Library Renovation Proposal

Submitted by

Thomas Singarella, Ph.D.
Professor and Director

Health Sciences Library and Biocommunications Center
University of Tennessee Health Science Center







April 25, 2012


ii
Executive Summary

The Library Renovation Proposal presents a comprehensive plan for making long-needed
improvements to the Health Sciences Library and builds on the Library 5
th
Floor Space
Reallocation Proposal of January 17, 2012. Dr. Ken Brown directed the library to reduce the
print collection on the 5
th
floor to increase student study space, expand space for the Historical
Collections, and specifically to develop a comprehensive renovation proposal to detail
improvements to all library floors for funding consideration. As a major campus resource for
students, faculty, staff, and as the public face to visitors to the campus, the library needs
renovation.

The guiding principle in developing the proposal was to more effectively accommodate the
needs of students using the library. Major student input was provided for the student learning,
study, and information commons.

The Library Renovation Proposal includes all library floors; foremost among general
improvements for consistent aesthetics is new carpeting. The proposal includes adding a student
study, learning, and information commons and expanding the Historical Collections on the 5
th

floor; centralizing the print collection and creating new individual student study quiet areas
around the periphery of the print collection on the 4
th
floor; reallocating offices to create three
additional student small-group study rooms and renovating library staff and student break rooms,
and offices on the 3
rd
floor; and renovating the foyer and main entrance to the library, creating a
one-stop, single-service, multifunctional Information Desk (combining reference, circulation and
access services), and renovating the library conference room, student instructional lab, and staff
operations areas on the 2
nd
floor. Considerable work is currently under way to remove the
remaining 5
th
floor print collection and shelving to the 4
th
floor to create space for added student
study areas.

The development of the Library Renovation Proposal was placed on the fast track. Input was
provided by many campus and vendor participants, foremost Kari Conrad (Facilities), Steve
Butler (ITS), Steve Tom (Facilities Moving), Stephanie McGee (CFA--Contract Furniture
Alliance), as well as the faculty and staff of the library who worked daily and tirelessly to
develop this proposal.

Summary cost estimates received from Facilities and CFA make up the bulk of the proposal
costs and are outlined (to date) as follows:

Budget Summary

Item Cost ($)
General Renovations – All Floors 289,661
5
th
Floor 373,600
4
th
Floor 90,200
3
rd
Floor 158,886
2
nd
Floor 313,595
TOTAL 1,225,942

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Specific budget estimates are provided in the proposal. The library will begin implementing the
renovation plan as soon as approval to proceed in whole or part is provided by Dr. Brown.

In summary, this Library Renovation Proposal presents a detailed plan for renovating major
areas of the library to make them most useful to students, improve and create more efficient
library operations, improve security, ensure ADA compliance, and create a visually attractive
modern health sciences library that will be a showcase for the campus.


iv
Table of Contents

Introduction .................................................................................................................................. 1
Background .................................................................................................................................... 2
Rationale ........................................................................................................................................ 2

General Renovations – All Floors ............................................................................................... 4
Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 4
Infrastructure .................................................................................................................................. 4
Replace carpet .................................................................................................................... 4
Replace window blinds ...................................................................................................... 4
Painting/Staining ................................................................................................................ 4
Signage ............................................................................................................................... 4
UTHSC building signage ................................................................................................... 4
Wall treatments/décor ....................................................................................................... 4
Security cameras ................................................................................................................ 4
Trash receptacles ................................................................................................................ 5
Clean windows ................................................................................................................... 5
Update restrooms ............................................................................................................... 5
Miscellaneous .................................................................................................................... 5
Budget ............................................................................................................................................ 5

Fifth Floor ..................................................................................................................................... 6
Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 6
Student Learning, Study, and Information Commons ................................................................... 6
Remove print materials and shelving ................................................................................. 6
Student break room ............................................................................................................ 7
Café-style area ................................................................................................................... 7
Group-study area ................................................................................................................ 7
Casual seating areas ........................................................................................................... 7
Charging station ................................................................................................................. 7
Glass walls ......................................................................................................................... 7
Casual seating/reception area ............................................................................................. 7
Replace study carrel seating and provide white boards ..................................................... 8
Health Sciences Historical Collections Expansion ........................................................................ 8
Expand Historical Collections space ................................................................................. 8
Replace carpet with ceramic tile ........................................................................................ 8
Dedicated climate control system ...................................................................................... 8
Budget ............................................................................................................................................ 9

Fourth Floor ............................................................................................................................... 10
Introduction .................................................................................................................................. 10
Individual-study Area .................................................................................................................. 10
Individual study pods ....................................................................................................... 10
Replace study carrel seating ............................................................................................. 10
Historical Collections Workrooms .............................................................................................. 10

v
Workrooms ...................................................................................................................... 10
Budget .......................................................................................................................................... 11

Third Floor ................................................................................................................................. 12
Introduction .................................................................................................................................. 12
Student Study Rooms ................................................................................................................... 12
Repurpose rooms 318, 342, and 344 for student use ....................................................... 12
Replace all seating ........................................................................................................... 12
Replace and supplement existing 32” flat-screen monitors with 55” flat-screen
monitors with VGA ad HDMI cables ........................................................................ 12
Replace all dry erasable white boards and marker containers ......................................... 12
Student Break Room .................................................................................................................... 13
Replace carpet with ceramic tile ...................................................................................... 13
Add credenza with space for small refrigerator ............................................................... 13
Replace tables and chairs ................................................................................................. 13
Install sink with garbage disposal .................................................................................... 13
Staff Break Room ........................................................................................................................ 13
Replace carpet with ceramic tile ...................................................................................... 13
Replace tables and chairs ................................................................................................. 13
Replace kitchen cabinets, counters, and sink ................................................................... 13
Add a wall-mounted, flat-screen, digital TV and wall-mounted telephone for staff use . 13
Add card-swipe access ..................................................................................................... 13
Remove bookcases ........................................................................................................... 14
Library Offices ............................................................................................................................. 14
Replace all office furniture and seating ........................................................................... 14
Table and seating in room 308 ......................................................................................... 14
Lockable storage cabinet in room 308 ............................................................................. 14
Miscellaneous .............................................................................................................................. 14
Replace mailboxes and furniture in mailroom ................................................................. 14
Replace carpet with ceramic tile in hallway outside of break rooms and restrooms ....... 14
Budget .......................................................................................................................................... 14

Second Floor ............................................................................................................................... 15
Introduction .................................................................................................................................. 15
Library Foyer ............................................................................................................................... 15
Renovate library foyer ..................................................................................................... 16
Library Entrance .......................................................................................................................... 16
Renovate library entrance ................................................................................................ 16
Information Desk ......................................................................................................................... 16
Install single, multipurpose, redesigned Information Desk that will incorporate the
services and functions of the current Circulation and Reference desks ..................... 17
Add consultation stations ................................................................................................. 17
Move door alarm button, security gates interface, door buzzer, and any other
necessary switches and/or buttons to the new Information Desk .............................. 17
Add a panic button at the Information Desk .................................................................... 17
Add electronic signage at the Information Desk .............................................................. 17

vi
Conference Room ........................................................................................................................ 17
Replace conference table and seating .............................................................................. 17
Additional seating ............................................................................................................ 18
Add motorized projection screen, ceiling-mounted projector with speakers, and
smart podium with dedicated computer ..................................................................... 18
Add rolling dry erase white board ................................................................................... 18
Add wall-mounted telephone, including long cord for phone conferences ..................... 18
Add credenza with small refrigerator .............................................................................. 18
Miscellaneous .................................................................................................................. 18
Library Offices ............................................................................................................................. 18
Replace all office furniture and seating ........................................................................... 18
Create one continuous hallway in the Electronic and Collection Services area .............. 18
Add walls and doors in select areas to create three distinct offices and a workroom
for the staff in the Electronic and Collection Services area ....................................... 18
Remove the door between Rooms 244 and 246 ............................................................... 19
Reconfigure Interlibrary Loan (Room 226) ..................................................................... 19
Media Lab .................................................................................................................................... 19
Convert office (210A) into area for biomedical models .................................................. 19
Replace workstations and remove partition wall ............................................................. 19
Add motorized projection screen, ceiling-mounted projector with speakers, and
smart podium with dedicated instruction computer ................................................... 19
Remove inner door in Media Lab .................................................................................... 19
Public Computer Area .................................................................................................................. 19
Update furniture and seating ............................................................................................ 19
Miscellaneous .............................................................................................................................. 20
Add glass wall in copier area ........................................................................................... 20
Recondition bookshelves ................................................................................................. 20
Replace Historical Collections display cases ................................................................... 20
Budget .......................................................................................................................................... 20

Budget Summary ....................................................................................................................... 21

Acknowledgments ...................................................................................................................... 22
Special Thanks ................................................................................................................. 22
Space Reallocation Committee ........................................................................................ 22
Additional Contributors ................................................................................................... 22
Summary .......................................................................................................................... 23

Appendices .................................................................................................................................. 24

A. Floor Plans ...................................................................................................................... 25
B. Detailed Budget Tables .................................................................................................. 30
C. Visuals ............................................................................................................................. 35
D. Consultant’s Report on the Historical Collections ..................................................... 63
E. Current Circulation and Reference Desk Responsibilities ........................................ 68

1
Introduction

The Library Renovation Proposal presents a comprehensive plan for making long-needed
improvements to the Health Sciences Library and builds on the Library 5
th
Floor Space
Reallocation Proposal of January 17, 2012. That proposal included repurposing part of the 5
th

floor to create a student study, learning, and information commons, as well as expanding the
Historical Collections.

