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com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 145
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd. #1
South San Francisco, CA
94080
Pillar Point Harbor
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay, CA
94019
It doesn’t get any fresher!
Just caught seafood for sale right at the
docks at Pillar Point Harbor.
SYRIAN AIRSTRIKE
WORLD PAGE 31
OBAMA’S POLICY
UNSUPPORTED
BUSINESS PAGE 10
BRUNO MARS LIGHTS
UP HALFTIME SHOW
NATION PAGE 8
AT LEAST 36 KILLED BY GOVERNMENT RAIDS
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Although the governor’s
drought declaration is less than a
month old, San Mateo County
farmers and ranchers have been
struggling with dry conditions
for years and are fearful it will
continue.
Agricultural workers in the
county rely on water sourced
from wells, rainfall and reser-
voirs that capture from creeks or
ponds. The drought is acutely
daunting to those who are at the
mercy of the weather, said John
Muller, a Half Moon Bay coun-
cilman and farmer.
“I don’t think there’s too many
farmers in this
world that don’t
wake up in the
middle of the
night not wor-
rying about
growing condi-
tions or weath-
er conditions,” Muller said.
Often when a crop is out of sea-
son, a farmer plants cover vege-
tation to capture moisture, deter
erosion and put nutrients back
into the soil, Muller said. Poor
soil quality can affect what’s
grown for years and he’ll proba-
bly purchase fewer seeds and har-
vest less produce, Muller said.
The Westland Water District
serves approximately 600,000
acres of agriculture lands in the
San Joaquin Valley. Because of
the drought, about 200,000 acres
may be fallowed this year and
there will be less produce, Muller
said.
“That’s huge. That’s frighten-
ing to think of that,” Muller
said. “There could definitely be a
spike in food costs. Cattleman
are having to sell their cattle,
dairy farmers are worrying about
fee costs. It’s a huge chain reac-
tion that impacts all of us in
America. California does produce
a major portion of our food prod-
ucts for America and the world.”
Doniga Markegard runs a cattle
ranch with her husband Erik and
Farmers, ranchers struggling
Drought having severe impact on San Mateo County food producers
SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL
Erik and Doniga Markegard assess the damage the drought has caused on
their Half Moon Bay cattle ranch.
REUTERS
Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning walks off the field after a set of downs against the Seattle
Seahawks in the third quarter. The Seahawks won 43-8 at the NFL Super Bowl XLVIII football game in East
Rutherford, New Jersey. SEE SPORTS PAGE 11.
DENVER IS DOMINATED
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo County is 52 mil-
lion meals short of meeting its
need — a 10 percent increase
from the previous year — and the
situation is looking more dire due
to food stamp cuts and the
drought.
The 2012 Hunger Index, which
measures the difference between
the need for food and the ability
of individuals to receive it, found
that the 47 million missing
meals in 2011 jumped to 52 mil-
lion in 2012. In that same peri-
od, food assistance increased
from 40 million meals to 44 mil-
lion meals.
The increasing divide is worri-
some, said Kathy Jackson, CEO
of Second Harvest Food Bank,
but the data should be tempered
by noting that it comes from
2012 rather than today or even
last year. The economy overall is
in a better position but Jackson
said signs of improvement like
housing and rental increases
ironically can make life tougher
for those struggling to make ends
meet.
Reports shows county
hunger gap widening
Second Harvest Food Bank says drought,
federal food stamp cuts increasing need
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With startups flourishing along
the Peninsula, a new center is
being opened to help support both
veteran and new entrepreneurs.
The Bay Area Entrepreneur
Center, in a partnership with
Skyline College, will be opening
in San Bruno this year, offering
classes and seminars on a variety
of topics. Topics include optimiz-
ing search engine results, certified
classes, classes with shorter dura-
tions for college credits, classes
Entrepreneur center
opening in San Bruno
Skyline College partners for incubator project
FARMS
STRUGGLING
STATEWIDE
See page 6
INSIDE
See FARMS, Page 22
See HUNGER, Page 22
See SKYLINE, Page 21
Reptile consignment
intercepted in South Africa
JOHANNESBURG — A large ship-
ment of reptiles smuggled from
Madagascar and destined for the exot-
ic pet trade in the United States were
confiscated in South Africa, said ani-
mal protection activists.
An estimated 1,600 reptiles and
amphibians were discovered during a
routine inspection at Johannesburg’s
international airport, said South
Africa’s Society for the Prevention
of Cruelty to Animals said in a state-
ment Friday.
Geckos, frogs, chameleons,
skinks, lizards and toads, many of
which are endangered species, were
tied up in small muslin bags, or
crammed into overcrowded plastic
tubs for approximately 5 days before
they were discovered. Many of the
animals had already died.
The animals, bound for the U.S.
from Madagascar, were left unattend-
ed in the cargo area when flights to
the U.S. were cancelled. The surviv-
ing reptiles were taken to the
Johannesburg Zoo for treatment,
according to local news reports.
Dead Puerto Rico boxer
posed standing in the ring
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Even in
death, Christopher Rivera Amaro
almost looked ready to box, leaning
against the corner of a simulated
ring.
Mourners who came to his wake in
San Juan on Friday found him posed
afoot, a yellow hood on his head,
sunglasses glasses over his eyes and
blue boxing gloves on his hands.
Elsie Rodriguez, vice president of
the Marin Funeral Home, said
Rivera’s family wanted to stress his
boxing. The funeral home suggested
posing him in a ring.
The makeshift ring was set up in a
community center of a public hous-
ing complex. Rodriguez told The
Associated Press it took them several
hours to create the scene.
The funeral home has staged simi-
lar wakes for others. One featured a
deceased man riding his motorcycle.
The 23-year-old Rivera had a 5-15
record in the 130-pound weight
class. Police said he was shot dead
Sunday in the city of Santurce. No
one has been arrested.
Handlers: Punxsutawney
Phil predicts longer winter
PUNXSUTAWNEY, Pa. — Emergi ng
from his lair on Super Bowl Sunday,
groundhog Punxsutawney Phil could-
n’t predict the winner of the big game
but his handlers said he was sure of
his weather forecast: There will be
six more weeks of winter.
Pennsylvania’s famed groundhog
was roused from slumber at 7:28 a.m.
Sunday and, according to the
Punxsutawney Groundhog Club,
directed handler Bill Deeley to a
scroll that contained the prediction -
along with a Super Bowl reference.
As usual, thousands of fans turned
out on Groundhog Day to see the
furry rodent, the most famous of a
small group of groundhogs said to
forecast the weather.
Legend has it that if the groundhog
sees his shadow on Feb. 2, winter
will last another month-and-a-half. If
he doesn’t see it, spring will come
early.
In reality, Phil’s prediction is
decided ahead of time by a group
called the Inner Circle, whose mem-
bers don top hats and tuxedos for the
annual ceremony on Gobbler’s
Knob, the tiny hill in the town for
which he’s named about 65 miles
northeast of Pittsburgh.
The prediction fell on Super Bowl
Sunday for the first time. The closest
the game previously came to coincid-
ing with Groundhog Day was in
2009, when the just-down-the-road
Pittsburgh Steelers defeated the
Arizona Cardinals 27-23 the night
before Phil’s forecast.
This year’s NFL championship pit-
ting the Seattle Seahawks and Denver
Broncos at MetLife Stadium in East
Rutherford, N.J., will be the Super
Bowl’s 48th installment, while Phil
has been predicting the weather since
1886.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor Nathan Lane
is 58.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1959
Rock-and-roll stars Buddy Holly,
Ritchie Valens and J.P. “The Big
Bopper” Richardson died in a small
plane crash near Clear Lake, Iowa. An
American Airlines Lockheed Electra
crashed into New York’s East River,
killing 65 of the 73 people on board.
“Your friend
will argue with you.”
— Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Russian writer (1918-2008)
Actress Morgan
Fairchild is 64.
Rapper Sean
Kingston is 24.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A clown sits before an annual church service in memory of Joseph Grimaldi, Britain's best loved clown who lived from
1778 to 1837, at Holy Trinity Church in Dalston, east London.
Monday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the
lower 50s. Northeast winds 5 to 15
mph...Becoming northwest 15 to 20 mph
in the afternoon.
Monday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly clear.
Lows in the lower 40s. Northwest winds
10 to 20 mph.
Tuesday: Partly cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Highs in the lower 50s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the lower to mid 40s.
Wednesday through thursday...Mostly cloudy. A slight
chance of rain. Highs in the mid 50s. Lows in the lower to
mid 40s.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy. Aslight chance of rain. Lows
around 40.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1014, Sweyn I, the king of Denmark, Norway and
England, died in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, just over a
month after being declared ruler of the English.
I n 1783, Spain formally recognized American independ-
ence.
I n 1865, President Abraham Lincoln and Confederate Vice
President Alexander H. Stephens held a shipboard peace
conference off the Virginia coast; the talks deadlocked over
the issue of Southern autonomy.
I n 1913, the 16th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution,
providing for a federal income tax, was ratified.
I n 1924, the 28th president of the United States, Woodrow
Wilson, died in Washington, D.C., at age 67.
I n 1930, the chief justice of the United States, William
Howard Taft, resigned for health reasons. (He died just over
a month later. )
I n 1943, during World War II, the U.S. transport ship
Dorchester, which was carrying troops to Greenland, sank
after being hit by a German torpedo; of the more than 900
men aboard, only some 230 survived.
I n 1966, the Soviet probe Luna 9 became the first manmade
object to make a soft landing on the moon.
I n 1972, the XI Olympic Winter Games opened in
Sapporo, Japan.
I n 1989, Alfredo Stroessner, president of Paraguay for
more than three decades, was overthrown in a military coup.
I n 1994, the space shuttle Discovery lifted off, carrying
Sergei Krikalev, the first Russian cosmonaut to fly aboard a
U.S. spacecraft.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
FIGHT AVOID LOCKET GOBBLE
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: Kicking the ball between the uprights to win
the game was his — FIELD GOAL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NUROD
BUGRY
CHOSOM
HERTOB
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Print answer here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Big Ben, No. 4,
in first place; Eureka, No. 7, in second place; and
Lucky Charms,No.12,in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:40.56.
1 0 3
3 9 13 47 52 8
Mega number
Jan. 31 Mega Millions
5 12 15 27 38 7
Powerball
Feb. 1 Powerball
9 19 26 38 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
3 3 8 6
Daily Four
0 8 9
Daily three evening
9 14 15 16 44 24
Mega number
Feb. 1 Super Lotto Plus
Comedian Shelley Berman is 89. Former Sen. Paul
Sarbanes, D-Md., is 81. Football Hall-of-Famer Fran
Tarkenton is 74. Actress Bridget Hanley is 73. Actress Blythe
Danner is 71. Singer Dennis Edwards is 71. Football Hall-of-
Famer Bob Griese is 69. Singer-guitarist Dave Davies (The
Kinks) is 67. Singer Melanie is 67. Actress Pamela Franklin
is 64. Rock musician Lee Ranaldo (Sonic Youth) is 58. Actor
Thomas Calabro is 55. Actor-director Keith Gordon is 53.
Actress Michele Greene is 52. Country singer Matraca Berg is
50. Actress Maura Tierney is 49. Actor Warwick Davis is 44.
Actress Elisa Donovan is 43.
3
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BURLINGAME
Disturbance. A person complained about
unwanted phone calls made to their home in
the middle of the night on the 1600 block of
Chapin Avenue before 10:41 a.m. Sunday,
Jan. 26.
Ani mal cal l. Officers contacted the owners
of dog who attacked another dog on the
1200 block of Burlingame Avenue before
5:22 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26.
Public intoxication. Officers found a man
behind a store with his pants down and took
him to the hospital because he required med-
ical attention on the 1800 block of El Camino
Real before 5:54 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26.
