOS E ........................................................................ 6-22
Figure 6-14 West Side Shuttle Proposed Route .................................................................................. 6-23
iii
List of Tables
Table 2-1 Study Intersections............................................................................................................... 2-1
Table 2-2 Level of Service (LOS) Criteria For Signalized Intersections................................................ 2-4
Table 2-3 Roadway Segment Capacity Level of Service ......................................................................2-6
Table 2-4 Levels of Significance Criteria For Intersections and Roadway Segments.............................2-7
Table 3-1 Existing Roadway Segment Dimensions ..............................................................................3-2
Table 3-2 Intersection Count Data Source.......................................................................................... 3-11
Table 3-3 Roadway Segment Count Data Source ............................................................................... 3-13
Table 3-4 Existing Conditions Peak-Hour Intersection Level of Service Summary............................. 3-22
Table 3-5 Existing Conditions Roadway Segment Level of Service Summary.................................... 3-26
Table 4-1 Urban Core Specific Plan Projected Buildout .......................................................................4-1
Table 4-2 Trip Generation Summary....................................................................................................4-2
Table 5-1 Year 2030 Conditions Peak-Hour Intersection Level of Service Summary.......................... 5-10
Table 5-2 Year 2030 Conditions Roadway Segment Level of Service Summary ................................ 5-14
Table 6-1 Proposed Roadway Segment Dimensions.............................................................................6-2
Table 6-2 Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions Roadway Segment Level of Service Summary. 6-13
Table 6-3 Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions Peak-Hour Intersection Level of Service Summary
................................................................................................................................................... 6-20
List of Appendices
Appendix A
§ Benefits of Grade Separation Memorandum
Appendix B
§ Existing Peak-Hour and ADT Volumes
Appendix C
§ Peak-Hour Intersection LOS Worksheets
Appendix D
§ Figures from City of Chula Vista General Plan
Traffic Impact Analysis Introduction
Chula Vista Urban Core 1-1 October 2005
1.0 INTRODUCTION
This study evaluates the potential traffic-related impacts associated with the adoption of the Chula Vista
Urban Core Specific Plan. This study determines the appropriate geometric design of the urban arterials,
as defined in the Chula Vista General Plan. In addition, this study will recommend improvements to
achieve acceptable LOS for any potential traffic impacts associated with the project. This study will
serve as the traffic impact analysis for future redevelopment projects consistent with the Urban Core
Specific Plan.
Project Description
The Chula Vista Urban Core is located in the northwestern portion of the City of Chula Vista, California.
Figure 1-1 illustrates the project study area in a regional context. The Urban Core Specific Plan (UCSP)
Study Area covers approximately 1,700 acres within the northwestern portion of the City of Chula Vista.
It is generally bordered by the San Diego Freeway (I-5) to the west, C Street to the north, Del Mar Street
to the east, and L Street to the south. While there are 1,700 acres within the UCSP Study Area, it was
determined that the proposed changes to land use designations be focused on areas more in need of
revitalization. Therefore, the Specific Plan boundary focuses on the development and redevelopment of
approximately 690 gross acres within the larger UCSP Study Area. Figure 1-2 illustrates both the UCSP
Study Area and the Focus Area.
Analysis Scenarios
A total of three scenarios were analyzed as part of the Urban Core project, which are listed below:
§ Existing Conditions
Ø Existing Conditions: Represents the traffic conditions of the existing street network, primarily
in the Urban Core Focus Area, but also includes key intersections and roadway segments
within and near the Urban Core Specific Plan Study Area.
§ Year 2030
Ø Year 2030 Conditions: Represents the traffic conditions of the street network consistent with
the adopted general plan update, implementation of the regional transit vision, and full build-
out of the Urban Core.
Ø Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions: Represents the traffic conditions of the street
network with improvements to several roadways and intersections.
It should be noted that due to urban revitalization, the timing, sequencing, and the extent of development
is not predictable and is speculative. The Urban Core Specific Plan covers a large geographic area, which
could redevelop in many different ways. As a result, the intermediate years were not analyzed; only the
full buildout of the Urban Core was analyzed. As such, the impacts resulting from the full buildout of the
Urban Core would be considered cumulative impacts.
Figure 1-1
Chula Vista Urban Core
Regional Vicinity Map
Urban Core Specific Plan
1-2
1-3
Traffic Impact Analysis Methodology
Chula Vista Urban Core 2-1 October 2005
2.0 METHODOLOGY
The following section describes the methodology used in the determination of study intersections,
analysis process, and determination of significant impacts.
Study Intersections
The Urban Core is located in the Northwest Planning Subarea, located south of SR-54, west of I-805,
north of L Street, and east of I-5. More specifically, the Urban Core Specific Plan is bounded by C Street,
Del Mar Avenue, L Street, and I-5. The following intersections shown in Table 2-1 were identified for
evaluation. These intersections represent all key intersections in the Urban Core Specific Plan and others
that could be influenced by land use intensifications within the Urban Core.
Table 2-1 Study Intersections
TABLE 2-1
STUDY INTERSECTIONS
Intersection Traffic Control (a)
1 Bay Blvd-I-5 SB Ramp @ E St (b) Signal
2 I-5 NB Ramp @ E St Signal
3 Woodlawn Ave @ E St Signal
4 Broadway @ E St Signal
5 5th Ave @ E St Signal
6 4th Ave @ E St Signal
7 3rd Ave @ E St Signal
8 2nd Ave @ E St Signal
9 1st Ave @ E St (b) Signal
10 Flower St @ E St (b) Signal
11 Bonita Glen Dr @ Bonita Rd (b) Signal
12 Bay Blvd @ F St (b) AWSC
13 Broadway @ F St Signal
14 5th Ave @ F St Signal
15 4th Ave @ F St Signal
16 3rd Ave @ F St Signal
17 2nd Ave @ F St Signal
18 Broadway @ G St Signal
19 5th Ave @ G St Signal
20 4th Ave @ G St Signal
21 3rd Ave @ G St Signal
22 2nd Ave @ G St AWSC
23 Hilltop Dr @ G St (b) AWSC
24 I-5 SB Ramp @ H St Signal
25 I-5 NB Ramp @ H St Signal
Notes:
(a) Signal = Traffic signal, AWSC = All-way Stop Control, TWSC = Two-way Stop Control
(b) Outside of Urban Core Specific Plan study area, but due to proximity and ingress/egress patterns, these
intersections were included as part of the study area.
Traffic Impact Analysis Methodology
Chula Vista Urban Core 2-2 October 2005
TABLE 2-1
STUDY INTERSECTIONS (Continued)
Intersection Traffic Control (a)
26 Woodlawn Ave @ H St Signal
27 Broadway @ H St Signal
28 5th Ave @ H St Signal
29 4th Ave @ H St Signal
30 3rd Ave @ H St Signal
31 2nd Ave @ H St Signal
32 1st Ave @ H St (b) Signal
33 Hilltop Dr @ H St (b) Signal
34 Broadway @ SR-54 WB Ramp (b) Signal
35 Broadway @ SR-54 EB Ramp (b) Signal
36 Broadway @ C St Signal
37 Broadway @ D Street Signal
38 Broadway @ Flower St Signal
39 Broadway @ I St Signal
40 Broadway @ J St Signal
41 Broadway @ K St Signal
42 Broadway @ L St Signal
43 4th Ave @ SR-54 WB Ramp (b) Signal
44 4th Ave @ SR-54 EB Ramp (b) Signal
45 4th Ave @ Brisbane St (b) Signal
46 4th Ave @ C St Signal
47 4th Ave @ D St Signal
48 4th Ave @ I St Signal
49 4th Ave @ J St Signal
50 4th Ave @ K St Signal
51 4th Ave @ L St Signal
52 3rd Ave @ Davidson St Signal
53 3rd Ave @ I St Signal
54 3rd Ave @ J St Signal
55 3rd Ave @ K St Signal
56 3rd Ave @ L St Signal
57 2nd Ave @ D St AWSC
58 J St @ I-5 SB Ramp Signal
59 J St @ I-5 NB Ramp Signal
60 Woodlawn Ave @ J St TWSC
61 L St @ Bay Blvd TWSC
62 L St @ Industrial Blvd Signal
63 Bay Blvd @ I-5 SB Ramp (b) TWSC
64 Industrial Blvd @ I-5 NB Ramp (b) AWSC
Notes:
(a) Signal = Traffic signal, AWSC = All-way Stop Control, TWSC = Two-way Stop Control
(b) Outside of Urban Core Specific Plan study area, but due to proximity and ingress/egress patterns, these
intersections were included as part of the study area.
Traffic Impact Analysis Methodology
Chula Vista Urban Core 2-3 October 2005
As shown in Table 2-1, 56 signalized intersections exist near and within the Urban Core Specific Plan
study area under existing conditions. It should be noted that intersections 1, 9 through 12, 23, 32 through
35, 43 through 45, 63, and 64 are outside of the Urban Core Specific Plan study area, but are included in
the analysis due to the proximity and ingress/egress patterns. Figure 2-1 displays the location of the
study intersections.
Analysis Process
The analysis process includes determining the operations at the study intersections for the a.m. and p.m.
peak-hours and operations on roadway segments using ADT volumes. Intersections will be measured and
quantified by using the Synchro traffic analysis software package. Roadway segments will be measured
based on each segment’s volume and assigned capacity. Results will be compared to the City’s standards
to determine the level of service (LOS).
Analysis Software
To analyze the operations of both signalized and unsignalized intersections, Synchro 6 (Trafficware) was
used for the analysis. Synchro 6 uses the methodologies outlined in the 2000 Highway Capacity Manual
(HCM).
The default peak-hour factor (PHF) of 0.92 was used for the Existing Conditions and Year 2030
scenarios. Under the Year 2030 scenario, all signal timings and phasings at the study intersections were
optimized as a network and a common cycle length was selected at all intersections. Also, it should be
noted that at each interchange, the two ramp intersections were optimized separately and assumed to be
coordinated.
Signalized Intersections
The 2000 HCM published by the Transportation Research Board establishes a system whereby highway
facilities are rated for their ability to process traffic volumes. The terminology "level of service" is used
to provide a "qualitative" evaluation based on certain "quantitative" calculations, which are related to
empirical values.
LOS for signalized intersections is defined in terms of delay, which is a measure of driver discomfort,
frustration, fuel consumption, and loss of travel time. Specifically, LOS criteria are stated in terms of the
average control delay per vehicle for the peak 15-minute period within the hour analyzed. The average
control delay includes initial deceleration delay, queue move-up time, and final acceleration time in
addition to the stop delay. The criteria for the various levels of service designations are given in Table 2-
2.
Traffic Impact Analysis Methodology
Chula Vista Urban Core 2-4 October 2005
Table 2-2 Level of Service (LOS) Criteria For Signalized Intersections
TABLE 2-2
LEVEL OF SERVICE (LOS) CRITERIA FOR SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS
LOS
Control Delay
(sec/veh) (a) Description
A <10.0 Operations with very low delay and most vehicles do not stop.
B <10.0 and <20.0 Operations with good progression but with some restricted movement.
C >20.0 and <35.0
Operations where a significant number of vehicles are stopping with some backup and
light congestion.
D >35.0 and <55.0
Operations where congestion is noticeable, longer delays occur, and many vehicles stop.
The proportion of vehicles not stopping declines.
E >55.0 and <80.0 Operations where there is significant delay, extensive queuing, and poor progression.
F >80.0
Operations that are unacceptable to most drivers, when the arrival rates exceed the
capacity of the intersection.
Notes:
(a) 2000 Highway Capacity Manual, Chapter 16, Page 2, Exhibit 16-2
Effects of At-Grade Trolley Crossings
As part of the General Plan Update transportation analysis, the effects of the trolley grade crossings at E
Street and H Street were evaluated. The analysis replicated the effects of a trolley/rail crossing by
assuming a signal at the trolley crossings. A summary of this analysis is included as an attachment to this
report (see Appendix A). The analysis assumed that a trolley would cross once per every five minutes,
using current trolley service and once every two and a half minutes using planned service increases. Field
observations indicate that the trolley crossing guards stay down for about 54 seconds. This means that
one-sixth of the time, the trolley crossings are down and with future service enhancements, the trolley
crossing guards are down one-third of the time.
With the trolley crossings down, queues would start to form in the east-west direction and extend into
adjacent intersections. This would cause additional delays and affect the operations at each impacted
intersection. As such, delays shown in the respective intersection summary tables for the intersections
affected by the trolley crossings would be increased between 17 and 40 seconds per vehicle, causing a
drop in LOS grade.
2-5
Traffic Impact Analysis Methodology
Chula Vista Urban Core 2-6 October 2005
Roadway Segments
In order to determine the LOS for a street segment on a daily basis, the average daily traffic (ADT)
volume is compared to its maximum acceptable volume for each type of roadway (arterial, collector, etc.)
in the City. The roadway segment capacities of Circulation Element roadways (Class I Collectors and
above) were evaluated under existing and proposed conditions using LOS thresholds published by the
City of Chula Vista’s adopted General Plan. Volume-to-Capacity (v/c) ratios were calculated for each
segment. It should be noted that the capacity of a roadway is equal to the maximum LOS E volume, but
the LOS is based on the acceptable volume for each respective type of facility. Table 2-3 summarizes the
acceptable volumes with its corresponding LOS for each Circulation Element and Urban Core Circulation
Roadway. A more detailed discussion related to the development of the Urban Core Circulation Element
is contained in Section 1.2 of the 2005 adopted General Plan.
Table 2-3 Roadway Segment Capacity Level of Service
TABLE 2-3
ROADWAY SEGMENT CAPACITY AND LEVEL OF SERVICE
FACILITY LEVEL OF SERVICE (LOS)
CLASS (a) LANES
ACCEPTABLE
LOS A B C D E
CIRCULATION ELEMENT ROADWAYS
Expressway 7/8 C 52,500 61,300 70,000 78,800 87,500
Prime 6 C 37,500 43,800 50,000 56,300 62,500
6 C 30,000 35,000 40,000 45,000 50,000
Major
Street
4 C 22,500 26,300 30,000 33,800 37,500
Class I
Collector
4 C 16,500 19,300 22,000 24,800 27,500
URBAN CORE CIRCULATION ELEMENT ROADWAYS
6 D 40,800 47,600 54,400 61,200 68,000
Gateway
Street
4 D 28,800 33,600 38,400 43,200 48,000
Urban
Arterial
4 D 25,200 29,400 33,600 37,800 42,000
Commercial
Boulevard
4 D 22,500 26,250 30,000 33,750 37,500
4 D 22,500 26,250 30,000 33,750 37,500
Downtown
Promenade
2 D 9,600 11,200 12,800 14,400 16,000
Note:
Shaded cells correspond to the acceptable traffic volumes for each respective roadway.
(a) The adopted Circulation Element roadways are considered to be Class I Collector Streets and above, and the
Urban Core Circulation Element are considered to be 6-lane Gateway Streets and below.
Traffic Impact Analysis Methodology
Chula Vista Urban Core 2-7 October 2005
Significance Determination
The significance criteria to evaluate the project impacts to intersections are based on the City of Chula
Vista’s Guidelines for Traffic Impact Studies in the City of Chula Vista, February 13, 2001 and on the City
of Chula Vista’s adopted General Plan. At intersections, the measurement of effectiveness (MOE) is based
on allowable increases in delay. At roadway segments, the MOE is based on allowable increases in the
ADT.
Within the City of Chula Vista, the goal is to achieve LOS D or better at all signalized and unsignalized
intersections. A project specific impact would occur if the operations at intersections are at LOS E or F
and the project trips comprise five percent or more of the entering volume. Entering volumes are defined
as the number of vehicles “entering” an intersection during a peak-hour. A cumulative impact would
occur if the operations at intersections are at LOS E or F only.