On March 1, 2012, Dr. Ken Brown directed the library to develop a comprehensive renovation
proposal on a fast track and present it to him as soon as possible. He asked that the library
expand efforts to reduce the print collection on the 5
th
floor to increase student study space and
create expanded space for the Historical Collections. Moreover, he suggested that a
comprehensive renovation proposal that included improvements to all library floors be
developed and submitted to him.

Therefore, on the 5
th
floor we are proposing to create space for a study, learning, and information
commons for students who need group-study and collaborative learning areas, as well as a
student break room. We are also proposing to expand the library’s Health Sciences Historical
Collections, with needed improvements.

The 4
th
floor proposal includes centralizing the archival print collection (incorporating materials
from the 5
th
floor), creating new individual student study areas around the periphery of the print
collection, and converting the current copy room into a file room.

The 3
rd
floor proposal includes reallocating offices and a file room to create three additional
small-group student study rooms and renovating the library staff and student break rooms.

Renovating the 2
nd
-floor main entrance to the library is critical to improving first impressions,
functionality, and impact of the entire renovation project. The aesthetics and function of the
foyer and entrance to the library must be improved to reflect a modern academic health sciences
library. We propose a single-service, one-stop, multifunctional service desk to improve library
security, be ADA compliant, and provide efficient library staffing.

The funding required for library renovations is significant. However, Dr. Brown suggested that
we not worry about the costs and just give him a good plan. With this charge in mind, we have
developed within a short period what we believe to be a reasonable and well-developed plan. The
library will begin implementing the space renovation plan as soon as Dr. Brown grants approval.

In summary, this Library Renovation Proposal presents a detailed plan for renovating major
areas of the library to make them most useful to students, improve and create more efficient
library operations, improve security, ensure ADA compliance, and create a visually attractive
health sciences library that will be a showcase for the campus.

This proposal details the space renovation plan by floor and provides background, rationale,
projected costs, and related matters. Appendices include specific information, illustrations, and

2
furniture examples. Recommendations are numbered throughout the proposal for convenient
discussion and are not indicative of relative importance.

Background

On March 1, the Library 5
th
Floor Space Reallocation Proposal of January 17, 2012, was
discussed in a meeting attended by Drs. Ken Brown, Cheryl Scheid, and Tom Singarella; Mr.
Rick Fought (library); Bruce Stiles and Kari Conrad (Facilities); and Steve Butler and Lisa
Aitken (ITS). At that meeting, Dr. Brown requested that the library develop a comprehensive
library renovation proposal and submit it to him as soon as possible. Dr. Singarella indicated that
a proposal would be submitted within 2 months for discussion and action and that the library
would begin removing the entire print collection from the 5
th
floor.

The development of the Library Renovation Proposal was placed on the fast track and included a
team effort. The removal of the 5
th
floor print collection was the top priority, and Steve Tom
assisted Rick Fought and his team with moving materials and shelving. Removing the entire
print collection and shelving to the 4
th
floor requires major effort and is projected to be
completed by summer.

Input was provided by many campus and vendor participants, including Kari Conrad and Ken
Bradshaw (Facilities), Lisa Aitken and Steve Butler (ITS), Steve Tom (Facilities Moving),
Stephanie McGee (Contract Furniture Alliance), as well as the faculty and staff of the library
who worked daily and tirelessly to develop this proposal.

Rick Fought is the project manager for the library. The library director worked closely with the
project manager, library faculty, and others in developing this proposal.

The Library Space Committee worked with vendors and campus offices to develop a cohesive
plan to address the needs of the student body and library operations. For a complete background
on development of library space reallocation proposals, see the Library 5
th
Floor Space
Reallocation Proposal, January 17, 2012.

Rationale

The library has undergone no major renovation since it moved into the Alexander Building in
1985. The way health sciences information is funded, accessed, stored, retrieved, and evaluated
is in constant flux because of the technology revolution. Certainly, electronic books, journals,
and databases have changed the way patient care, research, education, and service are conducted
on health science campuses. Most members of our campus community often access library
resources from their office workstations and only seldom come to the library. With the number
of e-resources growing and visits to the library by faculty declining, the library has reimagined
its physical collection of books and journals and the space that it currently occupies. Most
notably, recent improvements to the library space have resulted in significantly increased student
use, with an average of 200,000 entries to the library every year. Therefore, the concept of
library as place for students remains important and viable even as the need for certain physical
print collections decreases. As a result of research and student surveys, we are focused on

3
creating on the 5
th
floor a student study, learning, and information commons; expanding study
and learning space wherever possible; and renovating library areas for greater security and staff
efficiency.

Many institutions have renovated their academic health sciences libraries to create a student
information or learning commons and improve library operations. The rationale for reallocating
the library space is that, properly designed and implemented, enhanced student library spaces
promote study, learning, academic success, and scholarship. Compared to other campus areas,
library space is unique because of materials, models, technology, services, and hours of staffed
operation (open 96 hours and 7 days per week). The library is open to the citizens of Tennessee,
as well as health care professionals, and is part of the public face of the campus.

Because workflow in libraries has changed significantly in the past decade, primarily as a result
of technology innovations, the current multiple service desk configuration (separate Circulation
Desk and Reference Desk) is no longer relevant. Therefore, we need to remove the two outdated
desks and replace them with one multipurpose, single-service desk that will incorporate both
circulation and reference functions. This configuration, along with creating a better entrance, will
more effectively accommodate the needs of students and others using the library, allow
significantly more efficient use of personnel (e.g., staff will be cross-trained and faculty can
attend to higher-level tasks while still being available to assist patrons), be ADA-compliant, and
use library space more effectively. Moreover, the updated configuration will provide a major
aesthetic improvement to those entering the library.

Expanding the Health Sciences Historical Collections space will provide space for processing
materials and a foundation for preservation, research, and fundraising.

In summary, the library requires a major renovation and expansion of student study space;
renovation of the main entrance to improve library operations; and a means of preserving campus,
state, and regional treasured Historical Collections.


4
General Renovations – All Floors

Introduction
A number of renovation improvements are needed for all library floors to provide consistent
aesthetics and function. General recommendations for all floors are noted below rather than in
the individual sections by floor to avoid duplication and facilitate simplicity. Foremost among
these needs is carpeting for the entire Health Sciences Library. Appendix A contains
architectural plans for each floor.

Infrastructure

1. Replace carpet. We recommend replacing the carpet on all floors with carpet tiles to create a
professional, uniform look. We do not recommend carpeting the stairs. In certain areas, we are
recommending ceramic tiles or other appropriate flooring instead of carpet, the cost of which is
included in this estimate.
Estimated cost: $160,000

2. Replace window blinds. All of the old, worn, and damaged minivenetian blinds currently on
windows need to be removed and replaced by roller blinds (like those in the new Pharmacy
Building).
Estimated cost: $25,000

3. Painting/Staining. We recommend painting all walls and concrete and refinishing and
staining all appropriate oak wood surfaces.
Estimated cost: Alexander Building Renovation Plan

4. Signage. We recommend replacing all signage designating library service areas and main
entrance to create a consistent and professional look.
Estimated cost: $6,600

5. UTHSC building signage. UTHSC building signage (e.g., room numbers, floor listings, fire)
should be replaced. Campus room signage must accommodate QR codes on the student study
rooms so students can scan codes for more information or to reserve an individual study carrel.
Estimated cost: Facilities

6. Wall treatments/décor. All current items on library walls will be removed prior to painting
and installing the new items. The furniture vendor has recommended adding new wall treatments
(e.g., clocks and appropriate décor) to the library to coordinate aesthetics and provide
consistency with the other renovations to further enhance the new look of the library.
Estimated cost: $5,400

7. Security cameras. A greatly reduced staff operates the library at nights (until midnight) and
on weekends. To ensure the safety of staff, faculty, and students, we recommend adding digital
security cameras in appropriate locations on each floor to be monitored at the Information Desk.
Estimated cost: Campus Police/ITS

5

8. Trash receptacles. We recommend replacing all of the trash receptacles in the library with
appropriate and consistent receptacles to accommodate the larger student study areas
(specifically adding trash receptacles on the 4
th
and 5
th
floors and public areas). The furniture
vendor recommends 40-gallon trash receptacles (similar to those in the new Pharmacy Building)
for areas near student break rooms.
Estimated cost: $5,000

9. Clean windows. We recommend cleaning and repairing all library windows, particularly the
outside panes that are so soiled you can hardly see through them.
Estimated cost: Alexander Building Renovation Plan

10. Update restrooms. Restrooms are old, worn, and unattractive, and they create a less than
positive impression of the library for faculty, students, and visitors. For example, lighting is poor
and the tiling is brown, which make the rooms dark, and the stalls, sinks, toilets, and urinals are
worn and need to be replaced, as well as the hodgepodge of tissue and towel dispensers.
Estimated cost: $84,661 (8 restrooms)

11. Miscellaneous. Miscellaneous items (e.g., book returns around campus) may be necessary
during renovation, and we are working with Facilities and the furniture vendor to determine
these items and cost.
Estimated cost: $3,000

Budget

Detailed budgets are provided in Appendix B.

Item Cost ($)
Infrastructure 289,661
TOTAL 289,661


6
Fifth Floor

Introduction

The Library Renovation Proposal builds on the Library 5
th
Floor Space Reallocation Proposal
of January 17, 2012. The earlier space proposal included repurposing part of the 5
th
floor to
create a student study, learning, and information commons, as well as expanding the Historical
Collections, and that plan is now significantly expanded. We are removing the entire print
collection from the 5
th
floor to the 4
th
floor. This activity should be complete before the end of
June. We will use the cleared floor space to expand student study space and the Historical
Collections.