REDWOOD CITY
Vandal i sm. Three employees had their
vans egged on Middlefield Road before
11:12 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstances. Aman hold-
ing a wire tried to open the door of a truck
before 9:44 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26.
Armed robbery. Four people reportedly
pulled a gun and attempted to rob the
Stevens Creek Toyota on Clinton Street
before 8:02 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26.
Disturbance. Aman received a phone call
from a person making threats that his house
would be shot on Topaz Street before 7:10
p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26.
Police reports
Fastball
Aman reported his ex-roommate stole a
radar gun that belongs to the San Mateo
Little League on the 2700 block of
South Norfolk Street in San Mateo
before 10:16 p.m. Friday, Jan. 24.
T
he 1849 Gold Rush presented oppor-
tunities of great wealth for those
who left the settled communities
from the East Coast and other lands. Those
who were smart set reasonable goals for
their life and the money that was presented
to them. Unfortunately the gold fields didn’t
keep the 49ers busy for the entire year and
when the rains came in the winter, most left
for the settle community of San Francisco.
With time on their hands now, most of the
men (it was a male community) sought
pleasure in the forms offered in this devel-
oping community. Gambling became the
favorite pastime with cards, dice and horse
racing predominate.
The need to travel to San Jose to San
Francisco posed a problem due to the
unpaved and unimproved path that was the
main way to travel on foot and horseback.
In good weather, it could be traveled in a day
but bridge washouts and muddy, gumbo clay
sometimes made it impossible to complete
the trip in one or two days time. The devel-
opment of El Camino Real started with the
need for food and lodging along the way. In
San Bruno, a wide, deep and dangerous creek
by Crystal Springs Road presented delays in
the rainy season so an enterprising individ-
ual built a small shack to supply food for the
horses and men who got stuck there waiting
for the water to go down. Business was so
good that the shack was soon enlarged into
a permanent two-story, well-constructed
roadhouse. Being 14 miles from the
Mission Dolores, it became named “The 14-
Mile House.” Eventually, not only food and
shelter was offered, but entertainment and
gambling. It grew into an institution
known throughout the state.
In the late 1850s, a toll road was built that
made it possible to get to San Francisco by
traveling around (to the east side) San Bruno
Mountain. This shortened the time travel-
ing to San Francisco. Just before a railroad
(San Francisco and San Jose Railroad) was
built through San Bruno, Mr. Cunningham
purchased land to the east of El Camino Real
(where the American Legion is now). The
railroad was built through his property and
Cunningham built two two-story buildings
he named “The San Bruno House.” His bar
was advertised as the biggest bar in the
county. Asmall horse track was built also as
well as trap-shoot across the road and the
area developed into a sportsmen’s paradise.
Boxing bouts were scheduled and thousands
would flock to the area for weekend festivi-
ties.
In the late 1880s, a former manager of the
14-Mile House, August Jenevein, bought
the land across from the street, at a triangu-
lar corner, and he built a magnificent two-
story, New Orleans-style architecture hotel
he advertised as being a “family” oriented
hotel. The reputation of the 14-Mile House
had become too risqué for many travelers.
Since the late 1840s, San Francisco’s
development had been one of a traditional
“western town,” wide-open, bent-hell for
pleasure community. Uncontrolled crime
was common and the businessmen took
advantage of little law enforcement by run-
ning crooked gambling joints. The area
soon sported many places for horse racing.
In the Mission District, a track was built to
the north of Army Street where Lake Dolores
once stood. The entire area became a pleas-
ure center. Restaurants, bars and gambling
abounded that allowed the miners all types
of opportunity to spend their money.
Another race track was built in Bayside
(near Hunters Point), another to the west in
Ingleside. Many more stood for short times
and have been forgotten. The gambling,
however, eventually posed too many prob-
lems for the police and horse racing in San
Francisco was outlawed in the 1890s.
When the Spanish arrived on the
Peninsula in the 1770s, they found a nice,
pleasant stretch of land that was ideal on
which to race horses. This piece of land
stood in what is now San Bruno. When
horse racing was outlawed in San Francisco,
this offered an opportunity to develop a
track on the site that had been used for rac-
ing for many years.
With the demise of horse racing in San
Francisco, a new horse racing track was
built on property to the north of Uncle
Tom’s Cabin (14-Mile House). With the rail-
road to the east of the stands, it was easy for
patrons from San Francisco to travel to the
Tanforan race track. However, when gam-
bling was outlawed by the state, the track
became used for the coming fad — the auto-
mobile. Auto races were scheduled until
World War I when the area was used to train
soldiers to go to Europe to fight. The track
never recovered without gambling and it
was torn down in 1918.
In 1922, with new investors and a modi-
fied gambling attitude by lawmakers, a new
track was built on the west side of the site,
along El Camino Real.
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold
Fredricks appears in the Monday edition of
the Daily Journal.
Pleasure centers of San Bruno
PHOTO COURTESY OF FRED BELTROMO
After 100 years,the area around the famous Uncle Tom’s Cabin (14-Mile House),was developed
for housing in the 1940s.
4
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
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San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
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Job Requirements:
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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Brian Ponty isn’t sure what his
next chapter holds but the retiring
Redwood City finance director is
pretty sure his wife does.
“She has a very keen talent in
keeping me occupied around the
house. I don’t think I’ll get
bored,” Ponty said.
Ponty also has college visits
with his son, golf and a “proper
vacation” without constant email
and iPad checks on his post-city
career to-do list. Although after so
many years with finance pretty
much his life, Ponty said he does-
n’t have too many hard and fast
plans for days when he’s not liv-
ing and breathing municipal gov-
ernment.
“I’m just looking forward to a
blank canvas,” he said.
After 30 years keeping Redwood
City’s finances in check, Ponty,
56, is leaving in May. During his
tenure, Ponty has seen quite a few
changes and says without hesita-
tion the downtown development
is the biggest.
He’s also seen his share of sur-
prises. One of them — the state’s
dissolution of redevelopment
agencies — and the ensuring
headaches prompted thoughts of
changing course about two years
ago.
“I started to think about how life
would look,” he said. “I wanted the
opportunity to retire and spend
more time with my family and
experience other things in life.”
But as much as Ponty said he’s
looking to the future, he also cele-
brates his time with Redwood
City. Ponty, who graduated with
degrees in accounting finance
from CSU East Bay, spent four and
a half years as a management ana-
lyst with San Mateo County
before opening the paper one
Sunday and spotting the Redwood
City job advertisement that would
put him on his current path. The
position offered the breadth and
depth of a city’s overall financial
picture rather than pigeonholing
him in a smaller niche like budget-
ing or treasury management.
He joined the city in 1985 as an
assistant finance director and
accepted the finance director spot
in November 1993. When he first
joined the city, he estimated stay-
ing three to five years. His depar-
ture marks significantly more time
passed than that initial prediction
and he currently oversees a depart-
ment staff of 18 and a budget that
includes estimated general fund
revenues of $86.6 million.
Ponty said he’s always enjoyed
finance and how it allows him to
solve problems. He appreciates
pulling together his team and
gathering around a white board to
find the answers. Those are the
people he counts among what
he’ll miss most.
He is also grateful for a city
which he said allowed him to reach
those conclusions without being
bogged down in a tedious process.
That license to act is part of why
he stayed so long, Ponty said.
City brass say they are also glad
for Ponty’s longevity.
“Brian has been instrumental in
seeing us through tough financial
times,” said City Manager Bob
Bell. “His expertise in ‘all things
financial,’ his ability to look
beyond the numbers to see the
impacts of financial decisions on
staff and our community, and his
calm and professional demeanor
will be missed.”
The city is actively recruiting
for Ponty’s replacement and Bell
said it is a tall order.
“As city manager, I know that
finding someone to fill Brian’s
shoes will not be easy, but I am
confident that our city’s reputation
for fiscal health and strong leader-
ship will attract top quality candi-
dates for this important posi-
tion,” he said.
A posting notes the window
closes Monday, Feb. 17 and the
salary range is $164,676 to
$201,216. The recruitment char-
acterizes the ideal candidate as an
“adept manager of people” with an
“exceptional customer orienta-
tion.”
Ponty’s advice for his successor
is more straightforward — come
with a healthy passion for munici-
pal finance and curiosity.
Ponty doesn’t discount the pos-
sibility of coming back to work
for a government or nonprofit
agency where he can add value.
Although he’s ready to step away
from a full-time workload, Ponty
said there are still many aspects of
the job he enjoys.
“This is where I realized what
my role on Earth is,” he said.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Longtime city finance director retiring
Brian Ponty has helped manage Redwood City’s money for 30 years
MICHELLE DURAND/DAILY JOURNAL
Brian Ponty is retiring after working for Redwood City for 30 years.
5
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The all-apparent lack of rain has
put a thorn in the side of the coun-
ty’s planned reseeding of the
endangered thornmint plant at
Edgewood Park.
Using an innovative govern-
mental crowdfunding site, parks
officials and supporters were
recently able to make donations
pour into its thornmint seeding
project. Mother Nature, however,
has been a lot more stingy.
Although some precipitation is
predicted, it will likely be too lit-
tle too late for the plants to com-
plete a normal life cycle, wrote
Julia Bott, San Mateo County
Parks Foundation director, and
Stuart B. Weiss and Christal
Niederer, of the Creekside Center
for Earth Observation, in a letter
to “thornmint lovers.”
The seeding has now been post-
poned until next year and the
$5,400 raised through Citizinvestor
will be placed in a special founda-
tion fund earmarked only for this
project, according to Bott.
Bott said the foundation consid-
ered supplemental irrigation but
doing so is logistically tough
because it would be the primary
source of water rather than just a
helping hand.
The thornmint is an annual
plant standing 2 to 4 inches high
with white and purple flowers and
some thorns. The plant, which is
on both the federal and state
endangered species lists, was
only ever identified in San Mateo
County and now is only in a secret
location in Edgewood Park. This
single population has been on the
decline for years, with an estimate
of more than 53,000 plants in
1994 dropping to only 249 indi-
viduals counted in 2008. That
year, the restoration project
began and, by May 2011, the
population hit 3,450. But without
seeding the last few years, the
number of plants again plummet-
ed and advocates had hoped the
December 2013 planting window
would result in springtime
blooms.
The county’s parks have no ded-
icated source of funding and are
often first on the budgetary chop-
ping block which is why wish list
projects like this are often in the
hands of public generosity.
The county Parks Foundation
turned to Citizinvestor late last
year to fund the thornmint plant-
ing along with proposals to
replace the fire rings at Memorial
Park and three months worth of
funding for the Bicycle Sunday
program, the closure of Cañada
Road for non-motorized activity.
Donors could pledge any amount
but were not charged unless the
given project reached 100 percent
of its funding goal before the
deadline ends.
The fire ring idea never really
caught on and fell short of its
$27,540 goal. The foundation
finally pulled the project and
instead extended the Bicycle
Sunday investment. The funding
window for that project closes in a
week and Bott said it still needs to
raise a little more than $4,300.
The total could be met by a few
big gifts and lots of little contri-
butions, Bott said.
For more information and to
donate, visit
www.citizinvestor.com
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Drought proves thorn in side of seeding project
County Parks Foundation shifting focus to Bicycle Sunday effort
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — Walter Cottle
Lester, a third-generation
California farmer who stubbornly
refused to sell his family’s 237-
acre ranch to developers even as
Silicon Valley rose up around it
and made the land worth hundreds
of millions of dollars, has died at
age 88.
Lester died of natural causes on
Friday, a day before a 4-mile
perimeter trail representing the
first piece of a future park and agri-
cultural preserve that will occupy
his family homestead opened to
the public, The San Jose Mercury
News reported .
Lester deeded the land, which
had been in his family since the
1860s and where fruit and grains
still are grown, to Santa Clara
County and the state starting a
decade ago on the condition that it
remain as open space forever.