For non-Urban Core Circulation Element roadways (Expressway, Prime Arterial, Major Street, Town Center
Arterial, Class I Collector), a roadway segment that currently operates at LOS C or better and with the
proposed changes would operate at LOS D or worse at General Plan buildout is considered a significant
impact. In addition, a roadway segment that currently operates at LOS D or E would operate at LOS E or F
at General Plan buildout, respectively, or which operates at LOS D, E, or F and would worsen by five
percent or more at General Plan buildout is considered a significant impact.
For Urban Core Circulation Element roadways (Gateway Street, Urban Arterial, Commercial Boulevard,
Downtown Promenade), a roadway segment that currently operates at LOS D or better and with the
proposed changes would operate at LOS E or F at General Plan buildout is considered a significant impact.
In addition, a roadway segment that currently operates at LOS F and would worsen by five percent of more
at General Plan buildout is considered a significant impact. Table 2-4 shows the criteria for determining
levels of significance at intersections and roadway segments.
Table 2-4 Levels of Significance Criteria For Intersections and Roadway Segments
TABLE 2-4
LEVELS OF SIGNIFICANCE CRITERIA FOR INTERSECTIONS AND ROADWAY SEGMENTS
Facility
Measurement of
Effectiveness (MOE) Significance Threshold
Intersection Seconds of delay LOS E or F and >5% of entering volume
Roadway Segment ADT
Non Urban Core Circulation Element Roadways:
LOS C or better à LOS D or worse at buildout or LOS D/E à LOS E/F
at buildout and >5% of entering volume
Urban Core Circulation Element Roadways:
LOS D or better à LOS E/F at buildout or LOS E/F and >5% of
entering volume
Source: Guidelines for Traffic Impact Studies in the City of Chula Vista, February 13, 2001 and City of Chula Vista Adopted General Plan.
Traffic Impact Analysis Existing Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 3-1 October 2005
3.0 EXISTING CONDITIONS
This section summarizes the existing roadway circulation network, peak-hour and daily traffic volumes,
and operations at the study intersections and roadway segments.
Road Network
The following provides a description of the existing street system within the Urban Core study area. It
should be noted that the street network is set up in a grid system, with “Streets” typically running east-
west and “Avenues” typically running north-south. In addition, each section contains an exhibit of a
typical cross section for each respective roadway segment.
E Street is an east-west roadway. E Street is classified as a four-lane gateway street between I-5 and I-
805, with the exception of the segment between Broadway and First Avenue, which is classified as a four-
lane urban arterial. E Street is four lanes between 3
rd
Avenue and Broadway, approximately 62 feet in
width. Parallel parking is provided on both sides of the street in this section. E Street to the west of
Broadway has four lanes, is approximately 70 feet in width, has a two-way left-turn lane, and has no on-
street parking. Sidewalks are provided on both sides of the roadway in both sections. The posted speed
limit is 30 mph.
F Street is an east-west roadway. F Street is classified as a four-lane downtown promenade between I-5
and Broadway and as a two-lane downtown promenade between Broadway and Third Avenue. F Street is
four lanes between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue with a raised median in the center and is
approximately 65 feet in width. The only on-street parking provided in this segment is limited parallel
parking on the north side of F Street between Third Avenue and Garret Avenue. Between Fourth Avenue
and Broadway, F Street is a two-lane roadway, approximately 40 feet in width with parallel parking on
both sides. F Street has four lanes between Broadway and I-5 with parallel parking on both sides and is
approximately 66 feet in width. Sidewalks are provided on both sides of the roadway in all three sections.
The posted speed limit is 30 mph.
H Street is an east-west roadway with a center two-way left turn lane. H Street is classified as a six-lane
gateway street between I-5 and Broadway and between Hilltop Drive and I-805 and as a four-lane urban
arterial between Broadway and Hilltop Drive; however, it should be noted that H Street is not built to its
ultimate classification and functions as a four-lane roadway between I-5 and Broadway. Parking is
provided on-street east of Third Avenue. H Street is approximately 70 feet in curb-to-curb width between
Third Avenue and Broadway and 64 feet in curb-to-curb width between Broadway and I-5. Sidewalks are
provided on both sides of the street. The posted speed limit is 35 mph.
Broadway is a north-south roadway. Broadway is classified as a four-lane gateway street between SR-54
and C Street and a four-lane commercial boulevard between C Street and L Street. Parallel parking is
provided on both sides of the roadway. Between F Street and H Street, there is a two-way left turn lane
and the roadway is approximately 82 feet in width. Broadway is approximately 68 feet in width between
E Street and F Street. Sidewalks are provided on both sides of the street. The posted speed limit is 35
mph.
3rd Avenue is a north-south roadway. Third Avenue is classified as a four-lane commercial boulevard
between C Street and E Street and between H Street and L Street and classified as a two/four-lane
downtown promenade between E Street and H Street. Third Avenue is two lanes between E Street and F
Street, approximately 72 feet in width. Between F Street and Madrona Street, Third Avenue is a four-lane
Traffic Impact Analysis Existing Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 3-2 October 2005
roadway with a raised median, approximately 101 feet in width. Between Madrona Street and G Street,
Third Avenue is four lanes and approximately 72 feet in width. Angled parking is provided in these first
three sections. Third Avenue is a four-lane roadway with a center two-way left-turn lane between G
Street and H Street; approximately 66 feet in width and including parallel parking. Sidewalks are
provided on both sides of the street in all four sections. The posted speed limit is 35 mph.
Table 3-1 summarizes the existing roadway segment dimensions based on field observations and
measurements by Kimley-Horn staff.
Figures 3-1 to 3-1.5 show the existing lane configurations and traffic control at the study intersections and
Figure 3-2 shows the number of lanes and street classification on each evaluated roadway segment within
the vicinity of the project site.
Table 3-1 Existing Roadway Segment Dimensions
TABLE 3-1
EXISTING ROADWAY SEGMENT DIMENSIONS
Street Segment
Total
Travel
Lanes Median/Turn Lane
Curb-to-
Curb
Width Parking
Bike
Lane
E St between I-5 and Woodlawn Ave 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 70’ N N
E St between Woodlawn Ave and Broadway 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 70’ N N
E St between Broadway and 1
st
Ave 4 N 62’ Y N
E St between 1
st
Ave and I-805 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 71’ N Y
F St between I-5 and Woodlawn Ave 4 N 66’ Y N
F St between Woodlawn Ave and Broadway 4 N 66’ Y N
F St between Broadway and 4
th
Ave 2 N 40’ Y N
F St between 4th Ave and 3
rd
Ave 4 Raised Median 65’ N N
H St between I-5 and Broadway 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 64’ N N
H St between Broadway and 3
rd
Ave 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 64’ N N
H St between 3
rd
Ave and Hilltop Dr 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 64’ N Y
H St between Hilltop Dr and I-805 4 N 65’ N N
J St between Bay Blvd and Broadway 4 Raised Median 67’ N N
L St between I-5 and Broadway 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 63’ N N
L St between Broadway and Hilltop Dr 4 N 64’ Y N
Woodlawn Ave between E St and F St 2 N 36’ Y N
Woodlawn Ave between G St and H St 2 N 33’ Y N
Traffic Impact Analysis Existing Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 3-3 October 2005
TABLE 3-1
EXISTING ROADWAY SEGMENT DIMENSIONS (Continued)
Street Segment
Total
Travel
Lanes Median/Turn Lane
Curb-to-
Curb
Width Parking
Bike
Lane
Broadway between SR-54 and C St 4 N 68’ N N
Broadway between C St and E St 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 70’ Y N
Broadway between E St and F St 4 N 68’ Y N
Broadway between F St and H St 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 82’ Y N
Broadway between H St and K St 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 80’ Y N
Broadway between K St and L St 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 80’ Y N
Broadway south of L St 4 Raised Median 82’ Y N
4
th
Ave between SR-54 and C St 4
Raised Median
Extended NB/SB RT Lanes
90’ N N
4
th
Ave between C St and E St 4 N 64’ Y N
4
th
Ave between E St and H St 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 64’ N N
4
th
Ave between H St and L St 4 N 63’ Y N
3
rd
Ave between C St and E St 4 N 64’ Y N
3
rd
Ave between E St and F St 2 N 62’ Y N
3
rd
Ave between F St and Madrona St 4 Raised Median 101’ Y N
3
rd
Ave between Madrona St and G St 4 N 72’ Y N
3
rd
Ave between G St and H St 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 66’ Y N
3
rd
Ave between H St and L St 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 63’ N N
3
rd
Ave south of L St 4 Two-Way Left Turn Lane 61’ N N
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-9
3-10
Traffic Impact Analysis Existing Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 3-11 October 2005
Traffic Volumes
Existing a.m. (7:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.) and p.m. (4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.) peak-hour turning movement
counts were conducted by Southland Car Counters, Turning Point Traffic Service, and Traffic Data
Service Southwest at the study intersections. These counts were taken during several different time
periods in 2004/2005 and are summarized in Table 3-2. The existing ADT for the roadway segments
were obtained from the City of Chula Vista. Dates of these counts ranged between 1995 and 2003 and are
summarized in Table 3-3.
Table 3-2 Intersection Count Data Source
TABLE 3-2
INTERSECTION SEGMENT COUNT DATA SOURCE
INTERSECTION SOURCE DATE
1 Bay Blvd-I-5 SB Ramp @ E St TPTS 11/16/04
2 I-5 NB Ramp @ E St TPTS 11/23/04
3 Woodlawn Ave @ E St SCC 6/16/04
4 Broadway @ E St SCC 6/22/04
5 5th Ave @ E St SCC 6/23/04
6 4th Ave @ E St SCC 6/22/04
7 3rd Ave @ E St SCC 6/23/04
8 2nd Ave @ E St SCC 6/23/04
9 1st Ave @ E St SCC 6/23/04
10 Flower St @ E St SCC 6/23/04
11 Bonita Glen Dr @ Bonita Rd SCC 6/23/04
12 Bay Blvd @ F St TPTS 11/18/04
13 Broadway @ F St SCC 6/16/04
14 5th Ave @ F St SCC 6/24/04
15 4th Ave @ F St SCC 6/23/04
16 3rd Ave @ F St SCC 6/16/04
17 2nd Ave @ F St TDSS 4/20/05
18 Broadway @ G St SCC 6/22/04
19 5th Ave @ G St SCC 6/16/04
20 4th Ave @ G St SCC 6/16/04
21 3rd Ave @ G St SCC 6/22/04
22 2nd Ave @ G St TDSS 4/20/05
23 Hilltop Dr @ G St TDSS 4/20/05
24 I-5 SB Ramp @ H St TPTS 11/18/04
25 I-5 NB Ramp @ H St SCC 11/14/04
26 Woodlawn Ave @ H St SCC 1/19/04
27 Broadway @ H St SCC 1/15/04
28 5th Ave @ H St SCC 1/15/04
29 4th Ave @ H St SCC 1/14/04
30 3rd Ave @ H St SCC 1/14/04
31 2nd Ave @ H St SCC 1/14/04
32 1st Ave @ H St SCC 1/15/04
Notes:
SCC = Southland Car Counters; TPTS = Turning Point Traffic Services, TDSS = Traffic Data Service Southwest
Traffic Impact Analysis Existing Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 3-12 October 2005
TABLE 3-2
INTERSECTION SEGMENT COUNT DATA SOURCE (Continued)
INTERSECTION SOURCE DATE
33 Hilltop Dr @ H St SCC 1/15/04
34 Broadway @ SR-54 WB Ramp TDSS 4/20/05
35 Broadway @ SR-54 EB Ramp TDSS 4/20/05
36 Broadway @ C St SCC 6/16/04
37 Broadway @ D Street SCC 6/16/04
38 Broadway @ Flower St SCC 6/16/04
39 Broadway @ I St TDSS 4/20/05
40 Broadway @ J St TDSS 3/30/05
41 Broadway @ K St TDSS 4/20/05
42 Broadway @ L St TDSS 4/20/05
43 4th Ave @ SR-54 WB Ramp TDSS 4/20/05
44 4th Ave @ SR-54 EB Ramp TDSS 4/20/05
45 4th Ave @ Brisbane St SCC 6/16/04
46 4th Ave @ C St SCC 6/16/04
47 4th Ave @ D St SCC 6/16/04
48 4th Ave @ I St SCC 6/23/04
49 4th Ave @ J St SCC 6/16/04
50 4th Ave @ K St SCC 6/16/04
51 4th Ave @ L St SCC 6/16/04
52 3rd Ave @ Davidson St SCC 6/23/04
53 3rd Ave @ I St SCC 6/23/04
54 3rd Ave @ J St SCC 6/16/04
55 3rd Ave @ K St SCC 6/16/04
56 3rd Ave @ L St SCC 6/16/04
57 2nd Ave @ D St TDSS 5/3/05
58 J St @ I-5 SB Ramp TPTS 11/16/04
59 J St @ I-5 NB Ramp TPTS 11/16/04
60 Woodlawn Ave @ J St TDSS 4/20/05
61 L St @ Bay Blvd TPTS 11/17/04
62 L St @ Industrial Blvd TPTS 11/17/04
63 Bay Blvd @ I-5 SB Ramp TPTS 11/17/04
64 Industrial Blvd @ I-5 NB Ramp TPTS 11/17/04
Notes:
SCC = Southland Car Counters; TPTS = Turning Point Traffic Services, TDSS = Traffic Data Service Southwest
Traffic Impact Analysis Existing Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 3-13 October 2005
Table 3-3 Roadway Segment Count Data Source
TABLE 3-3
ROADWAY SEGMENT COUNT DATA SOURCE
STREET SEGMENT COUNT SOURCE COUNT DATE
I-5 - Woodlawn Avenue City of Chula Vista 2003
Woodlawn Avenue - Broadway City of Chula Vista 2003 E Street
Broadway - First Avenue City of Chula Vista 2002/2003
Bay Boulevard - Broadway City of Chula Vista 2000
F Street
Broadway - 3rd Avenue City of Chula Vista 1996/2000/2001
I-5 - Broadway City of Chula Vista 2002
H Street
Broadway - Hilltop Drive City of Chula Vista 2002/2003
J Street Bay Boulevard - Broadway City of Chula Vista 2002/2003
L Street I-5 - Broadway City of Chula Vista 2002/2003
E Street – F Street City of Chula Vista 2002/2003
Woodlawn
Avenue
G Street – H Street City of Chula Vista 2002/2003
C Street - E Street City of Chula Vista 1997
E Street - H Street City of Chula Vista 1996/1997/2003 Broadway
H Street - L Street City of Chula Vista 1997/2003
C Street - E Street City of Chula Vista 2000
E Street - H Street City of Chula Vista 1996/2002 4th Avenue
H Street - L Street City of Chula Vista 1995/1996/2000/2003
C Street - E Street City of Chula Vista 1995/1996
E Street - H Street City of Chula Vista 2002 3rd Avenue
H Street - L Street City of Chula Vista 2002/2003
Figures 3-3 to 3-3.5 illustrate the existing peak-hour traffic volumes at the study intersections and Figure
3-4 illustrates the existing ADT volumes along the roadway segments.
Appendix B contains the existing peak-hour traffic volume data at the study intersections and the existing
ADT volume data for the roadway segments.