We will significantly expand the space dedicated to a student study, learning, and information
commons. We are adding a student break room surrounded by a glass wall as part of an
improved design. A student lounge area will contain two types of café-style booths with privacy
screens between them for small-group study and will be located along the windows on the west
and north walls. Free-standing group-study pods with digital monitors that students can use with
their laptops will aid in collaborative projects. Electrical outlets and task lighting will be part of
these pods. White erasable boards will also be included in each pod. Other areas of the 5
th
floor
will contain free-standing, collaborative study pods. A charging station will be located around
the cement support pillar located in the northwest area of the 5
th
floor so students can recharge
their laptops, cellphones, and other mobile devices while enjoying a break in the lounge area or
on the sofas near the group-study areas.

We will also expand the library’s Health Sciences Historical Collections on the 5
th
floor by
creating walls to house increased storage of historical materials.

A large, open, circular leisure seating area with integrated historical exhibits in front of the
current elevator will be used by students and for possible library receptions.

Students have long requested to have a 24/7 area in the library. While this accommodation is not
part of the current renovation proposal, the current plans for the 5
th
floor include this future
possibility.

Student Learning, Study, and Information Commons

12. Remove print materials and shelving. All remaining print materials (books and journals)
will be moved to the 4
th
floor to create study space for 150+ students. Several bookshelves have
been dismantled and moved to the 4
th
floor to accommodate the collection from the 5
th
floor. The
collection being moved must be integrated into (not simply added to) the collection on the 4
th

floor. Integration necessarily includes revising records in the online catalog, signage, and printed
and electronic library information guides. The archival theses and dissertations, which do not
circulate and are part of the university’s heritage, will be moved to the expanded Historical
Collections.
Estimated cost: $10,000


7
13. Student break room. A small area partially enclosed with glass walls (to maintain an open,
spacious environment) will include vending machines, microwave, small refrigerator, and tables
and chairs so that students studying on the 5
th
floor do not need to pick up their things to go to
the 3
rd
floor or other buildings when they need a break. The break room will be tiled and will
have a kitchen counter. Student security and convenience are the primary reasons for creating a
space adjacent to where students are already studying.
Estimated cost: $8,700

15. Café-style area. The lounge area will contain two types of café-style booths with privacy
screens between them for small-group study and will be located along the windows on the west
and north walls. The first booth style seats four people; the other style seats approximately seven
people. The booths will have built-in electrical outlets for laptops and mobile devices. Bistro
tables and chairs will also be arranged in this area. Square tables will make it easier for students
to move them together as needed. Appendix C contains photographs of representative furniture.
Estimated cost: $58,000

15. Group-study area. This area will have 15 freestanding study pods that accommodate up to
five students each. These pods are hexagonal with five 83” high acoustical screens (for noise
reduction and privacy), a 60” table at which five people can comfortably sit, and a flat-screen
digital monitor that students can use with their laptops to aid in collaborative projects. Electrical
outlets, task lighting, white erasable boards, and the capability to attach markers and erasers will
be part of these pods.
Estimated cost: $175,000.

16. Casual seating areas. Sofas, loveseats, and ottomans will be located along the north wall, in
the northeast corner, and in the middle of the eastern side of the floor to provide a restful and
relaxed area for students.
Estimated cost: $37,000.

17. Charging station. Personal and library laptops (and other information devices) need to be
charged periodically. The charging station provides such a capability and will decrease the need
for additional wall sockets around the 5
th
floor.
Estimated cost: $8,500.

18. Glass walls. Modular glass walls will separate a casual seating/reception area (outside the
entrance to the Historical Collections) and the casual seating area (in the middle of the eastern
side of the floor) from the student study areas. These walls will provide a sound barrier for the
study areas and will allow an open esthetic. These walls will be modular to provide easy future
changes to the floor plan.
Estimated cost: $14,000

19. Casual seating/reception area. The student learning, study, and information commons will
be the focal point for students seeking group-study space and a comfortable, relaxing
environment on campus. The casual seating/reception area will be the visual showcase for this
entire floor but will also be highly functional. This area will provide a place to host library events.
It can also be used by students wanting to study in groups or just wanting a place to rest and

8
relax. We are proposing a tiered, circular seating area with built-in display cases for our
Historical Collection items, which will create a visually stunning effect that is sure to impress.
Estimated cost: $16,000 (excluding electrical)

20. Replace study carrel seating and provide white boards. (Rooms 501-516C, 539, 541, 543,
545, 547, 549, 551, 553, 555, 565, 569, 571, 573, 575, 577, 579, 581, 583, 585) Seating in all
study carrels throughout the library will be the same. The number of chairs in study carrels
required on the 5
th
floor is 34. As requested by students, small white boards will be installed in
each carrel.
Estimated cost: $24,400

Health Sciences Historical Collections Expansion (Rooms 508-509)

The Historical Collections stores and preserves significant works related to the history of the
health sciences in Tennessee and the Mid-South and of the Health Science Center. We propose
expanding the Historical Collections on the 5
th
floor and improving the Historical Collections
facilities on the 4
th
floor (workrooms) and 2
nd
floor (display cases). The expansion will provide
space for processing materials and a foundation for preservation, research, fundraising, and a
showcase for our treasured historical materials.

Renovations to protect the valuable artifacts currently in (and anticipated for) the Historical
Collections include expanded space (793 sq. ft. to 1955 sq. ft.), a new thermostat system,
archival shelving to accommodate files in an acid-free environment, and appropriate window
shades and lighting to control ultraviolet radiation. Detailed information is available in the
Library 5
th
Floor Space Reallocation Proposal of January 17, 2012. Additionally, in the fall of
2011, a consultant was invited to review the Historical Collections; his report is in Appendix D.

21. Expand Historical Collections space. Walls will be added to expand the 5
th
floor space
from 793 sq. ft. to 1955 sq. ft. Electrical work that will be needed is included.
Estimated cost: $22,000 (excluding HVAC)

22. Replace carpet with ceramic tile. Tile is preferred over carpet in an archival facility.
Estimated cost: Included with carpet estimate

23. Dedicated climate control system. Strict climate control is necessary for the long-term
preservation of our Historical Collections, and that can be achieved only through a dedicated
climate control system for this area.
Estimated cost: TBD

Additional workspace on the 4
th
floor and new display cases on the 2
nd
floor are also being
proposed. Specific information is provided in the section of each floor.



9
Budget

Item Cost ($)
Student Learning, Study, and Information Commons 351,600
Historical Collections Expansion 22,000
TOTAL 373,600


10
Fourth Floor

Introduction

The 4
th
floor renovation will include centralizing most of the print collection by incorporating
journals and books from the 5
th
floor. We will designate the 4
th
floor as a quiet area for
individual student study. We will create new, individual, quiet student study areas to be located
around the print collection and in front of the large windows overlooking Madison Ave.
Additionally, we will repurpose the old copy room to create a secure, locked file room for the
library business office. Two Historical Collections rooms will be improved by adding
appropriate shelving and a work area, with a sink in one of them, to intake and preserve
historical materials.

Individual-study Area

24. Individual study pods. In addition to 19 existing individual student study carrels, this floor
will contain 39 pods with the same acoustical screening as in the group-study area. The 5’ high
acoustical screens will provide privacy and noise reduction. Recessed desks will be 48” wide
(large surfaces were requested by the students), and the individual pods will include power
outlets and task lighting.
Estimated cost: $84,500

25. Replace study carrel seating. (Rooms 439, 441, 443, 445, 447, 449, 451, 453, 455, 465, 469,
471, 473, 475, 477, 479, 481, 483, 485) We recommend replacing chairs in the 19 study carrels
on this floor.
Estimated cost: $5,700

Historical Collections Workrooms (Rooms 407A and 410)

Currently, two rooms (407A and 410) are devoted to Historical Collections storerooms and
contain primarily boxes full of artifacts and historical records being catalogued and awaiting
processing. The initial steps after accepting items are receiving and preparing acquisitions for
their inclusion in the Historical Collections. These steps require a space where acquisitions can
be organized, cleaned, and transferred into folders or other appropriate containers. Cleaning and
preservation supplies must be on hand for processing new materials. Room 407A will require a
double sink with hot and cold running water and a cabinet with drawers and doors for supplies.
Two work chairs will be added in this room. Facilities will construct the cabinet and install the
sink. Room 410 will require new shelving to hold newly acquired items and to store processed
items.

26. Workrooms. For Room 407A, we recommend installing plumbing with a double sink and
cabinet to allow for appropriate cleaning and processing of Historical Collections materials. We
also recommend two task chairs for this workstation and a cabinet along the north wall. For
Room 410, we recommend installing storage shelving to hold archival boxes. Both rooms must
have a ceramic tile floor.
Estimated cost: TBD

11

Budget

Item Cost ($)
Individual-study Area 90,200
Historical Collections Workrooms TBD
TOTAL 90,200


12
Third Floor

Introduction

The 3
rd
floor renovations will improve student services by relocating two staff offices and a
current storage room to the 2
nd
floor to provide three additional small-group student study rooms.
We propose purchasing additional tables, chairs, digital screens, and white boards to outfit these
additional student study rooms and add new, consistent seating to all of the current student rooms.

Because of extended evening and weekend hours of library operation, a staff break room is an
integral part of every UT library. We propose to renovate the staff break room, including
replacing the small kitchenette that is old, worn, broken, and nonfunctional. The furniture is a
mixed bag of old, badly worn items that also need to be replaced. The badly stained carpet in the
break room, as well as in the hallway outside the staff break room, should be replaced with
ceramic tile. In addition, two items of furniture in the mailroom should be replaced for improved
efficiency. We also propose minor renovations of the student break room to include a sink with
garbage disposal, furniture, and tiling for the floor and adjacent hallway.

Student Study Rooms (Rooms 316, 318, 320, 322, 324, 326, 342, 344, 346, 348,
350, 352, 354, 356)

Students heavily use these small-group study rooms because they are quiet and secure and have a
feeling of openness because of the glass wall in front. They are large enough to accommodate
small groups. We currently have flat-screen monitors (32”) in six of the rooms.