At his request, the future Martial
Cottle Park will be named for his
maternal grandfather, who
bequeathed the ranch to Lester’s
mother, who in turn passed it on to
her son and his sister,
who died 15 years ago.
Lester, who never
married or had chil-
dren, died in the same
140-year-old farmhouse where he
was born. He was the last surviv-
ing member of the Cottle family
and Silicon Valley’s last big farm
owner, the Mercury News reported.
He repeatedly turned down offers
from developers eager to secure
the prime south San Jose real
estate and could have gotten as
much as $500 million for the
property, the newspaper said.
“People ask: Why didn’t Walter
sell and go buy an island? Well,
his world was right here,” said
David Giordano, who managed
Lester’s farming operation for the
past two decades. “His duty in life,
as he perceived it, was to preserve
the ranch in its entirety. ”
Current plans call for the park to
include a visitor center that
explores the area’s agricultural
past, picnic areas and parcels that
can be leased for farming and the
crops sold at local markets.
Former Santa Clara Supervisor
Susanne Wilson, who worked with
Lester to hammer out the preserva-
tion deal, said the project will be a
tribute to his determination.
“He was just a crusty old farmer
who had a dream, and he stuck with
it. He was stubborn and crotchety,
and a loner in many ways. He
knew what he wanted,” Wilson
said. “He wasn’t about to relin-
quish one bit of that land. He was
here first, and, by golly, he had
rights.”
Silicon Valley’s last big farm owner dies at 88
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6
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE
By Scott Smith
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MENDOTA — Amid California’s driest
year on record, the nation’s leading agricul-
tural region is locked in drought and bracing
for unemployment to soar, sending farm
workers to food lines in a place famous for
its abundance.
One-third of the Central Valley’s jobs are
related to farming. Strains on water sup-
plies are expected to force farmers to leave
fields unplanted, creating a ripple effect on
food processing plant workers, truck driv-
ers and those who sell fertilizer, irrigation
equipment and tractors.
No place may be harder hit than Mendota,
a small farm town where unemployment
rose above 40 percent at the height of the
economic recession in 2009, also a dry
year. Mayor Robert Silva said he fears this
year could be even worse.
“We’re supposed to be the cantaloupe cap-
ital of the world,” Silva said. “But we’re the
food line capital of the world.”
Residents of Mendota late last year began
seeing tough times on the horizon when lit-
tle rain fell in the valley and snow didn’t
blanket the High Sierra. This marks the
third consecutive dry year for California,
and Gov. Jerry Brown has declared a drought
emergency.
This past week, the snow pack’s water
content was measured at 12 percent of nor-
mal. State officials announced that they
would not be sending water to California’s
agricultural customers. U.S. officials are
expected in late February to announce they
will allot only a fraction of the federally
controlled water that farmers want, if any.
If that scenario plays out, Silva estimates
the lines they saw outside a Mendota food
bank five years ago could run three times as
long this year. His town’s unemployment
today is at 34 percent — the highest in
Fresno County — and interim City Manager
Don Pauley figures it will top 50 percent.
Officials at Mendota’s City Hall aren’t the
only uneasy ones. Steve Malanca, general
manager at Thomason Tractor in Firebaugh,
said farmers have already told him that dig-
ging deeper wells and buying irrigation
water are higher priorities in 2014 than
investing in new farm equipment from him.
With reduced work in the fields, Malanca
said it’s clear he will have to lay off some of
his 49 employees.
The ripple effect of drought extends to the
trucking companies that haul crops, tire
companies that outfit the big rigs and fuel
suppliers who provide diesel, he said.
Employees at John Deere world headquarters
in Moline, Ill., will feel repercussions from
drought in California, the biggest agricul-
tural producer, he said. So will the business-
es that make cardboard boxes to hold can-
taloupes and the wooden pallets for stacking
the boxes, Malanca said. The list goes on.
“When you make a hay bale, you’ve got
to tie that bale with string,” he said. “The
supplier who made that string, he’s going
to be out of work, too.”
A 2012 study by the Agricultural Issues
Center at the University of California,
Davis, found that farming and food process-
ing industries created nearly 38 percent of
all Central Valley jobs. Every 100 farm and
processing jobs create work for another 92
people, said the report, which measured
agriculture’s impact on the state’s economy.
Farmers brace for drought, unemployment
REUTERS
A visitor walks near the receding waters at Folsom Lake, which is 17 percent of its capacity, in
Folsom.
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
NAPA— Police arrested a mother and her
boyfriend Sunday after being questioned in
connection with the sexual assault and
homicide of the woman’s three-year-old
daughter in Napa on Saturday, according to a
police lieutenant.
The girl’s mother, Sara Krueger, 23, and
her boyfriend, Ryan Scott Warner, 26, have
both been arrested for assault resulting in a
child’s death, homicide, and special circum-
stances murder, according to police. The
homicide investigation began at about 1
p.m. on Saturday when Napa police received
an anonymous phone call requesting a wel-
fare check at an apartment in the 2000
block of Wilkins Avenue for a three-year-old
girl, police said.
Officers entered the apartment and found
the young girl deceased in her bed, police
said.
Detectives found evidence of foul play,
observed signs of blunt force trauma
injuries on the child’s body, and found pre-
liminary evidence of a sexual assault,
according to Napa police Lt. Debbie
Peecook.
The girl’s mother and her mother’s
boyfriend were not home when police
arrived and had been last seen carrying lug-
gage from Krueger’s apartment at about 10
a.m. on Saturday, according to police.
Neither Krueger nor Warner owns a vehi-
cle and police were not been able to reach
them on their cellphones, Peecook said.
Regional law enforcement was advised to
be on the lookout for the couple, police
said.
An citizen saw the couple at a restaurant in
El Cerrito, about 30 miles south of Napa,
and reported their whereabouts to police.
BARTpolice detained Krueger and Warner at
the El Cerrito del Norte BART station, at
about 11 a.m. Sunday, according to
Peecook.
Napa police officers picked up the couple
and interviewed them about the circum-
stances surrounding the death of Krueger’s
daughter. Both Warner and Krueger were
booked into the Napa County Department of
Corrections, according to Peecook.
Detective Andy Hess is in charge of the
investigation and anyone with information
regarding this case is urged to contact him at
ahess@cityofnapa.org.
Mother arrested in connection with 3-year-old girl’s death
NATION 7
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama’s new declaration that he’s open
to legalizing many immigrants short of
citizenship sounds a lot like House
Speaker John Boehner and other GOP
leaders, an election-year compromise
that numerous Republicans as well as
Democrats crave.
But the drive for the first overhaul in
three decades still faces major resistance
from many Republicans who are wary that
the divisive issue could derail what they
see as a smooth glide path to winning
November’s congressional elections.
And they deeply distrust the Democratic
president to enforce the law.
Just hours after Boehner pitched immigra-
tion to the GOP at a Maryland retreat,
Obama suddenly indicated he would be open
to legal status for many
of the 11 million living
here illegally, dropping
his once-ironclad insis-
tence on a special path
to citizenship.
Democrats, including
Obama, and other immi-
gration proponents have
warned repeatedly about
the creation of a two-tier
class system.
“If the speaker proposes something that
says right away, folks aren’t being deport-
ed, families aren’t being separated, we’re
able to attract top young students to provide
the skills or start businesses here, and then
there’s a regular process of citizenship, I’m
not sure how wide the divide ends up being,”
Obama said in a CNN interview that was
recorded Thursday and aired Friday.
Obama’s flexibility is a clear indication
of the president’s desire to secure an elusive
legislative achievement
before voters decide
whether to hand him even
more opposition in
Congress. Republicans
are expected to maintain
their grip on the House
and have a legitimate
shot at grabbing the
majority in the Senate.
“I’m going to do
everything I can in the coming months to
see if we can get this over the finish line,”
Obama said Friday of an immigration over-
haul in a Google Plus Hangout talk.
In an earlier compromise, Obama sig-
naled late last year that he could accept the
House’s piecemeal, bill-by-bill approach to
immigration changes after months of back-
ing a comprehensive, bipartisan Senate
bill. Notably, he calibrated his comments
on immigration in his State of the Union
address this week.
“I think he realizes that this is a very del-
icate issue, it’s very controversial and I
think his recent statements have been very,
very positive in allowing us to move for-
ward,” Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla., a
proponent of immigration overhaul, told
reporters Friday.
Boehner, for his part, tried to sell his
reluctant broader caucus on tackling immi-
gration this year by casting it as critical to
job creation, economic growth and nation-
al security. The speaker, along with Reps.
Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and Jeff Denham, R-
Calif., argued for action in a closed-door
session with other House Republicans
Thursday at their annual retreat in
Cambridge, Md.
Boehner rejected the idea of a special path
to citizenship.
“If Democrats insist on that, then we are
not going to get anywhere this year,” he
said.
Citizenship for immigrants? Obama eases insistence
John Boehner Barack Obama
By Mathew Daly
and Dina Cappiello
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The White
House has rebuffed repeated
protests by some of President
Barack Obama’s top environmen-
tal allies that his climate strategy
won’t work.
The heads of 18 environmental
groups went public recently with a
complaint they have privately
pressed the White House on for
months: Obama’s support of
expanded oil and gas production
doesn’t make sense for a president
who wants to reduce global warm-
ing pollution.
“We believe that continued
reliance on an ‘all-of-the-above’
energy strategy would be funda-
mentally at odds with your goal of
cutting carbon pollution,” the
environmentalists wrote in a let-
ter to Obama this month.
The plea from some of his
staunchest supporters did not stop
Obama, who proclaimed in his
State of the Union address Tuesday
that his energy strategy is work-
i ng.
“Taken together, our energy pol-
icy is creating jobs and leading to
a cleaner, safer planet,” said
Obama, who also declared that
“climate change is a fact.”
The dispute between Obama and
the leaders of major green groups
has been simmering for months, a
schism that shows the fine line the
environmental community has
walked with a Democratic presi-
dent who has taken significant
steps on climate change and the
recalcitrance of Obama’s White
House when it is criticized, even
by its allies.
White House officials knew last
spring that a letter objecting to
Obama’s energy policy was in the
works. They urged the environ-
mental groups to wait until after
Obama delivered a speech on cli-
mate change in June, hoping his
aggressive steps on global warm-
ing would change their minds.
“There is a cognitive dissonance
inside the administration,”
Michael Brune, executive director
of the Sierra Club, said in an inter-
view with The Associated Press.
“We believe their commitment to
fight climate change is genuine,
and yet the energy policy goals of
the administration make address-
ing climate change much more dif-
ficult.”
The environmental groups’
stance could be dismissed as advo-
cacy groups just doing what they
do — pushing the president to go
further on an issue important to
their members. Already, they have
protested a pipeline project carry-
ing Canadian tar sands oil into the
U.S., fought to shutter coal-fired
power plants and opposed the
drilling technique known as
hydraulic fracturing.
But for the major groups, the
letter marked new territory, the
first time the lobby has been both
united and sharply critical of
Obama’s central environmental
issue, one they support in princi-
ple: curbing climate change.
“Not a lot of these groups have
said it aloud. It does mark a shift in
environmental community,” said
Maura Cowley, executive director
of the Energy Action Coalition,
who signed the letter.
That shift was clear in the reac-
tion to Obama’s State of the
Union. Groups that had viewed the
June climate speech positively
pointed out what they saw as a flaw
in logic in the president’s remarks
Tuesday night.