4 20 538 508 5 9
20 79 249 465 698 844
2 5 0 0 78 66
0 0 120 242 3 11
2 13 251 743 540 833
1 2 0 0 81 62
114 50 26 36 48 98
407 469 435 500 372 439
28 112 19 43 79 121
305 318 21 36 38 55
238 513 337 615 271 526
88 170 15 40 53 80
91 84 123 51 37 16
463 501 710 648 688 682
132 182 51 75 58 38
16 43 39 41 141 43
312 613 368 865 374 849
52 144 16 38 27 103
96 131 21 20
720 651 833 818
XX YY
78 116 95 201
3 28 16 22
375 867 554 1022
1 3 17 30
5
1
2
1
2
1
3
1
1
0
1
8
4
4
8
3
3
Bonita Glen Dr @ Bonita Rd
2
2
1
0
7
7
1
1
4
4
0 1
8
5
1
1
1
1
1
8
1
Flower St @ E St
1
6
1
1
0
8
5
6
2
9
5
8
Intersection 10: Intersection 11:
Intersection 7:
3rd Ave @ E St
4
6
2
6
Intersection 9:
1st Ave @ E St
3
3
6
5
3
6
6
5
7
4
8
5
9
7
5
3
6
2
0
2
1
2
2
1
3
7
4
2
Chula Vista Urban Core Traffic Study
Figure 3-3
4
6
1
9
2
8
1
2
2
8
3
1
2
4
1
7
8
3
9
3
4
2
5
7
1
0
6
6
6
3
4
Intersection 8:
2nd Ave @ E St
8
4
3
6
1
0
7
Intersection 6:
4th Ave @ E St
7
2
6
8
3
1
9
5
1
6
0
4
0
6
4
0
Intersection 5:
5th Ave @ E St
4
5
1
1
4
1
8
2
6
3
3
1
6
0
1
4
2
2
7
2
0
2
4
0
1
1
3
1
4
5
6
0
1
2
1
2
4
5
Intersection 3:
Woodlawn Ave @ E St
1
3
1
1
1
6
7
6
0
Intersection 2:
I-5 NB Ramp @ E St
0
0
1
7
1
4
Intersection 1:
Bay Blvd-I-5 SB Ramp @ E St
2
7
Existing Peak-Hour Traffic Volumes
1
7
0
2
8
9
3
8
5
4
6
9
3
3
2
7
3
2
7
8
0
3
4
0
3
0
0 0
0
3
4
4
2
Intersection 4:
5
0
8
7
0
2
8
8
4
Legend
=AM/PM Peak Hour Volumes
7
4
8
9
8
8
2
0
8
4
3
8
1
8
1
9
8
2
7
1
2
1
0
1
3
4
1
0
0
0 0
1
2
1
7
8
1
6
Broadway @ E St
2
5
4
7
8
6
9
3
3-14
65 96 41 61 16 41
57 18 118 120 142 225
46 64 56 89 8 37
30 157 27 47 14 15
17 62 99 281 163 317
4 13 90 159 19 64
43 114 28 39 86 42
189 189 174 157 194 145
25 98 42 79 8 11
23 45 9 63 16 47
81 316 108 254 91 320
54 106 57 182 14 38
43 95 11 33 27 29
30 83 62 167 56 121
13 49 17 18 33 31
63 61 22 21 12 37
46 77 85 160 67 126
39 62 5 17 24 51
49 34 21 21
80 106 146 105
XX YY
39 51 42 20
24 22 32 28
55 137 86 150
20 54 32 47
9
8
0
7
4
4
4
2
3
5
3
9
4th Ave @ F St
3
1
7
4
0
8
5
6
5
5
1
6
2
1
0
8
7
8
3
5
3
Legend
=AM/PM Peak Hour Volumes
6
6
2
1
6
5
4
8
3
0
1
7
2
2
7
6
1
5
3
7
9
7
1
1
8
3
4
9
6
4
2
9
6
8
7
Intersection 15:
5
1
1
0
9
2
9
4
8
2
6
4
2
4
7
3
6
Bay Blvd @ F St
3
3
Existing Peak-Hour Traffic Volumes
2
1
5
4
5
5
6
9
3
0
4
2
0
6
4
1
4
Intersection 13:
Broadway @ F St
4
9
2
9
8
1
6
4
Intersection 12: Intersection 14:
5th Ave @ F St
3
6
1
8
4
3
2
4
5
1
5
3
2
1
0
7
2
0
1
1
4
7
1
1
4
5
2
8
2
5
0
5
0
4
8
2
9
3
4
8
Intersection 16:
3rd Ave @ F St
6
3
3
9
8
4
1
3
0
1
8
3
Intersection 17:
2nd Ave @ F St
3
2
3
2
0
8
7
2
6
1
4
6
2
3
3
5
4
2
3
Intersection 19:
5th Ave @ G St
2
9
2
0
6
9
Chula Vista Urban Core Traffic Study
Figure 3-3.1
2
0
2
2
3
3
4
2
3
2
1
9
6
9
4
6
4
1
8
6
4
4
4
2
2
1
2
1
3
1
0
4
2
0
4
0
7
1
4
Intersection 20:
4th Ave @ G St
3
1
1
1
3
2
6
1
5
Intersection 18:
Broadway @ G St
1
0
8
3
7
1
8
3 2
Intersection 21: Intersection 22:
3rd Ave @ G St
3
0
5
5
7
3
6
2
3
2
6
9
1
8
4
4
4
9
2
5
3
3
0
3
2
0
3
5
2nd Ave @ G St
3
4
3
0
9
3
1
2
2
1
7
1
1
3
3
7
2
2
0
2
8
4
6
2
9
9
2
2
3-15
10 14 0 0 364 542
31 42 71 47 508 601
45 83 478 547 0 0
4 5 0 0 9 62
28 43 19 88 435 651
85 128 15 82 0 0
35 35 112 135 193 70
536 835 375 581 598 776
14 7 147 322 34 188
32 92 198 163 187 51
728 898 442 512 544 722
16 25 80 233 9 122
108 140 129 140 186 75
528 725 582 617 828 936
75 116 216 233 124 68
117 149 81 142 22 30
462 758 368 677 451 991
95 197 160 206 33 51
52 39 160 94
1082 1013 1335 1106
XX YY
156 72 402 345
11 12 9 24
583 1150 690 1207
26 23 76 67
0
6
5
8
8
4
1
8
2
1
5
5
Woodlawn Ave @ H St
1
0
9
2
7
3
4
2
7
5
0
9
5
6
2
1
8
5
1
5
0
Legend
=AM/PM Peak Hour Volumes
8
2
1
9
3
1
3
9
8
1
2
4
7
1
7
7
8
9
6
9
1
1
1
9
2
3
9
6
5
6
3
6
4
6
3
0
Intersection 26:
1
5
4
1
5
1
5
0
2
1
0
3
4
2
9
Hilltop Dr @ G St
7
Existing Peak-Hour Traffic Volumes
6
5
0 0
0
3
0
4
6
7
0
9
0
Intersection 24:
I-5 SB Ramp @ H St
3
8
5
4
0
0
Intersection 23: Intersection 25:
I-5 NB Ramp @ H St
0 0 0
0 0
1
1
0
5
3
1
3
6
0
4
7
2
1
0
3
1
6
6
9
2
4
1 9
Intersection 27:
Broadway @ H St
1
3
6
7
8
2
2
0
7
5
9
3
8
5
Intersection 28:
5th Ave @ H St
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
7
3
9
4
1
2
1
2
4
3
2
8
9
5
Intersection 30:
3rd Ave @ H St
1
5
0
5
5
2
9
9
Chula Vista Urban Core Traffic Study
Figure 3-3.2
6
2
1
5
8
1
0
3
4
1
1
9
7
4
2
6
7
3
1
2
1
0
5
1
5
9
5
1
9
0
4
5
9
4
6
4
1
9
7
5
5
Intersection 31:
2nd Ave @ H St
5
1
2
5
1
4
9
7
6
Intersection 29:
4th Ave @ H St
1
9
8
7
9
1
7
7
1
3
2
7
6
Intersection 32: Intersection 33:
1st Ave @ H St
2
5
1
6
0
3
9
1
2
1
0
6
2
6
9
9
6
8
0
1
5
1
2
9
1
0
4
Hilltop Dr @ H St
8
2
4
3
1
5
0
9
1
6
1
1
0
4
6
6
3
2
5
2
9
9
1
0
3
3
0
9
4
9
6
3-16
1043 213 0 0 158 115
0 0 0 0 0 0
181 278 0 0 40 174
0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
57 30 10 20 135 95
53 28 66 11 105 147
30 48 28 44 82 209
45 31 54 12 87 61
23 28 57 15 113 170
41 51 94 91 50 52
62 78 94 98 106 85
303 316 56 72 435 380
31 48 69 95 102 152
115 177 51 28 116 130
277 426 72 71 395 554
78 135 30 26 88 179
383 315 0 0
2 2 0 0
XX YY
390 599 0
0 0 255 267
0 0 0 0
0 0 301 522
8
8
1
6
4
3
0
6
4
2
5
0
0
0
7
9
4
1
8
9
0
4th Ave @ SR-54 EB Ramp
0
1
2
6
1
2
3
5
8
7
4
0
2
0
1
7
6
1
0
1
4
2
4
5
5
0
2
8
7
4th Ave @ SR-54 WB Ramp
3
6
3
9
0
4
0
9
9
3
3
1
2
1
Intersection 43: Intersection 44:
Intersection 40:
Broadway @ J St
1
9
5
8
2
Intersection 42:
Broadway @ L St
8
0
8
1
3
9
4
6
3
1
6
1
1
1
6
1
0
9
1
4
8
5
7
7
6
6
6
4
0
4
5
2
6
0
Chula Vista Urban Core Traffic Study
Figure 3-3.3
6
9
0
1
0
0
4
4
7
1
0
7
0
1
0
6
6
2
0
3
5
2
8
4
1
6
4
2
3
8
0
5
5
Intersection 41:
Broadway @ K St
6
2
3
5
3
2
1
Intersection 39:
Broadway @ I St
1
2
8
6
8
1
2
4
2
4
6
2
9
3
1
Intersection 38:
Broadway @ Flower St
1
8
1
0
6
4
3
9
1
0
2
3
9
3
1
2
1
2
2
0
4
1
1
0
2
0
7
7
8
5
7
2
2
3
3
5
0
6
0
1
Intersection 36:
Broadway @ C St
0
8
9
2
1
1
6
0
0
0
Intersection 35:
Broadway @ SR-54 EB on Ramp
3
4
6
1
0
0
2
5
1
1
8
8
Intersection 34:
Broadway @ SR-54 WB off Ramp
0
Existing Peak-Hour Traffic Volumes
0
1
1
1
5
0
0
1
4
2
7
2
6
7
0
0
0
4
2
9
3
5
2
0
1
0
8
6
0
4
3
6
Intersection 37:
6
6
4
6
9
9
9
7
2
2
Legend
=AM/PM Peak Hour Volumes
1
6
6
8
7
4
1
1
1
9
2
4
1
2
6
6
4
0
1
4
7
5
6
9
6
5
9
9
7
7
1
1
1
6
1
2
3
7
0
6
7
6
2
7
0
1
Broadway @ D St
3
2
9
5
1
4
3
3-17
156 139 256 302 36 26
10 13 99 118 34 45
24 31 38 72 10 14
219 579 77 147 41 54
8 16 58 137 30 32
44 122 26 76 33 46
34 26 60 56 120 124
133 192 397 403 179 216
15 29 48 72 78 47
42 68 42 46 58 32
130 266 467 632 184 236
12 50 46 42 115 74
83 95 16 30 53 27
500 455 4 9 107 144
83 118 7 6 75 28
60 77 7 12 38 68
395 551 12 34 86 229
47 115 15 27 49 121
69 47 31 44
348 202 166 125
XX YY
105 117 40 77
98 102 68 74
313 528 159 140
149 272 102 118
8
1
5
3
0
1
7
3
2
4
7
3
6
4th Ave @ I St
7
5
8
4
6
1
1
8
3
8
6
4
8
2
6
7
4
1
1
4
5
7
Legend
=AM/PM Peak Hour Volumes
5
7
1
0
7
4
2
5
1
1
2
2
3
1
1
4
8
5
6
2
5
4
6
2
3
8
9
5
7
2
6
3
4
1
3
5
1
3
Intersection 48:
6
6
7
1
5
8
1
6
5
3
4
7
8
3
4
0
4
2
3
3
4th Ave @ Brisbane St
7
3
9
Existing Peak-Hour Traffic Volumes
2
7
3
5
7
6
8
1
9
1
0
3
0
3
2
5
1
5
0
5
5
Intersection 46:
4th Ave @ C St
1
1
1
2
6
9
2
7
3
Intersection 45: Intersection 47:
4th Ave @ D St
3
0
8
6
7
4
5
3
5
3
1
5
4
6
5
1
3
2
2
3
7
3
7
7
1
8
2
0
3
8
0
2
4
6
0
2
0
4
9
0
3
6
Intersection 49:
4th Ave @ J St
4
8
7
4
4
1
6
0
3
9
4
3
0
Intersection 50:
4th Ave @ K St
4
9
8
1
0
6
8
5
1
4
3
0
8
6
3
6
5
9
0
Intersection 52:
3rd Ave @ Davidson St
3
2
1
1
2
3
3
Chula Vista Urban Core Traffic Study
Figure 3-3.4
5
6
6
6
5
3
1
4
3
3
6
0
4
6
4
2
7
1
1
8
5
7
9
1
3
7
9
1
9
4
6
5
2
5
2
8
4
8
3
6
Intersection 53:
3rd Ave @ I St
6
2
2
6
4
8
5
2
6
Intersection 51:
4th Ave @ L St
8
6
1
3
2
1
3
0
1
0
7
Intersection 54: Intersection 55:
3rd Ave @ J St
1
6
9
1
0
5
7
1
0
6
4
2
4
3
4
5
1
1
2
7
6
3
3
7
5
1
2
4
7
0
9
4
8
3rd Ave @ K St
1
8
8
1
0
9
7
1
5
5
1
1
1
4
6
2
5
9
7
9
7
0
8
6
7
6
7
7
2
6
3
4
3-18
142 98 0 0 0 0
418 404 0 0 414 231
185 157 0 0 142 247
161 115 33 31 0 0
316 573 0 0 98 343
119 95 33 88 18 179
346 298 45 51 92 6
314 375 601 724 0 0
0 0 0 0 341 584
50 172 0 0 0 0
262 629 560 977 0 0
0 0 12 33 0 0
5 12 458 697 0 0
324 419 0 0 0 0
228 354 62 24 0 0
4 6 0 0 339 281
348 540 0 0 0 0
244 453 0 0 135 171
XX YY
8
9
0 4
Intersection 62:
L St @ Industrial Blvd
9
3
Intersection 64:
Industrial Blvd @ I-5 NB Ramp
2
9
1
2
1
4
2
6
2
0
3
3
1
0
3
3
5
3
1
7
0
1
2
8
4
8
1
5
1
0
Chula Vista Urban Core Traffic Study
Figure 3-3.5
7
8
5
9
0
7
0
4
5
5
0
3
4
2
1
0
4
9
0
4 7
Intersection 63:
Bay Blvd @ I-5 SB Ramp
0
0
5
1
Intersection 61:
L St @ Bay Blvd
0
6
7
1
1
8
2
2
5
2
1
1
4
9
0
Intersection 60:
Woodlawn Ave @ J St
2
1
0 0
4
0
0 0 0 0
1
0
0
0
0 0 0
0
2
1
8
0 0
Intersection 58:
J St @ I-5 SB Ramp
9
5
0
3
9
6
9
7
1
0
0
8
4
Intersection 57:
2nd Ave @ D St
3
1
2
1
3
9
7
2
Intersection 56:
3rd Ave @ L St
1
6
2
Existing Peak-Hour Traffic Volumes
8
9
4
7
9
0
1
9
4
9
1
7
4
2
3
8
1
2
4
5
0
5
9
8
1
8
7
0
5
6
9
1
8
0
2
5
9
Intersection 59:
0
2
7
7
0 0
Legend
=AM/PM Peak Hour Volumes
0
9
6
4
0
4
2
6
4
7
1
0
1
8
2
1
5
5
8 5
8
3
4
1
2
0
4
4
6
1
3
2
2
4
J St @ I-5 NB Ramp
0 0 0
3-19
Traffic Impact Analysis Existing Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 3-21 October 2005
Intersection Analysis
Table 3-4 displays the LOS analysis results for the study intersections under Existing Conditions. As
shown in this table, all study intersections operate at LOS D or better during both peak periods, except for
the following intersections:
§ #34 Broadway @ SR-54 WB Ramp (LOS F – AM Peak);
§ #61 L Street @ Bay Boulevard (LOS F – PM Peak); and
§ #63 Bay Boulevard @ I-5 SB Ramp (LOS E – PM Peak).