27. Repurpose rooms 318, 342, and 344 for student use. We recommend adding tables in each
of these three rooms to match the tables we have in the other student study rooms. This will
increase the number of student study rooms from 11 to 14.
Estimated cost: $4,500

28. Replace all seating. We recommend six task chairs per room for a total of 84 chairs.
Estimated cost: $26,200

29. Replace and supplement existing 32” flat-screen monitors with 55” flat-screen monitors
with VGA and HDMI cables. Students need large, high-definition, wall-mounted, digital
screens to adequately view instructional images and videos.
Estimated cost: $29,386

30. Replace all dry erasable white boards and marker containers. The current white boards
are heavily used and are nearing the end of their usefulness. Storage space for markers and
erasers will improve room maintenance and appearance.
Estimated cost: $6,200



13
Student Break Room (Room 371)

31. Replace carpet with ceramic tile. Ceramic tile is much more resistant to moisture and stains
than other materials and ideal for use in high-traffic areas where food and drinks are used.
Estimated cost: Included in carpet estimate

32. Add credenza with space for small refrigerator. This will give the students counter space,
provide a surface for microwave, and provide some storage. (There is already a small refrigerator
in the room.)
Estimated cost: $3,500

33. Replace tables and chairs. Current tables and chairs are mismatched, dated, and worn.
Estimated cost: $1,200

34. Install sink with garbage disposal. Students need an area to clean up after eating. They
frequently use the restroom sinks and drinking fountain to clean dishes and dispose of food,
thereby clogging plumbing.
Estimated cost: TBD

Staff Break Room (Room 360)

The current staff break room desperately needs updating with a new floor and modern appliances
and furniture. This area will allow library personnel a comfortable area to have lunch and take a
break during library hours of operation that include evenings and weekends. This renovated
space will also provide access to updated kitchen facilities and an area for staff functions.

35. Replace carpet with ceramic tile. Ceramic tile is much more resistant to moisture than other
materials and ideal for use in high-traffic areas where food and drinks are used.
Estimated cost: Included with carpet estimate

36. Replace tables and chairs. We recommend tables and seating to accommodate the library
staff and a leisure seating area with lounge seating so people can relax.
Estimated cost: $10,200

37. Replace kitchen cabinets, counters, and sink. We recommend replacing the kitchen
counter tops and adding a double sink with a garbage disposal, a built-in microwave, cook range,
and kitchen cabinets.
Estimated cost: $6,000

38. Add a wall-mounted, flat-screen, digital TV and wall-mounted telephone for staff use.
Estimated cost: $1,500

39. Add card-swipe access. On several occasions, people other than library staff have used this
space and left behind messes and other problems. Adding card-reader restricted access would be
an important security feature to restrict use to library staff.
Estimated cost: Campus Police and ITS

14

40. Remove bookcases. The current bookcases are unused and unnecessary.
Estimated cost: Facilities

Library Offices (Rooms 308, 310, 323, 328, 330, 332, 338, 340)

The office furniture and seating in the library are dated, worn, and no longer functionally or
ergonomically adequate. Technological changes over the years have rendered much of this
furniture obsolete, and it is a hindrance to faculty and staff performance. Library office furniture
is in exceedingly poor condition, is uncomfortable, and badly needs updating. New office
furniture and seating would make the library staff more efficient and effective in their duties,
improve morale and performance, and create a more professional work environment.

41. Replace all office furniture and seating. There are eight office areas on the 3
rd
floor.
Estimated cost: $61,000

42. Table and seating in room 308. Part of instructional services’ suite, this room needs space
for small-group consultation.
Estimated cost: $5,500

43. Lockable storage cabinet in room 308. Instructional services has many electronic devices
and other materials that need to be stored securely and regularly recharged.
Estimated cost: $500

Miscellaneous

44. Replace mailboxes and furniture in mailroom. (Room 355) We recommend adding
enough print mailboxes for library faculty and staff and updating the rest of the furniture in the
mailroom to make this room functional.
Estimated cost: $3,200

45. Replace carpet with ceramic tile in hallway outside of break rooms and restrooms.
Estimated cost: Included with carpet estimate

Budget

Item Cost ($)
Student Study Rooms 66,286
Student Break Room 4,700
Staff Break Room 17,700
Library Offices 67,000
Miscellaneous 3,200
TOTAL 158,886



15
Second Floor

Introduction
Renovating the main entrance to the library is critical to making a major difference in first
impressions, as well as functionality and impact of the entire space renovation project. The
aesthetics and function of the foyer and entrance to the library must be improved to reflect a
modern academic health sciences library.

We propose a major renovation of the library foyer and main entrance. The foyer flooring should
be replaced (e.g., marble, granite), and the library entrance wall should be replaced with a glass
wall and the doors centered (inasmuch as possible) for easy access and security. Double entrance
doors will be ADA compliant and offer a line of sight centered on a single-service Information
Desk inside the library. A digital signage screen (like those around campus) mounted on the wall
by the main entrance will display library announcements (e.g., instructional activities, special
events, open hours, web page, and closings). We propose removing the two large, old service
desks (Circulation and Reference) and replacing them with a single-service, specially designed,
semicircular, multifunctional Information Desk that will provide an attractive, single stop for all
library patrons entering and using the library. The Information Desk will incorporate reference
and circulation functions, as well as materials on reserve. Appropriate built-in technology (e.g.,
recessed computers), and its semicircular design will allow centralized service access for library
patrons. The Information Desk will improve library security, be ADA compliant, and provide
efficient library staffing (staffing flexibility is critical because of decreased staffing, illness,
vacations, etc.). We also recommend that a digital security system be incorporated into the desk
so that evening/weekend staff can view remote library areas; a “hot button” to easily contact
campus police should be part of the security system. Sitting areas near the Information Desk will
allow patron consultations with reference and instructional librarians. In summary, the main
entrance and single-service Information Desk will not only create a great first impression, they
will improve traffic flow, create better security, be ADA compliant, and allow more efficient use
of library staff.

Additional 2
nd
floor renovations in the public areas will improve services (e.g., research alcoves,
leisure reading areas, technology access, copy area surrounded by glass wall), functionality, and
aesthetics. Improvements are recommended to the Media Lab and offices to improve library
operations. The present configuration of library faculty and staff offices includes a mixed bag of
old furniture and needs to be updated to provide a consistent image and improve work flow (as
well as morale). Although the current carpet on the 2
nd
floor was replaced in 2006, it is roll
carpet with several stains, and we are requesting that it be replaced to match the new carpet that
will be installed throughout the library to provide a consistent look and the functionality of
carpet tiles. We have requested that the entire library infrastructure be improved (e.g., wood
refinishing where appropriate, painting, and carpeting).

Library Foyer

The library foyer on the 2
nd
floor of the Alexander Building is more the 25 years old and shows
its wear and tear. Consequently, we propose that the flooring be replaced with granite, marble, or

16
ceramic tile for enhanced durability and as the entryway to a renovated, modern health sciences
library. Rugs or mats, as recommended by Facilities, will be included to protect both the foyer
and library. The outdated wall display cases (2) should be replaced with current technology
already used throughout the campus—a flat-screen, digital display board dedicated to library
information (e.g., instructional activities, hours, closings, and updates about library resources).
While managed by the library, the digital display screen will be boxed identically to those on
campus (ITS input has already been received) and will display campus-wide emergency notices.
Comfortable foyer seating will be included for those arriving early and waiting for the library to
open, for those needing to talk on cellphones, and for visitors (e.g., potential students and
parents).

46. Renovate library foyer.
Estimated cost: $6,000

Library Entrance

We propose that a transparent glass wall replace the current solid wall as the entry into the
library. The glass wall will provide a more inviting entry to the library and will allow library
faculty and staff increased visibility (and security) relative to those entering the library. The
entry doors will be replaced with double doors to make the library entrance and exit ADA
compliant. The specific positioning and style of the doors will be recommended by Facilities and
will provide a clear line of sight for those entering the library and the library staff at the
Information Desk. The doors will include the current card reader system, talk box, and button
door opener for security; the security devices currently in place to protect the library from loss of
items in the collection will need to be adjusted accordingly. The current public address system
controls and fire-door alarms will need to be moved to the new Information Desk.

Changing the front entrance to the library will improve the staffing, security, and function of the
entire library. In addition, the proposed renovation will provide an aesthetically pleasing first
impression of a major, campus-wide asset and resource.

47. Renovate library entrance.
Estimated cost: TBD

Information Desk

Because workflow and library use have changed significantly in the past decade, primarily as a
result of technology innovations, the current service desk configuration (separate Circulation
Desk and Reference Desk) of 30 years ago is no longer relevant. We propose removing the two
outdated desks and replacing them with one multipurpose, single-service desk that will
incorporate both circulation and reference functions, more effectively accommodate the needs of
students and others using the library, allow significantly more efficient use of personnel (e.g.,
staff will be cross-trained and faculty can attend to higher-level tasks while still being on call to
assist patrons), and be ADA compliant. Consultants from Contract Furniture Alliance and our
Facilities department designed the best furniture configuration based on our needs: to welcome
users into the library, to provide immediate answers to users’ questions, to secure the library, to

17
use personnel resources efficiently, and to accommodate the myriad activities currently the
responsibility of those staffing the circulation and reference desks (Appendix E details these
responsibilities).

The proposed Information Desk will have a durable surface (e.g., granite or marble) with
different heights to accommodate staff and patrons either standing or sitting. The Information
Desk will include space for books and other materials on reserve, and electronics panel that
includes a public address system, digital security system, and appropriate built-in technology.

Near the Information Desk, individual and small-group seating will be available for on-call
librarians to consult with library patrons.