Green groups: Obama not doing enough on climate
NATION 8
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tuesday February 4th 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Zephyr Café
3643 Balboa Street
San Francisco, CA 94121
(Outer Richmond District San Francisco)
Tuesday February 4th 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Peninsula Jewish Community Center
800 Foster City Blvd.
Foster City, CA 94404
Conference Room A
(THIS EVENT/PROGRAM IS NOT SPONSORED BY THE PJCC)
Wednesday February 5th 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Home Town Buffet
212 Greenhouse Marketplace
San Leandro, CA 94579
Wednesday February 5th 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
City of Belmont Twin Pines Lodge
40 Twin Pines Lane
Belmont, CA 94002
Thursday February 6th 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Millbrae Library – Room A
1 Library Lane
Millbrae, CA 94030
Thursday February 6th 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
CyBelle’s Front Room Restaurant
1385 9th Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94122
(Sunset District)
Tuesday February 11th 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
City of Palo Alto Community Center
2415 University Avenue
East Palo Alto, CA 94303
Tuesday February 11th 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Jewish Center of San Francisco - Room 209
3200 California Street
San Francisco, CA 94118
THIS IS NOT A PROGRAM BY THE JCCSF
(Parking is available underneath building - Bring
Self-Parking Ticket into Seminar for Validation)
Wednesday February 12th 10:00AM to 12:00PM
Piccolo Ristorante Italiano
651-H Maloney Lane
Menlo Park, CA 94025
Wednesday February 12th 2:00PM to 4:00PM
Shari’s Cafe
2010 Rollingwood Drive
San Bruno, CA 94066
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By Chris Talbott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Anybody worried about how Bruno Mars
would do on one of the world’s largest
stages had obviously never seen the young
star perform live. That all changed Sunday
night when tens of millions got their first
chance to see why he’s one of the most
exciting live acts of his generation.
Mars, 28, took his high-powered live
show to Super Bowl halftime, creating what
felt like an intimate show in the arena in
East Rutherford, N.J., and supersizing it in
what has become a defining moment for
those who preceded him on the list of half-
time performers in the big game.
The Grammy Award-winning singer elimi-
nated any doubters from the second he
appeared on screen in a skinny tie and gold
jacket almost as dazzling as his smile. He
played a deep-groove drum solo while
rolling across the field on a raised, motor-
ized platform, then joined his smoking-hot
live band for a series of energetically exe-
cuted hits that were clearly not lip-synced.
He then seamlessly integrated the Red Hot
Chili Peppers into his set.
“There were a lot of doubters and my man
delivered,” Fox commentator Howie Long
said after the performance.
Hard to disagree. There were no flubs, no
negative moments that will live on at the
water cooler Monday morning. And while
you can argue about the entertainment value
of watching shirtless Chili Peppers gambol
about the stage, the 50-year-old Rock and
Roll Hall of Famers managed to match
Mars’ energy in a brief appearance that was
no less memorable.
Mars trades in shared memories, taking
the best of acts that have come before like
the infectiousness of Sting and The Police,
or the groove of James Brown, and updating
them with lyrics and sounds that capture the
freshness of the current moment.
Bruno Mars delivers red hot set at Super Bowl
REUTERS
Bruno Mars performs during the halftime show of the NFL Super Bowl XLVIII football game
between the Denver Broncos and the Seattle Seahawks in East Rutherford, New Jersey.
By Candice Choi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Super Bowl advertisers finally seeing their
efforts play out on the industry’s biggest stage.
Here’s a look at some highlights of the Super Bowl ad
action. Check back for updates throughout the night.
———————
BOB DYLAN’S SUPER BOWL
Legendary singer Bob Dylan appears in the flesh for one
of Chrysler’s surprise ads for the night. The two-minute
spot is reminiscent of the car maker’s patriotic ad starring
Eminem and celebrating Detroit in 2011.
Dylan walks through the city streets explaining that
“Detroit made cars” and that “cars are made in America.”
In case you didn’t get the point, he goes on to explain in
his familiar raspy voice:
“Let Germany brew your beer, let Switzerland assemble
your watch, let Asia assemble your phone. We will build
your car. ”
It’s the second appearance of the night for Dylan, if you
count the tune of “I Want You” in the Chobani ad.
——————
A SEINFELD REUNION...SORT OF
Sightings of “Seinfeld” actors filming in New York City
this week sparked rumors of a reunion.
Now we know what it was all about: an ad for Jerry
Seinfeld’s show “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee” on
Crackle.
In the ad, George gripes that he wasn’t invited to a Super
Bowl party. After some prodding, Jerry tells him it’s
because he “over-cheered.” After some more prodding, Jerry
admits the real reason: it seems George “availed himself” in
the bathroom of the host’s master bedroom.
————————
NEWYORK CITY GETS A TUNE-UP
Halftime sponsor Pepsi got one of the sweetest ad spots
of the night, with a 30-second lead-in to the show starring
Bruno Mars.
The spot showed various New York City monuments at
night being lit up and played like instruments — the
Manhattan bridge is strummed like a guitar, Columbus
Circle is spun like a record and the Guggenheim and famous
Pepsi-Cola sign in Long Island City get played like drums.
MetLife stadium, where the game is being played, is
turned like a dial, making the lights climb across the city’s
skyscrapers.
—————
TIM TEBOW MAKES IT TO
THE SUPER BOWL AFTER ALL
Tim Tebow may not be on the field, but he’s still in the
NFL spotlight.
T-Mobile wants to win over customers and who better than
the former Broncos quarterback to show how great life can
be without a contract?
The Broncos may have gone with Peyton Manning for its
quarterback, but expect to see more Tebow tonight too; T-
Mobile has more ads on the way.
————————
SLOWCLAP FOR...STEPHEN COLBERT’S EAGLE
The best part of the Wonderful Pistachios ads starring
Stephen Colbert? The eagle perched on his desk wearing a
little matching suit.
The spots launch a yearlong sponsorship for between
Colbert and parent company Roll Global. Mainly, we’re
looking forward to seeing what other outfits the eagle will
sport.
Wonderful Pistachios says the eagle — played by a puppet
— is female.
“Colbert calls her a girl in the teaser,” notes Rob Six, a
Roll Global spokesman.
EYES ON THE ADS
OPINION 9
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Water usage tips
Editor,
Last month, Gov. Jerry Brown
declared we need to institute a 20
percent water conservation.
Conservation will help protect our
vital water supply. Our two year
drought has now resulted in a water
emergency in the state of California.
Since it is probable that there will
be little future rainfall, the present
cutback will become mandatory.
Future violators will undoubtfully be
fined. So, here are some tips to con-
serve water:
• Reduce water flow;
• Take shorter showers;
• Don’t needlessly run water while
shaving/brushing teeth;
• Operate dishwashers and washing
machines at full load;
• Skip washing autos/driveways;
• Water gardens lightly and at
night and use mulch around plants;
and
• Report/repair any and all leaks or
dripping faucets.
Conservation is important because
it protects our vital water supply.
Let’s all do our part during this dry
season, but don’t overlook drinking
water daily.
Paul J. Constantino
Burlingame
CSM parking
Editor,
I am on the College of San Mateo
campus five days a week, and park-
ing on Monday and Wednesday
mornings is nearly impossible. On a
recent morning, I arrived at the
lower Hillsdale parking lot to find
that Solar City and Go Pro have now
been given more than half of that
lower lot for their exclusive use. At
9:45 a.m., there were precious few
spaces left for student use and by 1
p.m., when I returned to the lot,
dozens of students had been ticketed
(they were courtesy warnings today).
When taxpayers approved the two
college district bonds, they assumed
the money was going to improve
facilities for students, not to build
parking lots for private companies.
The entire north parking area at
CSM has been closed for renova-
tion. Why would CSM, then, take
limited parking space away from stu-
dents, give it to private companies
and then ticket students when there
is nowhere to park?
No student should have to pay a
parking ticket as long as Solar City
and Go Pro have priority parking
over students.
Donna Bischoff
San Mateo
I’m so proud
Editor,
After reading the front page arti-
cle, “7-Eleven legal battle still far
from finished,” in the Jan. 27 issue
of the Daily Journal, I just have to
tell everyone that I’m so proud of
the executive employees of the city
of San Mateo. In particular, a certain
city councilman, a certain staff
member of the city attorney’s office
and the mayor himself are all to be
congratulated. Collectively, they
have learned some valuable lessons
in the wake of the “7-Eleven fias-
co.” I am so proud of them because
they learned how to “sweep their
screw-ups under the rug.” I’m so
proud that they also learned how to
“cover up for their fellow city
employees.” Finally, I’m so proud
that they learned how to “move for-
ward, like nothing has happened” by
employing the ol’ “We need more
training …” excuse. Man, to think
that we, the citizens of San Mateo,
pay big bucks for city employees
like these. No wonder no one trusts
government, including the local city
government.
All sarcasm aside, I believe that if
7-Eleven prevails in the lawsuit
with the city of San Mateo, the cer-
tain city councilman and city attor-
ney employee should have to pay for
any judgment, since they are ones
who caused this whole “7-Eleven
fiasco” in the first place. The people
of San Mateo shouldn’t have to pay
for the mistakes these highly paid
and highly trained city employees
caused.
Michael R. Oberg
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
Orange County Register
J
an. 1 marked the full implemen-
tation of the federal govern-
ment’s ban on traditional
incandescent light bulbs, as 40-watt
and 60-watt bulbs were phased out.
Congressional Republicans made one
last-gasp attempt to fight the ban by
inserting a provision into the
omnibus spending bill preventing the
Department of Energy from enforcing
the ban, though they did not overturn
the ban and manufacturers have
resigned to it, no longer making the
banned bulbs.
The bulb ban was included in the
Energy Independence and Security Act
of 2007, which was passed with the
help of Republican votes and signed
into law by President George W.
Bush. It was not just environmental-
ists who pushed for the prohibition.
The provision also enjoyed strong
support from manufacturers, who
stood to benefit from the higher profit
margins of the remaining higher-cost,
energy-efficient bulbs.
As some Republican lawmakers
learned, many people don’t like being
told how to live their lives. During a
failed attempt by some Republicans
to repeal the ban in 2011, Rep. Fred
Upton, R-Mich., who had co-spon-
sored the EISA, issued a mea culpa:
“The public response on this issue is
a clear signal that markets — not
governments — should be driving
technological advancements.” Even
in the face of inevitability, a January
2014 Rasmussen poll shows that 60
percent still oppose the ban, and just
25 percent support it.
Whether the issue is cost, a prefer-
ence for the light cast by incandes-
cent versus energy-efficient bulbs, the
inability to dim some compact fluo-
rescent light or light-emitting diode
bulbs, concerns over the potentially-
harmful mercury contained in CFL
bulbs or simply resistance to govern-
ment paternalism, many consumers
have rendered a verdict in favor of the
traditional incandescent bulbs.
Not that this would have always
remained the case. If CFL, LED or
other types of light bulbs not yet
invented truly are superior, consumers
will choose to use them. Instead, peo-
ple have been forced to stockpile
their preferred incandescent bulbs.
The light-bulb ban may not have
eviscerated freedom as we know it, but
it is symptomatic of the heavy-hand-
ed approach used by both major polit-
ical parties to dictate how we live our
lives and what choices we are allowed
to make.
Moreover, it raises a frightening
question: If politicians and bureau-
crats are willing to revoke so trivial a
freedom, which aspects of our lives
and what choices that we take for
granted today remain beyond the
reach of their dictates?
A not-so-bright idea
No sugar to help the
medicine go down
W
hen it comes to the state of American educa-
tion, we know the problems and remedies but
there’s no sugar to help the medicine go down.
And, typically, the patient refuses to swallow.
Here is a brief diagnosis. The reason American students
are falling behind their peers in other industrialized coun-
tries is because:
1). We need better trained
teachers. Especially in
math and science where few
teachers have majored in
these subjects or are prop-
erly equipped to teach
them. The United States
needs to revamp teacher
training, make it more rig-
orous and raise the bar on
admittance. We should be
aiming for the top third
college graduates instead of
the present bottom third.