It should be noted that the E Street and H Street intersections at the I-5 interchange (including Woodlawn
Avenue) do not take into account the queues associated with the at-grade trolley crossings at both of these
locations. As noted in the methodology section, the E Street and H Street intersections affected by the
trolley crossing would experience additional delay along the arterial and at adjacent intersections.
Additional delays would be between 17 and 40 seconds per vehicle (depending on the direction and time
of day) and drop the LOS by at least one grade.
Appendix C contains the peak-hour intersections LOS calculation worksheets.
Roadway Segment Analysis
Table 3-5 summarizes the existing condition LOS analysis for the roadway segments located in the Urban
Core. The existing volume is compared to the acceptable volume as defined in the City of Chula Vista’s
General Plan. Roadway segments that are part of the Urban Core Circulation Element have an acceptable
volume equal to LOS D or better. All other roadway segments within the City have an acceptable volume
equal to LOS C or better. As shown in this table, all Urban Core roadways currently function at LOS D
or better.
Existing Transit Service
The Urban Core of Chula Vista is currently served by 11 Chula Vista Transit (CVT) routes (Routes 701,
702, 703, 704, 705, 706, 707, 708, 709, 711, and 712), two Metropolitan Transit System (MTS) routes
(Routes 929 and 932), and the San Diego Trolley’s Blue Line. Several CVT transit routes circulate
within the Urban Core and Bayfront area; others serve the greater Chula Vista area and provide
connections to National City Transit and other transit providers. MTS route 929 runs along 3
rd
and 4
th
Avenues through the Urban Core; MTS transit route 932 runs along Broadway. The San Diego Trolley’s
Blue Line provides service between Qualcomm Stadium and San Ysidro/Tijuana and extends through the
Urban Core parallel to and on the east side of I-5, with stations at Bayfront/E Street and H Street. Service
is provided seven days a week with service starting around 5:00 a.m. and ending around 12:00 a.m.
During the peak periods, service is provided with 7.5-minute headways and 15 minutes during the off-
peak periods.
Figure 3-5 displays the existing transit routes in the Urban Core.
EXISTING
INTERSECTION DELAY (a) LOS (b)
AM 10.1 B
PM 16.6 B
AM 33.2 C
PM 18.2 B
AM 21.7 C
PM 15.5 B
AM 16.9 B
PM 26.3 C
AM 5.0 A
PM 6.4 A
AM 13.5 B
PM 18.8 B
AM 11.9 B
PM 15.2 B
AM 7.3 A
PM 11.0 B
AM 6.8 A
PM 5.5 A
AM 10.6 B
PM 12.5 B
AM 12.1 B
PM 16.5 B
AM 8.8 A
PM 14.7 B
AM 16.5 B
PM 24.1 C
AM 5.7 A
PM 8.2 A
AM 13.5 B
PM 17.7 B
AM 13.9 B
PM 19.2 B
AM 9.7 A
PM 12.5 B
AM 12.3 B
PM 14.9 B
AM 6.3 A
PM 7.5 A
AM 8.9 A
PM 10.3 B
Notes:
K:###BOT_TEXT###95413000\Excel\October 2005 Final Report\[413in08(MODIFIED).xls]Existing
15 4th Ave @ F St
16 3rd Ave @ F St
17 2nd Ave @ F St
18 Broadway @ G St
14 5th Ave @ F St
12 Bay Blvd @ F St
13 Broadway @ F St
10 Flower St @ E St
11 Bonita Glen Dr @ Bonita Rd
8 2nd Ave @ E St
9 1st Ave @ E St
6 4th Ave @ E St
7 3rd Ave @ E St
4 Broadway @ E St
5 5th Ave @ E St
2 I-5 NB Ramp @ E St
3 Woodlawn Ave @ E St
TABLE 3-4
EXISTING CONDITIONS
PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION LEVEL OF SERVICE SUMMARY
1 Bay Blvd-I-5 SB Ramp @ E St
PEAK HOUR
19 5th Ave @ G St
20 4th Ave @ G St
(a) Delay refers to the average control delay for the entire intersection, measured in seconds per vehicle. At a two-way stop-controlled
intersection, delay refers to the worst movement.
(b) LOS calculations are based on the methodology outlined in the 2000 Highway Capacity Manual and performed using Synchro 6.0
3-22
EXISTING
INTERSECTION DELAY (a) LOS (b)
AM 8.6 A
PM 9.2 A
AM 14.1 B
PM 16.3 C
AM 16.7 C
PM 14.4 B
AM 28.8 C
PM 21.1 C
AM 12.7 B
PM 14.8 B
AM 38.0 D
PM 22.3 C
AM 25.7 C
PM 27.1 C
AM 10.8 B
PM 11.3 B
AM 22.1 C
PM 29.2 C
AM 19.3 B
PM 23.8 C
AM 8.4 A
PM 11.5 B
AM 7.6 A
PM 8.2 A
AM 32.2 C
PM 41.3 D
AM 82.9 F
PM 11.8 B
AM 3.3 A
PM 6.3 A
AM 18.1 B
PM 15.1 B
AM 9.2 A
PM 10.2 B
AM 11.5 B
PM 14.0 B
AM 16.3 B
PM 17.3 B
AM 13.6 B
PM 18.6 B
Notes:
Bold values indicate intersections operating at LOS E or F.
K:###BOT_TEXT###95413000\Excel\October 2005 Final Report\[413in08(MODIFIED).xls]Existing
21 3rd Ave @ G St
22 2nd Ave @ G St
23 Hilltop Dr @ G St
24 I-5 SB Ramp @ H St
25 I-5 NB Ramp @ H St
26 Woodlawn Ave @ H St
27 Broadway @ H St
28 5th Ave @ H St
29 4th Ave @ H St
30 3rd Ave @ H St
31 2nd Ave @ H St
32 1st Ave @ H St
Hilltop Dr @ H St
Broadway @ D Street
34 Broadway @ SR-54 WB Ramp
35 Broadway @ SR-54 EB Ramp
36 Broadway @ C St
37
TABLE 3-4
EXISTING CONDITIONS
PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION LEVEL OF SERVICE SUMMARY (Continued)
(a) Delay refers to the average control delay for the entire intersection, measured in seconds per vehicle. At a two-way stop-controlled
intersection, delay refers to the worst movement.
(b) LOS calculations are based on the methodology outlined in the 2000 Highway Capacity Manual and performed using Synchro 6.0
PEAK HOUR
38 Broadway @ Flower St
39 Broadway @ I St
33
40 Broadway @ J St
3-23
EXISTING
INTERSECTION DELAY (a) LOS (b)
AM 11.7 B
PM 13.2 B
AM 15.5 B
PM 20.4 C
AM 14.7 B
PM 25.9 C
AM 13.4 B
PM 27.2 C
AM 21.5 C
PM 27.3 C
AM 23.2 C
PM 31.4 C
AM 9.1 A
PM 10.5 B
AM 8.8 A
PM 10.1 B
AM 9.3 A
PM 15.7 B
AM 8.5 A
PM 10.1 B
AM 24.6 C
PM 26.6 C
AM 9.9 A
PM 13.2 B
AM 10.1 B
PM 12.2 B
AM 18.8 B
PM 35.9 D
AM 9.5 A
PM 11.0 B
AM 18.1 B
PM 27.0 C
AM 14.9 B
PM 14.9 B
AM 8.9 A
PM 15.1 B
AM 10.6 B
PM 8.2 A
AM 11.0 B
PM 11.9 B
Notes:
K:###BOT_TEXT###95413000\Excel\October 2005 Final Report\[413in08(MODIFIED).xls]Existing
60 Woodlawn Ave @ J St
(a) Delay refers to the average control delay for the entire intersection, measured in seconds per vehicle. At a two-way stop-controlled
intersection, delay refers to the worst movement.
(b) LOS calculations are based on the methodology outlined in the 2000 Highway Capacity Manual and performed using Synchro 6.0
58 J St @ I-5 SB Ramp
59 J St @ I-5 NB Ramp
56 3rd Ave @ L St
57 2nd Ave @ D St
54 3rd Ave @ J St
55 3rd Ave @ K St
52 3rd Ave @ Davidson St
53 3rd Ave @ I St
50 4th Ave @ K St
51 4th Ave @ L St
48 4th Ave @ I St
49 4th Ave @ J St
44 4th Ave @ SR-54 EB Ramp
47 4th Ave @ D St
45 4th Ave @ Brisbane St
46 4th Ave @ C St
42 Broadway @ L St
43 4th Ave @ SR-54 WB Ramp
TABLE 3-4
EXISTING CONDITIONS
PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION LEVEL OF SERVICE SUMMARY (Continued)
PEAK HOUR
41 Broadway @ K St
3-24
EXISTING
INTERSECTION DELAY (a) LOS (b)
AM 16.8 C
PM 120.3 F
AM 18.9 B
PM 25.4 C
AM 22.2 C
PM 48.6 E
AM 15.4 C
PM 17.7 C
Notes:
K:###BOT_TEXT###95413000\Excel\October 2005 Final Report\[413in08(MODIFIED).xls]Existing
(b) LOS calculations are based on the methodology outlined in the 2000 Highway Capacity Manual and performed using Synchro 6.0
Bold values indicate intersections operating at LOS E or F.
(a) Delay refers to the average control delay for the entire intersection, measured in seconds per vehicle. At a two-way stop-controlled
intersection, delay refers to the worst movement.
64 Industrial Blvd @ I-5 NB Ramp
62 L St @ Industrial Blvd
63 Bay Blvd @ I-5 SB Ramp
PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION LEVEL OF SERVICE SUMMARY (Continued)
PEAK HOUR
61 L St @ Bay Blvd
TABLE 3-4
EXISTING CONDITIONS
3-25
DAILY DAILY
STREET TRAFFIC ACCEPTABLE LOS E SEGMENT
STREET SEGMENT CLASSIFICATION (b) VOLUME VOLUME CAPACITY LOS
I-5 - Woodlawn Avenue 4 Lanes Gateway Street 26,924 43,200 48,000 0.56 (b) A
Woodlawn Avenue - Broadway 4 Lanes Gateway Street 21,997 43,200 48,000 0.46 (b) A
Broadway - 1st Avenue 4 Lanes Urban Arterial 17,493 37,800 42,000 0.42 (b) A
1st Avenue - I-805 4 Lanes Gateway Street 17,966 43,200 48,000 0.37 (b) A
Bay Boulevard - Woodlawn Avenue 4 Lanes Downtown Promenade 5,336 33,750 37,500 0.14 (b) A
Woodlawn Avenue - Broadway 4 Lanes Downtown Promenade 9,263 33,750 37,500 0.25 (b) A
Broadway - 4th Avenue 2 Lanes Downtown Promenade 8,574 14,400 16,000 0.54 (b) A
4th Avenue - 3rd Avenue 4 Lanes Downtown Promenade 11,395 33,750 37,500 0.30 (b) A
I-5 - Broadway 4 Lanes Gateway Street 33,116 43,200 48,000 0.69 (b) B
Broadway - 3rd Avenue 4 Lanes Urban Arterial 24,637 37,800 42,000 0.59 (b) A
3rd Avenue - Hilltop Drive 4 Lanes Urban Arterial 27,474 37,800 42,000 0.65 (b) A
Hilltop Drive - I-805 4 Lanes Gateway Street 40,184 43,200 48,000 0.84 (b) D
Bay Boulevard - Broadway 4 Lanes Major Street 19,024 40,000 37,500 0.51 (b) A
I-5 - Broadway 4 Lanes Gateway Street 15,450 43,200 48,000 0.32 (b) A
Broadway - Hilltop Drive 4 Lanes Class I Collector 16,430 22,000 27,500 0.60 (b) A
E Street - F Street 2 Lanes Downtown Promenade 4,900 14,400 16,000 0.31 (b) A
G Street - H Street 2 Lanes Downtown Promenade 2,600 14,400 16,000 0.16 (b) A
SR-54 - C Street 4 Lanes Gateway Street 22,107 43,200 48,000 0.46 (b) A
C Street - E Street 4 Lanes Commercial Boulevard 20,015 33,750 37,500 0.53 (b) A
E Street - H Street 4 Lanes Commercial Boulevard 23,208 33,750 37,500 0.62 (b) B
H Street - K Street 4 Lanes Commercial Boulevard 25,713 33,750 37,500 0.69 (b) B
K Street - L Street 4 Lanes Commercial Boulevard 26,599 33,750 37,500 0.71 (b) C
South of L Street 4 Lanes Major Street 27,053 40,000 37,500 0.72 C
SR-54 - C Street 4 Lanes Gateway Street 36,923 43,200 48,000 0.77 (b) C
C Street - E Street 4 Lanes Urban Arterial 17,812 37,800 42,000 0.42 (b) A
E Street - H Street 4 Lanes Urban Arterial 17,001 37,800 42,000 0.40 (b) A
H Street - L Street 4 Lanes Urban Arterial 16,101 37,800 42,000 0.38 (b) A
C Street - E Street 4 Lanes Commercial Boulevard 7,220 33,750 37,500 0.19 (b) A
E Street - G Street 4 Lanes Downtown Promenade 14,413 33,750 37,500 0.38 (b) A
G Street - H Street 4 Lanes Downtown Promenade 18,071 33,750 37,500 0.48 (b) A
H Street - L Street 4 Lanes Commercial Boulevard 23,459 33,750 37,500 0.63 (b) B
South of L Street 4 Lanes Class I Collector 21,814 22,000 27,500 0.79 C
NOTE: Values in bold indicate roadway segments exceeding the City's minimum performance standard.
K:###BOT_TEXT###95413000\Excel\October 2005 Final Report\[413rs050504.xls]Existing
TABLE 3-5
EXISTING CONDITIONS ROADWAY SEGMENT LEVEL OF SERVICE SUMMARY
E Street
F Street
H Street
VOLUME TO
CAPACITY
(V/C)
Woodlawn Avenue
L Street
J Street
4th Avenue
3rd Avenue
Broadway
10/11/2005 10:29
(c) This roadway segment is classified as a 6-lane roadway, but is assumed to function as a 4-lane roadway for this scenario.
(a) Street classification is based on the standards provided in the 2005 Chula Vista General Plan, but will be analyzed with existing number of lanes for each respective roadway segment.
(b) This roadway segment is part of the Urban Core Circulation Element.
(c)
(c)
(c)
3-26
Figure 3-5
Chula Vista Urban Core
Existing Transit Routes
K:###BOT_TEXT###95413000\Figures\October 2005Final Report\Existing Transit.doc
3
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2
7
Traffic Impact Analysis Urban Core Traffic
Chula Vista Urban Core 4-1 October 2005
4.0 URBAN CORE TRAFFIC
The following section describes the City of Chula Vista’s Urban Core Specific Plan project including the
projected land uses, Urban Core traffic generation, and transportation modeling assumptions.
Land Uses
In order to realize the vision for the urban core established by the updated General Plan, it was recognized
that existing zoning for the Urban Core focus area or “subdistricts” needed “re-tooling”. The 30+ year-
old zoning regulations either precluded or created a cumbersome entitlement process to achieve the
variety of living, employment, and service choices envisioned by the General Plan and quite common
place in the 21
st
century. Therefore, the Specific Plan was prepared to provide a set of contemporary
implementing tools to allow new development and redevelopment to occur over the next 20 to 25 years.
To that end, the Specific Plan anticipates the following projected buildout over the life of the plan
consistent with the General Plan, which is summarized in Table 4-1.
Figure 4-1 shows the location of the land uses assumed in the Urban Core.
