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Volume 126 Issue 70 kansan.

com Monday, February 3, 2014


UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
All contents, unless stated otherwise, 2014 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 11
CROSSWORD 5
CRYPTOQUIPS 5
OPINION 4
SPORTS 12
SUDOKU 5
Cloudy. Winds SE at 5
to 10 mph. 50 percent
of snow at night.
Its Black History Month.
Index Dont
Forget
Todays
Weather
Im Jay and I like warm hugs.
HI: 38
LO: 24
BASKETBALL
PAGE 12 Kansas loses rst conference game
CAMPUS
CASSIDY RITTER
news@kansan.com
FILE PHOTO/KANSAN
These lots located on the west side of Lewis and Hashinger halls will be closed beginning March 16 for the construction of two new dorms that will replace McCollum Hall on Daisy Hill.
With two new dorms being
built on Daisy Hill this spring,
students can expect difcul-
ty fnding a parking spot. On
April 18, Daisy Hill will under-
go construction. For staf and
students, this means parking
lots 102 and 103 will be closed
beginning March 16. Tese lots
are located on the west side of
Lewis and Hashinger halls.
Student Housing encourages
students living on Daisy Hill
to leave their cars at home af-
ter spring break. If that is not
an option, they suggest looking
into other parking permit op-
tions.
Diana Robertson, director of
Student Housing, said the two
dorms will undergo construc-
tion at the same time along
with the construction of an ad-
joining commons building.
Te frst sign of construction
began on Jan. 22 with core drill-
ing in parking lots 102 and 103.
Student Housing said these
drilling samples allowed archi-
tects and engineers to set the
depth of footing for the build-
ings.
Te new dorms will each be
in an L shape with the com-
mons building connecting the
two dorms. Engel Road, cur-
rently in the front of Lewis and
Hashinger halls, will be moved
to wrap around the west side of
the new dorms. Te current
Engel Road and the two park-
ing lots to the west of Lewis and
Hashinger halls will become a
grassy quad area.
We had a consultant that
we hired in the spring of 11
when the study was conducted
to help us analyze the current
conditions of McCollum Hall,
whether to renovate or build
new, Robertson said.
Constructing new would be
less expensive than renovating
McCollum Hall, Robertson
said. She also added that the
consultants spoke to students,
and they decided to build two
new dorms instead of one be-
cause students want smaller liv-
ing environments to give them
a better sense of community
within their dorms.
Te two dorms, costing $47.8
million, are expected to be done
July 2015. Afer the dorms are
built, McCollum Hall will be
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
This map shows future designs of the two L-shaped dorms that will replace McCollum Hall on Daisy Hill.
STATE
Bill provides convenience, challenges locally owned liquor stores
TOM DEHART
news@kansan.com
A bill that was recently intro-
duced into the Kansas legisla-
ture may give grocery stores
the ability to sell wine, spirits
and other alcoholic beverages
beyond just 3.2 percent beer.
Te bill was introduced on
Jan. 29, and was sponsored by
Uncork Kansas, a movement
that wants to allow Kansans
the opportunity to buy their
groceries and liquor all in one
place, instead of making sep-
arate trips to both locations.
According to the movements
website, Uncork Kansas in-
tends to promote convenience
for consumers and to also
provide a boost to the Kansas
economy. Similar legislation
was also recently adopted in
the state of Tennessee that
will allow them to incorporate
wine in grocery stores.
According to Uncork Kansas
website, lifing government
restrictions on retail liquor
sales will attract new business
and stimulate free enterprise
and competition. It will also
stop money going to border
states and will cut back on
extraneous government regu-
lations.
Aside from providing con-
venience and stimulating the
economy, Tara Jo Brown, the
Store Director of the Hy-Vee
located at 3504 Clinton Park-
way said it will also enhance
the grocery shopping expe-
rience for those who want to
pair their foods with their al-
cohol.
Its nice for us as well because
Hy-Vee is pretty big into culi-
nary experience and a portion
of that has to do with the al-
cohol and beverage industry,
Brown said. He also said that
the bill would provide a signif-
icant level of convenience for
grocery shoppers.
Te bill would prevent new
liquor licenses from being pur-
chased between the summer of
2015 to the summer of 2024.
During that time, however, it
would also allow grocery re-
tailers like Brown to attempt
to buy a liquor license from an
independently owned liquor
store. More loosely restricted
licenses will be available to
purchase from the state Alco-
hol Beverage Control division
for grocery stores to gradual-
ly incorporate beer, wine and
spirits into retailers grocery
store locations up until July
2024.
Jason Schmidtberger, the
SEE BILL PAGE 7
SEE HOUSING PAGE 2
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sen. Bill Ketron, R-Murfreesboro, discusses his bill to allow supermarket wine sales in Tennessee on Thursday,
Jan 30. A similiar bill has been proposed in Kansas that will allow wine and liquor sales inside supermarkets.
Construction of two new dorms begins on Daisy Hill
In April, the 2014 student
elections will be held and
students should be expecting
things to be a little diferent
than in the past. New amend-
ments were added to the elec-
tions code during this last
school year, bringing about a
few changes.
Student Body President Mar-
cus Tetwiler has announced
Ad Astras plan for the upcom-
ing election.
Ad Astra will not be run-
ning. We said from the be-
ginning that the last thing we
wanted was Ad Astra to be-
come KUnited, Tetwiler said.
So we wont be participating
in the election, we have no
skin in the game, and the name
will not be used.
Jessie Pringle, a former mem-
ber of the KUnited coalition,
has also declared that KUnit-
ed will not be running in this
years election.
KUnited is no longer a func-
tioning coalition on campus,
Pringle said. Tere will be no
party that is afliated with the
name or the ideals of KUnit-
ed.
One big change that will be
put into efect this election
season is the addition of cau-
cuses. For those who dont
know, a caucus is the gathering
of members of a party in which
they choose the candidate that
they wish to nominate for the
election. Students can create
a coalition or they can caucus
for any additional coalitions
that come forward.
Te Ad Astra coalition cam-
p a i g n e d
that they
were going
to abolish
coalitions.
When they
c o u l d n t
get a two-
thirds vote
in the Stu-
dent Senate, the caucuses were
added into the elections.
It is going to be a completely
transparent process, Tetwiler
said.
Also in the new elections
code, the Elections Committee
will hold informational meet-
ings so that any student who is
interested can come and fnd
out what the elections are all
about and how they can get
involved. Once the Union f-
nalizes the rooms, the dates for
these will be released.
Tetwiler said that these new
changes give any student the
opportunity to participate and
be a part of student govern-
ment.
I urge as many students
that are interested in doing it
to stick their foot in the race
and to play the game, Tetwiler
said.
A kill switch was also writ-
ten into the new elections
code. If the Elections Commit-
tee sees a need to amend any-
thing new that was written in,
they have the power to do so.
We think we have a quality
product at the end but there
are a few things that as we
change, we kind of forgot that
something that we had passed
earlier would be afected by
this new change, Executive
Chief of Staf Tyler Childress
said.
Minor changes that were
also added include things like
when, where and how students
can chalk on campus to pro-
mote their collations or cau-
cus.
We had limited chalking to
just right before the election
but the caucusing happens
outside of that timeframe with
chalking, Childress said. So
the Elections Commission
came forward with the full
senate and wanted to allow
48 hours of chalking before a
caucus event but it can only be
about the caucus. Tat passed,
so that was something that was
added.
For any more information
about these changes or how
to get involved with Student
Senate, feel free to stop by the
Student Senate ofces in the
Kansas Union or email sen-
ate@ku.edu.
Edited by Callan Reilly
NEWS MANAGEMENT
Editor-in-chief
Katie Kutsko
Managing editor production
Allison Kohn
Managing editor digital media
Lauren Armendariz
Associate production editor
Madison Schultz
Associate digital media editor
Will Webber
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT
Advertising director
Sean Powers
Sales manager
Kolby Botts
Digital media and sales manager
Mollie Pointer
NEWS SECTION EDITORS
News editor
Emma LeGault
Associate news editor
Duncan McHenry
Sports editor
Blake Schuster
Associate sports editor
Ben Felderstein
Entertainment editor
Christine Stanwood
Special sections editor
Dani Brady
Head copy chief
Tara Bryant
Copy chiefs
Casey Hutchins
Hayley Jozwiak
Paige Lytle
Design chiefs
Cole Anneberg
Trey Conrad
Designers
Ali Self
Clayton Rohlman
Hayden Parks
Opinion editor
Anna Wenner
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Associate photo editor
Michael Strickland
ADVISERS
Media director and
content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2014 PAGE 2
CONTACT US
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Advertising: (785) 864-4358
Twitter: @KansanNews
Facebook: facebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the
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Additional copies of The Kansan
are 50 cents. Subscriptions can
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Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside
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The University Daily Kansan (ISSN
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Check out KUJH-TV on Wow! of
Kansas Channel 31 in Lawrence for
more on what youve read in todays
Kansan and other news. Also see
KUJHs website at tv.ku.edu.
KJHK is the student voice in radio.
Whether its rock n roll or reggae,
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2000 Dole Human Development Center
1000 Sunnyside Avenue
Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
Jay?
Whats the
weather.com
WEDNESDAY
HI: 15
LO: -3
Cloudy. Highs in the
mid teens and lows
-1 to -5F.
Beware the
frozen heart.
TUESDAY
HI: 27
LO: 13
Winds NE at 10 to 20
mph. 4 to 6 inches of
snow expected.
Do you want to
build a snowman?