48. Install single, multipurpose, redesigned Information Desk that will incorporate the
services and functions of the current Circulation and Reference desks. We also recommend
adding adequate shelving at the Information Desk to house the reserve collection.
Estimated cost: $26,000

49. Add consultation stations. Many faculty and students require in-depth, one-on-one library
assistance that is difficult to provide at the Information Desk where there are many distractions
and interruptions. Two reference/instructional consultation stations, consisting of a workstation
big enough for two people to sit comfortably side-by-side, adequate seating, a desktop computer,
and space and a power receptacle for plugging in a laptop are recommended, as budget permits.
Estimated cost: $11,000

50. Move door alarm button, security gates interface, door buzzer, and any other necessary
switches and/or buttons to the new Information Desk.
Estimated cost: Facilities/ITS/Campus Police

51. Add a panic button at the Information Desk. This button, when pressed, will immediately
alert campus police and is especially needed for the evening/weekend staff.
Estimated cost: Campus Police

52. Add electronic signage at the Information Desk.
Estimated cost: $4,000

Conference Room (Room 230)

The library conference room is a multipurpose room used for faculty/staff meetings, hosting
vendors and visitors, and as additional instructional space for the library and UTHSC faculty
upon request and when available.

53. Replace conference table and seating. The two conference tables are old, in bad condition,
and do not adequately address the needs of the library staff. We recommend a single, large, oval-
shaped conference table that will seat at least 14 people along with appropriate seating.
Estimated cost: $22,000


18
54. Additional seating. We recommend adding 10-15 stackable chairs to the room to
accommodate large meetings, as well as the entire library staff.
Estimated cost: $7,200

55. Add motorized projection screen, ceiling-mounted projector with speakers, and smart
podium with dedicated computer. This optimizes the conference room for instructional use and
presentations.
Estimated cost: $9,850

56. Add rolling dry erase white board.
Estimated cost: $1,500

57. Add wall-mounted telephone, including long cord for phone conferences.
Estimated cost: $200

58. Add credenza with small refrigerator. This will provide counter space along with needed
storage underneath.
Estimated cost: $3,500

59. Miscellaneous (e.g., coat rack, clock).
Estimated cost: $1,000

Library Offices (Rooms 214, 216, 218, 220, 222, 224, 226, 234, 236, 240, 244,
246, 248, 250)

The office furniture and seating in the library are dated, worn, and no longer functionally or
ergonomically adequate. Technological changes over the years have rendered much of this
furniture obsolete, and it is a hindrance to faculty and staff performance. New office furniture
and seating would make the library staff more efficient and effective in their duties, improve
morale and performance, and create a more professional work environment.

60. Replace all office furniture and seating. There are 17 office areas on the 2
nd
floor.
Estimated cost: $96,500

61. Create one continuous hallway in the Electronic and Collection Services area. Currently,
the only way to get to some staff offices is to walk through other staff offices.
Estimated cost: $25,000 (excluding HVAC)

62. Add walls and doors in select areas to create three distinct offices and a workroom for
the staff in the Electronic and Collection Services area. This recommendation would improve
security in this area. It would also eliminate distractions caused by staff walking through other
offices. A dedicated workroom is necessary for processing library materials.
Estimated cost: Included in Item 61.



19
63. Remove the door between Rooms 244 and 246. This is necessary for the security of the
area head’s office.
Estimated cost: Included in Item 61.

64. Reconfigure Interlibrary Loan. (Room 226). Update this space to allow for altered function
and workflow that have changed dramatically in the past decade. We recommend reconfiguring
this area by adding three modular office units for more effective and efficient use of space and
staff.
Estimated cost: $9,500

Media Lab (Rooms 210, 210A)

As it is presently configured, the Media Lab includes a small computer lab and biomedical
models for students. We propose converting this area into a multifunction space that can be used
for instruction and as a media lab to house the library’s extensive collection of biomedical
models.

65. Convert office (210A) into area for biomedical models. We recommend removing the door
to this room and putting in adequate tables and/or shelving to house the model collection.
Estimated cost: Facilities

66. Replace workstations and remove partition wall. The current 12 workstations are not
optimal for this space, and the partition wall no longer serves any purpose. We recommend
changing the orientation of the room to face south and adding lower profile workstations
conducive to student use and instruction.
Estimated cost: $25,750

67. Add motorized projection screen, ceiling-mounted projector with speakers, and smart
podium with dedicated instruction computer. These are essential if we want to be able to use
the Media Lab for instruction, and they optimize the Media Lab for library and vendor
instruction.
Estimated cost: $3,985

68. Remove inner door in Media Lab. This door serves no purpose and removing it would
open the area up.
Estimated cost: Facilities

Public Computer Areas

These areas are primarily for our students with a few computers available to the general public.

69. Update furniture and seating. These areas are close to the Information Desk and library
entrance, and the current furniture is old, worn, and does not match the rest of the furniture in the
area. Updated furniture would allow us to add some laptop work/charging computer stations for
students to access online library resources and provide a more professional, uniform look.
Estimated cost: $28,300

20

Miscellaneous

70. Add glass wall in copier area. Currently, there is a partition screen separating the copier
area from the reading area. A transparent glass wall would effectively minimize the noise of the
copier area while making the area more visible and improving the lighting.
Estimated cost: $3,600

71. Recondition bookshelves. Recondition (add plastic wood-like film covering to) existing
bookshelves to match the color of the library furniture on the 2
nd
floor.
Estimated cost: $8,710

72. Replace Historical Collections display cases. To showcase the historical heritage of the
health sciences and to provide a consistent image for our Historical Collections in the renovated
Health Sciences Library, we propose replacing three display cases that are old, not secure, and
look out of place even today. A fourth display case is new and will be retained; the three cases
will be replaced to match the newer ones on the 2
nd
and 3
rd
floors.
Estimated cost: $20,000

Budget

Item Cost ($)
Library Foyer 6,000
Library Entrance TBD
Information Desk 41,000
Conference Room 45,250
Library Offices 131,000
Media Lab 29,735
Public Computer Areas 28,300
Miscellaneous 32,310
TOTAL 313,595



21
Budget Summary

Item Cost ($)
General Renovations – All Floors 289,661
5
th
Floor 373,600
4
th
Floor 90,200
3
rd
Floor 158,886
2
nd
Floor 313,595
TOTAL 1,225,942


22
Acknowledgments

A significant effort has gone into developing the new, comprehensive renovation plans,
preparing this proposal, and removing items from the 5
th
floor in an incredibly short period of
time. These efforts would not have been possible without a large team effort involving the library,
Facilities, Contract Furniture Alliance, as well as many others on campus. The following
individuals are acknowledged for their efforts in the development of the Library Renovation
Proposal.

Special Thanks

Special thanks are extended to Dr. Ken Brown for his support and encouraging us to develop a
comprehensive Library Renovation Proposal, for placing the plan on the fast track for
completion as quickly as possible, and for motivating us to develop a good plan for funding
consideration; and to Dr. Cheryl Scheid for her encouraging the library space reallocation efforts.

This proposal would not have been possible without the time, energy, and efforts of several
dedicated people. Special thanks are extended to Rick Fought for chairing the Space Reallocation
Committee, serving as project manager, and his untiring work developing plans, furniture
suggestions, design considerations, and optimism; Dr. David Armbruster for organizing the
proposal and serving as a member of the management team; Richard Nollan for his stewardship
of the library’s Historical Collections expansion; Mary Williams for spearheading the removal
and relocation of the print collection; Dee Helton, Teresa Bell, and Lindsey Wells for student
input and support throughout the process; Kari Conrad from the Facilities Services Department
who made excellent suggestions and coordinated the myriad of facility matters; Stephanie
McGee and her colleagues from Contract Furniture Alliance; and last, but not least, the UTHSC
student body for their unflagging support of the Health Sciences Library.

Space Reallocation Committee

David Armbruster Communications/Scientific Editing Health Sciences Library
Teresa Bell Student Government Association College of Pharmacy
Rick Fought (chair) Electronic & Collection Services Health Sciences Library
Gloria Harris Electronic & Collection Services Health Sciences Library
Dee Helton Student Government Association Graduate Health Sciences
Gwen Jackson Access Services Health Sciences Library
Richard Nollan Reference & Outreach Services Health Sciences Library
Deborah Taylor Electronic & Collection Services Health Sciences Library
Lindsey Wells Student Government Association College of Medicine
Mary Williams Electronic & Collection Services Health Sciences Library

Additional Contributors

Additional people have contributed in many ways to the development of the Library Renovation
Proposal, the space plan, the removal of print items from the 5
th
floor and their relocation; and
the other aspects of this project. This is a partial list of additional contributors:

23

Lisa Aitken
Wanda Booker-Wade
Steve Butler
Brenda Clark
Paul Gahn
Brenda F. Green
Gloria Harris
Gwen Jackson
Carolyn Polk
Deborah Taylor
Steve Tom
Rozann Turner
Maggie White
Lin Wu

Summary

In summary, my sincere thanks to all of the above individuals, without whom you would not be
reading this proposal nor would there be an effective plan to renovate the Health Sciences
Library to support the campus. We are all very excited about creating a more modern and useful
Health Sciences Library to meet the needs of our library patrons.