Table 4-1 Urban Core Specific Plan Projected Buildout
TABLE 4-1
URBAN CORE SPECIFIC PLAN PROJECTED BUILDOUT
Land Use Existing Net Increase Total
Residential 3,700 du 7,100 du 10,800 du
Retail 3,000,000 sf 1,000,000 sf 4,000,000 sf
Office 2,400,000 sf 1,300,000 sf 3,700,000 sf
Visitor Serving Commercial -- 1,300,000 sf 1,300,000 sf
Note:
All totals are approximate and may include a combination of new infill development and existing uses.
Traffic Impact Analysis Urban Core Traffic
Chula Vista Urban Core 4-2 October 2005
Urban Core Traffic Generation
The traffic associated with the Urban Core has been included in the traffic volumes used for the General
Plan Update. The traffic forecasts from the General Plan Update were used for the UCSP transportation
analysis because the trip generation for the Urban Core is generally consistent with the General Plan land
uses associated projected traffic volumes and distribution patterns. Based on the Urban Core land uses
shown in Figure 4-1, Table 4-2 summarizes the trip generation for the Chula Vista Urban Core project.
As shown in the table, a total of approximately 331,100 ADT is expected with the full build-out of the
Urban Core. This would be an increase of 141,100 ADT over existing conditions. The largest percentage
increase in ADT would occur from the residential land use, with an increase of approximately 100
percent.
Table 4-2 Trip Generation Summary
TABLE 4-2
TRIP GENERATION SUMMARY
Land Use Existing ADT Net ADT Increase Total ADT
Residential 22,200 42,600 64,800
Retail 120,000 40,000 160,000
Office 48,000 26,000 74,000
Visitor Serving Commercial -- 32,500 32,500
TOTALS 190,200 141,100 331,100
Note:
Trip generation values shown above were based rates referenced in the Brief Guide of Vehicular Traffic
Generation Rates for the San Diego Region, SANDAG, April 2002. (6 trips/du for residential, 40
trips/1,000 sf for retail, 20 trips/1,000 sf for office, and 50% hotel/50% retail for visitor serving
commercial)
Fig u r e 4-1
Ch u la Vis t a Ur b an Co r e
L o c atio n o f Ur b an Co r e L an d U s es
K:###BOT_TEXT###95413000\Figures\October 2005 Final Report\Location of Urban Core Land Uses.doc
4
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3
Traffic Impact Analysis Urban Core Traffic
Chula Vista Urban Core 4-4 October 2005
Transportation Modeling
Traffic volumes for of the proposed Urban Core Specific Plan were generated using the SANDAG
TRANPLAN regional traffic model, which is based on Series 10 employment and population projections
for the San Diego region. This computerized model takes land use and transportation network
information as inputs and estimates the volumes of traffic on existing and future roadways under long-
term future conditions using the four-step Urban Transportation Planning Process:
1) Trip generation;
2) Mode split;
3) Trip distribution; and
4) Traffic assignment.
Regional transportation infrastructure was modeled using SANDAG’s “reasonably expected” Mobility
2030 assumptions and General Plan land use assumptions. The following list summarizes the land use
and network assumptions evaluated in this study:
Land Use Assumptions
§ Full build-out of planned future land uses in the City of Chula Vista
§ 2030 Population and Employment in the region
§ See General Plan for other/all considerations
Network Assumptions
§ Woodlawn Avenue would not be connected between F Street and G Street. H Street between
Broadway and Hilltop Drive would be reclassified from a six-lane major to four-lane major
(Circulation element changes within Urban Core. For other changes in Chula Vista, refer to
Figure 1.2-1 of the City of Chula Vista General Plan shown in Appendix D.)
§ SR-125 is a four-lane toll road
§ See General Plan for other/all considerations
Transit Assumptions
§ Regional Transit Vision (RTV) described in the Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) emphasizes
integration of transit service within communities and neighborhoods, makes use of high-
occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes and/or managed lanes, incorporates signal priority or transit-only
lanes on arterials, increasing transit competitiveness with automobile trips, and improved transit
customer service.
Traffic Impact Analysis Urban Core Traffic
Chula Vista Urban Core 4-5 October 2005
§ Regional Comprehensive Plan (RCP) incorporates smart growth, which involves identifying
appropriate land patterns and a complementary multi-modal transportation system so as to
improve the viability of public transit and other travel modes for the whole range of trip types,
including commuting, shopping, school, etc.
§ A Yellow Car Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) route would be provided along I-5, additional Blue Line
Light Rail Transit (LRT) service would be provided along the existing trolley tracks, and a BRT
route would be provided along H Street connecting the west and east ends of Chula Vista (For
other routes outside of the Urban Core, refer to Figure 1.2-3 of the City of Chula Vista General
Plan shown in Appendix D.)
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 5-1 October 2005
5.0 YEAR 2030 CONDITIONS
This section provides a description of the year 2030 traffic conditions with the full build-out of the City of
Chula Vista’s Urban Core Specific Plan project land uses.
Road Network
It was assumed that roads within the Urban Core would be reclassified, but not yet built to their ultimate
classification. As a result, no changes would be made to the roadway network compared to Existing
Conditions. See previously shown Figures 3-1 to 3-1.5 and 3-2 for the traffic control and lane
configurations at the study intersections and the number of lanes and street classifications on each
roadway segment in 2030, respectively.
Traffic Volumes
Year 2030 traffic volumes at study intersections were calculated by applying growth factors to existing
traffic volumes. These growth factors were determined by comparing the Year 2030 ADT by the existing
ADT for each respective roadway segment. This growth in traffic varied between a minimum of 10
percent to a more than doubling of traffic on some intersection approaches. In cases where extreme
traffic growth was projected, adjustments were made to account for spreading of the peak hour. This
spreading presumes that the peak hour may last for more than one hour in the morning or afternoon peak
hour.
The Year 2030 Conditions ADT volumes along the roadway segments were obtained from SANDAG.
This forecast model was based on Series 10 and included the Regional Transit Vision (RTV) assumption.
Figures 5-1 to 5-1.5 illustrate the Year 2030 Conditions peak-hour traffic volumes at the study
intersections and Figure 5-2 illustrates the Year 2030 Conditions ADT volumes along the roadway
segments.
292 518 646 610 6 11
451 227 671 738 838 1013
24 95 0 0 180 160
0 0 163 361 4 13
199 557 431 1236 648 1000
4 12 0 0 200 150
137 60 31 43 58 118
488 563 522 600 446 527
34 134 23 52 95 145
366 382 25 43 46 66
286 616 404 738 325 631
106 204 18 48 64 96
109 101 246 102 74 32
556 601 1420 1296 1376 1364
230 310 102 150 116 76
19 52 47 49 282 86
374 736 442 1038 748 1698
90 250 19 46 54 206
192 262 25 24
1440 1302 1000 982
XX YY
156 232 114 241
6 56 19 26
750 1734 665 1226
2 6 20 36
6
1
4
5
2
5
4
1
3
2
2
2
5
5
8
4
0
Bonita Glen Dr @ Bonita Rd
2
6
1
2
9
2
1
1
7
3
0 1
1
0
2
1
3
1
1
4
2
1
Flower St @ E St
1
9
1
1
3
0
1
0
0
3
5
7
0
Intersection 10: Intersection 11:
Intersection 7:
3rd Ave @ E St
6
0
3
4
Intersection 9:
1st Ave @ E St
4
0
7
8
4
3
7
6
8
5
8
7
1
9
0
4
3
2
4
2
1
4
6
1
6
4
5
0
Chula Vista Urban Core Traffic Study
Figure 5-1
5
9
9
1
2
0
1
0
5
2
9
6
4
0
3
4
3
0
0
7
0
5
1
3
8
6
1
3
8
8
6
4
4
Intersection 8:
2nd Ave @ E St
1
0
1
4
3
1
2
8
Intersection 6:
4th Ave @ E St
1
0
8
1
0
2
5
2
9
3
2
0
8
5
2
8
5
2
Intersection 5:
5th Ave @ E St
6
3
1
6
0
2
5
3
6
4
6
2
0
8
1
8
5
3
5
2
6
3
1
0
0
2
8
0
3
5
1
4
0
0
2
4
3
0
0
2
0
Intersection 3:
Woodlawn Ave @ E St
2
6
2
2
3
2
1
5
8
1
0
1
1
Intersection 2:
I-5 NB Ramp @ E St
0
0
4
4
8
9
Intersection 1:
Bay Blvd-I-5 SB Ramp @ E St
2
9
0
Year 2030 Peak-Hour Traffic Volumes
1
7
0
2
8
9
4
6
2
8
5
0
0
3
2
7
3
9
2
9
6
4
4
8
4
0
0 0
0
3
4
4
2
Intersection 4:
6
6
0
9
1
3
9
1
1
8
Legend
=AM/PM Peak Hour Volumes
1
0
6
7
1
4
7
1
0
2
4
1
0
1
5
3
2
5
3
4
0
3
2
5
2
7
3
1
7
4
1
7
0
0 0
2
1
0
9
4
1
9
Broadway @ E St
3
3
0
1
0
2
2
1
2
1
5-2
78 115 49 73 19 49
68 22 142 144 170 270
55 77 67 107 10 44
36 188 68 118 17 18
20 74 248 703 196 380
5 16 225 398 23 77
52 137 50 60 103 50
227 227 209 188 233 174
30 118 50 95 10 13
28 54 30 100 19 56
97 379 130 305 109 384
65 127 68 218 17 46
52 114 13 40 32 35
36 100 74 200 67 145
16 59 20 22 40 37
76 73 26 25 30 44
55 92 102 192 120 151
47 74 6 20 150 120
59 41 25 25
96 127 175 126
XX YY
47 61 50 24
29 26 38 34
66 164 103 180
24 65 38 56
1
3
7
2
1
0
4
6
2
2
8
6
4
7
4th Ave @ F St
3
7
8
8
8
1
0
2
9
1
7
1
9
4
1
5
2
2
1
1
6
7
4
Legend
=AM/PM Peak Hour Volumes
1
0
7
4
1
9
6
5
9
9
6
2
0
2
7
2
7
3
6
4
4
1
1
6
1
4
2
4
1
9
7
7
3
5
9
6
2
Intersection 15:
6
1
1
3
1
3
5
3
1
1
5
7
7
3
4
6
5
0
Bay Blvd @ F St
4
0
Year 2030 Peak-Hour Traffic Volumes
2
5
7
6
3
7
8
1
1
3
6
5
2
4
7
5
1
7
Intersection 13:
Broadway @ F St
6
9
4
1
1
1
3
9
0
Intersection 12: Intersection 14:
5th Ave @ F St
4
3
2
2
1
3
8
5
4
1
8
3
8
1
2
8
2
4
1
3
5
6
1
3
5
4
3
3
8
6
0
6
0
5
8
3
5
2
5
8
Intersection 16:
3rd Ave @ F St
1
1
0
6
8
0
1
7
0
5
0
3
1
0
Intersection 17:
2nd Ave @ F St
3
8
3
8
4
1
0
4
3
1
1
7
5
2
8
4
9
6
3
2
Intersection 19:
5th Ave @ G St
3
5
2
4
8
3
Chula Vista Urban Core Traffic Study
Figure 5-1.1
2
4
2
2
8
4
1
2
7
8
2
3
8
3
6
5
0
2
5
7
7
8
0
6
0
1
4
1
6
1
2
5
2
4
4
8
8
5
0
Intersection 20:
4th Ave @ G St
3
7
3
0
3
9
1
3
0
Intersection 18:
Broadway @ G St
1
5
1
5
2
2
5
4 2
Intersection 21: Intersection 22:
3rd Ave @ G St
3
6
8
0
0
4
3
2
8
3
5
0
2
2
5
3
5
9
0
6
4
3
6
3
8
4
4
2
2nd Ave @ G St
4
1
3
7
1
3
7
2
6
2
0
5
1
6
4
4
2
6
4
3
4
5
5
3
5
9
2
6
5-3
12 17 0 0 473 705
37 50 841 539 1226 1073
54 100 621 711 0 0
5 6 0 0 460 932
34 52 775 1489 871 1376
102 154 120 343 0 0
150 250 64 162 232 84
1200 1400 600 1200 718 931
275 200 176 386 120 400
250 350 300 400 224 61
1100 1400 800 1200 653 1000
160 150 104 303 130 350
130 250 155 168 223 90
910 1150 850 800 1100 1200
120 200 259 280 149 82
140 179 97 170 26 36
750 1000 500 1010 600 1350
114 236 192 247 40 61
62 47 192 113
1298 1216 1602 1327
XX YY
187 86 482 414
13 14 11 29
700 666 828 866
31 28 91 80
0
8
5
5
1
0
1
2
1
8
1
8
6
Woodlawn Ave @ H St
3
0
0
1
0
0
1
9
0
5
1
2
6
1
1
6
7
4
2
2
2
1
8
0
Legend
=AM/PM Peak Hour Volumes
1
2
3
2
9
0
1
8
1
9
7
2
9
6
2
1
2
1
3
4
4
1
3
7
1
0
0
1
0
0
3
5
9
9
8
4
4
3
7
7
6
0
Intersection 26:
1
8
5
1
8
1
8
0
2
5
2
3
5
5
8
Hilltop Dr @ G St
8
Year 2030 Peak-Hour Traffic Volumes
7
8
0 0
0
3
6
5
7
8
4
1
0
8
Intersection 24:
I-5 SB Ramp @ H St
5
9
9
8
8
6
0
0
Intersection 23: Intersection 25:
I-5 NB Ramp @ H St
0 0 0
0 0
2
1
2
0
6
9
0
2
4
0
1
6
1
4
4
5
0
1
0
0
2
3
0
3
5
0
8
0
4
0
2
0