THURSDAY
HI: 13
LO: 1
Mostly Cloudy.
The cold never
bothered me anyway.
What: Scholarships Info Session
When: 4 to 5 p.m.
Where: Nunemaker Center
About: Information about Rhodes,
Marshall, Mitchell, Churchill and
Gates-Cambridge scholarships.
What: Making the Delivery: An
Evening with Shannon Brown
When: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Where: Dole Institute of Politics
About: Shannon Brown is the senior
vice president and Chief HR and
Diversity Ofcer for FedEx Express.
He will speak about his career and
volunteer experiences.
Calendar
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
What: Study Abroad Fair
When: 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union
About: Information about various
study abroad programs.
What: Conversation with Literary
Agent Anneli Hoier
When: 12 to 1 p.m.
Where: Nunemaker Center, Brosseau
Commons
About: Anneli Hoier is recognized for
her translation of German authors.
She runs a literary rights agency in
Denmark. Food provided, and open to
the public.
What: Peace Corps Coffee Chat
When: All day
Where: Henrys Coffee Shop (11 E.
8th St.)
About: Informal information session
for those interested in joining the
Peace Corps.
What: International Summer Intern-
ship Application Deadline
When: All day
About: Applications due for inter-
national study abroad programs
during the summer.
What: Rocket Grants Info Session
When: 7 to 8 p.m.
Where: Spooner Hall
About: Information about Rocket
Grants for creative, artist-driven
projects. Deadline for grants is
March 24.
Monday, Feb. 3 Tuesday, Feb. 4 Wednesday, Feb. 5 Thursday, Feb. 6
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Ad Astra, KUnited wont run as coalitions
STUDENT SENATE
DUNCAN MARSHALL
news@kansan.com
Tetwiler
Caucuses are being
introduced.
Elections Committee to hold
informational meetings
for students interested in
running for positions.
Tetwiler announces that
Ad Astra will be
dissolved after term is over.
Election Changes
torn down making room
for a parking lot.
Well probably still be
fnishing parking as the
school year begins in the
fall of 15, Robertson said.
But, I would guess by
mid-fall for sure that all
the parking would be com-
pleted.
While the new dorms
will provide students with
more housing options, not
everyone is excited about
the construction that will
take place over the course
of the next few months.
"[Te new dorm con-
struction] is due to make
parking for residents of
Hashinger and Lewis a
total inconvenience by
removing both of their
designated parking lots,"
said freshman Riley Brown
from Olathe. "I am curious
to what the University will
do in regards to refunding
their parking permits,since
Hashinger and Lewis res-
idents will not be able to
park in their original lots."
For any questions about
parking, please contact the
KU Parking Department at
(785) 864-PARK or online
at parking.ku.edu
Edited by Sarah Kramer
HOUSING FROM PAGE 1
Te University received a
$775,000 grant from the De-
partment of Defense for for-
eign language instruction for
military personnel.
With the grant, the Univer-
sity will now provide language
instruction for the U.S. Army
at Te Command and General
Staf College at Fort Leaven-
worth and the Marines at Fort
Leonard Wood, Mo.
Te grant will pay for the de-
velopment of the foreign lan-
guage curricula, the instruc-
tors and the tuition costs for
military personnel.
We have a role that the men
and women who are out de-
fending the country are the
best educated, are the most
culturally-astute they can be,
and we take a lot of pride in
that role, said Mike Denning,
director of graduate military
programs.
Denning also said the Uni-
versity is one of nine public
institutions that currently
have DoD-funded language
instruction.
In the future, DoD will con-
tinue to look at the University
of Kansas as one of the leading
institutes that provide foreign
language to the military, Den-
ning said. As far as civilian
universities, we are defnitely
on the leading edge.
Te University already has a
tradition of educating military
personnel from Fort Leaven-
worth in Lawrence. But now
with this program, on-site
learning will include online in-
struction and in-class instruc-
tors at the military bases.
Tis relationship has been
growing stronger over recent
years as military holds high
value on the Universitys ed-
ucation, said Megan Greene,
director of the Center for East
Asian Studies. She was one of
the principal investigators who
helped create the curricula for
the military.
Te close partnership and the
quality of education Kansas of-
fers as a public university were
key reasons the University re-
ceived the grant, Greene said.
Because we are a public in-
stitution, its a good value from
the dollars in the defense per-
spective, Denning said. But
it really comes down to the
quality of the program and
the quality of instruction we
are providing here at KU. We
could be the cheapest univer-
sity in the nation and we could
have the best relationship with
the military, but if the edu-
cational quality wasnt there,
they would never look at us.
Te University ofers cours-
es on 40 diferent foreign lan-
guages, more than any other
university in Kansas.
Most institutions teach
many fewer than we do and
thats one of the things that
makes KU more special,
Greene said. I think increas-
ingly people outside of Kan-
sas and inside of Kansas are
becoming aware of this great
strength the University has. It
makes sense KU would be a
language training site.
Te Universitys foreign lan-
guage program is precisely
what drew future Marine Nick
Morrison, a freshman from
Austin, Texas, to the Univer-
sity. Morrison, who wanted
to get a college degree before
service, had only two require-
ments in looking for college:
a naval ROTC, which ofers a
Marine option, and a Kiswahili
language course.
Tat defnitely narrowed
down my options to four
schools, so that was defnitely
a big part of why I applied to
KU, Morrison said.
Kiswahili is the most-spoken
African language. With this
language skill, Morrison has
the potential to work in many
diferent places.
Te military has diferent
commands over diferent parts
of the world, Morrison said.
In 2009 the government cre-
ated Africom, which monitors
situation and does human-
itarian assistance in Africa.
Perhaps Ill be assigned to an
embassy in Kenya or Tanza-
nia and my language skills can
come into use there. At this
point, Im only a freshman, I
dont know where Ill end up,
but having the language skill is
very useful.
With military bases and
embassies all over the world,
language skills and cultural
awareness is critical for the
U.S. Armed Forces.
Most of the time, much of
their roles have nothing to
do with fghting the nations
battle, Denning said. A lot
of what they do is trying to
prevent that from occurring
and they do that by day-to-
day engagement with the local
populace. So its really critical
to the success of the mission
that they understand the cul-
tural norms in the country as
well as the language to be able
to communicate.
Edited by Chelsea Mies
Kansas played its rst mens
basketball game ever 115
years ago today. It was
against the KC YMCA and
Kansas lost 16-5.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2014 PAGE 3 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Grant provides military language instruction
EDUCATION
YU KYUNG LEE
news@kansan.com
KU instructors provide Arabic, French, Japanese, German,
Spanish and Russian courses at the military bases.
$775,000 grant pays for the development of the curricula, lan-
guage instructors and the tuition costs for military personnel.
Special Operations Ofcers are required to maintain at least an
intermediate level of language skills throughout their career.
Grant Breakdown
AMIE JUST/KANSAN
The University received national funding as a military language training center. The funding will provide military
personnel with a variety of foreign language options.
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In the future, DoD will


continue to look at the
University of Kansas as one
of the leading institutes that
provide foreign language to
the military.
MIKE DENNING
Director of graduate
military programs
T
he Kansas Supreme
Court is expected to
publish the opinion in
Gannon v. State of Kansas any
day now. Te suit questions
the current funding levels of
Kansas schools. Te case was
reviewed afer a ruling by a
lower Kansas court last year
that found that the levels of
funding to public schools were
not high enough to provide the
resources necessary to meet
the standard set by the Kansas
Constitution, which enumer-
ates the provision of suitable
levels of public education.
Gov. Sam Brownback
appealed that ruling, which
would have mandated an
increase in state education
funding. During that legislative
cycle his administration con-
tinued the trend of recent dras-
tic cuts to education including
higher-ed cuts totaling $13.5
million in decreased funding
to the University.
In Brownbacks recent State of
the State address, the governor
actually made a plea to the
present Kansas Supreme Court
justices to rule against the
funding mandate, efectively
asking them to ignore concerns
over education along with his
and their constitutional re-
quirements all in the name
of throwing students under
the bus.
However, despite Brown-
backs disinclination toward
adequately supporting schools,
it wouldnt be an election year
without an education platform,
and he has made it well known
that his focus is now the devel-
opment of an all-day kinder-
garten program.
Tis program is a worth-
while pursuit to be sure, but
an expensive new initiative in
education seems at odds with
the administrations tax scheme
and perplexing in light of the
Governors unwillingness to
fully and appropriately fund
current commitments and
responsibilities to schools.
Brownback has cited budget
surplus as the fnancier of his
all-day kindergarten proposal.
Te job his administration has
done balancing the budget
was a focal point Brownback
touted throughout his address.
However, the projections for
fscal year 2014, according to
the Kansas Legislative Research
Department Consensus, indi-
cate a forecasted defcit rather
than a surplus as he repeatedly
asserted.
Much of Brownbacks address
focused on economic fgures
that dont add up, not the least
of which being the kindergar-
ten program. Brownback laid
the foundation of his address
around the economic prosperi-
ty under his tenure, the growth
of the median household
income of Kansans being his
marquee statistic. But even this
calling card sufers on closer
examination revealing that
when calculated with infation
the real median income has
dropped, not grown, accord-
ing to numbers from the U.S.
Census Bureau.
Tis administrations tax plan
has been to lower income tax
rates (Brownback has voiced a
desire to eliminate income tax
completely) and to instead rely
on more regressive taxes, shif-
ing the tax burden away from
wealthy Kansans. It would
seem as though this adminis-
tration held the belief this plan
would relieve the impetus sub-
duing our economic prosperity
therefore unleashing newfound
revenue cascading through
Topeka, as would be necessary
for such new initiatives (we will
have to keep cutting higher-ed
though).