The medicine: teacher
unions should relent on
their opposition to merit
pay and be more supportive of reforms to improve evalua-
tion and remove failing teachers. The other bitter pill:
good teachers need to make more money and teaching as a
profession needs to be up there with lawyers and doctors
as a respected and sought-after occupation. But it’s not
just the fault of inadequate teaching. And teachers are sick
and tired of getting all the blame.
2). We need students to take their education more seri-
ously. According to Thomas Friedman in the New York
Times, Arne Duncan, U.S. Secretary of Education, asks: “
Are we falling behind as a country in education not just
because we fail to recruit the smartest college students to
become teachers or reform-resistant teachers’ unions, but
because of our culture today: too many parents and too
many kids just don’t take education seriously enough and
don’t want to put in the work needed today to really
excel?”
High school kids complain about the six to eight hours
of homework they get a night. But is it really six to eight
hours or does it just take that long because of the study
breaks via Facebook, texting, etc. Parents complain
about the homework, while some students just don’t do
the work. Here’s a true story: Student Aattended a local
high school. Her best friend B, came from South Korea. B
was taking a year off from her South Korean studies to
attend a high-achieving high school in the United States.
The young woman would do her U.S. homework in about
an hour or two and then finish off the evening by doing
South Korean homework so she could keep up on her
return home. What’s so scary is that A, very bright and
with good grades, would spend about eight hours doing
the same assignments. Was she texting in between or just
not as smart as her friend? I bet it was the former.
The medicine: parents and teachers need to revere and
support education the way they revere sports. They need
to be willing to have the self-discipline to work hard
every day. Because if you are not good, you are not going
to make the team. Sports is the one area in education
where meritocracy still counts. You don’t get on the A
team if you can’t play.
3). We need students to spend more time on task: If we
treated education as we treat sports, students would be
spending more time in school. You don’t get to be or
remain a good athlete unless you practice, practice, prac-
tice. Our California students spend only 180 days in
school a year. That’s just half a year. Meanwhile, students
in other countries have longer school days and spend
more days in school per year. More time in school means
more money for staff. That’s the bitter pill.
4). We need to further the talents of our very brightest
students. Too many mathematically gifted kids are bored
in the classroom. Too many educators feel bright kids can
fend for themselves. Acceleration and tracking, once tools
for dealing with the gifted, are now in most cases unac-
ceptable. The medicine: we need special attention paid to
those who need extra help as well as special attention to
those whose full potential is being ignored.
5). We need more and better preschool for all children.
This is the one area where there is progress. Politicians
all over the country starting with the president are
singing this song (Will devote a future column to what’s
happening in our county, Oklahoma and other states).
Reluctantly, this is a negative picture of American edu-
cation. Yet you go into a classroom and witness a teacher
working his/her magic and students doing incredible
things. In many places, including San Mateo County,
there’s a spoonful of sugar to help the medicine go down.
It’s a work in progress.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column
runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Other voices
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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BUSINESS 10
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Adam Geller
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASHBURN, Va. — The wealthi-
est county in America is settled
deep in 4 a.m. slumber when Neal
Breen threads the mini-mansion
subdivisions and snow-blanketed
fairways on his way to open shop.
There’s two hours yet before the
business day begins, but Breen,
who is 21, has plenty to do after
flipping on the lights. Donning a
green apron without taking off his
tweed cap, he boils the first of
more than 500 bagels, then shov-
els them into a waiting oven.
When the early risers step from
their cars at a few minutes past 6, a
chalkboard meets them at the
door: “Breakfast of Champions.”
Breen, who quit college a year
ago with hopes of saving money
to start his own business, is keen-
ly aware that the wealth in the
neighborhoods where he delivers
breakfast sandwiches is, for now,
beyond reach. He’s long known
what it means to have less; he
recalls growing up as the son of a
pastor whose earnings sometimes
made it tough to feed five children.
But he does not decry the gap
between the Vienna sausage din-
ners of childhood and the
$168,000 median income of the
households surrounding this
shopping center, about 35 miles
from Capitol Hill.
It just confirms that the free-
market economy is working,
Breen says, by rewarding those
who do for themselves.
“Capitalism is about seizing
opportunity. A lot of people get
more opportunities than others,
but a lot of people aren’t comfort-
able seizing it,” he says.
When President Barack Obama
promised to do something about
growing economic inequality in
his State of the Union address, he
spoke to a public whose own
experiences have, like Breen’s ,
shaped very personal views about
who makes it in today’s economy
and who gets left behind.
“Those at the top have never
done better. But average wages
have barely budged. Inequality has
deepened. ... Our job is to reverse
these trends,” Obama said.
The speech addressed deeply
held convictions: Americans
know firsthand the challenges of
trying to get ahead, and some-
times just getting by, and speak
reverently about making sure the
country fulfills its promise as a
land of economic opportunity.
But in a reporter’s conversa-
tions along a drive of more than
400 miles, from communities of
wealth to those of poverty, from
areas where politics increasingly
lean Democratic to those fast tilt-
ing Republican, there was little
agreement on how to realize that
ideal or on what role government
should play.
In a college town, a retired ele-
mentary school principal whose
uneducated father toiled in citrus
groves says in this technological
age, it’s harder to rise from poverty.
In a faded railroad town along
West Virginia’s New River, a
young barber is grateful for the
programs that helped him pay for
training and put food on his table
until he found work, but he’s skep-
tical about people who abuse such
aid.
“It’s a conundrum,” says Chris
Meyer, the owner of a landscaping
business, leaving Ashburn Bagel
& Sandwich Shop, breakfast in
hand. “How do you make a work-
able system out of being a com-
passionate people?”
Americans grapple with income inequality
By Mathew Pennington
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President
Barack Obama’s Asia policy took
a hit this week, and it came from a
member of his own party.
The top Democratic senator,
Harry Reid, announced that he
opposes legislation that’s key for
a trans-Pacific trade pact that is
arguably the most important part
of Obama’s effort to strengthen
American engagement in Asia.
Since Obama rolled out the poli-
cy, most attention has been on the
military aspect, largely because it
was described as a rebalance in
U.S. priorities after a decade of
costly war in Afghanistan and
Iraq.
But officials have increasingly
stressed that Obama’s foreign pol-
icy “pivot” to Asia is about more
than cementing America’s stature
as the pre-eminent power in the
Asia-Pacific as China grows in
strength. It’s about capitalizing
on the region’s rapid economic
growth.
That’s the importance of the
Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP,
an ambitious free trade agreement
being negotiated by 12 nations,
including Japan, that account for
some 40 percent of global gross
domestic product.
“The pivot is the TPP right
now,” Victor Cha, director of
Asian studies at Georgetown
University’s School of Foreign
Service, told a conference at a
Washington think tank this week
on U.S. policy and the outlook for
Asia in 2014.
The problem for Obama is that
Congress needs to approve so-
called fast track negotiating
authority to move TPP along.
Many of his fellow Democrats are
against fast-track authority, which
would require Congress to act on
the trade deals negotiated by the
administration by a yes-or-no
vote, without the ability to make
any changes.
In a bitterly divided
Washington, Obama’s in the rare
position of having more support
for a key policy among his politi-
cal rivals, the Republicans, than
from his own party.
Reid, the Senate majority leader,
said Wednesday that he opposed
fast-track authority and that law-
makers should not push for it now
— a comment suggesting that leg-
islation introduced three weeks
ago will go nowhere soon.
The Obama administration’s
Asia policy has been welcomed by
countries wary of China’s rise and
expansive territorial claims.
During the president’s first term,
the U.S. made progress in
strengthening old alliances with
nations like the Philippines,
forging deeper ties with Indonesia
and Vietnam and befriending for-
mer pariah state Myanmar.
There were missteps. Angry pol-
itics at home forced Obama to
withdraw from the East Asia
Summit last fall, raising some
questions about his commitment
to the region. New military
deployments in the Asia-Pacific —
a few hundred Marines in
Australia, new warships rotated
through Singapore — have fueled
Chinese accusations of a U.S. pol-
icy of containment while making
little impact on regional security.
Asia got little mention in
Obama’s State of the Union
address Tuesday, adding to percep-
tions in some quarters that the
pivot has dropped in the adminis-
tration’s policy agenda in the
president’s second term.
But he did urge both parties in
Congress to approve fast-track
legislation needed to make the
TPP and a trade deal under negotia-
tion with Europe a reality, saying
it would open new markets and cre-
ate American jobs.
While that legislation is co-
sponsored by a senior Democrat
— Obama’s nominee to become
the next ambassador to China,
Sen. Max Baucus — many in the
party join with labor unions in
opposing lowered trade barriers,
which they worry will cost jobs
due to increased competition.
But top Republicans who want
fast-track authority accuse the
administration of failing to do its
part to mobilize support for it
among Democrats in Congress —
a task that will be complicated by
the midterm elections in
November. Lawmakers will be
careful to avoid measures that
could hurt their prospects of re-
election.
Analysis: Obama’s Asia policy set back by Democrats
REUTERS
U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry
Reid addresses reporters during a
news conference at the U.S.Capitol
in Washington.
Farm bill plows
under direct payments
MINNEAPOLIS — Afive-
year federal farm that could
become law in the coming
week does away with farm
subsidies that have guided
agriculture through record
profits in recent years.
Gone are direct pay-
ments, a politically unten-
able system that paid
landowners a fixed amount
per acre, no matter the crop
price or even if they plant-
ed at all. But farmers aren’t
complaining, because new
subsidies in the legislation
could be just as generous.
Under the new bill, direct
payments would be
replaced a choice of two
approaches that require
producers to suffer a loss
before getting a payout.
Cotton farmers also would
get a new insurance-based
program.
Trust issues menswear
merger battle
J os . A. Bank rai sed
doubt s Sunday about
whether the federal gov-
ernment will approve the
t akeover bi d by ri val
cl ot hi er Men’s
Wearhouse.
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers
said that Men’s Wearhouse
had yet to explain why the
Federal Trade Commission
would approve the pro-
posed combi nat i on
because of antitrust con-
cerns.
Di rect ors for Jos. A.
Bank not ed i n a l et t er
t hat t he FTC had sent
Men’s Wearhouse a sec-
ond request for informa-
t i on as par t of i t s
antitrust review.
“It i s a very seri ous
step for the FTC to issue a
second request,” the letter
sai d.
Business briefs
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014
By Barry Wilner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — The Seattle
Seahawks’ mantra all season was to make
each day a championship day.
They made Super Bowl Sunday the best
day of all with one of the greatest perform-
ances in an NFL title game — sparked by a
defense that ranks among the best ever.
The Seahawks won their first Super Bowl
crown in overpowering fashion, punishing
Peyton Manning and the Denver Broncos
43-8. That masterful defense, the NFL’s
stingiest, never let the five-time MVP get
going, disarming the highest-scoring
offense in league history.
Seattle (16-3) was too quick, too physical
and just too good for Denver, and that was
true in all areas. What was hyped as a classic
matchup between an unstoppable offense
and a miserly defense turned into a rout.
“We been relentless all season,” quarter-
back Russell Wilson said. “Having that
mentality of having a championship day
every day. At the end of the day, you want to
play your best football and that is what we
did today. ”
Punctuating Seattle’s dominance were a
69-yard interception return touchdown by
linebacker Malcolm Smith to make it 22-0,
and Percy Harvin’s sensational 87-yard
kickoff runback to open the second half.
Smith was the game’s MVP, the first
defender in 11 years to win the award.
When the Seahawks, up by 29 points,
forced a Denver punt early in the third quar-
ter, the 12th Man — and there were legions
of them in MetLife Stadium — began chant-
ing “L-O-B, L-O-B.”
As in Legion of Boom, the Seahawks
hard-hitting secondary, part of young team
with an average age of 26 years, 138 days.