Thomas Singarella, Ph.D.
Professor and Director
Health Sciences Library and Biocommunications Center
University of Tennessee Health Science Center

24
Appendices

25
A. Floor Plans


26
5
th
Floor


27
4
th
Floor






28
3
rd
Floor



29
2
nd
Floor


30
B. Detailed Budget Tables

Abbreviations used in tables:
• ABRP: Alexander Building Renovation Plan
• CE: included in carpet estimate
• CFA: Contract Furniture Alliance
• CP: Campus Police
• F: Facilities
• ITS: Information Technology Services
• TBD: To be determined

General Renovations – All Floors

Item Cost ($)
Infrastructure
1. Replace carpet 160,000
2. Replace window blinds 25,000
3. Painting/Staining ABRP
4. Signage 6,600
5. UTHSC building signage Facilities
6. Wall treatments/décor 5,400
7. Security cameras CP/ITS
8. Trash receptacles 5,000
9. Clean windows ABRP
10. Update restrooms 84,661
11. Miscellaneous 3,000
TOTAL 289,661




31
Fifth Floor

Item Cost ($)
Student Learning, Study, and Information Commons
12. Remove print materials and shelving 10,000
13. Student break room 8,700
14. Café-style area 58,000
15. Group-study area 175,000
16. Casual seating areas 37,000
17. Charging station 8,500
18. Glass walls 14,000
19. Casual seating/reception area 16,000
20. Replace study carrel seating and provide white boards 24,400
Health Sciences Historical Collections Expansion
21. Expand Historical Collections space 22,000
22. Replace carpet with ceramic tile CE
23. Dedicated climate control system TBD
TOTAL 373,600

Fourth Floor

Item Cost ($)
Individual-study Areas
24. Individual study pods (39) 84,500
25. Replace study carrel seating (19) 5,700
Historical Collections Workrooms
26. Workrooms TBD
TOTAL 90,200




32
Third Floor

Item Cost ($)
Student Study Rooms
27. Repurpose rooms 318, 342, and 344 for student use 4,500
28. Replace all seating 26,200
29. Replace and supplement existing 32” flat-screen
monitors with 55” flat-screen monitors with VGA and
HDMI cables


29,386
30. Replace all dry erasable white boards and marker
containers

6,200
Student Break Room
31. Replace carpet with ceramic tile CE
32. Add credenza with space for small refrigerator 3,500
33. Replace tables and chairs 1,200
34. Install sink with a garbage disposal TBD
Staff Break Room
35. Replace carpet with ceramic tile CE
36. Replace tables and chairs 10,200
37. Replace kitchen cabinets, counters, and sink 6,000
38. Add a wall-mounted, flat-screen TV and wall-mounted
telephone for staff use

1,500
39. Add card-swipe access CP/ITS
40. Remove bookcases Facilities
Library Offices
41. Replace all office furniture and seating 61,000
42. Table and seating in room 308 5,500
43. Lockable storage cabinet in room 308 500
Miscellaneous
44. Replace mailboxes and furniture in mailroom 3,200
45. Replace carpet with ceramic tile in hallway outside of
break rooms and restrooms

CE
TOTAL 158,886




33
Second Floor

Item Cost ($)
Library Foyer
46. Renovate library foyer 6,000
Library Entrance
47. Renovate library entrance TBD
Information Desk
48. Install single, multipurpose, redesigned Information Desk
that will incorporate the services of the current
Circulation and Reference desks


26,000
49. Add consultation stations 11,000
50. Move door alarm button, security gates interface, door
buzzer, and any other necessary switches and/or buttons
to the new Information Desk


F/ITS/CP
51. Add a panic button at the Information Desk CP
52. Add electronic signage at the Information Desk 4,000
Conference Room
53. Replace conference table and seating 22,000
54. Additional seating 7,200
55. Add motorized projection screen, ceiling-mounted
projector with speakers, and smart podium with dedicated
computer


9,850
56. Add rolling dry erase white board 1,500
57. Add wall-mounted telephone, including long cord for
phone conferences

200
58. Add credenza with small refrigerator 3,500
59. Miscellaneous (e.g., coat rack, clock) 1,000
Library Offices
60. Replace all office furniture and seating 96,500
61. Create one continuous hallway in the Electronic and
Collection Services area

25,000
62. Add walls and doors in select areas to create three
distinct offices and a workroom for the staff in the
Electronic and Collection Services area


Included in 61
63. Remove the door between Rooms 244 and 246 Included in 61
64. Reconfigure Interlibrary Loan 9,500
Media Lab
65. Convert office (210A) into area for biomedical models Facilities
66. Replace workstations and remove partition wall 25,750
67. Add motorized projection screen, ceiling-mounted
projector with speakers, and smart podium with dedicated
instruction computer


3,985
68. Remove inner door in Media Lab Facilities
Public Computer Areas
69. Update furniture and seating 28,300

34
Miscellaneous
70. Add glass wall in copier area 3,600
71. Recondition bookshelves 8,710
72. Replace Historical Collections display cases 20,000
TOTAL 313,595



35
C. Visuals

1. Current library entrance
2. Current Information and Circulation desks
3. Representation of modern information desk
4. Current offices and furniture
5. Representation of modern office furniture
6. Current 5
th
floor furniture
7. Representation of reception area furniture
8. Samples of furniture from CFA
9. Furniture and fabric information
10. CFA information



36
Current Library Entrance




37
Current Information Desk




38
Current Circulation Desk




39
Representation of Modern Information Desk




40
Representation of Modern Information Desk



41
Current Offices and Furniture




42
Current Offices and Furniture




43
Current Offices and Furniture





44
Representation of Modern Office Furniture
(UT Pharmacy)



45
Representation of Modern Office Furniture
(UT Pharmacy)



46
Current 5
th
Floor Furniture



47
Representation of Reception Area Furniture



48
Samples of Furniture from CFA


!"#$ &'(() !"#$ '"*)+, #(- &'(()& "./ *(('0&
&'-"120' *(('0&
3,&0"4+ *(('0&
540('(& "-+ -+4-+&+.'"'1(.") "./ 6"7 .(' -+#)+!'
"!'3") #1.1&0+&8 #"*-1!&8 (- (4'1(.&

49
Samples of Furniture from CFA



!"#$%& (")*
!"#$%& +,*-.
"//"0*$1+"))&& /*2!&
34,"/"( *.& .&4.&(&$/*/-"$*! *$5 0*6 $"/ .&)!&+/
*+/#*! )-$-(,&(7 )*2.-+(7 ". "4/-"$(

50
Samples of Furniture from CFA


!"#$ &'(")
*+',!,# ")- )-+)-#-.!"!(,."/ ".0 1"2 .,! )-3/-&!
"&!4"/ 3(.(#'-#5 3"6)(&#5 ,) ,+!(,.#
&'")7(.7 #!"!(,. ".0 8,)$#!"!(,. +),04&!#9
)-.0-)(.7 ,3 8,)$#!"!(,.#
&'")7(.7 #!"!(,. +/".

51
Samples of Furniture from CFA


!""#$%& ()* $%+($,-#$)%
+./"!-#$. )0 -.#1-2 !""#$%& ()*+ 0), 1#/+. 2$3,-,4

52
Samples of Furniture from CFA


!"#$% '($ )*!')+,")(*
!-./0,")- (1 ,-"#,2 !"#$% '($! 1(+ #".!- 2)3+,+%

53
Furniture and Fabric Information


!"#$ &'(")* #+,&(-(!. -(/'!(0/* "01 !"2-, !3+ +34,) 53) #!61.
+31#
7+'3!3# "), ),+),#,0!"!(30"- "01 8". 03! ),5-,&!
"&!6"- 5(0(#',#* 5"2)(&#* 3) 3+!(30#

54
Furniture and Fabric Information





WhaL do we mean by 8enewable? Slmple, really. All 1ransformaLlons producLs can be Laken aparL and all
fabrlcs can be removed. And, Lhanks Lo our unlque 1ransformaLlons paLenLs, all of Lhls can be done easlly,
ln Lhe fleld (so Lhere ls no downLlme) and, wlLhouL Lools!

1he reason for all Lhls ls Lo allow your faclllLy Lo look good all Lhe Llme. 8ecause of 1ransformaLlons' ablllLy Lo
lasL a very long Llme, our producLs are also very frlendly Lo Lhe envlronmenL.

WheLher you choose 1ransformaLlons because of greaL deslgn, producL longevlLy, or dollars-and-cenLs, lL all
makes sense.
!" $%&' (&''&)*+

55
Furniture and Fabric Information




56
Furniture and Fabric Information









57
Furniture and Fabric Information




!"#$%&'()%* ,#-)'&#-.
AL lnLerlor ConcepLs our educaLlonal furnlLure can efflclenLly flll a wlde array of educaLlonal envlronmenLs. Cur
furnlLure soluLlons lnclude compuLer lab furnlLure, Lables, Lechnology educaLlon and admlnlsLraLlve offlce
furnlLure, and everyLhlng ln beLween. AL lnLerlor ConcepLs, we know you are asked Lo do more and beLLer wlLh
less and fewer. ls lL even posslble? lL's no small feaL [uggllng budgeL, faclllLy, and learnlng needs. We can help
you maxlmlze your resources wheLher you are renovaLlng an exlsLlng bulldlng or worklng on a new
consLrucLlon pro[ecL. lloor space ls expenslve, so we manufacLure our furnlLure Lo cusLom flL your space and
appllcaLlon requlremenLs. Cur ablllLy Lo maxlmlze space ls an lnLegral parL of maklng educaLlonal faclllLles
more efflclenL. Lspeclally slnce now more Lhan ever educaLlonal envlronmenLs are mulLl-purpose spaces LhaL
are used by sLudenLs, sLaff, and Lhe communlLy. We're here Lo help. ConLacL us, and our deslgn speclallsLs can
help you deslgn furnlLure Lo accommodaLe all of your needs.

/0%1. 2'-. 3%)%4.5.)& 671&.5
Allow l1 Lo updaLe and change hardware 30° fasLer.
Many LradlLlonal furnlLure sysLems use a base panel raceway and elecLrlcal sysLem where wlre and daLa
cabllng ls run Lhrough narrow panel raceways along Lhe boLLom of Lhe furnlLure. WlLh our sysLem, wlres and
cables sLore neaLly behlnd slldlng doors, keeplng Lhem easlly accesslble, and floors cluLLer-free. uellverlng up
Lo 80 Llmes more cabllng capaclLy Lhan convenLlonal panel raceways and cuLLlng lnsLallaLlon Llme by 23-30°
and reduclng cabllng conLracLor cosLs by up Lo 40°.