Tat hasnt happened.
Instead government revenue
has been stymied, making the
fulfllment of well-intentioned
initiatives such as all-day kin-
dergarten fnanced by surplus
funding merely a pipe dream.

Clay Cosby is a junior from
Overland Park studying
political science.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2014 PAGE 4
When we get the conference
championship again this year, can
we just rename the big 12 KUs
winning streak?
Wearing leggings in the cold isnt
stupid. I can wear three layers of
thermal leggings and look normal.
I cannot wear three layers of
jeans or sweats without looking
like a pillow.
Can we bring back the before
second half pump up video?
BTW, the buses do have GPS track-
ing systems and you can track
them at: thebus.mobi and select
the University of Kansas.
Maybe KU does have a secret tun-
nel system. How would we know?
Its secret.
God created eece-lined leggings
for the winter, were not stupid but
we are comfortable.
We have a secret tunnel system,
they just dont let us use it.
In todays paper: front page party
penalties, next page giant beer ad.
How is it that no matter which di-
rection I walk, I am always walking
-into- the wind?!
If the UDK runs out of ideas, they
should have an FFA Honorable
Mentions section.
My professor just burped in the
middle of her lecture...it made me
chuckle...that will be all.
I think my bus driver intentionally
drives all jerky to mess with the
standing passengers...
To the girl who always does the
puzzles one page over, youre a
little nerdy but super perdyy ;)
Okay, theres snow on the ground
again. Lets remember how to park
this time, KU.
Everywhere is a bed if you
try hard enough.
Theres urries of snow on the
ground, school should be can-
celed, said no Kansan ever.
You can put whatever you want on
your resume, but you must accept
the consequences.
It looks like a Styrofoam
factory exploded.
When a bus comes I get hopeful
then it ashes Skips Daisy Hill.
I have to be careful in the future
not to ever seriously anger my best
friend. She knows too much...
I skipped cell structure and func-
tion this morning and ate seaweed
paper with my dog.
Send your FFA
submissions to
785-289-8351 or
kansan.com
HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
LETTER GUIDELINES
Send letters to opinion@kansan.com. Write
LETTER TO THE EDITOR in the e-mail subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the authors name,
grade and hometown. Find our full letter to the
editor policy online at kansan.com/letters.
Katie Kutsko, editor-in-chief
kkutsko@kansan.com
Allison Kohn, managing editor
akohn@kansan.com
Lauren Armendariz, managing editor
larmendariz@kansan.com
Anna Wenner, opinion editor
awenner@kansan.com
Sean Powers, business manager
spowers@kansan.com
Kolby Botts, sales manager
kbotts@kansan.com
Brett Akagi, media director and content
strategest
bakagi@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board
are Katie Kutsko, Allison Kohn, Lauren
Armendariz, Anna Wenner, Sean Powers
and Kolby Botts.
@NLongsfeld
@KansanOpinion the library will be
completely empty.
@Captin_Morgan93
@KansanOpinion commercials unless
Art Rooney is holding up the Lombardi
Trophy at the end.
@codyjano
@KansanOpinion the Puppy Bowl.
What is the best thing
about the Super Bowl?
FFA OF THE DAY

Every time I write a check for tuition,


another horcrux is made.
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
I
am disappointed with
the way a situation was
handled in Allen Field-
house during the Iowa State
game. I feel KU Athletics al-
lowed a disservice to occur
to the best student section
in the nation, and they
should make sure it doesnt
happen again.
Per KU tradition, I and
members of my camping
group woke up before sun-
rise on a freezing January
morning to attend lottery.
We camped throughout the
week, got our number and
found some seats in the
legendary AFH. For this
particular game, we needed
to save three seats, so we
set a coat on one and UDKs
on two others to establish
that they were saved. In one
particular row, there were
two of my group members
sitting, two seats saved and
two open seats.
A man with a general
admission ticket sat in one
of the seats, which was fne.
However, he was joined by
two other GA-ticket hold-
ers, a woman and a man
who were now sitting in one
of our saved seats. We told
the newcomers they were
sitting in saved seats and
they refused to move.
When our three fnal
group members arrived
at 6:40 (note: more than
an hour before tipof), the
GA-ticket holders still re-
fused to move so I asked the
red-vested crowd control/
seat fnder gentleman for
assistance. He came up and
told the GA people that they
needed to honor our saved
seats, but they didnt move,
and he called in his super-
visor. Te supervisor asked
them to move, and, once
again, they refused. Te
supervisor told me there
was nothing she could do
because apparently seat-sav-
ing had been suspended,
even though it was only
6:44, still more than an hour
before tipof, and she said I
would need to contact the
University with complaints,
which I am currently fol-
lowing up on.
As a result of the GA-ticket
holders refusal to abide by
AFH traditions and stip-
ulations, and, in addition,
common courtesy, I was
unable to fully enjoy this
game, and I am fearful
this has happened to other
students in the past, or will
happen again in the future.
Terefore, I suggest that the
Athletics department adds
a note to all GA tickets re-
minding ticket holders that
they are not to sit in saved
seats, and that the depart-
ment takes proper steps to
better manage this situation
and protect the tradition of
that best student section it
promotes.
Brianna Leiker is a junior from
Kansas City, Kan., studying
chemical engineering.
I
recently had a mid-
senior-year crisis, and
not for the reasons you
might think. See, I spent
the fall semester of this
past year researching a
thesis concerning the social
gender issues of Disney
fairytales, and then, to my
surprise, Disney one-ups
me and presents the flm
Frozen.
For those of you who dont
know, Frozen is the newest
Disney animation flm, based
on Hans Christian Ander-
sens Te Snow Queen.
Te flm focuses on the love
between two sisters, who
ultimately come together to
accept each other and save
their kingdom from the ca-
lamity of an eternal winter.
Perhaps only the 5-year-
old inside of me actually
cares about anything
Disney-related, but Frozen
is an incredibly refreshing
addition to Disneys long line
of fairy tales. Consider this:
Frozen is the frst Disney
princess flm that has not
ended in marriage or the
somewhat-verbal prospect
thereof, and the frst where
the female leads have the
only hand in the outcome
of the flm (yes, I am even
including Mulan in that
analysis).
Now, I know what youre
thinking, I totally care
about Disney flms targeted
for children under 5. Tis is
completely applicable to my
life! But in all honesty, this
is a really important mile-
stone in Disney history. In
a world where articles with
titles like 23 Trends Guys
Hate (Tat Women Love)
are running rampant and
stomping on any notions of
feminism, strong, indepen-
dent, female role models are
hard to come by, particularly
in childrens flm and televi-
sion. What does that imply
for the future society we are
raising?
Take our generation, for ex-
ample. Most of us were born
into the 90s comeback-era
of Disney flms. A good
portion of us were raised on
Te Lion King, Beauty
and the Beast, Aladdin,
Mulan, and so forth. And I
would bet that many of us
myself included still love
those stories and characters.
Weve also had certain social
standards drilled into us;
social standards that are
refected and reiterated in
those very movies. Whether
we want to admit it or not,
these ideas about marriage,
love, appearance and the
relationship between men
and women have made our
society what it is today. We
idolize the characters we
meet in stories and we learn
from them, and for many of
us, Disney was a large part of
that aspect of our education.
My point is simple: we
live in a society where we
still struggle to understand
feminism and what it means
for women to be equal with
men. We live in a society
where mens privilege ofen
goes unrecognized and we
praise overtly-sexualized,
digitally-perfected celebrity
women for being role models
for the rest of us. But we also
live in a society that is learn-
ing. A society that can come
up with a flm like Frozen,
a flm that, while still having
a way to go, demonstrates
that love does not have to
come from romance, and
that women can save the day
too.
Tasha Cerny is a senior
from Salina studying English.
Student section saved
seats not being honored
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Brownback ignores funding problem in platform
Frozen heroines break
traditional womens roles
POLITICS
EQUALITY
By Tasha Cerny
opinion@kansan.com
By Clay Cosby
opinion@kansan.com
Follow us on Twitter
@KansanOpinion. Tweet us your
opinions, and we just might
publish them.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2014
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
entertainment
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know things we dont.
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SEARCH DONT SETTLE STUDENTS PREMIERE HOUSING SITE
KANSAN PUZZLES
CRYPTOQUIP
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 9
You're condent and eager to go
for the next two days. Keep an eye
out for hidden treasure. Make new
contacts while lling present orders.
An unexpected development leads to
a startling discovery. Keep digging.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7
You can complete projects with more
ease. Slow down and think it over.
Start by cleaning out closets and
discover a forgotten treasure. Others
nd the answer you've been seeking.
A friend has a brilliant idea.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is an 8
Circumstances control your actions
today and tomorrow. A startling
change in command could disrupt
things. Appearances deceive. Gather
input from others. Associates
deliver the data. A surprise project
comes your way. Encourage
someone's creativity.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 7
Career opportunities arise today and
tomorrow. Use your imagination to
take advantage. Focus attention
and stay alert to jump at the right
moment. Make contact. Be respect-
ful. Your consultant provides legal
insight. Keep the rules and move.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is an 8
Travel conditions look good today
and tomorrow. A startling revelation
propels your plans. The nancial
situation could be unstable. And
household matters need attention.
Still, don't limit your imagination.