“This is an amazing team. Took us four
years to get to this point but they never
have taken a step sideways,” coach Pete
Carroll said. “These guys would not take
anything but winning this ballgame.”
The loss by the Broncos again raised
questions about Manning’s ability to win
the biggest games. He is 11-12 in the post-
season, 1-2 in Super Bowls. After the game,
he brushed off questions about his legacy.
“Certainly to finish this way is very dis-
appointing,” he said.
He never looked comfortable against a
defense some will begin comparing to the
1985 Bears and 2000 Ravens — other NFL
champions who had runaway Super Bowl
victories.
Seattle forced four turnovers; Denver had
26 all season.
The Seahawks looked comfortable and at
ease, and not just their defense, which lost
All-Pro cornerback Richard Sherman to a
high ankle sprain in the fourth quarter. He
celebrated on crutches.
“I hope we etched out names in the histo-
ry books,” Sherman said.
Wilson, who has an NFL-record 28 wins
in his first two pro seasons, including play-
offs, had a 23-yard TD pass to Jermaine
Kearse late in the third quarter to make it 36-
0.
Wilson also hit Doug Baldwin for a 10-
yard score in the final period in what had
become one of the most lopsided Super
Bowls. For the fifth time in six meetings
between the NFL’s No. 1 offense and
defense, the D dominated.
“It’s all about making history,” All-Pro
safety Earl Thomas said. “This was a domi-
nant performance from top to bottom.”
Denver fell to 2-5 in Super Bowls, and by
the end many of Manning’s passes resem-
bled the “ducks” Sherman said the All-Pro
quarterback sometimes threw.
The victory was particularly sweet for
Carroll, who was fired in 1994 by the Jets,
led the Patriots for three seasons and again
was canned. After a short stint out of coach-
ing, he took over at Southern California and
won two national titles.
But he always felt there was unfinished
business in the NFL. Carroll finished that
business by lifting the Vince Lombardi
Trophy, four years after taking charge in
Seattle and eight years after the Seahawks
lost in their only previous Super Bowl to
Pittsburgh.
SUPER BOWL XLVIII 12
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever been
entrusted to make
final arrangements
for a funeral?
Those of you
who’ve had this
experience know
that important decisions are required and
must be made in a timely manner. The next
of kin is many times required to search for
information about the deceased which may
not be easily accessible, and must answer
questions without the time to think things
out. Even though your Funeral Director is
trained to guide you every step of the way, it
is still best for you to be prepared with the
proper information if the need should arise.
Ask your Funeral Director what info is
needed before you meet with him/her.
Making funeral arrangements can be very
simple, or can become difficult at times if
you are not prepared. A good Funeral
Director is experienced in leading you with
the necessary requirements, and will offer
details that you may not have thought about
or previously considered as an option.
Allowing him/her to guide you will make
the arrangements go by quickly and easily.
A number of items should be considered
in preparation for the future:
1. Talk to your loved ones about the
inevitable. Give them an indication on what
your wishes are regarding the type of funeral
you want, burial or cremation, etc., and ask
them their feelings about plans for their own
funeral. This is only conversation, but it is
an important topic which will help break the
ice and prevent any type of confusion when
the time comes.
2. Talk to your Funeral Director. Write
down a list of questions and make a phone
call to your Funeral Director asking how to
be prepared. He/she will gladly provide
detailed information and can mail this
information to you for your reference.
Asking questions doesn’t cost anything and
will help you with being organized.
3. Make an appointment and Pre-plan a
Funeral. Many more people are following
through with this step by making Pre-Need
Arrangements. Completing arrangements
ahead of time makes this process more
relaxed, and putting these details behind you
will take a weight off your shoulders. Your
wishes will be finalized and kept on file at
the Mortuary. Your Funeral Director will
even help you set aside funding now as to
cover costs at the time of death. Families
who meet with us at the CHAPEL OF THE
HIGHLANDS are grateful for the chance to
make Pre-Need Arrangements. With their
final details in place it helps to make matters
more calming for surviving loved-ones.
4. Enjoy Life. There are those who dwell
on situations that can’t be controlled.
Taking time to stop and look around at
beauty in the world and appreciate good
things can be therapeutic. If you need to use
a negative statement, try re-wording it into a
positive. Change “I had a lousy day today”
into “Today was demanding, but it made me
appreciate my better days.” As the song
goes: “Accentuate the positive; Eliminate
the negative; Latch on to the affirmative.”
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Accentuating The Positive
Can Eliminate The Negative
ADVERTISEMENT
Seattle romps Denver in first Super Bowl win
USATODAY SPORTS
Seattle’s Percy Harvin returns the second half kick off for a touchdown in the Seahawks’ win.
SUPER BOWL XLVIII 13
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Nerves, Seahawks get better of Broncos
USATODAY SPORTS
Peyton Manning walks off the field after the Broncos fell to the Seahawks 43-8.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.— All those
records, all for naught.
Peyton Manning couldn’t cap the greatest
season any NFL quarterback ever had or
secure his legacy as the best QB in history
because his Denver Broncos came down
with a case of the yips Sunday night.
They lost to Seattle in the Super Bowl 43-
8 by falling behind right from the start and
never recovering.
The bumbling Broncos trailed before
Manning ever got his hands on the ball
because Manny Ramirez’s bad snap went for
a safety 12 seconds into the game.
“It was a crazy start,” Manning said, “not
the way you expect to start the game.”
It only got worse for the league’s most
prolific point producers who scored 606 of
‘em in the regular season, then dominated
the AFC in the playoffs but mustered only
Demaryius Thomas’ 14-yard touchdown
catch on the final play of the third quarter at
MetLife Stadium.
“We couldn’t get it to swing, man,” left
tackle Chris Clark said. “We tried, but they
just played better than we did today. It didn’t
shift. We didn’t play Broncos football
today. When you got a good thing going,
you want to finish it off and we didn’t do that
today. ”
Dominated in every way, the Broncos (15-
4) trudged through the tunnel trailing 22-0
at halftime, then watched Percy Harvin
return the second-half kickoff for a TD.
“You’ve got to play well in this game to
win it,” said Broncos boss John Elway, who
lost Super Bowls by scores of 39-20, 42-10
and 55-10 during his Hall of Fame playing
career before winning his last two.
Elway returned to rescue his beloved
Broncos in 2011 after the franchise
foundered and his biggest coup was luring
Manning to Denver.
Over his two seasons in Colorado,
Manning engineered the greatest comeback
in NFL history: recovering from neck
fusion surgery that weakened his throwing
arm to win his fifth MVP award this season
when he set records by throwing for 55 TDs
and 5,447 yards.
But he couldn’t match that with the great-
est comeback in Super Bowl history after
falling behind 36-0.
“I will tell you this: it’s hard to get things
turned around against a great defense like
that,” Elway said. “They are a great defense.
So, that’s why you can’t afford to lose the
momentum because to try to flip it on a great
defense is always hard.”
This was easily Manning’s worst day
since trading the blue and white horseshoe
of the Indianapolis Colts for the orange-
mane mustang of Denver. He was sacked for
the first time in the playoffs, threw two
interceptions, one of which was returned for
a touchdown, lost a fumble and turned it over
on downs.
The bumbling Broncos finally found the
end zone when Thomas made a leaping,
twisting grab of Manning’s 14-yard pass —
his 100th TD toss for Denver. But he needed
a lot more of those to keep up with the effi-
cient Russell Wilson, who didn’t commit
any turnovers and kept plays alive with his
legs and pinpoint passes.
“They outplayed us in every facet,” tight
end Jacob Tamme said.
Thomas caught 13 passes for 118 yards
but he also had a fumble as Denver was driv-
ing in the third quarter.
Denver was missing five defensive
starters who are on IR that might have made
this a fairer fight — Von Miller, Rahim
Moore, Kevin Vickerson, Derek Wolfe and
Chris Harris Jr.
“We just didn’t play like we’re capable
of,” Elway said. “It’s disappointing. But we
had a great year. And hopefully we’ll learn
from this. But it started tough and we just
couldn’t seem to get it going.
SUPER BOWL XLVIII 14
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Howard Fendrich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. —
Malcolm Smith always was ready
to step in when the Seattle
Seahawks needed him.
Now he’s only the third line-
backer in NFL history to earn
Super Bowl MVP honors.
Smith returned an interception
of regular-season MVP Peyton
Manning 69 yards for a touchdown
in the first half, recovered a fumble
in the second half, and was part of
a dominating defensive perform-
ance by Seattle during its 43-8
victory over the Denver Broncos
on Sunday night.
“I woke up jumping, bouncing,”
Smith said when presented with a
truck amid the confetti-strewn field
after the game. “It turned out great
for us tonight.”
Sure did. And it was rather appro-
priate that a member of Seattle’s
league-leading “D” would be the
MVP of the Super Bowl, consider-
ing the way the Seahawks shut
down Manning and Denver’s
record-breaking offense, forcing
four turnovers and holding the
Broncos scoreless until the last
play of the third quarter.
Smith joined Ray Lewis of
Baltimore in 2001, and Chuck
Howley of Dallas in 1971 as the
only linebackers to be picked as
the top player in a Super Bowl.
Only eight of 48 Super Bowls
have ended with a defensive player
getting the honor; the last exam-
ple was Tampa Bay Buccaneers free
safety Dexter Jackson in 2003.
Seahawks cornerback Richard
Sherman and safety Earl Thomas
were first-team All-Pro selections
this season, and both finished
among the top five vote-getters
for NFL Defensive Player of the
Year. Safety Kam Chancellor was a
second-team All-Pro choice.
That trio of defensive backs is
part of a talented secondary known
as the “Legion of Boom,” and
guys such as Smith often get over-
shadowed.
Seattle LB Malcom Smith earns Super Bowl MVP
USATODAY SPORTS
Malcolm Smith celebrates after his Seahawks on Super Bowl XLVIII.
SUPER BOWL XLVIII 15
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PHOTOS/USATODAY SPORTS
Clockwise: Russell Wilson holds the Super
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Fireworks go off at MetLife Stadium in New
York/New Jersey prior to the start of Super
Bowl XLVIII.
Seattle wide receiver Doug Baldwin dives into
the end zone for a fourth quarter touchdown
in Seattle’s 43-8 victory over the Denver Bron-
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A Seahawks fan cries after his team claimed its
first Super Bowl championship in team his-
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EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP)
— The talk, at least before the
Denver Broncos took a team vote
and decided not to show up for the
game, was that Peyton Manning
might call it a career and ride off
into the sunset after winning his
second Super
Bowl ring.
After as
miserable a
performance
as you will
ever see on a
big stage by a
future Hall of
Famer, the
Broncos
might be
excused if
they just
don’t invite
him back.
They will, of course, because
Manning can still put up big num-
bers and win more games than the
average quarterback. He actually
set a Super Bowl record Sunday
night by completing 34 passes,
though the vast majority were
meaningless short throws that the
Seattle Seahawks were more than
happy to give him in a 43-8
blowout.
But after a second Super Bowl
flop where the 37-year-old seemed
to be aging by the minute, it may
be that Manning is destined to
forever be among a large group of
quarterbacks who win the big one
only once.
Yes, he had plenty of help from
teammates who couldn’t hold
onto the ball and others who
seemed to forget how to tackle.
Yes, the Seahawks have a suffo-
cating defense filled with players
who like to hit and strut and then
do it all over again.
But it was Manning and center
Manny Ramirez who set the tone
with a miscommunication for the
ages on the opening play from
scrimmage. And it was Manning
who threw two first half intercep-
tions that gave the opportunistic
Seahawks a lead they weren’t
about to give up.
One of the greatest quarterbacks
ever? Not this night, when
Manning seemed jittery and
unprepared against a Seahawks
defense eager to stake a claim to
greatness of their own.