58
Furniture and Fabric Information





1eknlon ls a leadlng lnLernaLlonal deslgner, manufacLurer and markeLer of mld- Lo hlgh-end offlce sysLems and
relaLed furnlLure producLs. Cur lnLegraLed producL porLfollo encompasses several llnes of sysLems furnlLure,
moblle furnlLure, archlLecLural wall sysLems, seaLlng, sLorage and flllng, freesLandlng casegoods and
accessorles.


!"# %&'()*)+&,
1eknlon embraces change and lLs lnherenL posslblllLles. Cur culLure ls one of lnnovaLlon. A dlverse, yeL
lnLegraLed producL llne allows companles Lo adapL Lo new forms of work as Lhey unfold. 1eknlon producLs
perform lndependenLly and ln concerL, comblnlng ln vlrLually unllmlLed conflguraLlons LhaL flL new needs as
Lhe world's economles and culLures evolve. AL 1eknlon, we seek Lo reallze Lhe power of deslgn Lo enhance our
ablllLy Lo lnLeracL wlLh one anoLher and our world. 1eknlon creaLes furnlLure LhaL connecLs people, Lechnology
and spaces. lnLegraLed deslgn wlLh unllmlLed



!"#$%&$ (%)%*"+ (%,"*%)" -.//.$*0

59
Furniture and Fabric Information





?our chalr, your way. vlsco elasLlc foam, lndlvldual conLrols, and LoLal flexlblllLy. 1ake a rlde.
• We provlde LradlLlonal, LranslLlonal and conLemporary seaLlng producLs. Cur offerlng ls deslgned Lo
lnclude mulLlple opLlons and a varleLy of funcLlons, all wlLhln a mld-markeL prlce polnL.
• SLandard feaLures on our producLs are ofLen offered aL an upcharge by oLher manufacLurers. 1hls
lncludes balllsLlc nylon on backs, ÞvC arms, and vlsco elasLlc memory foam. CusLomlzed feaLures are also
avallable
• Cur exLenslve LexLlle offerlng ls complemenLed by a hlghly CCM-frlendly speclflcaLlon process.
We dellver whaL you need, all day every day.

!"##"$%&
8elax. We've goL you covered. Arm resLs, backs, LexLlles, casLers - and everyLhlng ln beLween.
• We'll proudly sLand behlnd our ouLsLandlng workmanshlp and maLerlals.
• LlfeLlme warranLy on all sLrucLural componenLs proves LhaL SlLCnlL chalrs are bullL Lo Lhe LoughesL
sLandards of lasLlng durablllLy.
• llve-year warranLy on all foam and fabrlc promlses conLlnuous comforL and Llmeless good looks.





60
Furniture and Fabric Information


CrypLon Super labrlcs

!"#$"%& !()#$"%& *(+,"- ."#)/$#&

0(12$+-3 ls englneered Lo be Lhe mosL advanced, envlronmenLally frlendly performance LexLlle soluLlon ln Lhe
world. lL ls molsLure, sLaln, odor, and bacLerla reslsLanL.

4+5 %+"# 6$ 5+(78
unllke applled coaLlngs, Loplcal LreaLmenLs, or lamlnaLes, CrypLon's paLenLed process ls englneered rlghL lnLo
Lhe fabrlc, encapsulaLlng every flber. 1hls prevenLs molsLure, bacLerla, and sLalns from ever enLerlng lnLo
flbers and also allows forelgn subsLances Lo be easlly removed from beLween Lhe flbers' pores. 8ecause lL ls
lmpervlous, fabrlc keeps spllls rlghL on Lhe surface where Lhey can slmply be wlped away. 1he resulL ls a
fabrlc LhaL reLalns lLs orlglnal appearance.


9:+ )#"# 0(12$+- ;)2"( <=>(6?#8
Ma[or lnLernaLlonal corporaLlons such as @=((6+$$A 46/$+-A 0=(-6,=/ 0()6#" B6-" and @?C+-=/%D# uLlllze over 80
mllllon yards of CrypLon LreaLed fabrlcs. 1hey prefer Lhe reLurn on lnvesLmenL Lhey can flnd only wlLh a
CrypLon producL.

E+ #26//#& E+ #$=6-#& E+ #)(2(6#"#& E+$:6-F ?=- 2"-"$(=$" 0(12$+-&



61
CFA Information







West Tennessee Office
777 Alloy Drive
Newbern, TN 38059


Account Manager: Stephanie McGee: (901) 598-9971
Located in Collierville, TN

Territory Manager: Leah Orr: (731) 882-8258

Project Manager: Jessi McDivitt: (731) 676-0040
Office: (731) 627-9600
Fax: (731) 627-2747


Corporate Office
1114 Stones River Court
LaVergne, TN 37086
Office: (615) 793-7927
Fax: (615) 793-7964
Toll Free: (866) 743-9804
Toll Free Fax: (888)884-9804



62
CFA Information





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D76 L)%M4(&&* #2@?<' ?3%F*#8' 8%82& %4*3 GI- @(&&(%) '()#* +,,-

63
D. Consultant’s Report on the Historical Collections

"#$%&'($)* +, -&##&((&& .&/$012 3&#)&'
45&0$12 3+22&0)$+#( 6((&((7&#) 8&5+')9 #+: ;

This iepoit is the iesult of an on-site visit maue on 0ctobei S1, 2u11. It is a follow up to an
eailiei on-site assessment I peifoimeu in August of 2uuS. It was piompteu by a iequest
fiom Richaiu Nollan, Associate Piofessoi anu Special Collections Cooiuinatoi, anu Tom
Singaiella, Biiectoi, to "make iecommenuations on how the collection might be centializeu
anu the space expanueu, anu the stoiage anu woik enviionment impioveu." The
availability of some enuowment funus to suppoit such an enueavoi will allow the libiaiy to
puisue these lauuable goals.

Since a uetaileu assessment of histoiical mateiials was maue in 2uuS, a ievisiting of the
collections themselves is not necessaiy since it uoes not appeai to have changeu
significantly ovei the inteivening yeais. (Please see the fiist iepoit foi uetails.) That saiu,
conceins that weie noteu in the oiiginal iepoit iemain:

• Space is still pioblematic as mateiials aie scatteieu in six uiffeient locations.
• This gives iise to secuiity conceins.
• Climate contiol issues also iaise pieseivation conceins.
• Nost items aie not catalogeu anu theiefoie "hiuuen" fiom access anu view.
• Theie iemains a neeu to builu a cleai campus constituency foi these mateiials.

I must ieiteiate my eailiei assessment that uespite these issues noteu above, Richaiu
Nollan has uemonstiateu excellent stewaiuship ovei these valuable mateiials. 0ngoing
aieas of neeu aie a natuial iesult constiaineu iesouices in money, space, anu staffing. Ni.
Nollan is to be commenueu foi what he has been able to accomplish given these foimiuable
challenges. Bi. Singaiella is also to be commenueu foi iecognizing the significance of these
histoiical mateiials anu his willingness to puisue a piogiam of uevelopment that will help
secuie theii futuie value as a iesouice foi the univeisity anu the ieseaich community.

Aftei viewing the stoiage aieas anu consulting with Ni. Nollan anu Bi. Singaiella, the
iecommenuations of this iepoit aie as follows:

1. As much as possible, biing all histoiical items togethei in one space.
2. Auuiess secuiity issues.
S. Auuiess pieseivation issues.
4. uet the mateiials catalogeu.
S. Cieate a histoiical collection space that can be useu in a multi-puipose enviionment
that facilitates ieseaich as well as establishes a space that can help builu an on-
campus constituency foi it.

64
6. The enuowment shoulu be useu to auuiess the above issues anu, in tuin, help iaise
awaieness anu iesolve at the univeisity auministiative level to suppoit Special
Collections on campus foi the long teim.

I will auuiess each of the above iecommenuations in oiuei.

Fiist, expanu the piesent histoiical collection space on the S
th
flooi by extenuing the
piesent ioom Su7 uown to the next suppoit pillai anu enclosing with walls anu giving
appiopiiate uooiway access (secuiable with ueaubolt locks). See gieen lines maikeu on
flooi plan attacheu.

Seconu, move 4
th
flooi mateiials into the expanueu aiea to biing all histoiical collections
togethei as much as possible.

Secuiity woulu be enhanceu by mounting closeu-ciicuit cameias at least in ieauing ioom
anu public use aieas. The aiea shoulu aie equippeu a motion uetectoi alaims wiieu into
campus secuiity that can be aimeu uuiing the houis it is unoccupieu oi closeu. Whethei
the existing wall sepaiating ioom Su7 fiom the newly expanueu histoiical collection aiea
neeus to be ietaineu shoulu be consiueieu, but theie seems to be goou ieasons foi its
iemoval to help cieate a moie continuous stack aiea foi the collection.

Thiiu, some basic pieseivation can take place in ioom Su8. Bowevei, it is sometimes
necessaiy to glue, paste oi use othei mateiials in the pieseivation piocess that iequiieu a
sink foi cleaning biushes anu hanus. Since the expense of auueu plumbing is a concein, I
suggest utilizing ioom S12 foi a "wet pieseivation" ioom wheie mateiials can be taken to
be woikeu on as uesciibeu above. Locateu next to the women's lavatoiy, this plumbing tie-
in shoulu be accomplisheu at minimal cost, plus it keeps pipes anu the sink sepaiate fiom
the iemaining collections in iooms Su8 anu Su7.