Travel seems appealing, but it's not
without peril.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 7
Organize your nancial plans today
and tomorrow. Look into the future
and imagine what you want. Talk
it over and gain surprising insight
into your partner's desires. With
purchases, invest in the highest
long-lasting quality. Build your nest.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is an 8
Spend time with your partner and
anticipate surprises. Let somebody
else direct the show for a couple of
days. Imagine perfection. Upgrade
the technology. Push yourself
forward. Surprise! That works better
than you thought possible.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 9
It's busy, so let intuition steer you
in the right direction. Work matters
are on the front burner. Break out of
your shell! Risk a little and discover
a lucky break. Entertain new ideas
and suggestions.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 7
It's okay to get a little wild, even
revolutionary. Get ready to party and
invite your network. Clear up any
confusion before broadcasting.
Play with friends and family,
and encourage the fun. Celebrate
being together.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 6
Stick close to home for the next two
days, where the house and family
require more attention. Upgrade
the space and personal comfort
level. Domestic bliss restores and
rejuvenates. Share it with your
closest crew.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 7
Your concentration and communica-
tion ows extraordinarily well today
and tomorrow. This gets handy with
unexpected costs or income arising.
Study the issue for solutions. Take
this opportunity to go for the prize.
Shop carefully for supplies.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 9
There's money coming, but also
going today and tomorrow. Follow
your inner voice when choosing
direction. Or hold off and let things
cook and simmer. Be patient with
those who are confused. The answer
surprises.
SPONSORED BY
T
he Granada, located at
1020 Massachusetts St.,
was bathed in psyche-
delic sounds to a nearly sold
out crowd on Friday as both
60s psych legend Roky Erick-
son and modern psych revival
group Te Black Angels re-
spectively took the stage. De-
spite the late start time, both
artists brought an exciting
live show that captivated the
audience each in their own
unique way. Even the opening
band, Brooklyn, N.Y.,-based
trio Golden Animals, was on
point as they ripped through a
set of retro grooves that would
not have sounded out of place
in the 60s.
For most, however, the night
truly began once Erickson hit
the stage. Most people know
him as the voice of psyche-
delic pioneers, the 13th Floor
Elevators, who some claim
invented the entire genre
back in 1966. It was like being
transported into another
time period hearing Erick-
sons famous scream on 13th
Floor Elevators songs Roller
Coaster and Youre Gonna
Miss Me echo throughout
the venue. I was especially
happy to hear songs from his
solo career like Two-Headed
Dog. Credit also has to be
given to Ericksons band who
did an amazing job with the
arrangements. By the end of
Ericksons set, the crowd gave
him a huge ovation as they
erupted in a huge chant.
Next up was Te Black An-
gels, who have been making
a name for themselves lately
with their unique brand of
psychedelic rock. As they
ripped through their set, a
backdrop of kaleidoscopic
images and lights fashed the
crowd, creating an almost
hypnotic efect on the audi-
ence. Tis backdrop worked
well with their music which
efortlessly blended itself
between upbeat stomps like
Dont Play With Guns, and
their more subdued grooves
like You On the Run. All
of the band members were
on point and played the
songs with precision. I was
impressed with their material
from their newest album
Indigo Meadow, which I was
excited to hear live for the frst
time.
With Lawrence being only
the frst stop on their winter
tour, I can only imagine how
they will be by the end.
Edited by Callan Reilly
By Jake Waters
jwaters@kansan.com
Granada hosts 60s-inspired
psychedelic rock concert
MUSIC REVIEW
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
The Black Angels performed on Friday at the Granada, located at 1020 Massachusetts St., along with psych
legend Roky Erickson.
GO ONLINE AT
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SUPERBOWL COVERAGE
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Interested in
submitting your
own cartoon?
email:
opinion@kansan.com
Filmmaker Quentin Taran-
tino fled a lawsuit for con-
tributory copyright infringe-
ment against Gawker Media
at the U.S. District Court in
Los Angeles on Jan. 27. Te
lawsuit seeks at least $1 mil-
lion in damages from Gawker
for posting a link to a leaked
copy of his latest script, Te
Hateful Eight.
According to USA Today,
the lawsuit declares, Tere
was nothing newsworthy or
journalistic about Gawker
Media facilitating and en-
couraging the public's vio-
lation of [Tarantino's] copy-
right in the Screenplay, and
it's conduct will not shield
Gawker Media from liability
for their unlawful activity.
Te suit also claims Gawker, a
celebrity gossip blog based in
New York, actively solicited
people to submit the script to
its site on Jan. 22, one day af-
ter the script ofcially leaked.
Te details of the leak re-
main unclear, but the script
was allegedly posted on
anonfles.com and scribd.
com by anonymous sources
on Jan. 21. Gawkers De-
famer blog, self-described
as yellow journalism for the
red carpet," posted a link to
the AnonFiles script a few
days later. During a Jan. 21
interview with Deadline Hol-
lywood, Tarantino said he
showed only four colleagues
the scripts frst draf: Djan-
go Unchained producer
Reginald Hudlin and actors
Tim Roth, Bruce Dern and
Michael Madsen. To Taran-
tinos knowledge, only one
other person saw the script:
Hudlins unnamed associate
who is a Hollywood agent.
In Tarantinos Deadline in-
terview, the mystery lies in
the hands of an unknown
sixth person. He expressed
certainty of his close friend
Roths innocence, but said
he believes either Madsens
or Derns agent is responsible
for the leak. He said he more
strongly suspects Creative
Artists Agency, a leading en-
tertainment and sports agen-
cy representing Dern.
One of the others let their
agent read it, and that agent
has now passed it on to every-
one in Hollywood, Tarantino
said in the interview.
Tarantino also announced
in the interview a halt to the
entire project. He then re-
vealed his next move and the
scripts fate.
Ill publish it, Tarantino
said in the interview. Im
done. Ill move on to the next
thing. Ive got 10 more where
that came from.
Gawker posted a response
to the suit on Jan. 27, rein-
forcing the fact that they were
not the actual leakers and de-
fending the posts newswor-
thiness, stating Tarantinos
interview with Deadline itself
was the biggest cause of the
leaks notoriety.
University of Kansas Asso-
ciate Professor of Film and
Media Studies Matt Jacobson
brought an alternative theory
to light, sharing a circulating
speculation that Tarantino
perhaps intentionally leaked
the screenplay.
Putting an un-water-
marked script out there,
without any type of non-dis-
closure paperwork, just
means that there was every
probability that someone was
bound to leak this, Jacobson
said. He has a great reason
for wanting to bypass Hate-
ful Eight in favor of some-
thing else and a leak like this
is a perfect reason. It'll be easy
to raise a budget for Kill Bill:
Vol. 3, a sequel to two suc-
cessful, proftable flms.
Te Hateful Eight was a
western scheduled to begin
production next winter.
Edited by Amber Kasselman
ANDREW HOSKINS
entertain@kansan.com
FILM
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Director Quentin Tarantino sued Gawker Media on Jan. 27 for copyright infringement. The site leaked a copy
of his script for a lm called The Hateful Eight.
NEW YORK Philip Sey-
mour Hofman, who won the
Oscar for best actor in 2006 for
his portrayal of writer Truman
Capote and created a gallery of
other vivid characters, many of
them slovenly and somewhat
dissipated, was found dead
Sunday in his apartment with
what ofcials said was a needle
in his arm. He was 46.
Two law enforcement of-
cials, who spoke to Te Associ-
ated Press on condition of an-
onymity because they were not
authorized to talk about the
evidence, said the actor appar-
ently died of a drug overdose.
Glassine envelopes containing
what were believed to be her-
oin were found with him, they
said.
Hofman made his career
mostly as a character actor,
and was one of the most pro-
lifc in the business, plying his
craf with a rumpled natural-
ism that also made him one of
the most admired performers
of his generation.
Te stage-trained actor
was nominated for Acade-
my Awards four times in all:
for "Capote," ''Te Master,"
''Doubt" and "Charlie Wilson's
War." He also received three
Tony nominations for his work
on Broadway, which included
an acclaimed turn as the weary
and defeated Willy Loman in
"Death of a Salesman."
Hofman spoke candidly over
the years about past struggles
with drug addiction. Afer 23
years sober, he admitted in
interviews last year to falling
of the wagon and developing
a heroin problem that led to a
stint in rehab.
Tributes poured in from oth-
er Hollywood fgures.
Kevin Costner said in an
AP interview: "Philip was a
very important actor and re-
ally takes his place among the
real great actors. It's a shame.
Who knows what he would
have been able to do? But we're
lef with the legacy of the work
he's done and it all speaks for
itself."
"No words for this. He was
too great and we're too shat-
tered," said Mike Nichols, who
directed Hofman in "Charlie
Wilson's War" and in "Death
of a Salesman."
Te law enforcement ofcials
said Hofman's body was dis-
covered in a bathroom at his
Greenwich Village apartment
by a friend who made the 911
call and his assistant.
Late Sunday, a police crime-
scene van was parked out
front, and technicians carry-
ing brown paper bags went in
and out. Police kept a grow-
ing crowd of onlookers back.
A single red daisy had been
placed in front of the lobby
door.
Hofman's family called the
news "tragic and sudden."
Hofman is survived by his
partner of 15 years, Mimi
O'Donnell, and their three
children.
"We are devastated by the loss
of our beloved Phil and appre-
ciate the outpouring of love
and support we have received
from everyone," the family
said in a statement.