Intersection 27:
Broadway @ H St
2
0
4
1
1
7
3
3
1
1
8
9
5
7
8
Intersection 28:
5th Ave @ H St
1
4
6
2
5
0
2
2
5
1
2
2
6
0
4
1
0
3
9
4
1
1
4
Intersection 30:
3rd Ave @ H St
2
1
0
1
0
0
3
5
9
Chula Vista Urban Core Traffic Study
Figure 5-1.2
2
0
0
4
5
0
1
3
0
7
0
1
3
0
1
4
6
5
1
1
8
8
1
4
1
2
6
1
8
1
1
4
2
2
8
5
5
1
5
5
7
2
3
6
6
6
Intersection 31:
2nd Ave @ H St
6
1
3
0
1
7
9
9
1
Intersection 29:
4th Ave @ H St
2
3
8
9
5
2
1
2
1
5
8
9
1
Intersection 32: Intersection 33:
1st Ave @ H St
3
0
1
9
2
4
7
1
4
1
2
7
3
1
1
1
1
1
5
9
6
1
8
1
5
5
1
2
5
Hilltop Dr @ H St
1
0
2
9
2
1
8
0
1
1
1
9
3
1
2
5
7
9
3
9
0
3
5
9
1
2
4
3
7
1
5
9
5
5-4
1252 256 0 0 190 138
0 0 0 0 0 0
217 334 0 0 48 209
0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
68 36 12 24 162 114
64 34 79 13 126 176
36 58 34 53 98 251
54 37 65 14 104 73
28 34 68 18 136 204
49 61 113 109 60 62
74 94 113 118 127 102
364 379 67 86 522 456
37 58 83 114 122 182
138 212 61 34 139 156
332 511 86 85 474 665
94 162 36 31 106 215
460 378 0 0
2 2 0 0
XX YY
468 719 0
0 0 306 320
0 0 0 0
0 0 361 626
1
0
5
7
7
7
2
0
7
7
0
6
0
0
0
9
5
3
2
2
7
0
4th Ave @ SR-54 EB Ramp
0
1
5
1
3
2
8
2
1
0
4
9
0
2
4
1
9
1
3
0
1
7
0
5
4
6
0
3
4
4
4th Ave @ SR-54 WB Ramp
4
3
6
1
0
8
5
0
1
1
9
4
0
1
4
5
Intersection 43: Intersection 44:
Intersection 40:
Broadway @ J St
2
3
4
9
8
Intersection 42:
Broadway @ L St
9
6
9
7
4
7
3
7
6
1
9
3
1
3
9
1
3
1
1
7
8
6
8
9
1
9
7
6
8
5
4
2
7
2
Chula Vista Urban Core Traffic Study
Figure 5-1.3
8
2
8
1
2
0
5
3
8
5
2
8
4
1
2
7
7
4
4
4
2
3
4
4
9
9
5
0
4
5
6
6
6
Intersection 41:
Broadway @ K St
7
4
4
2
3
8
5
Intersection 39:
Broadway @ I St
1
4
1
0
4
2
1
4
9
3
1
8
1
8
4
0
Intersection 38:
Broadway @ Flower St
2
2
1
2
7
7
4
7
1
2
2
8
7
4
0
2
7
6
2
6
5
3
1
3
3
0
1
0
1
1
7
4
2
6
8
4
2
0
7
8
1
Intersection 36:
Broadway @ C St
0
1
0
7
0
1
3
9
0
0
0
Intersection 35:
Broadway @ SR-54 EB on Ramp
4
1
5
1
2
0
3
2
6
2
4
4
Intersection 34:
Broadway @ SR-54 WB off Ramp
0
Year 2030 Peak-Hour Traffic Volumes
0
1
4
5
0
0
0
1
7
1
2
3
2
0
0
0
0
5
5
8
4
2
2
0
1
4
1
2
0
5
6
7
Intersection 37:
8
6
3
9
0
1
1
9
8
6
6
Legend
=AM/PM Peak Hour Volumes
1
9
8
2
8
9
1
3
3
1
1
0
9
1
5
1
7
6
8
1
7
9
0
7
1
1
5
8
1
1
9
6
8
5
1
3
9
1
4
8
4
0
8
0
7
4
8
4
1
Broadway @ D St
4
2
1
2
3
6
5
6
5-5
187 167 307 362 43 31
12 16 119 142 41 54
29 37 46 86 12 17
263 695 92 176 49 65
10 19 70 164 36 38
53 146 31 91 40 55
41 31 72 67 144 149
160 230 476 484 215 259
18 35 58 86 94 56
50 82 50 55 70 38
156 319 560 758 221 283
14 60 55 50 138 89
100 114 19 36 64 32
600 546 5 11 128 173
100 142 8 7 90 34
72 92 8 14 46 82
474 661 14 41 103 275
56 138 18 32 59 145
83 56 37 53
418 242 199 150
XX YY
126 140 48 92
118 122 82 89
376 634 191 168
179 326 122 142
9
7
8
3
6
1
8
8
2
9
8
8
3
4th Ave @ I St
9
0
1
0
1
5
1
4
2
4
6
3
5
7
8
8
0
9
1
3
7
6
8
Legend
=AM/PM Peak Hour Volumes
6
8
1
2
8
5
0
6
1
1
4
6
8
1
3
5
8
2
7
4
6
5
5
2
8
1
0
7
6
8
6
7
6
1
1
6
7
7
0
Intersection 48:
8
0
0
1
9
0
1
9
8
5
1
9
4
0
4
8
5
2
8
0
4th Ave @ Brisbane St
8
8
7
Year 2030 Peak-Hour Traffic Volumes
3
2
5
3
6
1
0
2
2
9
1
2
3
6
3
9
0
1
8
0
6
6
Intersection 46:
4th Ave @ C St
1
3
3
3
1
1
3
8
1
1
0
Intersection 45: Intersection 47:
4th Ave @ D St
4
5
1
3
0
1
6
8
5
3
0
2
3
6
9
7
7
0
3
3
5
6
5
6
6
2
7
2
4
4
5
6
2
9
7
2
2
4
5
8
8
4
3
Intersection 49:
4th Ave @ J St
5
8
8
9
3
1
9
2
4
7
5
1
6
Intersection 50:
4th Ave @ K St
5
9
9
7
2
8
2
6
1
5
1
6
1
0
3
4
3
8
1
0
8
Intersection 52:
3rd Ave @ Davidson St
3
8
1
3
2
8
0
Chula Vista Urban Core Traffic Study
Figure 5-1.4
6
7
9
7
8
3
7
5
2
0
7
2
5
5
5
1
2
1
4
2
6
8
1
0
9
4
4
1
1
2
3
5
5
8
3
0
2
1
0
1
8
4
3
Intersection 53:
3rd Ave @ I St
7
4
3
1
5
8
2
3
1
Intersection 51:
4th Ave @ L St
1
0
3
1
5
8
1
5
6
1
2
8
Intersection 54: Intersection 55:
3rd Ave @ J St
2
0
3
1
2
6
8
1
2
7
5
0
5
2
1
6
1
1
5
2
7
6
0
9
0
1
4
9
8
5
1
5
8
3rd Ave @ K St
2
2
6
1
3
1
6
1
8
6
1
3
3
5
5
4
7
1
9
5
8
5
0
8
0
8
0
8
7
1
4
1
5-6
170 118 0 0 0 0
502 485 0 0 1238 705
222 188 0 0 170 296
193 138 40 37 0 0
379 688 0 0 422 933
143 114 40 106 266 580
415 358 54 61 675 367
763 709 721 869 0 0
0 0 0 0 389 623
164 358 0 0 0 0
524 1159 672 1172 0 0
0 0 14 40 0 0
5 12 458 697 0 0
692 659 0 0 0 0
228 354 62 24 0 0
4 6 0 0 339 281
550 921 0 0 0 0
388 716 0 0 135 171
XX YY
3
5
1
0 4
Intersection 62:
L St @ Industrial Blvd
9
3
Intersection 64:
Industrial Blvd @ I-5 NB Ramp
2
9
1
2
1
4
4
0
6
0
3
3
1
0
3
3
5
3
1
7
0
1
9
4
2
1
9
4
1
3
0
Chula Vista Urban Core Traffic Study
Figure 5-1.5
4
2
8
9
1
0
1
6
5
5
3
1
0
3
4
2
1
0
8
5
0
4 7
Intersection 63:
Bay Blvd @ I-5 SB Ramp
0
0
1
3
5
Intersection 61:
L St @ Bay Blvd
0
1
5
3
7
3
0
6
9
3
2
1
1
5
8
8
Intersection 60:
Woodlawn Ave @ J St
2
5
0 0
4
0
0 0 0 0
3
1
6
0
0 0 0
0
2
6
2
0 0
Intersection 58:
J St @ I-5 SB Ramp
2
1
0
0
4
7
5
1
1
6
1
2
0
1
0
1
Intersection 57:
2nd Ave @ D St
3
7
2
5
4
7
8
6
Intersection 56:
3rd Ave @ L St
1
9
4
Year 2030 Peak-Hour Traffic Volumes
1
0
7
5
7
5
0
3
8
3
1
1
0
0
5
0
8
9
7
2
9
4
0
7
1
8
2
2
4
0
6
8
3
2
1
6
3
1
1
Intersection 59:
0
3
3
2
0 0
Legend
=AM/PM Peak Hour Volumes
0
1
1
3
3
4
0
6
8
9
4
7
1
0
1
8
2
2
8
0
8 5
2
4
3
4
9
4
0
4
4
6
1
3
3
8
4
J St @ I-5 NB Ramp
0 0 0
5-7
5-8
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 5-9 October 2005
Intersection Analysis
Table 5-1 displays the LOS analysis results for the study intersections under the Year 2030 Conditions
scenario. As shown in this table, all study intersections operate at LOS D or better during both peak
periods, except for the following 19 intersections:
§ #1 Bay Boulevard/I-5 SB Ramp @ E Street (LOS E – AM Peak, LOS F – PM Peak);
§ #2 I-5 NB Ramp @ E Street (LOS E – AM Peak);
§ #13 Broadway @ F Street (LOS E – PM Peak);
§ #24 I-5 SB Ramp @ H Street (LOS F – PM Peak);
§ #25 I-5 NB Ramp @ H Street (LOS F – PM Peak);
§ #26 Woodlawn Avenue @ H Street (LOS F – PM Peak);
§ #27 Broadway @ H Street (LOS F – PM Peak);
§ #28 5
th
Avenue @ H Street (LOS E – PM Peak);
§ #29 4
th
Avenue @ H Street (LOS E – PM Peak);
§ #33 Hilltop Drive @ H Street (LOS E – AM and PM Peak);
§ #34 Broadway @ SR-54 WB Ramp (LOS F – AM Peak);
§ #44 4
th
Avenue @ SR-54 EB Ramp (LOS F – PM Peak);
§ #45 4
th
Avenue @ Brisbane Street (LOS E – PM Peak);
§ #54 3
rd
Avenue @ J Street (LOS E – PM Peak);
§ #57 2
nd
Avenue @ D Street (LOS E – PM Peak);
§ #59 J Street @ I-5 NB Ramp (LOS F – AM Peak, LOS E – PM Peak);
§ #61 L Street @ Bay Boulevard (LOS F – PM Peak);
§ #63 Bay Boulevard @ I-5 SB Ramp (LOS F – AM and PM Peak); and
§ #64 Industrial Boulevard @ I-5 NB Ramp (LOS F – PM Peak).
The majority of the interchange study intersections along I-5 or SR-54 would operate at an unacceptable
LOS. In addition, many of the intersections along the H Street corridor would operate at an unacceptable
LOS. As previously noted in Section 3, the delay at the E Street and H Street intersections affected by the
trolley crossing would be worse than the delay shown in Table 5-1. Additional delays would be between
17 and 40 seconds per vehicle (depending on the direction and time of day) and drop the LOS by at least
one grade. By providing a grade-separated trolley crossing at E Street and H Street, delays and LOS
would be similar to the results shown in Table 5-1.
Appendix C contains the peak-hour intersections LOS calculation worksheets.
Roadway Segment Analysis
Table 5-2 summarizes the Year 2030 Conditions LOS analysis for the roadway segments located in the
Urban Core. The projected volume, estimated using the approved transportation model of SANDAG, is
compared to the acceptable volume of the roadways using the adopted functional classifications from the
Chula Vista General Plan. As shown in this table, all roadway segments meet the adopted LOS standard
of D for the Urban Street System, except for the following roadway segments:
§ H Street between I-5 and Broadway (LOS F)
§ H Street between Hilltop Drive and I-805 (LOS E)
EXISTING YEAR 2030
INTERSECTION DELAY (a) LOS (b) DELAY (a) LOS (b)
AM 10.1 B 58.4 E 48.3 YES
PM 16.6 B 302.9 F 286.3 YES
AM 33.2 C 60.5 E 27.3 YES
PM 18.2 B 31.9 C 13.7 NO
AM 21.7 C 25.8 C 4.1 NO
PM 15.5 B 20.5 C 5.0 NO
AM 16.9 B 30.3 C 13.4 NO
PM 26.3 C 47.2 D 20.9 NO
AM 5.0 A 5.6 A 0.6 NO
PM 6.4 A 7.7 A 1.3 NO
AM 13.5 B 16.2 B 2.7 NO
PM 18.8 B 33.3 C 14.5 NO
AM 11.9 B 12.9 B 1.0 NO
PM 15.2 B 24.8 C 9.6 NO
AM 7.3 A 15.5 B 8.2 NO
PM 11.0 B 28.9 C 17.9 NO
AM 6.8 A 40.6 D 33.8 NO
PM 5.5 A 10.1 B 4.6 NO
AM 10.6 B 20.2 C 9.6 NO
PM 12.5 B 37.1 D 24.6 NO
AM 12.1 B 12.5 B 0.4 NO
PM 16.5 B 23.0 C 6.5 NO
AM 8.8 A 9.8 A 1.0 NO
PM 14.7 B 21.4 C 6.7 NO
AM 16.5 B 17.7 B 1.2 NO
PM 24.1 C 66.1 E 42.0 YES
AM 5.7 A 6.6 A 0.9 NO
PM 8.2 A 10.0 A 1.8 NO
AM 13.5 B 15.3 B 1.8 NO
PM 17.7 B 23.7 C 6.0 NO
AM 13.9 B 15.9 B 2.0 NO
PM 19.2 B 23.5 C 4.3 NO
AM 9.7 A 13.4 B 3.7 NO
PM 12.5 B 12.7 B 0.2 NO
AM 12.3 B 14.0 B 1.7 NO
PM 14.9 B 21.0 C 6.1 NO
AM 6.3 A 7.7 A 1.4 NO
PM 7.5 A 8.3 A 0.8 NO
AM 8.9 A 12.8 B 3.9 NO
PM 10.3 B 18.0 B 7.7 NO
Notes:
Bold values indicate intersections operating at LOS E or F.
K:###BOT_TEXT###95413000\Excel\October 2005 Final Report\[413in08(MODIFIED).xls]Plan to Ground
INCREASE IN
DELAY
SIGNIFICANT
IMPACT?
15 4th Ave @ F St
16 3rd Ave @ F St
17 2nd Ave @ F St
18 Broadway @ G St
14 5th Ave @ F St
12 Bay Blvd @ F St
13 Broadway @ F St
10 Flower St @ E St
11 Bonita Glen Dr @ E St
8 2nd Ave @ E St
9 1st Ave @ E St
6 4th Ave @ E St
7 3rd Ave @ E St
4 Broadway @ E St
5 5th Ave @ E St
2 I-5 NB Ramp @ E St
3 Woodlawn Ave @ E St
1 Bay Blvd-I-5 SB Ramp @ E St
PEAK HOUR
TABLE 5-1
YEAR 2030 CONDITIONS
PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION LEVEL OF SERVICE SUMMARY
19 5th Ave @ G St
20 4th Ave @ G St
(a) Delay refers to the average control delay for the entire intersection, measured in seconds per vehicle. At a two-way stop-controlled intersection, delay refers to the worst movement.
(b) LOS calculations are based on the methodology outlined in the 2000 Highway Capacity Manual and performed using Synchro 6.0
5
-
1
0
EXISTING YEAR 2030
INTERSECTION DELAY (a) LOS (b) DELAY (a) LOS (b)
AM 8.6 A 11.8 B 3.2 NO
PM 9.2 A 10.5 B 1.3 NO
AM 14.1 B 22.2 C 8.1 NO
PM 16.3 C 32.3 D 16.0 NO
AM 16.7 C 33.7 D 17.0 NO
PM 14.4 B 24.1 C 9.7 NO
AM 28.8 C 36.7 D 7.9 NO
PM 21.1 C 84.5 F 63.4 YES
AM 12.7 B 47.6 D 34.9 NO
PM 14.8 B 138.4 F 123.6 YES
AM 38.0 D 33.7 C -4.3 NO
PM 22.3 F 260.6 F 238.3 YES
AM 25.7 C 42.7 D 17.0 NO
PM 27.1 C 118.1 F 91.0 YES
AM 10.8 B 15.2 B 4.4 NO
PM 11.3 B 61.6 E 50.3 YES
AM 22.1 C 38.6 D 16.5 NO
PM 29.2 C 59.4 E 30.2 YES
AM 19.3 B 23.0 C 3.7 NO
PM 23.8 C 39.7 D 15.9 NO
AM 8.4 A 13.7 B 5.3 NO
PM 11.5 B 31.4 C 19.9 NO
AM 7.6 A 9.8 A 2.2 NO
PM 8.2 A 12.5 B 4.3 NO
AM 32.2 C 58.3 E 26.1 YES
PM 41.3 D 74.2 E 32.9 YES
AM 82.9 F 190.6 F 107.7 YES
PM 11.8 B 16.2 B 4.4 NO
AM 3.3 A 10.1 B 6.8 NO
PM 6.3 A 17.7 B 11.4 NO
AM 18.1 B 20.1 C 2.0 NO
PM 15.1 B 18.1 B 3.0 NO
AM 9.2 A 12.1 B 2.9 NO
PM 10.2 B 14.9 B 4.7 NO
AM 11.5 B 12.3 B 0.8 NO
PM 14.0 B 17.4 B 3.4 NO
AM 16.3 B 16.4 B 0.1 NO
PM 17.3 B 21.1 C 3.8 NO
AM 13.6 B 15.7 B 2.1 NO
PM 18.6 B 29.6 C 11.0 NO
Notes:
Bold values indicate intersections operating at LOS E or F.