Climate contiol in the histoiical collection aiea shoulu be monitoieu anu kept consistent.
The Noitheast Bocument Conseivation Centei:
<http://www.nedcc.org/resources/leaflets/2The_Environment/01BasicGuidelines.php>
iecommenus the following:


Authorities disagree on the ideal temperature and relative humidity for library and
archival materials. A frequent recommendation is a stable temperature no higher than
70°F and a stable relative humidity between a minimum of 30% and a maximum of 50%.
Research indicates that relative humidities at the lower end of this range are preferable
since deterioration then progresses at a slower rate. In general, the lower the temperature
the better.

Fouith, these mateiials shoulu be catalogeu using cuiient uesciiptive cataloging iules.
TBIS u0AL IS CR0CIAL: ITENS N0ST BE IBENTIFIEB ANB INC0RP0RATEB INT0 TBE
0PAC F0R ACCESS ANB BIBLI0uRAPBIC C0NTR0L. 0NLESS TBIS IS B0NE TBESE "uENS"
RENAIN B0RIEB ANB ESSENTIALLY INvISIBLE T0 TBE W0RLB. The option of simply

65
cieating an accessions list in an Access uatabase is not iecommenueu. While quickei anu
cheapei, the benefits gaineu in ielation to the time spent is not an acceptable tiaue off. In
the enu, these mateiials woulu iemain hiuuen to the ieseaich community anu is not in
keeping with best piactices of bibliogiaphic contiol.

valeiie uoiuon, heau of cataloging at Listei Bill Libiaiy of the Bealth Sciences, was veiy
helpful in suggesting goou iesouices in ueveloping an effective cataloging pioject. An
excellent aiticle gives "six lessons" in "Bigging into 0ui 'Biuuen Collections': Naximizing
Staff Skills anu Technology to Enhance Access to Special Collections." Also the 0niveisity of
Illinois at 0ibana-Champaign has a ieauy-iefeience guiue: see Quick & Clean Cataloging
Pioject. Aftei consulting with valeiie, we believe this woulu be ioughly a one-yeai pioject
assuming a collection size of appioximately 1,Suu titles. An estimate of 4Su titles pei
quaitei (S7.S title pei week is an ambitious high enu iange).

Baving saiu that, you will note that "Lesson Five" in the "Bigging into 0ui 'Biuuen
Collections'" aiticle states, "Nainstieam, stieamline, expeuite, exploit. At 0C Bavis, Special
Collections cataloging is 'mainstieameu' within a compiehensive cataloging uepaitment
anu is shaieu among catalogeis of vaiious job classifications. While catalogeis iespect
Special Collections, paiticulaily iaie books, they uo not feai them." This is oui expeiience
at Listei Bill Libiaiy as well. Such a uistiibution of laboi woulu, of couise, gieatly expeuite
the pioject anu ieuuce costs.

Some qualifications to look foi in a one-yeai, pioject-baseu catalogei aie the following:
Requiieu
• An NLS fiom an ALA-accieuiteu piogiam
• Familiaiity with AACR2
• Familiaiity with NARC21
• Familiaiity with 0CLC cataloging utilities

Piefeiieu
• Familiaiity with NLN¡NESB
• Expeiience woiking with integiateu libiaiy systems (Innovative Inteifaces
piefeiieu)
• Some woiking knowleuge of BCRN(B)÷Besciiptive Cataloging of Raie
Nonogiaphs (Books)
• Bacheloi uegiee with a majoi in histoiy

Fifth, cieate a histoiical collections space that has multipuipose capacity by iemoving
existing shelving anu paitially enclosing the aiea. This is maikeu by the gieen lines on the
attacheu flooi plan. Beie accoiuion enclosuies (see gieen uasheu lines) coulu be installeu
on two siues of this extenueu aiea. The aiea itself woulu be stockeu with histoiical but low
secuiity iisk items to be ueteimineu by the Special Collections Cooiuinatoi. Somewhat
highei-enu book cases with a moie elegant iathei than utilitaiian look coulu be installeu to
make the aiea moie inviting. Also some mouest but attiactive uisplay cases coulu be placeu
in the aiea to keep it inteiesting anu inviting to stuuents. Buiing noimal opeiating houis

66
this aiea coulu simply seive as a stuuent stuuy anu lounge aiea. Comfoitable seating with
wifi access coulu be pioviueu. Bowevei, the special value of this multipuipose aiea is that
the accoiuion walls coulu be pulleu out to enclose the aiea foi a special event÷a histoiical
lectuie, a histoiy society meeting, an event honoiing a faculty membei, etc. Iueally, this
space coulu be useu to help cieate a constituent society on campus that woulu highlight
these histoiical collections, uiscuss them, anu geneially iaise awaieness foi meuical
humanities on campus. The Special Collections Cooiuinatoi coulu help iuentify inteiesteu
paities anu key stakeholueis in such an oiganization. The conveitible, multipuipose aiea
shoulu be equippeu with a smait pouium (one with full computei capability, BvB, Inteinet,
anu PPT). The aiea shoulu have access to an LCB piojectoi, a ietiactable ceiling scieen, anu
full auuio capabilities.

Sixth, once completeu peihaps a one-time ueuication event coulu be scheuuleu with a
faculty membei with histoiical inteiests to uiscuss the value anu impoitance of the newly
enuoweu anu equippeu aiea. This shoulu be a high-piofile event by special invitation,
incluuing key univeisity auministiation, stuuent leaueis, anu select faculty. 0niveisity
Neuia shoulu be able to help piomote as well. The iuea is to get this on the auministiative
iauai in a positive way.

0thei comments:

Lighting
Lighting in the histoiical collections aiea shoulu be inuiiect oi fitteu with 0v sleeves (e.g.
http:¡¡www.uvpiocess.com¡piouuct.asp.coue=FILTER+++I).

Winuows
All winuows shoulu be shaueu. In aieas wheie books may come in contact with uiiect
sunlight, special 0v filteiing shaues shoulu be puichaseu. If books not come in uiiect
contact with sunlight oiuinaiy shaues shoulu suffice. Baseu upon my obseivation uuiing
my site visit, I uo not believe uiiect sunlight places any mateiials in potential shelving aieas
at iisk.

Flooiing
Although many libiaiy floois aie caipeteu, caipets aie not iueal foi histoiical collections.
They attiact anu holu moistuie, uust, uust mites, etc. 0ptimally, anu if funus will allow, a
conciete flooi tieateu with SSuSS Special Epoxy Flooi Coating as pei Nation Aichives anu
Recoius Auministiation (NARA) specs oi tile flooi is piefeiable.

Conclusion
Implementation of the six iecommenuations above will establish an impoitant founuation
upon which to builu histoiical collections that can suppoit meuical humanities in geneial
anu specifically cieate a well oiganizeu anu coheient iepositoiy in which to pieseive the
iich tiauitions of meuicine anu healthcaie. Special collections may then seive an
ambassauoiial function in highlighting anu piomoting the uisciplines foi the colleges
compiising the 0niveisity of Tennessee Bealth Science Centei. It is hopeu that such a
founuation will ultimately leau to the foimal establishment of a Bistoiical Collections unit

67
with some peimanent full-time staffing. Ciitical in this uevelopment will be the cieation of
a coie constituency on campus thiough a histoiy club, society, oi similai oiganization that
can utilize anu piomote the collections thiough iegulai meetings. This cuiient pioject,
theiefoie, iepiesents a ciitical fiist-step towaius a moie lasting anu peimanent futuie foi
0TBSC's past.
Sinceiely,

Nichael A. Flanneiy, NA, NLS
Piofessoi anu Associate Biiectoi foi Bistoiical Collections
Listei Bill Libiaiy of the Bealth Sciences
0niveisity of Alabama at Biimingham


68
E. Current Circulation and Reference Desk Responsibilities

The Circulation Desk currently operates with one full-time faculty supervisor and eight full-time
staff who are responsible for the library’s 96 open hours over 7 days each week. Responsibilities
include

• Opening and closing the library
• Completing the open procedures log sheet
• Signing off on petty cash housed in locked drawer/record in log book
• Circulating materials (check in and check out of books, journals, and computer
equipment)
• Operating multiline telephones
• Collecting fines, issuing receipts, and communicating with library administration when
collected
• Registering appropriate individuals in Millenium (the library online system)
• Preparing daily newspapers for the reading area
• Changing date due stamps
• Filling printer paper trays
• Assisting library users with photocopiers
• Maintaining office equipment (suggestion box, staplers, tape dispenser, and hole punch)
• Maintaining the permanent reserves (for use in the library only)
• Maintaining a key box of library keys
• Regulating access to the library (wall-mounted button), including scanning of non-UT
customer IDs and maintaining photo notebook for security purposes
• Distributing interlibrary loans and collecting fees
• Maintaining a lost and found area
• Providing exit clearance control for faculty, staff, and students leaving the university
• Assisting in training new hires
• Maintaining study carrel assignments
The Reference and Outreach area is staffed 45 hours each week and includes two faculty
librarians and one staff member, although all professional librarians (and some staff) work at the
Reference Desk throughout the week. Functions currently include

• Giving directions to areas of the library
• Providing basic help on equipment to Media Lab users (basic operation of scanners,
restarting computers, saving to flash drives)
• Providing general technical help to users (opening MS Office programs, emailing PDFs,
and printing)
• Instructing users on using public computers (creating guest user accounts and navigating
to library’s home page)
• Providing ready access to library resources (how to use the catalog/e-journals list, how to
request interlibrary loans, what resources the library has, how to access them, and how to
use effectively)

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• Using Millenium to verify citations in PubMed and to process interlibrary loans
• Maintaining telephone, email, and social media for communication with the wider
community
• Providing expert database searches

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