More recently, he was
Plutarch Heavensbee in "Te
Hunger Games: Catching Fire"
and was reprising that role
in the two-part sequel, "Te
Hunger Games: Mockingjay,"
which is in the works. And in
"Moneyball," he played Art
Howe, the grumpy manager
of the Oakland Athletics who
resisted new thinking about
baseball talent.
Just weeks ago, Showtime an-
nounced Hofman would star
in "Happyish," a new comedy
series about a middle-aged
man's pursuit of happiness.
He was nominated for the
2013 Academy Award for best
supporting actor for his role
in "Te Master" as the char-
ismatic leader of a religious
movement. Te flm, inspired
in part by the life of Scientol-
ogy founder L. Ron Hubbard,
reunited the actor with Ander-
son.
He also received a 2009
best-supporting nomination
for "Doubt," as a priest who
comes under suspicion be-
cause of his relationship with
a boy, and another best-sup-
porting nomination as a CIA
ofcer in "Charlie Wilson's
War."
Born in 1967 in Fairport,
N.Y., Hofman was interested
in acting from an early age. He
studied theater as a teenager
with the New York State Sum-
mer School of the Arts and the
Circle in the Square Teatre.
He then majored in drama at
New York University.
He could seemingly take on
any role, large or small, loath-
some or sympathetic, and ap-
peared to be utterly lacking in
vanity.
On Broadway, in addition
to starring as Willy Loman,
he played Jamie in "Long
Day's Journey Into Night" and
both leads in "True West." All
three performances were To-
ny-nominated.
Tarantino sues Gawker
over leaked movie script
Philip Seymour Hoffman
found dead in apartment
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CELEBRITY
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Philip Seymour Hoffman was found dead in his home on Sunday. Law
enforcement suspects that he died of an accidental heroin overdose.

He has a great reason for


wanting to bypass Hateful
Eight in favor of something
else and a leak like this is a
perfect reason.
MATT JACOBSON
Associate professor
TRENTON, N.J.
High-profle Republicans
were adamant Sunday that
New Jersey Gov. Chris Chris-
tie should not resign from his
post as chairman of the Re-
publican Governors Associa-
tion following a former ally's
claim that there is evidence
Christie knew about an ap-
parently politically motivated
trafc jam earlier than he has
said.
Te support from former
New York City Mayor Rudy
Giuliani, Louisiana Gov. Bob-
by Jindal and Wisconsin U.S.
Rep. Paul Ryan put Repub-
licans on the ofensive and
the Democratic chairman of
a state legislative committee
investigating the September
lane closures near the George
Washington Bridge on the de-
fensive the day Christie's state
hosts the Super Bowl.
Also Sunday, a member of
Christie's administration
who was subpoenaed by law-
makers investigating the lane
closings confrmed she had
resigned. Christina Genovese
Renna lef the governor's of-
fce Friday, according to her
lawyer. Renna had reported to
ousted Deputy Chief of Staf
Bridget Kelly, who apparently
set the lane closings in motion
with an email saying "time to
cause some trafc problems
in Fort Lee."
Christie, a potential 2016
presidential contender, has
been going about Super Bowl
ceremonial duties and has
not taken questions about
the scandal in recent days.
He didn't respond Saturday
when some spectators booed
him at an appearance in New
York City's Times Square. He
planned to watch Sunday's
game with his family from a
luxury box at MetLife Stadi-
um.
Giuliani, appearing on CBS'
"Face the Nation" took aim at
the credibility of two fgures
central to the scandal: John
Wisniewski, who's leading
the investigative probe, and
David Wildstein, the former
Christie loyalist who as an ex-
ecutive at the Port Authority
of New York and New Jersey
last year ordered the lane clo-
sures afer receiving Kelly's
email, as someone with less
than pure motives.
He said Wildstein "wants
somebody else to pay his le-
gal bills and he can't get them
paid unless the governor is re-
sponsible."
Te unannounced lane clo-
sures caused massive gridlock
in Fort Lee in September,
delaying emergency vehicles
and school buses and tying up
some commuters for hours
over four mornings. New Jer-
sey legislators are investigat-
ing whether Christie aides en-
gineered the lane closures to
send a message to the town's
Democratic mayor. Te U.S.
Attorney's ofce is also inves-
tigating.
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2300 Louisiana St,
Lawrence, KS 66046
EDINBURG, Texas Hilda
Vasquez saved money for her
U.S. citizenship application
by selling homemade tama-
les. Carmen Zalazar picked up
extra babysitting jobs at night
afer caring for kids all day in
Houston.
Te women saved for months
to pay for the $680 applica-
tion, but for other applicants
in the future, it might not be
enough.
As President Barack Obama
renews his quest for immigra-
tion reform, some proposals
would impose fnes of $2,000
on top of application fees,
making the fnancial hurdles
much taller for people who are
here illegally.
"You have more rights when
you are a citizen, like to vote,"
said Zalazar, a legal resident.
As soon as she started a citi-
zenship class, "I started to save
because I knew otherwise it
won't be possible."
Te struggle is familiar to
millions of immigrants. A
2012 survey by the Pew His-
panic Center showed that only
46 percent of Hispanic immi-
grants eligible to become citi-
zens had done so. Te top two
reasons were lack of English
skills and money to pay for the
application.
Manuel Enrique Angel made
learning English his frst pri-
ority upon arriving in Hous-
ton from his native El Salvador
two years ago. He now speaks
English clearly and plans to
apply for citizenship when he
becomes eligible this year.
Trained as a lawyer in El Sal-
vador, the 28-year-old works
as a cook in a Houston burger
joint. His wife, an American
citizen, is a hair stylist. He
estimates it will take him up
to eight months to save the
money for the citizenship ap-
plication.
"It's really hard when you
have to pay rent around $600,
when you have car notes for
$300 and $500," Angel said.
Angel plans to take advan-
tage of a program at a Hous-
ton credit union that ofers
small low-interest loans spe-
cifcally to help clients become
citizens. Te Promise Credit
Union partners with Neigh-
borhood Centers Inc., a non-
proft network of community
centers in the Houston area
that cater to immigrants.
Credit union President Ran-
dy Martinez said the program
began as a pilot in 2012 and
only ofcially started last fall.
"We don't want that to be-
come an obstacle for them
not to become citizens, just
because they don't have the
entire fee to pay," he said.
Te credit union's $455 loans
include $380 toward the cit-
izenship process plus a $75
processing fee for the loan
application. Tey carry a fxed
fve percent interest rate for a
12-month term, so the month-
ly payments work out to about
$38.
Applicants must contrib-
ute $300 of their own money.
Tey are all pre-screened by
the Neighborhood Centers
legal team to make sure they
qualify for citizenship and
have all the necessary docu-
mentation.
Te credit union has already
discussed expanding the loans
if Congress approves a reform
package that ofers people in
the country illegally a costlier
path to citizenship, Martinez
said.
An immigration reform bill
passed by the Senate in June
did not set the costs of the
proposed 13-year path to cit-
izenship. Lawmakers lef that
up to U.S. Citizenship and Im-
migration Services, with the
idea that fees would make the
system self-sustaining.
While the fees remain un-
specifed, the Senate bill lays
out penalties totaling $2,000
to be paid at various steps
along the way. Te legislation
would create a new status
called "registered provisional
immigrant" and require any-
one with that status to pay
taxes.
During the 13-year wait, im-
migrants would be "working
on the books, and you will
hopefully be able to make a
better income and be pro-
gressing in your life," said El-
len Battistelli, a policy analyst
with the National Immigra-
tion Law Center, who has ar-
gued against making the pro-
cess too costly.
"Tere are so many require-
ments and fnancial burdens,
this is a very rigorous path to
go," especially for low-wage
workers, Battistelli said.
On Tursday, the House re-
leased its immigration-reform
principles, which included no
special path to citizenship for
the 11 million people already
in the U.S. illegally but would
make those here illegally "pay
signifcant fnes and back tax-
es" to gain legal status.
In an interview with CNN
broadcast Friday, the presi-
dent signaled that he may con-
sider legislation that does not
ofer a path to citizenship a
noticeable shif from his pre-
vious position, which was that
it "doesn't make sense" to leave
that aspect of immigration un-
resolved.
Vasquez and Zalazar, both
legal residents in their 50s, did
not have to work in the shad-
ows, and both took citizenship
classes.
During Zalazar's classs at
the Baker-Ripley Community
Center in Houston's diverse
Gulfon neighborhood, teach-
er Crystal Gonzalez asked the
class how much it cost to be-
come a U.S. citizen. Several
hands shot up.
"How many of you have $680
that you can spend tomor-
row?" Gonzalez asked.
Immigration reform might raise price of citizenship
GOVERNMENT
NATIONAL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hilda Vasquez makes tamales in her kitchen in Edinburg, Texas. Vasquez raised the $680 for her U.S. citizenship
application by selling homemade tamales. Immigration advocates are concerned comprehensive immigration
reform proposals will make the nancial hurdles almost impassable.
assistant director at Alvins li-
quor store, said that this bill
sponsored by Uncork Kansas
will likely have a negative ef-
fect on independently owned
liquor stores, but understands
why it would be good for gro-
cery stores.
Teyre just looking out for
themselves and this is the last
independent business that you
can open up to where every-
body is equal. You dont have
any big corporations picking
on you because in this town its
very competitive, Schmidt-
berger said. But once a gro-
cery store begins to sell, they
can throw half-a-million dol-
lars a million dollars into
this program and destroy all
these liquor stores over a peri-
od of two years.