K:###BOT_TEXT###95413000\Excel\October 2005 Final Report\[413in08(MODIFIED).xls]Plan to Ground
3rd Ave @ G St
22 2nd Ave @ G St
23 Hilltop Dr @ G St
INCREASE IN
DELAY
21
24 I-5 SB Ramp @ H St
TABLE 5-1
YEAR 2030 CONDITIONS
PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION LEVEL OF SERVICE SUMMARY (Continued)
25 I-5 NB Ramp @ H St
26 Woodlawn Ave @ H St
27 Broadway @ H St
28 5th Ave @ H St
29 4th Ave @ H St
30 3rd Ave @ H St
31 2nd Ave @ H St
35 Broadway @ SR-54 EB Ramp
34 Broadway @ SR-54 WB Ramp
36 Broadway @ C St
37
32 1st Ave @ H St
Hilltop Dr @ H St
Broadway @ D Street
SIGNIFICANT
IMPACT?
(a) Delay refers to the average control delay for the entire intersection, measured in seconds per vehicle. At a two-way stop-controlled intersection, delay refers to the worst movement.
(b) LOS calculations are based on the methodology outlined in the 2000 Highway Capacity Manual and performed using Synchro 6.0
PEAK HOUR
38 Broadway @ Flower St
39 Broadway @ I St
33
40 Broadway @ J St
5
-
1
1
EXISTING YEAR 2030
INTERSECTION DELAY (a) LOS (b) DELAY (a) LOS (b)
AM 11.7 B 14.5 B 2.8 NO
PM 13.2 B 16.4 B 3.2 NO
AM 15.5 B 17.5 B 2.0 NO
PM 20.4 C 34.7 C 14.3 NO
AM 14.7 B 23.1 C 8.4 NO
PM 25.9 C 42.3 D 16.4 NO
AM 13.4 B 37.2 D 23.8 NO
PM 27.2 C 95.2 F 68.0 YES
AM 21.5 C 25.8 C 4.3 NO
PM 27.3 C 61.5 E 34.2 YES
AM 23.2 C 24.7 C 1.5 NO
PM 31.4 C 40.0 D 8.6 NO
AM 9.1 A 13.5 B 4.4 NO
PM 10.5 B 12.6 B 2.1 NO
AM 8.8 A 11.9 B 3.1 NO
PM 10.1 B 18.0 B 7.9 NO
AM 9.3 A 12.0 B 2.7 NO
PM 15.7 B 42.7 D 27.0 NO
AM 8.5 A 12.7 B 4.2 NO
PM 10.1 B 20.0 B 9.9 NO
AM 24.6 C 27.6 C 3.0 NO
PM 26.6 C 35.3 D 8.7 NO
AM 9.9 A 14.7 B 4.8 NO
PM 13.2 B 19.2 B 6.0 NO
AM 10.1 B 11.6 B 1.5 NO
PM 12.2 B 18.3 B 6.1 NO
AM 18.8 B 22.9 C 4.1 NO
PM 35.9 D 74.5 E 38.6 YES
AM 9.5 A 12.3 B 2.8 NO
PM 11.0 B 22.4 C 11.4 NO
AM 18.1 B 22.9 C 4.8 NO
PM 27.0 C 44.1 D 17.1 NO
AM 14.9 B 31.2 D 16.3 NO
PM 14.9 B 36.0 E 21.1 YES
AM 8.9 A 17.5 B 8.6 NO
PM 15.1 B 40.4 D 25.3 NO
AM 10.6 B 135.2 F 124.6 YES
PM 8.2 A 61.7 E 53.5 YES
AM 11.0 B 16.3 C 5.3 NO
PM 11.9 B 18.2 C 6.3 NO
Notes:
K:###BOT_TEXT###95413000\Excel\October 2005 Final Report\[413in08(MODIFIED).xls]Plan to Ground
51 4th Ave @ L St
INCREASE IN
DELAY
TABLE 5-1
SIGNIFICANT
IMPACT?
PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION LEVEL OF SERVICE SUMMARY (Continued)
50 4th Ave @ K St
48 4th Ave @ I St
49
YEAR 2030 CONDITIONS
55 3rd Ave @ K St
Woodlawn Ave @ J St
(a) Delay refers to the average control delay for the entire intersection, measured in seconds per vehicle. At a two-way stop-controlled intersection, delay refers to the worst movement.
(b) LOS calculations are based on the methodology outlined in the 2000 Highway Capacity Manual and performed using Synchro 6.0
58 J St @ I-5 SB Ramp
59 J St @ I-5 NB Ramp
60
3rd Ave @ Davidson St
53 3rd Ave @ I St
52
3rd Ave @ L St
57 2nd Ave @ D St
54 3rd Ave @ J St
56
4th Ave @ J St
47 4th Ave @ D St
45 4th Ave @ Brisbane St
46 4th Ave @ C St
43 4th Ave @ SR-54 WB Ramp
44 4th Ave @ SR-54 EB Ramp
Bold values indicate intersections operating at LOS E or F.
PEAK HOUR
41 Broadway @ K St
42 Broadway @ L St
5
-
1
2
EXISTING YEAR 2030
INTERSECTION DELAY (a) LOS (b) DELAY (a) LOS (b)
AM 16.8 C 22.7 C 5.9 NO
PM 120.3 F 203.0 F 82.7 YES
AM 18.9 B 30.9 C 12.0 NO
PM 25.4 C 52.6 D 27.2 NO
AM 22.2 C 84.0 F 61.8 YES
PM 48.6 E 221.2 F 172.6 YES
AM 15.4 C 26.0 D 10.6 NO
PM 17.7 C 66.5 F 48.8 YES
Notes:
ECL= Exceeds calculable limit . At intersections at or over capacity, the calculated delay value becomes unreliable.
K:###BOT_TEXT###95413000\Excel\October 2005 Final Report\[413in08(MODIFIED).xls]Plan to Ground
INCREASE IN
DELAY
SIGNIFICANT
IMPACT?
PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION LEVEL OF SERVICE SUMMARY (Continued)
PEAK HOUR
(b) LOS calculations are based on the methodology outlined in the 2000 Highway Capacity Manual and performed using Synchro 6.0
Bold values indicate intersections operating at LOS E or F.
(a) Delay refers to the average control delay for the entire intersection, measured in seconds per vehicle. At a two-way stop-controlled intersection, delay refers to the worst movement.
64 Industrial Blvd @ I-5 NB Ramp
62 L St @ Industrial Blvd
63 Bay Blvd @ I-5 SB Ramp
61 L St @ Bay Blvd
TABLE 5-1
YEAR 2030 CONDITIONS
5
-
1
3
DAILY DAILY
STREET TRAFFIC ACCEPTABLE LOS E SEGMENT
STREET SEGMENT CLASSIFICATION (b) VOLUME VOLUME CAPACITY LOS
I-5 - Woodlawn Avenue 4 Lanes Gateway Street 32,000 43,200 48,000 0.67 (b) B
Woodlawn Avenue - Broadway 4 Lanes Gateway Street 32,000 43,200 48,000 0.67 (b) B
Broadway - 1st Avenue 4 Lanes Urban Arterial 21,000 37,800 42,000 0.50 (b) A
1st Avenue - I-805 4 Lanes Gateway Street 24,000 43,200 48,000 0.50 (b) A
Bay Boulevard - Woodlawn Avenue 4 Lanes Downtown Promenade 19,000 33,750 37,500 0.51 (b) A
Woodlawn Avenue - Broadway 4 Lanes Downtown Promenade 18,000 33,750 37,500 0.48 (b) A
Broadway - 4th Avenue 2 Lanes Downtown Promenade 11,000 14,400 16,000 0.69 (b) B
4th Avenue - 3rd Avenue 4 Lanes Downtown Promenade 13,000 33,750 37,500 0.35 (b) A
I-5 - Broadway 4 Lanes Gateway Street 52,000 43,200 48,000 1.08 (b) F
Broadway - 3rd Avenue 4 Lanes Urban Arterial 37,000 37,800 42,000 0.88 (b) A
3rd Avenue- Hilltop Drive 4 Lanes Urban Arterial 35,000 37,800 42,000 0.83 (b) A
Hilltop Drive - I-805 4 Lanes Gateway Street 47,500 43,200 48,000 0.99 (b) E
J Street
Bay Boulevard - Broadway 4 Lanes Major Street 25,000 40,000 37,500 0.67 (b) B
I-5 - Broadway 4 Lanes Gateway Street 24,000 43,200 48,000 0.50 (b) A
Broadway - Hilltop Drive 4 Lanes Class I Collector 20,000 22,000 27,500 0.73 (b) C
E Street - F Street 2 Lanes Downtown Promenade 12,000 14,400 16,000 0.75 (b) C
G Street - H Street 2 Lanes Downtown Promenade 9,000 14,400 16,000 0.56 (b) A
SR-54 - C Street 4 Lanes Gateway Street 25,000 43,200 48,000 0.52 (b) A
C Street - E Street 4 Lanes Commercial Boulevard 28,000 33,750 37,500 0.75 (b) C
E Street - H Street 4 Lanes Commercial Boulevard 28,000 33,750 37,500 0.75 (b) C
H Street - K Street 4 Lanes Commercial Boulevard 29,000 33,750 37,500 0.77 (b) C
K Street - L Street 4 Lanes Commercial Boulevard 31,000 33,750 37,500 0.83 (b) D
South of L Street 4 Lanes Major Street 29,000 40,000 37,500 0.77 C
SR-54 - C Street 6 Lanes Gateway Street 42,000 61,200 68,000 0.62 (b) B
C Street - E Street 4 Lanes Urban Arterial 23,000 37,800 42,000 0.55 (b) A
E Street - H Street 4 Lanes Urban Arterial 20,000 37,800 42,000 0.48 (b) A
H Street - L Street 4 Lanes Urban Arterial 18,000 37,800 42,000 0.43 (b) A
C Street - E Street 4 Lanes Commercial Boulevard 12,000 33,750 37,500 0.32 (b) A
E Street - G Street 4 Lanes Downtown Promenade 21,000 33,750 37,500 0.56 (b) A
G Street - H Street 4 Lanes Downtown Promenade 19,000 33,750 37,500 0.51 (b) A
H Street - L Street 4 Lanes Commercial Boulevard 24,000 33,750 37,500 0.64 (b) B
South of L Street 4 Lanes Class I Collector 22,000 22,000 27,500 0.80 C
NOTE: Values in bold indicate roadway segments exceeding the City's minimum performance standard.
K:###BOT_TEXT###95413000\Excel\October 2005 Final Report\[413rs050504.xls]2030
VOLUME TO
CAPACITY
(V/C)
F Street
TABLE 5-2
YEAR 2030 ROADWAY SEGMENT LEVEL OF SERVICE SUMMARY
Broadway
E Street
L Street
Woodlawn Avenue
H Street
10/11/2005 8:16
(d) The ADT was taken from the March 25, 2005 Espanada Mixed Use Development Traffic Study prepared by Darnell & Associates, Inc.
4th Avenue
3rd Avenue
(a) Street classification is based on the standards provided in the 2005 Chula Vista General Plan.
(b) This roadway segment is part of the Urban Core Circulation Element.
(c) This roadway segment is classified as a 6-lane roadway, but is assumed to function as a 4-lane roadway for this scenario.
(c)
(d)
5
-
1
4
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 5-15 October 2005
Future Transit Service
A number of regional transit improvements are envisioned that will either serve the Urban Core area.
Many of these lines provide transit stations within the Urban Core Specific Planning area and are
integrated into the land use and transportation components of the specific plan. Other routes are located
with transit stations nearby; these routes could serve the urban core area. It should be noted that most
routes listed below do not have implementation dates except for the first phase of the regional BRT
project and that some of the route numbers may change in the future. Figure 5-3 depicts those planned
regional routes in the South Bay.
Route 510 (Existing Blue Line Trolley) would have increased frequency of service. LRT headways
would be reduced from 10 minutes to 5 minutes. In order to achieve this level of transit service, it would
be necessary to grade separate the LRT tracks from key surface streets, such as E Street and H Street
within the project area.
South Bay Transit First Project would provide Regional Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) service between
Otay Ranch in eastern Chula Vista and downtown San Diego. The first phase of the project would follow
I-805 and SR-94, along with East Palomar Street. Phase 1 of the project could be completed by the Year
2010. The second phase of the project would extend the line to the Otay Border crossing and serve
businesses in Otay Mesa.
Route 540 (I-5 Express Service) would provide Regional Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) service from San
Ysidro to downtown San Diego and Old Town. This route would use median lanes in I-5 and would have
a transit stop at H Street (with elevators to the H Street over crossing at I-5. This route would have
infrequent stations, which would allow for shorter travel times, as compared to Route 510.
Route 627 (H Street BRT) would provide a transit connection between the Chula Vista Urban Core
Specific Plan area and Southwestern College and the Eastern Urban Center. This route will connect the
major activity centers in the redeveloping areas of western Chula Vista to the rapidly growing areas of
eastern Chula Vista.
Route 680 (Sorrento Valley to San Ysidro International Border) would provide Regional BRT service
between the San Ysidro and Sorrento Mesa along the I-805 corridor. This service would connect Chula
Vista to major employment centers in Kearny Mesa and Sorrento Mesa. Transit stations for this route
would be located on I-805 at H Street.
Fig u r e 5-3
Ch u la Vis t a Ur b an Co r e
Reg io n al Tr an s it Ro u te s
K:###BOT_TEXT###95413000\Figures\October 2005 Final Report\Transit First.doc
625
680
540
510
694
627
694
RC1
5
-
1
6
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-1 October 2005
6.0 YEAR 2030 WITH IMPROVEMENTS CONDITIONS
This section provides a description of the Year 2030 traffic conditions at locations where improvements
were assumed due to the addition of a project feature or recommended to achieve acceptable LOS.
Project features were assumed at locations where either the roadway segment or study intersection
operates within acceptable thresholds, but were due to improvements associated with the UCSP.
Improvements are recommended at the majority of roadway segments/intersections that exceeded the
acceptable thresholds.
Road Network
The following section describes the recommended improvements along the roadway segments in the
Urban Core study area. These recommended roadway widths will be used in developing the parkway
recommendations and ROW dimensions. It should be noted that right-of-way (ROW) value for the
Woodlawn Avenue segment is not shown on the cross section figure due to the uncertainty of the park
area at this time.
Table 6-1 summarizes the proposed changes to the existing roadway network. It should be noted that
roadway segments that did not have any changes compared to existing conditions were omitted from the
table. As shown in the table, all improvements shown for Third Avenue, F Street, Broadway, and
Woodlawn Avenue would be considered project features. Improvements along E Street and H Street are
recommended to achieve acceptable LOS.
Figures 6-1 to 6-10 illustrate the proposed cross sections for the corridors of E Street, F Street, H Street,
Broadway, 3
rd
Avenue, and Woodlawn Avenue.