He wasn’t even the greatest in
the Broncos locker room after-
ward, where John Elway stood
against a wall and tried to give an
explanation about something he
couldn’t explain.
“You gotta play well in this
game,” Elway said. “Gotta play
well to win.”
That Manning didn’t even come
close was a shocker, after a sea-
son where he set NFL records with
55 touchdown passes and 5,447
yards while leading the league’s
top-ranked offense. He failed to
become the first quarterback to
win Super Bowls with two differ-
ent teams, and is 11-12 in playoff
games.
Tom Brady has lost a few of
these, but he never completely
gave them away. Joe Montana
wouldn’t have even dreamed of it.
Heck, it’s hard to even imagine
the other Manning sibling —
who owns two rings of his own
— losing like this.
“To finish this way is very dis-
appointing,” Manning said. “It’s
a bitter pill to swallow. ”
That Manning was even play-
ing at the end of the game is tes-
tament to his stubbornness, if
nothing else. His night should
have ended on the previous
Denver possession, when he was
hit while throwing and fumbled
the ball away for his third
turnover of the game.
Maybe he just wanted to end
with one good pass, and he did.
After hitting reserve back C.J.
Anderson on a throw across the
middle for 14 yards, he settled for
handing the ball off as the final
seconds ticked off.
Afterward, he dressed slowly in
front of his locker, putting a knot
in his tie and slipping on his suit
coat. Then he trudged off, head
down and hands in pocket, to the
interview tent where he knew the
questions ahead.
The play that sent the game
into a tailspin was blamed on
crowd noise, though Manning has
played in far noisier places than a
MetLife stadium that was filled
with 82,529 people with divided
loyalties. Manning said he was
moving forward to change the
cadence when Ramirez snapped
the football past him and running
back Knowshon Moreno fell on it
for a safety that was the fastest
score in Super Bowl history.
“It’s not the way you want to
start a game,” he said. “For what-
ever reason we couldn’t get any-
thing going after that.”
Someone then asked Manning
if the Broncos were embarrassed
by a blowout in a game they had
entered as slight favorites.
“It’s not embarrassing at all, I
would never use that word,” he
said. “The word embarrassing is
an insulting word, to tell you the
truth.”
With that, Manning was gone,
with as nifty of an escape as he
had made all night. He had said he
had a lot to think about during the
offseason, and it was time for the
thinking to begin.
He will be back, unless doctors
who treat his neck say otherwise.
But it’s hard to imagine how
next season will end any better
than this one did.
————
Tim Dahlberg is a national
sports columnist for The
Associated Press. Write to him at
tdahlberg(at)ap.org or http://twit-
ter.com/timdahlberg
Bad night at wrong time for Manning
TIM
DAHLBERG
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSCIATED PRESS
BERKELEY — California
expects to make significant strides
over the next month as the pro-
gram plays for what it hopes is
another special March.
Two competitive losses to rival
Stanford could provide the needed
motivation — or at least that’s
what coach Lindsay Gottlieb
hopes.
Brittany Boyd had 20 points,
six rebounds and six assists for
No. 21 Cal in a 79-64 loss to the
fourth-ranked Cardinal on Sunday,
the second meeting in four days
between the Bay Area teams.
“We have to turn around from
this week and say, ‘We’ve got
eight more games in this confer-
ence,’ and use the intensity and the
fight and competitiveness of this
weekend and turn that into our
team hitting another level,”
Gottlieb said. “I’m excited to see if
our players respond to that chal-
lenge.”
Mikayla Lyles added a career-
high 16 points with four 3-point-
ers for California (14-7, 6-4)
while making her second career
start after debuting in the starting
five Thursday.
Chiney Ogwumike had 29
points, eight rebounds and four
assists as Stanford ran its winning
streak to 20 games. Amber
Orrange added 13 points for the
Cardinal (21-1, 10-0 Pac-12),
whose only loss came Nov. 11 at
No. 1 Connecticut. Stanford is on
pace for a 14th straight conference
regular-season crown.
The sweep of Cal keeps Stanford
well ahead in the Pac-12 stand-
ings. These teams shared the Pac-
12 regular-season crown last sea-
son by each winning on the
other’s home floor, with the
Golden Bears later advancing to
their first Final Four berth in pro-
gram history.
Ogwumike shot 10 for 16 and
made 9 of 12 free throws.
“Chiney is just in there and
they’ve got to deal with her and
she finishes really well,” coach
Tara VanDerveer said.
Stanford answered nearly every
threat as Cal struggled to get time-
ly defensive stops. Cal has played
the Cardinal tougher than any
other conference opponent after
Stanford won its first eight Pac-12
games by an average of 25 points.
Lyles’ 3-pointer with 17:16 to
play cut Stanford’s lead to 39-32,
then Ogwumike answered on the
other end. When Lyles hit another
3 at the 14:10 mark, Ogwumike
quickly scored.
The game at Haas Pavilion drew
5,715 fans, but it was a far cry
from the dramatic way Thursday’s
game changed. Stanford led by 30
with 13:45 remaining and held on
for a 70-64 victory on its home
floor at Maples Pavilion.
Freshman Karlie Samuelson
scored 14 points off the bench
Thursday as Cal struggled to
defend the perimeter, opening up
things for Ogwumike inside.
Samuelson added 16 points
Sunday, including a three-point
play with 11:34 left that extended
the Cardinal’s lead to 52-38.
“I thought Stanford was just bet-
ter,” Gottlieb said. “It’s such a
problem with Chiney inside.”
Bears leading scorer Reshanda
Gray was held scoreless while
playing only 14 minutes Thursday
as Gottlieb stuck with a lineup she
thought was clicking, but the
coach told everybody afterward
Gray would lead the way again
Sunday.
No. 4 Stanford women
beat No. 21 Cal 79-64
Travis Bader breaks
Division I 3-point record
MILWAUKEE — Oakland’s
Travis Bader set the NCAA
Division I record for the most
career 3-pointers on Sunday
against UW-Milwaukee, surpass-
ing the previous mark of 457 set
by Duke’s J.J. Redick.
Bader, who entered the game two
behind Redick, missed his first 3-
point attempt but made his next
four. He broke the record with a
shot from the right corner with
6:17 left in the first half, pulling
Oakland within 29-28.
“I was in rhythm, caught it and
shot it in the corner. It went in,”
Bader said. “I practice those shots
all the time. It’s just constant rep-
etition and confidence that I’m
going to make every shot.”
He made his second attempt with
11:45 left in the half despite being
fouled, converting the four-point
play.
Bader, a 6-foot-5 senior guard,
tied the record with a 3-pointer
from the right wing with 6:58 left.
Bader scored 18 of his 21 points
in the first half, making of 5 of 7
3-pointers. He was 1 for 4 beyond
the arc in the second half, pushing
his career total to 461.
“You’ve got a guy sitting in the
room that’s the greatest of all-time
at something,” said Oakland coach
Greg Kampe. “And we’re not talk-
ing about flipping a tiddlywink or
something like that. This game’s
been played for a long, long time
and he’s the best ever. And, he’s
still got seven, eight games left.”
SPORTS 17
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia
— Construction workers ignored
the blaring alarm in Gorki Plaza
on Sunday, tuning out the loud
hoot-hoot-hoot and automated
voice that urged guests to evacu-
ate.
That was a fire drill — a require-
ment ahead of building approval
— but alarm bells of a more figura-
tive kind are ringing louder and
louder for the organizers of the
Sochi Olympics.
It’s almost impossible to pin
down how many hotels will be fin-
ished ahead of the Winter Games,
which officially open Friday.
Gorki Plaza was always sup-
posed to be a hive of activity, an
accommodation and transport hub
for thousands of visitors to
Olympic venues in the mountains
above Sochi. It just wasn’t sup-
posed to be a hive of building
activity this late. And that has
Olympic leaders worried.
IOC President Thomas Bach was
given a status update on accommo-
dation by local organizers at an
executive board meeting Sunday.
“There is a great confidence and
great satisfaction with what we
have seen here,” Bach said. “Of
course, ... always before the
games, we have some issues to be
addressed. We received informa-
tion that this will be addressed, but
in general for the athletes the
stage is set for great performanc-
es, both with regards to the vil-
lages and with regards to the
sports facilities.”
But the accommodation situa-
tion for non-athletes threatened to
become a major embarrassment for
organizers when some Olympic-
accredited people were turned away
in recent days from unfinished
hotels, or checked into unfinished
rooms.
Organizers estimate that thou-
sands of media will be arriving in
Sochi on Monday. About 11, 000
overall are expected to be cover-
ing Russia’s first Winter Games.
Spectators are expected to flood in
later in the week.
IOC spokesman Mark Adams
conceded there were hotels that
weren’t finished.
“That doesn’t mean they’re
empty shells with no beds or what-
ever,” he said, adding that 41,000
rooms were being provided for the
Sochi Games and, of those,
20,000 were brand new.
“I also understand not a single
person has gone without a room,”
he said. “All round, I think I can
assure you that people will get the
rooms they need.”
Alarm bells are ringing in
Olympic construction zone
Sports Brief
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 25 22 .532 —
Brooklyn 20 25 .444 4
New York 19 28 .404 6
Boston 16 33 .327 10
Philadelphia 15 33 .313 10 1/2
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 33 13 .717 —
Atlanta 25 21 .543 8
Washington 23 23 .500 10
Charlotte 21 28 .429 13 1/2
Orlando 13 36 .265 21 1/2
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 36 10 .783 —
Chicago 23 23 .500 13
Detroit 19 27 .413 17
Cleveland 16 31 .340 20 1/2
Milwaukee 8 39 .170 28 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 34 13 .723 —
Houston 32 17 .653 3
Memphis 26 20 .565 7 1/2
Dallas 27 21 .563 7 1/2
New Orleans 20 26 .435 13 1/2
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 38 11 .776 —
Portland 34 13 .723 3
Minnesota 23 24 .489 14
Denver 22 23 .489 14
Utah 16 31 .340 21
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 34 16 .680 —
Phoenix 29 18 .617 3 1/2
Golden State 29 19 .604 4
L.A. Lakers 16 31 .340 16 1/2
Sacramento 15 32 .319 17 1/2
Saturday’sGames
Indiana 97, Brooklyn 96
Washington 96, Oklahoma City 81
Detroit 113, Philadelphia 96
Atlanta 120, Minnesota 113
Houston 106, Cleveland 92
Memphis 99, Milwaukee 90
New Orleans 88, Chicago 79
Sunday’sGames
Boston 96, Orlando 89
Monday’sGames
Orlando at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Portland at Washington, 4 p.m.
Philadelphia at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m.
Detroit at Miami, 4:30 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m.
New York at Milwaukee, 5 p.m.
San Antonio at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
Cleveland at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Denver, 6 p.m.
Toronto at Utah, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Sacramento, 7 p.m.
Tuesday’sGames
Indiana at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Chicago at Phoenix, 6p.m.
Charlotte at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 54 35 16 3 73 164 119
Tampa Bay 55 32 18 5 69 162 137
Toronto 57 30 21 6 66 170 176
Montreal 56 29 21 6 64 137 139
Detroit 55 24 19 12 60 144 158
Ottawa 55 24 21 10 58 158 176
Florida 55 21 27 7 49 133 174
Buffalo 54 15 31 8 38 105 161
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 55 38 15 2 78 176 132
N.Y. Rangers 56 30 23 3 63 145 140
Columbus 55 28 23 4 60 163 154
Philadelphia 56 27 23 6 60 152 163
Carolina 54 25 20 9 59 137 151
Washington 56 25 22 9 59 164 172
New Jersey 56 23 21 12 58 132 140
N.Y. Islanders 57 21 28 8 50 159 191
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 57 33 10 14 80 200 158
St. Louis 54 37 12 5 79 185 125
Colorado 54 35 14 5 75 165 142
Minnesota 57 29 21 7 65 140 144
Dallas 55 25 21 9 59 158 160
Nashville 57 25 23 9 59 142 172
Winnipeg 57 27 25 5 59 161 166
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 57 40 12 5 85 189 139
San Jose 56 35 15 6 76 168 134
Los Angeles 57 30 21 6 66 134 122
Vancouver 56 27 20 9 63 142 147
Phoenix 55 26 19 10 62 159 164
Calgary 55 21 27 7 49 132 173
Edmonton 57 18 33 6 42 147 194
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Sunday’sGames
Washington 6, Detroit 5, OT
Winnipeg 2, Montreal 1
Monday’sGames
Edmonton at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.