Schmidtberger said he thinks
it would most likely be in his
best interest to liquidate his
items that he has for sale and
then close up his shop if the
bill is passed. He also said an
alternative option might exist
because hes unsure if grocery
stores will carry the variety
that his does.
I would have to make a de-
cision to adjust and just sell
imports and they could have
all these domestics and the
big ticket items then Id
just become a specialty store,
Schmidtberger said.
Brown said, however, that it
is neither up to grocery stores
nor liquor stores to decide
what to do with the bill.
I think its up to the voters
of the state of Kansas to decide
what they want to do, Brown
said. We do have to protect
our small businesses and we
do have to protect our state.
Edited by Callan Reilly
BILL FROM PAGE 1
Top Republicans say they stand by NJ Gov. Christie
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8
KANSAS
KANSAS STAT LEADERS
GAME TO REMEMBER
TEXAS
KANSAS 23 46 69
38 43 81 TEXAS
PLAYER PTS FG-FGA REBS A T0s
Wayne Selden, Jr. 21 8-16 2 0 3
Perry Ellis 11 4-9 2 0 1
Joel Embiid 8 3-9 10 2 3
Frank Mason 8 3-8 0 2 1
Andrew Wiggins 7 2-12 5 1 2
Jamari Traylor 4 2-3 6 2 0
Naadir Tharpe 3 1-4 3 3 2
Brannen Greene 3 1-3 1 0 0
Other Players 4 1-1 8 0 0
TOTAL 69 25-65 37 10 12
PLAYER PTS FG-FGA REBS A T0s
Isaiah Taylor 23 7-14 1 0 2
Jonathan Holmes 22 6-13 4 0 0
Javan Felix 9 1-6 2 2 1
Cameron Ridley 9 3-7 10 0 2
Connor Lammert 7 3-5 1 1 1
Demarcus Holland 4 1-4 11 3 2
Damarcus Croaker 3 1-2 2 1 1
Kendal Yancy 2 1-2 4 1 0
Other Players 2 1-3 9 0 2
TOTAL 81 24-56 44 8 11
Selden, Jr.
Embiid Tharpe Selden, Jr.
Wayne Selden, Jr., guard
REBOUNDS ASSISTS POINTS
By default well remember Seldens effort on
offense. No Jayhawk had a particularly good day,
but Seldens 21 points stopped this one from
getting really ugly. Give him credit; he fought
into the lane for most of his looks.
UNSUNG HERO
Embiid
Joel Embiid, forward
Embiid wasnt close to having a great game
either, yet with two more points he wouldve
added another double-double to his resume.
His 10 rebounds were important, but Kansas
could hardly convert them into points.
GAME TO FORGET
Wiggins
Andrew Wiggins, guard
Really, you could put just about any player here,
but Wiggins offensive day was probably the
worst well see from him. Nothing would fall
and Bill Self said he was settling for shots. He
ended the day 2-12 from the eld. Nothing to
be alarmed about yet, it was just a bad day.

BASKETBALL
Kansas 69
Jayhawks trail Longhorns most of the game in first conference loss
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Coach Bill Self walks off the court after Kansas loss to Texas on Saturday. The Jayhawks fell to the Longhorns 81-69.
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Freshman guard Andrew Wiggins jumps over the defender to attempt a basket. Wiggins only scored seven points during the game, going 2-12 from the
eld.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 9
10/29/2013 Pittsburg State Lawrence 7 p.m. W/97/57
11/5/2013 Fort Hays State Lawrence 7 p.m. W/92/75
11/8/2013 Louisiana-Monroe Lawrence 7 p.m. W/80/63
11/12/2013 Duke Chicago 8:30 p.m. W/94/83
11/19/2013 Iona Lawrence 7 p.m. W/86/66
11/22/2013 Towson Lawrence 7 p.m. W/88/55
11/28/2013 Wake Forest Bahamas 2:30 p.m. W/87/78
11/29/2013 Villanova Bahamas 8:30 L/59/63
11/30/2013 UTEP Bahamas 7 p.m. W/67/63
12/7/2013 Colorado Boulder, Colo. 2:15 p.m. L/72/75
12/10/2013 Florida Gainesville, Fla. 6 p.m. L/61/67
12/14/2013 New Mexico Kansas City, Mo. 6 p.m. W/80/63
12/21/2013 Georgetown Lawrence 11 a.m. W/86/64
12/30/2013 Toledo Lawrence 7 p.m. W/93/83
1/5/2014 San Diego State Lawrence 3:30 p.m. L/57/61
1/8/2014 Oklahoma Norman, Okla. 6 p.m. W/90/83
1/11/2014 Kansas State Lawrence 1 p.m. W/96/60
1/13/2014 Iowa State Ames, Iowa 8 p.m. W/77/70
1/18/2014 Oklahoma State Lawrence 3 p.m. W/80/78
1/20/2014 Baylor Lawrence 8 p.m. W/78/68
1/25/2014 TCU Fort Worth, Texas 8 p.m. W/91/69
1/29/2014 Iowa State Lawrence 8 p.m. W/92/81
2/1/2014 Texas Austin, Texas 3 p.m. L/69/81
2/4/2014 Baylor Waco, Texas 6 p.m.
2/8/2014 West Virginia Lawrence 3 p.m.
2/10/2014 Kansas State Manhattan 8 p.m.
2/15/2014 TCU Lawrence 3 p.m.
2/18/2014 Texas Tech Lubbock, Texas 7 p.m.
2/22/2014 Texas Lawrence 6:30 p.m.
2/24/2014 Oklahoma Lawrence 8 p.m.
3/1/2014 Oklahoma State Stillwater, Okla. 8 p.m.
3/5/2014 Texas Tech Lawrence 7 p.m.
3/8/2014 West Virginia Morgantown, W. Va. 11 a.m.
SCHEDULE
First Half
15:46 - Joel Embiid blocks a Cameron Ridley shot, Naadir Tharpe grabs the rebound and tosses it ahead to
Wayne Selden, Jr., for an easy layup. Kansas is tied at 10 with 15:46 left in the half.

12:43 - Jamari Traylor nds Brannen Greene open for a 3-pointer. Kansas trails 15-13 with 12:43 remaining
in the half.
9:43 - Frank Mason lobs a pass to Embiid who throws it down easily. Kansas trails 18-15 with 9:43 left in
the half.
Second Half
16:25 - Embiid kicks the ball out to Selden, Jr., who knocks down a 3-pointer. Kansas trails 47-30 with 16:25
remaining.
15:55 - After a Ridley turnover, Tharpe knocks down the second 3-pointer in a row for the Jayhawks with an
assist from Embiid. Kansas trails 47-33 with 15:55 remaining.
12:09 - After starting off 0-9 from the eld Andrew Wiggins gets his rst of two shots to fall. Kansas trails
53-39 with 12:09 remaining.
PRIME PLAYS
KEY STATS
Kansas eld goal percentage
Kansas free throws attempted (Texas had 45 shots
from the line)
Attendance at the Frank Erwin Center, which saw
its rst sellout since Kansas played there in 2012
38.5
19
16,540
BASKETBALL REWIND
Texas 81
Blake Schuster
Jayhawks trail Longhorns most of the game in first conference loss
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Freshman guard Wayne Selden, Jr., shoots the ball over Longhorns Javan Felix. Selden, Jr., led the Jayhawks
scoring with 21 points.
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Sophomore forward Perry Ellis plays defense as Texas Isaiah Taylor reaches for the ball. Kansas fell short in
Austin on Saturday, ending the game 81-69.
MISSED THE GAME?
CHECK OUT OUR GAME RECAP
VIDEO ON KANSAN.COM
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 10
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1991-2007, during which newsroom
staff won 16 Pul i tzer Pri zes; Wal l
Street Journal slaffer for 26 years
Founding editor-in-chief/now executive
chairman of ProPublica, which won
the first Pulitzer Prize awarded to an
online news organization in 2010 and
the first Pulitzer Prize awarded for
stories not published in print in 2011
Forner chair of lhe Connillee lo
Protect Journalists, which advocates freedom of the press
around lhe world enber of lhe sleering connillee of lhe
Feporlers Connillee for Freedon of lhe Press Truslee of
lhe John S. and Janes L. Knighl Foundalion Pulilzer Prize
Board nenber 19992007, chairnan 200607 Forner business
reporter, Washington correspondent and the business editor
for the Los Angeles Times enber of lhe Council on Foreign
Felalions Lifeline Achievenenl Enny Fecipienl for Business
and Financial Reporting
Friday, February 7 10:30 a.n. Alderson Audiloriun, Kansas enorial Union
PAUL STEIGER
ATOAL CTATO PFESETATO & LECTUFE
Feporler Leader Edilor of reporlers who have won 13 Pulilzer Prizes,
including the first Pulitzers for online journalism
WILLIAM ALLEN
WHITE DAY
Honoring
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Please join us for
WOMENS BASKETBALL
Afer being more-or-less
neutralized at the hands of
Texas last Tuesday, junior for-
ward Chelsea Gardner had two
options: dwell on her perfor-
mance or use it as motivation
for Sunday's matchup against
Texas Tech (6-15, 0-10 Big 12)
in Lubbock, Texas.
Following a career-high
34 points on 13-19 shooting
in the Jayhawks' (11-11, 4-6
Big 12) 70-62 road victory,
it would seem that Gardner
chose the latter. She collected
12 rebounds as well for her
fourth double-double in Kan-
sas' last fve contests.