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-2 October 2005
Table 6-1 Proposed Roadway Segment Dimensions
TABLE 6-1
PROPOSED ROADWAY SEGMENT DIMENSIONS
Street Segment
Total
Existing
Travel
Lanes
Total
Proposed
Travel
Lanes
Existing Turn
Lane/Median
Proposed Turn
Lane/Median
Existing
Curb-to-
Curb Width
Proposed
Curb-to-
Curb
Width
Existing
Parking
Proposed
Parking
Existing
Bike
Lanes
Proposed
Bike
Lanes
Project Feature
Third Avenue between E Street
and F Street
2 2 No Median No Median 72’ 24’/68’ * Y Y/N * N N
Third Avenue between F
Street and Madrona Street
4 2 Raised Median Raised Median 101’ 24’/68’ * Y Y/N * N N
Third Avenue between
Madrona Street and G Street
4 2 No Median No Median 72’ 24’/68’ * Y Y/N * N N
F Street between Third
Avenue and Fourth Avenue
4 2
Raised Median, Bike
Lanes (Class III)
Two-way Left Turn
Lane/Raised Median,
Bike Lanes (Class I)
65’ 48’ Y Y Y Y
F Street between Fourth
Avenue and I-5
2 2
No Median, Bike
Lanes (Class III)
Two-way Left Turn
Lane/Raised Median,
Bike Lanes (Class I)
40’ 48’ Y Y Y Y
Broadway between E Street
And F Street
4 4 No Median
Raised Median, Bike
Lanes (Class II)
68’ 82’ Y Y N Y
Broadway between F Street
and H Street
4 4
Two-way Left Turn
Lane
Raised Median, Bike
Lanes (Class II)
82’ 82’ Y Y N Y
Woodlawn Avenue between
E Street and H Street
2 2 No Median Park Area 36’ Varies Y Y N N
Improvements to Achieve Acceptable LOS
E Street between I-5 and
300’ east of I-5
4 4
Two-Way Left Turn
Lane
Two-Way Left Turn
Lane, Westbound Right
Turn Lane
70’ 76’ N N N N
H Street between I-5 and
Broadway
4 6
Two-Way Left Turn
Lane
Raised Median, Bike
Lanes (Class II)
64’ 94’ N N N Y
* The 24-foot cross section assumes no parking along Third Avenue and the 68-foot cross section assumes diagonal parking on both sides of Third Avenue.
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-3 October 2005
E Street Corridor
The roadway cross section on E Street is adequate to serve future traffic needs except for the segment
between Woodlawn Avenue and I-5. To mitigate the intersection impact at the I-5 NB Ramp with E
Street, a westbound right-turn lane is required. It is recommended that E Street be widened between
Woodlawn Avenue and I-5, which would add an additional six feet in the curb-to-curb width. This
segment will need an additional 22 feet of ROW. This added width will allow for an extended right-turn
lane on westbound E Street onto the I-5 northbound on-ramp. This improvement would help to reduce
the queues in the westbound direction and improve the operations at the I-5 NB ramp and at Woodlawn
Avenue intersection.
Figure 6-1 Proposed Cross Section, E Street Between I-5 and 300’ East of I-5 N Ramp
Figure 6-2 Proposed Cross Section, E Street Between 3
rd
Avenue and Broadway
* Sidewalks with tree wells
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-4 October 2005
F Street Bike Lanes
As a project feature of the Urban Core Specific Plan, Class I bike lanes would be added to F Street
between Third Avenue and I-5. The new Class I bike lanes (“bikeway”) will improve the connectivity of
the Urban Core to the Bayfront Area encouraging better synergy between uses/users on the Bayfront and
Urban Core, including pedestrians and bicyclists. Wide parkways, off-street bike lanes, and wide
sidewalks will provide an opportunity to stroll or bicycle through the Urban Core. A Class II facility
would exist on F Street where a Class I bikeway cannot be accommodated due to mature trees or
new/existing medians. For F Street, a 16-foot parkway is provided between Fourth Avenue and
Broadway and a 12-foot parkway is provided between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue. Existing trees
from Third Avenue to Broadway are proposed to be preserved and incorporated into the streetscape
theme. It is suggested that the overhead utility line be placed underground as part of this improvement
project.
Figure 6-3 Proposed Cross Section, F Street Between Third Avenue and I-5
* Raised median east of Broadway in
some segments
** Parkway includes 5’ of trees
(mature trees to be preserved), 6’ bike
lane, and 5’ of sidewalks
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-5 October 2005
H Street Corridor
The segment of H Street from Third Avenue to Broadway will be widened by eight feet. The new
segment configuration will feature two travel lanes and a bike lane in each direction, as well as a raised
center median. One side of the street will also have parallel parking.
An additional 30 feet in the curb-to-curb width will be added to H Street between Broadway and I-5 to
include an additional travel and in both directions. This improvement is consistent with the ultimate
classification of H Street as defined in the adopted General Plan. The additional travel lane is needed to
accommodate buildout daily and peak-hour traffic on H Street and would improve the operations along
this segment.
Further, a Class II bikeway is proposed to be added to H Street between Third Avenue and I-5. H Street
is intended as the “backbone” of the Urban Core, as it connects the transit focus areas at H Street/Third
Avenue and H Street/I-5 and facilitates local and regional transit routes (and Bus Rapid Transit in the
future). Twenty-foot wide sidewalks are proposed in order to create a grand boulevard feeling and
promote pedestrian use.
Figure 6-4 Proposed Cross Section, H Street Between Third Avenue and Broadway
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-6 October 2005
Figure 6-5 Proposed Cross Section, H Street Between Broadway and I-5
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-7 October 2005
Broadway Corridor
Broadway would be improved by adding a 12-foot raised median as a project feature. In addition, a Class
II bikeway is proposed to be added along Broadway between C Street and L Street. Broadway will be
widened by 14 feet between E Street and F Street to accommodate a final configuration consisting of the
raised median, bike lanes in both directions, and narrower traffic lanes. Between F Street and H Street,
the roadway would not need to be widened and the existing median would be converted to a raised
median. Nine-foot wide sidewalks will support pedestrian circulation. It is proposed to retain the
existing palm trees within parkway areas.
Figure 6-6 Proposed Cross Section, Broadway Between C Street and L Street
* 8’ sidewalks with tree wells
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-8 October 2005
3
rd
Avenue Pedestrian Enhancements
As a project feature of the Urban Core Specific Plan, the sidewalks on 3rd Avenue between E Street and
G Street will be widened. The widening of the sidewalks will encourage a higher pedestrian use of 3rd
Avenue and provide opportunity for outdoor activity areas within the Village Area. The cross section of
3
rd
Avenue varies greatly between E Street and G Street. The roadway width varies between 72 feet and
101 feet.
The roadway will be narrowed to provide one through lane in each direction between E Street and G
Street. The remainder of Third Avenue to L Street will stay in the current four-lane configuration. It is
proposed to retain the existing median. Three distinct cross sections will be provided. On-street parking
may be reduced with the implementation of the Third Avenue enhancements. It is recommended that
these enhancements be provided in coordination with the provision of off-street parking in the vicinity so
that parking impacts do not occur to surrounding areas.
Diagonal parking will be provided for most parts of Third Avenue. Figure 6-7 shows the cross section
where angled parking is permitted. Due to relatively high through traffic volumes, it is recommended that
the roadway be of sufficient width to allow vehicles to back out without blocking through traffic lanes. It
should be noted that the curb-to-curb dimension is not reduced where diagonal parking is provided on the
segment of Third Avenue between E Street and F Street.
Figure 6-8 illustrates selected mid-block locations where pedestrian crossing will occur. The roadway
would be narrowed to 24 feet by extending the curb into the street. Curbs will be extended toward the
roadway centerline about 38 feet on each side of the roadway. This reconfiguration would allow for
additional pedestrian crossings with reduced crossing distances at selected locations.
Figure 6-9 shows the treatment at intersections. This cross section allows for a right-turn lane and a left-
turn lane to be provided. Although the turning volumes from Third Avenue are not very high, these lanes
are needed to remove turning traffic from the through traffic. Turning vehicles will need to yield to
anticipated high pedestrian traffic volumes; the turn lanes allow these yielding vehicles to pull out of the
through travel lanes. This intersection configuration will adequately accommodate future traffic demands
along Third Avenue while providing a significantly enhanced pedestrian friendly streetscape.
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-9 October 2005
Figure 6-7 Proposed Cross Section, 3rd Avenue With Diagonal Parking
Figure 6-8 Proposed Cross Section, 3rd Avenue Without Diagonal Parking
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-10 October 2005
Figure 6-9 Proposed Cross Section, 3rd Avenue At Signalized Intersections
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-11 October 2005
Woodlawn Avenue Couplet
As a project feature, Woodlawn Avenue would be extended and converted to a one-way couplet between
south of E Street and north of H Street. Woodlawn Avenue is not built as a continuous roadway between
E Street and H Street. The creation of the one-way couplet would include the construction of a
neighborhood park between the one-way streets. The neighborhood park may include a variety of
recreational uses such as playgrounds, walkways, and basketball courts. The couplet could be
implemented over time as property redevelops.
Figure 6-10 Proposed Cross Section, Entire Length of Woodlawn Avenue
** Park area and ROW to be determined
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-12 October 2005
Roadway Segment Analysis
Table 6-2 summarizes the Year 2030 With Improvement Conditions LOS analysis for the roadway
segments with assumed improvements located in the Urban Core. As shown in this table, H Street
between I-5 and Broadway would be widened to a six-lane gateway. As a result, the acceptable ADT
would increase and result in an acceptable LOS. For 3
rd
Avenue between E Street and G Street, this
segment would be retained or narrowed as a two-lane downtown promenade. As a result, the acceptable
ADT would decrease and result in an unacceptable LOS. However, 3
rd
Avenue corridor intersections
would operate at acceptable levels of service and the narrowing of 3
rd
Avenue and increasing the width of
the sidewalks would create a friendlier pedestrian atmosphere.
DAILY ACCEPTABLE DAILY ACCEPTABLE DAILY
TRAFFIC BEFORE IMPROVEMENTS VOLUME SEGMENT AFTER IMPROVEMENTS VOLUME SEGMENT
STREET SEGMENT VOLUME LOS LOS
I-5 - Broadway 52,000 4 Lanes 43,200 F 6 Lanes 61,200 D
E Street - G Street 21,000 2/4 Lanes 14,400/ 33,350 A 2 Lanes 14,400 F
K:###BOT_TEXT###95413000\Excel\October 2005 Final Report\[413rs050504.xls]Table 6-2
3rd Avenue
H Street
TABLE 6-2
YEAR 2030 WITH IMPROVEMENTS CONDITIONS ROADWAY SEGMENT LEVEL OF SERVICE SUMMARY
6
-
1
3
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-14 October 2005
Intersection Improvements
Due to the unique nature of urban revitalization, the exact timing, sequence and extent of infill
development is hard to predict and doing so would be speculative. The anticipated 20-25 year
implementation of the Specific Plan therefore necessitates a different approach to implementing the
recommended long-term intersection improvements in order to achieve acceptable LOS thresholds. The
20 intersection improvements that follow have been divided into three tiers for phased long term
implementation based on need and enhancement to the function of the overall street network. It should be
noted that three of the intersections (#7, #16, and #21) are proposed as project features rather than
necessitated to improve intersection LOS and the improvements will likely be related to and timed with
implementation of streetscape improvements along Third Avenue. The intersection numbers correspond
to the intersection numbering system outlined in this report.
Tier 1 Improvements
§ Provide a grade-separated intersection at the E Street and H Street trolley crossing locations. This
improvement would be considered a regional improvement as the trolley provides service
throughout the region. Coordination with MTS/SANDAG will be required for this improvement.
§ #1 Bay Boulevard/I-5 Southbound Ramp/E Street: Add an eastbound through and right-turn
lane, southbound right-turn lane, and northbound right-turn lane. Coordination with Caltrans will
be required for this improvement.
§ #2 I-5 Northbound Ramp/E Street: Add a westbound right-turn lane. Coordination with
Caltrans will be required for this improvement.
§ #24 I-5 Southbound Ramp/H Street: Add a southbound left, eastbound through and right-turn
lanes. Coordination with Caltrans will be required for this improvement.
§ #25 I-5 Northbound Ramp/H Street: Add a westbound through and right-turn lane and restripe
south approach to accommodate dual left-turn lanes. Coordination with Caltrans will be required
for this improvement.
§ #26 Woodlawn Avenue/H Street: Change Woodlawn Avenue to a one-way couplet. This
improvement is required to serve the intense redevelopment occurring on both sides of H Street.
The couplet improvement is not required further north toward E Street.
§ #27 Broadway/H Street: Add an eastbound transit queue jumper lane and westbound through
and right-turn lanes.
§ #28 Fifth Avenue/H Street: Change the northbound/southbound approaches to include protective
plus permissive phasing and add a westbound right-turn lane.
§ #29 Fourth Avenue/H Street: Add an eastbound/westbound right-turn lane.
§ #44 Fourth Avenue/SR-54 Eastbound Ramp: Add an eastbound right-turn lane. Coordination
with Caltrans will be required for this improvement.
Tier 2 Improvements
§ #34 Broadway/SR-54 Westbound Ramp: Add a westbound right-turn lane. Coordination with
Caltrans will be required for this improvement.
§ #59 J Street/I-5 Northbound Ramp: Add an eastbound left-turn and westbound right-turn lane.
Coordination with Caltrans will be required for this improvement.
§ #61 L Street/Bay Boulevard: Signalize the intersection, add a southbound left-turn lane, and a
northbound right-turn overlap phase to the traffic signal.
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-15 October 2005
§ #63 Bay Boulevard/I-5 Southbound Ramp: Signalize the intersection. Coordination with
Caltrans will be required for this improvement.
§ #64 Industrial Boulevard/I-5 Northbound Ramp: Signalize the intersection. Coordination
with Caltrans will be required for this improvement.
§ H Street from four lanes to six lanes from I-5 to Broadway
Tier 3 Improvements
§ #7 Third Avenue/E Street: Convert the northbound and southbound shared right-through lane
into exclusive right-turn lanes.
§ #13 Broadway/F Street: Add an eastbound right-turn lane.
§ #16 Third Avenue/F Street: Separate the southbound shared through-right lane into an exclusive
through and right-turn lanes, convert the northbound shared through-right lane into an exclusive
right-turn lane.
§ #21 Third Avenue/G Street: Convert the northbound/southbound shared through-right lane into
exclusive right-turn lanes.
§ #45 Fourth Avenue/Brisbane Street: Add a southbound right-turn overlap phase to the traffic
signal.
§ #57 Second Avenue/D Street: Convert to an all-way stop controlled intersection.
In each individual tier, the City’s existing monitoring program will determine exactly which projects are
implemented first during the biannual CIP program review. In addition to determining timing and need,
this systems and operations monitoring approach should also be used to further ascertain final design
details of the intersection improvements and may include consideration of the effects on traffic flow as
well as the impacts/benefits to other travel modes (e.g. pedestrians and bicycles) that are foundational to
the successful implementation of the Specific Plan.
The recommended improvements at the study intersections listed above are shown in Figure 6-11 and 6-
11.1. It should be noted that the E Street and H Street intersections between the I-5 NB Ramp and
Woodlawn Avenue assumes a Light Rail Transit (LRT) grade separation, which would separate vehicular
traffic from the trolley. It is recommended that the trolley tracks be grade separated along E and H Streets
to improve intersection operations and to accommodate the planned increase in trolley frequency.
Recommendations at intersections 27, 33, and 54 do not improve conditions to an acceptable LOS due to
ROW constraints. Figure 6-12 shows the intersections that have improvements that are considered to be
project features or improvements.
Intersection Analysis
Table 6-3 displays the LOS analysis results for the study intersections that have assumed improvements
under the Year 2030 With Improvements scenario. As shown in this table, all study intersections could
operate at LOS D or better during both peak periods with the proposed improvements, except for the
following intersections:
§ #27 Broadway/H Street
§ #33 Hilltop Drive/H Street
§ #54 3
rd
Avenue/J Street
Traffic Impact Analysis Year 2030 With Improvements Conditions
Chula Vista Urban Core 6-16 October 2005
At the Broadway/H Street intersection (Int. #27), an additional northbound and southbound through lane
would be required in order to achieve an acceptable LOS D conditions. However, this improvement
would require extensive widening of Broadway and H Street to allow for lane drops. Furthermore, this
widening would create longer pedestrian crossings. As such, the recommended improvements of the
eastbound queue jumper lane and the additional westbound through and right-turn lanes would improve
the intersection from LOS F to LOS E conditions.
At the Hilltop Drive/H Street intersection (Int. #33), no improvements would be recommended due to
ROW constraints. The poor LOS at this intersection is primari