Gardner scored 23 of her 34
points during the Jayhawks'
crucial frst-half run. Te team
shot 54.5 percent from the
feld and were 3-5 from behind
the arc. Kansas usual staunch
defense was on display too,
holding the Red Raiders to
only 28 points in the frst.
In surely one of their more
impressive single half per-
formances of this season, the
Jayhawks jogged into the lock-
er room with a 13-point lead.
But, as has been the case much
of the year, Kansas began to
struggle in the second half.
Te Jayhawks extended their
lead to 20 early in the second
half, but an 11-0 Tech run over
just three minutes brought the
Red Raiders back within fve.
Kansas' accuracy from the feld
all but disappeared in the sec-
ond half as the team shot just
32 percent (8-25 FG).
Tech continued to claw their
way back, pulling within fve of
Kansas with just over a minute
remaining in the game. Led by
junior guard Amber Battle's
13 points and three assists,
the Red Raiders were able to
erase their early defcit, but it
was Gardner who would again
step up to keep the game out of
reach. She scored seven points
in the game's fnal two minutes
to quell any talks of an upset in
Lubbock.
Additionally, junior guard
Natalie Knight was active, reg-
istering 14 points including
3-for-3 from deep and dish-
ing out seven assists. Senior
guard CeCe Harper did her
part with 11 points and nine
assists to deny the Red Raiders
of their frst conference win of
the season.
Kansas possessed a decid-
edly strong advantage down
low throughout as they out-
rebounded Tech by 12 and
logged 34 points in the paint.
Teir 18 assists were the most
that the Jayhawks have record-
ed in a Big 12 game this year.
Kansas will look to ride Sun-
day's victory into Wednesdays
battle against No. 11 Oklaho-
ma State in Stillwater, Okla.
Edited by Sarah Kramer
Gardner leads Jayhawks
to victory with 34 points
KYLE PAPPAS
sports@kansan.com
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Junior forward Chelsea Gardner takes aim over a Baylor defenders head during Kansas game on Jan. 9. On
Saturday, Kansas beat Texas Tech 70-62 and Gardner scored a career-high 34 points and tallied 12 rebounds.
TODAYS DISCOUNT:
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You know, I just enjoy playing here...


its an electrifying place.
Kobe Bryant,
ESPN.com
?
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
Q: What is the highest point total
scored by a Knick at The Garden?
A: Carmelo Anthony, 62 points.
ESPN.com
!
FACT OF THE DAY
The Garden holds 18,200 people.
thegarden.com
Madison Square Garden making history since 1968
QUOTE OF THE DAY
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2014 PAGE 11 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
By Ben Felderstein
sports@kansan.com
3 BR and 4BR Available August.
Close to KU. All appliances. Must
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Call 785-766-7518.
General offce work that includes
answering phones, organizing &
scheduling appointments, handling
incoming requests, fling, sending
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NOW HIRING: friendly, profes
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become part of our kitchen & serv
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but preferred. Please apply in per
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Available June. 3BR. 2 Bath Near
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Stepping Stones is hiring teachers
aides for the toddler & preschool
classrooms & teachers for the ele
mentary after school program. Most
shifts are 8am1pm or 36pm Mon.,
Wed., Fri. &/or Tues., Thurs. Apply
at 1100 Wakarusa. EOE
901 Lofts
We are seeking a seasoned
Property Manager for our
downtown Lawrence Properties.
Qualifed candidates must have a
minimum of 2 years in the industry
as a property manager. Other
requirements: Exceptional
communication skills, both verbal &
written. Excellent organizational
skills & strong attention to detail.
Please submit resume to
jobs@frstmanagementinc.com or
mail to P.O. Box 1797, Lawrence,
KS 66044.
FOUND! IPhone at 13th & Ten
nessee. Call John at 7854236912
to claim.
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This week in athletics
Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Thursday Friday
Mens Basketball
Baylor
6 p.m.
Waco, Texas
Wednesday
Womens Tennis
Colorado
3 p.m.
Lawrence
Mens Basketball
West Virginia
3 p.m.
Lawrence
No Events Womens Basketball
Oklahoma State
7 p.m.
Stillwater, Okla.
Softball
Central Florida
5 p.m.
Orlando, Fla.
Softball
LIU Brooklyn
10 a.m.
Orlando, Fla.
Swimming and Diving
Iowa State
10 a.m.
Ames, Iowa
Track
Armory Collegiate
Invitatational
All day
New York, N.Y.
Mens Basketball
Kansas State
8 p.m.
Manhattan
Womens Basketball
Oklahoma
2 p.m.
Lawrence
Softball
Tennessee-Chattanooga
8 a.m.
Orlando, Fla.
Tennis
Eastern Michigan
10 a.m.
Lawrence
Over the weekend the Jay-
hawks went 1-1 with their du-
als, winning against Vanderbilt
163-130 and falling to Arkan-
sas 207-91, making the Kansas
squad 7-4 in dual meets this
season.
We were better than last
week, which is what we were
going for, coach Clark Camp-
bell said. Te competition
level was high. Te best thing
is to keep pushing and keep
training for the conference
championships.
Senior Morgan Sharp put
eight individual points on the
board for Kansas, leading the
team for point totals. Sharp
swam a 1:52.04 in the 200-
yard freestyle, placing second.
She also fnished second in the
100-yard freestyle, fnishing
with a personal best time of
the season at 51.67.
Sophomore Bryce Hinde and
freshman Pia Pavlic also took
home silver this weekend.
Hinde placed second in the
200-yard breaststroke, clock-
ing in with a time of 2:23.51.
Pavlic was beat by just .15 of a
second in the 100-yard butter-
fy, where she fnished with a
time of 56.98.
We had a good week of
practice this past week and I
thought we had a solid meet,
Campbell said. Swimming is
tough because you can have
a good week of practice and
show up at the meet and not
have good performances.
Arkansas swept the pool,
winning all but two events.
Te other two events, the 100-
yard butterfy and the 200-
yard backstroke, were won by
Vanderbilt swimmers.
Both Arkansas and Vander-
bilt are strong teams and they
both performed well, Camp-
bell said. Its good because
you can use the competition
to help you go faster. We need
teams to push us so that we
can get ready for the tough
competition we will have at the
Big 12 Championships.
Kansas has one more dual
before the Big 12 Champi-
onships. Te Jayhawks will
be making their fnal regular
season splash up in Ames,
Iowa, against the Iowa State
Cyclones this weekend on Feb.
7 and 8.
Edited by Callan Reilly
SWIMMING AND DIVING
AMIE JUST/KANSAN
Junior Caroline Patterson swims the 400 IM on Jan. 25. The Kansas
squad is now 7-4 in dual meets this season.
Kansas defeats Vanderbilt, falls to Arkansas
AMIE JUST
sports@kansan.com
Te Mecca, Te Garden, Te
Worlds Most Famous Arena are just a
few of the nicknames given to Madison
Square Garden. Te Garden is the
home of the New York Knicks and is
located in Manhattan, N.Y. Te rich
history of Te Garden is what has led
to its worldwide renown. It goes as far
back as when Phil Jackson was a Knick
and won two titles there, one that came
against a Pat Riley-led Lakers team.
But even more so in the modern era of
basketball, Te Garden has become the
biggest stage for the worlds best players
to perform on.
Players the likes of LeBron James,
Kobe Bryant and Kyrie Irving all
save their best performances for Te
Garden. Teres something about the
worlds most famous arena. Since 1947,
there have been 24 performances at
Te Garden where 50 or more points
have been scored. Tese games have
been highlighted by Wilt Chamber-
lains astounding six 50-point perfor-
mances. On Nov. 16, 1962, Chamber-
lain scored 73 points at Te Garden,
which was the most in a game in NBA
history until he scored 100 that same
season.
On Saturday night, LeBron James
posted a near triple-double in the
Miami Heats victory over the Knicks.
LeBron scored 30 points and recorded
eight rebounds and seven assists. James
has posted two 50-point games in his
career at Te Garden. He has
had near triple-doubles in both
of those games as well. On Feb.
2, 2009, Kobe Bryant put up 61
percent shooting from the feld
and shot 20-20 from the free-
throw line. Te newest mem-
ber of Te Garden 50-point
club is Stephen Curry. Curry
put up 54 points and shot 11-13 from
beyond the arc.
Te Garden has been home to
many memorable playof games as
well. Te most memorable series was
between the Indiana Pacers and the
New York Knicks in 1995. Tis series
was highlighted by the feud between
Pacers guard Reggie Miller and die-
hard Knicks fan Spike Lee. With 18.7
seconds lef in game one of the Eastern
Conference fnals, the Knicks lead the
Pacers by six points. With 16.4 ticks
lef on the clock, Miller hit a three and
then got the steal on
the ensuing in-bounds
pass. Miller then hit
another three to tie the
game up at 105. Afer two
Knicks collapsed at the oth-
er end of the court, Miller
grabbed the rebound and got
fouled. Before Miller toed the
free throw line, he committed the
most iconic act of taunting in sports
history. Miller looked Spike Lee right
in the eyes and put his hands over his
neck to resemble the Knicks choking.
Te Garden is basketballs great-
est stage. Te greatest players of all
time come to Te Garden and have
the greatest games of their careers.
Whether its the regular season, the
NBA playofs or college basketball, Te
Garden never fails to impress.

Edited by Amber Kasselman
For just the third time in
10 years, the womens tennis
team took down a Top 50
ranked opponent when they
defeated No. 36 Nebraska on
Friday in Lincoln, Neb.
Its great to win in a tough
situation away from home on
the frst match of the year,
coach Todd Chapman said.
Tere are a lot of positives to
take away from.
Te team was able to steal
the doubles point thanks to
a grueling 7-6 victory from
senior Claire Dreyer and
freshman Morgan Barnhill.
Sophomore Maria Jose Car-
dona and junior Maria Belen
Luduea secured the point for
the Jayhawks, topping their
opponent 6-2.
Te squad began singles
play with a 1-0 lead over the
Huskers. To start it of, na-
tionally ranked No. 63, Maggy
Lehmicke of Nebraska held
of Cardona 6-1, 6-4. Te
Jayhawks took back the lead
when Dylan Windom took
down Mary Hanna of Ne-
braska, 6-3, 7-6. Senior Pau-
lina Los grabbed the W over
Lisa Andersson with a score
of 7-6 (7-1), 6-3 to put Kan-
sas up 3-1. Nebraskas Izabella
Zgierska downed Luduea
in a super tiebreaker mak-
ing the score 3-2 Kansas. Te
Jayhawks didnt back down,
receiving another win from
Dreyer in a hard fought super
tiebreaker, ending in a score
of 6-2, 4-6, 1-0 (10-8). Te
Huskers would grab another
win from Hannah Sulz but it
wasnt enough, as Kansas took
the victory 4-3.
Even afer an impressive win
against a ranked opponent,
the team wasnt satisfed with
the way they fnished things
of in Lincoln. Tis attitude
excited Chapman, who said
that even though they won,
the girls were disappointed
that they didnt win by a big-
ger margin.
Tats saying a lot when
we just had the biggest win
in over ten years and theyre
disappointed, Chapman said.
Tat says were getting some-
where in my mind.
According to Chapman, the
girls expectations are much
higher than at the start of the
year and that how the expec-
tations dont just come from
the coaching staf, but from
themselves and each other.
With that comes a little
more pressure, Chapman
said. Tats what were learn-
ing to play with right now, is
how to deal with that pressure
and switch it into confdence.
When you have pressure, that
means youre good enough to
do something.
Te teams next match takes
place this Friday in Lawrence
at the Jayhawk Tennis Center,
where the girls will look to
keep the momentum rolling
against the University of Col-
orado.
Edited by Callan Reilly
AUSTIN, Texas Junior
guard Naadir Tarpe walked
slowly from the Kansas lock-
er room, suited in sweats and
sporting a hat with the words
Business As Usual stitched
on it in big bold letters. His
body language said otherwise.
What felt like the sky falling
in Austin on Saturday might
have just been gravity taking
hold of the Jayhawks. Afer
sprinting out to the head of
the conference through seven
games, the Longhorns proved
this Kansas team hasnt be-
come invincible.
Youre going to have games
like that, Tarpe said afer
No. 6 Kansas (16-5, 7-1 in the
Big 12) fell to No. 25 Texas
81-69.
Games like that happen
when Kansas shoots 25-65
from the feld, gets out-re-
bounded 44-37 and gets
blocked 12 times.
Games like that happen be-
cause, as coach Bill Self said
post-game, Tis is sports,
and you cant come out every
game and play a certain way.
In simpler terms: Kansas
played fat. No highlight-wor-
thy hustle plays, or dunks or
impressive stops on defense.
Te Kansas team that was last
seen Wednesday in Lawrence
putting away Iowa State with
relative ease, more closely re-
sembled the group of clumsy
underclassmen who struggled
to succeed in non-conference
play.
We just didnt come out
with the mindset and the
focus that we usually do,
Tarpe said. We kind of just
gave them the game.
Not that the matchup didnt
start out promising. Te Jay-
hawks connected on their
frst four feld goal attempts
while Texas struggled to fnd
its rhythm. But for the next
35 minutes it was Kansas that
couldnt get it together.
Te Jayhawks fnished the
half shooting 4-27 while the
Longhorns took a 15-point
lead.
Te way you win on the
road is to make sure your op-
ponent plays bad, Self said.
We didnt have that mindset.
Instead Kansas made things
harder on itself, such as fresh-
man guard Andrew Wiggins
settling for shots. Te result
was Wiggins worst game of
the year. Te freshman didnt
hit his frst feld goal until
the 12:06 mark of the second
half. Before then he recorded
just two other points on free
throws in the frst half. Wig-
gins fouled out with two and a
half minutes lef in regulation
afer going 2-12 with seven
points.
Kansas other freshman star,
freshman center Joel Embiid,
didnt fare much better from
the feld, shooting 3-9 al-
though Embiid did come up
with 10 rebounds.
Really the only Jayhawk
who came close to having
a great night was freshman
guard Wayne Selden, Jr., who
recorded 21 points and those
didnt even seem to matter.
Its a long season, Selden
said. We got caught up. Weve
got to take it one game at a
time.
If there was anything alarm-
ing about Kansas play that
could prove problematic in
the future, the lack of aggres-
sion in the paint specifcally
stood out.
Where Texas was able to
fght for 45 free throw at-
tempts, Kansas merely mus-
tered 19 shots from the line.
Te ofense was stale, the de-
fense lethargic. Seldens scor-
ing didnt stick out as much as
his inability to guard.
Even the more experienced
Tarpe, whos been anchor-
ing the Jayhawks as of late,
seemed uninspired. Afer
logging 12 assists last game
against the Cyclones he man-
aged just three in Austin. Self
ended up benching him mid-
way through the second half,
giving freshman guard Frank
Mason a chance to revive the
Jayhawks.
Of course, it didnt matter.
Whatever chemistry Kansas
had built up over the last sev-
en games evaporated at the
Frank Erwin Center which
had its frst sellout since Texas
played Kansas in 2012.
Its not a loss that sets Kan-
sas back much. In the quest
for 10 straight Big 12 titles, the
Jayhawks still lead the confer-
ence and will face Texas again
in Lawrence on Feb. 22.
It just wasnt Business As
Usual for Kansas, rather the
opposite.
We didnt come with a lot
of energy tonight and thats
the result, sophomore for-
ward Perry Ellis said. It hap-
pens.
Edited by Kaitlyn Klein
Volume 126 Issue 70 kansan.com Monday, February 3, 2014
By Blake Schuster
sports@kansan.com
COMMENTARY
Jayhawks suffer
rst Big 12 loss
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
S
WOMENS BASKETBALL
PAGE 10 Gardner sets a career high in scoring against Texas Tech
KANSAS 69 TEXAS 81
BLAKE SCHUSTER
sports@kansan.com
TROUBLE IN TEXAS
Jayhawks fall to Longhorns, ending seven-game winning streak
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Naadir Tharpe looks to the oor after Kansas failed to regain the lead against Texas on Saturday. Kansas lost 81-69.
Kansas defeats No. 36 Nebraska on the road
TENNIS
TORI RUBINSTEIN
sports@kansan.com
A
USTIN, Texas Kansas
was going to lose again.
Tat was obvious.
Even when Iowa State
coach Fred Hoiberg said the
Jayhawks had a shot to go un-
defeated in conference, there
was still little reason to believe
it would happen.
For all the domination that
Kansas showed capable of in
January there was nothing
to say that it was immune to
another bad game.
Still, the Longhorns 81-69
thrashing of the Jayhawks in
Austin on Saturday isnt a sign
that Kansas is back to playing
December ball. Not even close.
Tats sports, coach Bill
Self said afer the loss. I dont
think you can say that every
game a team is going to come
out and play a certain way.
Especially a young team. A
team that has virtually walked
through its frst seven confer-
ence games. Te bumps in the
road seem a lot more mean-
ingless when the victory fag is
fying high.
Freshman guard Andrew
Wiggins three points against
Oklahoma State a few weeks
back didnt look terrible
because his defense remained
solid and Kansas pulled out
the win.
But in Texas, in a loss to the
surprisingly second-best team
in the Big 12, Wiggins looked
as lost as ever. If Kansas had
won, the narrative wouldve
sounded a lot more like what
was said afer defeating the
Cowboys Kansas didnt even
need Wiggins to win that one.
Yes, even the No. 1 overall
recruit and the hidden gem of
the bunch, freshman center
Joel Embiid, are prone to
losing when it feels like they
shouldnt.
What matters now is how
they handle it. What matters
now is that the Jayhawks break
a cycle thats becoming eerily
familiar.
Around this time last season
the Jayhawks fell at home to
Oklahoma State. Te result was
another bad loss at TCU and
one more at Oklahoma right
afer. Kansas eventually fgured
things out and went on to
claim the Big 12 title.
Around this time two
seasons ago Kansas dropped
two out of three games afer
starting out conference play
with seven straight wins.
Tat team didnt lose another
meaningful game until the
National Championship (those
Jayhawks fell to Baylor in the
Big 12 Championship).
Playing at Kansas youre
going to get everybodys best
shot, freshman guard Wayne
Selden Jr. said afer leading
Kansas with 21 points in
Austin.
If the Jayhawks didnt get the
Longhorns best shot, it was
pretty close to it. And all the
bounces and 50-50 balls that
had been going Kansas way
were nowhere in sight on a day
worth forgetting.
Which is what the message in
the locker room was afer Kan-
sas dropped its frst conference
game.
Te game is over, sopho-
more forward Perry Ellis said.
We have to move on and get
ready for Baylor.
Edited by Amber Kasselman

We just didnt come out with the mindset and the focus that we
usually do. We kind of just gave them the game.
NAADIR THARPE
Junior guard
Thats saying a lot when we just had the biggest win in over
10 years and theyre disappointed. That says were getting
somewhere in my mind.
TODD CHAPMAN
Coach