Vancouver at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Colorado at New Jersey, 4:30 p.m.
Columbus at Anaheim, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday’sGames
Vancouver at Boston, 4 p.m.
Colorado at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m.
Winnipeg at Carolina, 4 p.m.
Calgary at Montreal, 4:30 p.m.
Toronto at Florida, 4:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Washington, 4:30 p.m.
Ottawa at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix,6 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
2014—Malcolm Smith, LB, Seattle
2013—Joe Flacco, QB, Baltimore
2012—Eli Manning, QB, N.Y. Giants
2011—Aaron Rodgers, QB, Green Bay
2010—Drew Brees, QB, New Orleans
2009—Santonio Holmes,WR, Pittsburgh
2008—Eli Manning, QB, N.Y. Giants
2007—Peyton Manning, QB, Indianapolis
2006—Hines Ward,WR, Pittsburgh
2005—Deion Branch,WR, New England
2004—Tom Brady, QB, New England
2003—Dexter Jackson, FS,Tampa Bay
2002—Tom Brady, QB, New England
2001—Ray Lewis, LB, Baltimore
2000—Kurt Warner, QB, St. Louis
1999—John Elway, QB, Denver
1998—Terrell Davis, RB, Denver
1997—Desmond Howard, KR, Green Bay
1996—Larry Brown, CB, Dallas
1995—SteveYoung, QB, SanFrancisco
1994—Emmitt Smith, RB, Dallas
1993—Troy Aikman, QB, Dallas
1992—Mark Rypien, QB,Washington
1991—Ottis Anderson, RB, N.Y. Giants
1990—JoeMontana, QB, SanFrancisco
1989—JerryRice,WR, SanFrancisco
1988—Doug Williams, QB,Washington
1987—Phil Simms, QB, N.Y. Giants
1986—Richard Dent, DE, Chicago
1985—JoeMontana, QB, SanFrancisco
1984—Marcus Allen, RB, L.A. Raiders
1983—John Riggins, RB,Washington
1982—JoeMontana, QB, SanFrancisco
1981—JimPlunkett, QB, Oakland
1980—Terry Bradshaw, QB, Pittsburgh
1979—Terry Bradshaw, QB, Pittsburgh
1978—Randy White,DT and Harvey Martin,DE,Dal-
las
1977—FredBiletnikoff,WR, Oakland
1976—Lynn Swann,WR, Pittsburgh
1975—Franco Harris, RB, Pittsburgh
1974—Larry Csonka, RB, Miami
1973—Jake Scott, S, Miami
1972—Roger Staubach, QB, Dallas
1971—Chuck Howley, LB, Dallas
1970—Len Dawson, QB, Kansas City
1969—Joe Namath, QB, N.Y. Jets
1968—Bart Starr, QB, Green Bay
1967—Bart Starr, QB, Green Bay
TRANSACTIONS
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CAROLINA HURRICANES — Recalled G Cam Ward
from Charlotte (AHL).
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Recalled D Tim Erixon
from Springfield (AHL).
DETROIT RED WINGS — Assigned C Cory Emmer-
ton to Grand Rapids (AHL).
NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Reassigned Fs Simon
Moser and Colton Sissons to Milwaukee (AHL).
Central Hockey League
BRAMPTON BEAST — Placed G Kevin McFarland on
waivers.
MISSOURI MAVERICKS — Placed G Bobby Andrews
on waivers.
TRANSACTIONS
18
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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details. No expiration. COUP466
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
Young performers wait their turn to demonstrate a traditional Dragon Dance for the Year of
the Horse at the Foster City Recreation Center's Lunar New Year's celebration on Feb. 2.
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
Mission Hospice and Home Care presented its 2014 Lotus Awards to June Field and Alice
Flynn at a dinner held Jan. 26 at the Peninsula Golf and Country Club in San Mateo. Mission
Hospice has served thousands of San Mateo County families since it was founded in 1979,
providing end-of-life services at no cost to patients. The Lotus Awards are awarded in
recognition of outstanding support of the Hospice's activities.Seen left to right at the dinner
are Outgoing Board Chair Maryann Raab, Honoree June Field, Hospice CEO Dwight Wilson,
Honoree Alice Flynn, and Current Board Chair Judy DiPaolo.
Reaching for the New Year Award winning care
Kemal Kurt, owner of Spasso, with
his family after being named
Business of the Year by the San
Carlos Chamber of Commerce. A
unanimous selection, Spasso has
made contributions to the San
Carlos business environment and
exhibited an ongoing
commitment to the community
and local causes, according to the
chamber. The presentation was
made during the chamber's
recognition gala. Beth Hunkapiller,
former member of the San Carlos
Elementary School District Board
of Trustees, was named the 2013
Citizen of the Year; Laura Marley
of LegalShield was named
Member of the Year; and Lee
Forrester of Mary Kay, was named
Ambassador of the Year.
Business of the Year award
DATEBOOK
19
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
O
f all my PHS/SPCAco-workers,
the one we call Miss Behavin’ i s
among my very favorites. She’s
fascinating, actually. One week, she’s a
dirty blond from the Southwest. The next
week, an Asian American who grew up
right here on the Peninsula. Then, she
becomes a brunette with an accent people
have trouble placing. Give up? Miss
Behavin’ is actually a name we’ve given
to the collective group of ladies who make
up PHS/SPCA’s Behavior and Training
Department. They split their time between
working with our shelter animals to make
them more adoptable (and training volun-
teers to do the same), and providing serv-
ices for members of the public, including
the area’s best obedience classes and a free
behavior helpline. We don’t get quite as
many calls as we used to — this may be,
in part, due to the availability of behavior
and training resources online. It could also
be that we don’t promote this fantastic,
free service well enough. It’s simple. You
call and leave a message, briefly describ-
ing your pet’s issue and Miss Behavin’
will call back, usually within 24 hours. Is
your kitty not using her covered litter
box? That’s a soft-ball teed-up for Miss
Behavin’. She’ll explain that while a cov-
ered litter box is good for you as odors are
kept in the box, it’s not comfortable for
your cat, due to the strong odor, moist lit-
ter and low ceiling. Does your dog bark
constantly at strangers? No problem for
our behavior experts. Do you know the
“must dos” for your new puppy’s first week
at home? Miss Behavin’ does. Are you
having trouble teaching your dog tricks or
getting your cat to stop using the back of
your couch as a scratching post? Miss
Behavin’ is all over that. Call 650/ 340-
7022 ext. 183. We can even answer ques-
tions in Spanish, so please pass this
along to your Spanish-speaking friends.
Same number, extension 186.
Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Adoption,
Behavior and Training, Education, Outreach,
Field Services, Cruelty Investigation,
Volunteer and Media/PR program areas and
By Tom Hays and Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Philip Seymour Hoffman,
who won the Oscar for best actor in 2006
for his portrayal of writer Truman Capote
and created a gallery of other vivid charac-
ters, many of them slovenly and somewhat
dissipated, was found dead Sunday in his
apartment with what officials said was a nee-
dle in his arm. He was 46.
Two law enforcement officials, who spoke
to The Associated Press on condition of
anonymity because they were not author-
ized to talk about the evidence, said the
actor apparently died of a drug overdose.
Glassine envelopes containing what was
believed to be heroin were found with him,
they said.
Hoffman — no matinee idol, with his
lumpy build and limp blond hair — made his
career mostly as a character actor, and was
one of the most prolific in the business,
plying his craft with a rumpled naturalism
that also made him one of the most admired
performers of his generation.
The stage-trained actor was nominated for
Academy Awards four times in all: for
“Capote,” ‘’The Master,” ‘’Doubt” and
“Charlie Wilson’s War.” He also received
three Tony nominations for his work on
Broadway, which included an acclaimed turn
as the weary and defeated Willy Loman in
“Death of a Salesman.”
Hoffman spoke candidly over the years
about past struggles with drug addiction.
After 23 years sober, he admitted in inter-
views last year to falling off the wagon and
developing a heroin problem that led to a
stint in rehab.
Tributes poured in from other Hollywood
figures.
“One of the greatest actors of a generation
and a sweet, funny & humble man,” actor
Ricky Gervais tweeted. Director Spike Lee
said on Twitter: “Damn, We Lost Another
Great Artist.”
And Kevin Costner said in an AP inter-
view: “Philip was a very important actor
and really takes his place among the real
great actors. It’s a shame. Who knows what
he would have been able to do? But we’re
left with the legacy of the work he’s done
and it all speaks for itself.”
“No words for this. He was too great and
we’re too shattered,” said Mike Nichols,
who directed Hoffman in “Charlie Wilson’s
War” and “Death of a Salesman.”
The law enforcement officials said
Hoffman’s body was discovered in a bathroom
at his Greenwich Village apartment by a friend
who made the 911 call and his assistant.
Late Sunday, a police crime-scene van was
parked out front, and technicians carrying
brown paper bags went in and out. Police
kept a growing crowd of onlookers back. A
single red daisy had been placed in front of
the lobby door.
Hoffman’s family called the news “tragic
and sudden.” Hoffman is survived by his
partner of 15 years, Mimi O’Donnell, and
their three children.
“We are devastated by the loss of our
beloved Phil and appreciate the outpouring
of love and support we have received from
everyone,” the family said in a statement.
In one of his earliest screen roles, he
played a spoiled prep school student in
“Scent of a Woman” in 1992. One of his
breakthroughs came as a gay member of a
porno film crew in “Boogie Nights,” one of
several movies directed by Paul Thomas
Anderson that he would eventually appear in.
He often played comic, slightly off-kilter
characters in movies like “Along Came
Polly,” ‘’The Big Lebowski” and “Almost
Famous.”
More recently, he was Plutarch
Heavensbee in “The Hunger Games:
Catching Fire” and was reprising that role
in the two-part sequel, “The Hunger
Games: Mockingjay,” which is in the
works. And in “Moneyball,” he played Art
Howe, the grumpy manager of the Oakland
Athletics who resisted new thinking about
baseball talent.
Philip Seymour Hoffman found dead in New York apartment
REUTERS
Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman poses on the red carpet during a screening for the movie
“The master” at the 69th Venice Film Festival in Venice in this file photo.
20
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE™
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS®
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
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Italian food and red wine every day is the secret to a long life,
says Pearl Rango of San Mateo, who turns 100 Feb. 6. Born and
raised in Chicago, Mrs. Rango moved to San Mateo in 1952 with
her husband Dave. She’s still cooking up a storm.
Happy 100th birthday!
President Chau Phan, PharmD.MS and President-Elect Mark
Reynolds,Pharm.D at the Jan. 25 San Mateo County Pharmacist
Association's Annual Installation Dinner.
Annual pharmacist dinner
Hundreds gathered for the 15th annual San Mateo County Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration at the San Mateo
Caltrain Station Jan.20.Following the gathering,participants rode Caltrain to San Francisco to share in their annual march
and celebration.This year’s celebration was highlighted by a special “Generation to Generation”recognition of Jesse May,
a San Mateo County resident who has been at all 15 celebrations. She is pictured as she was presented with a plaque and
framed picture of her at a planning retreat with Martin Luther King Jr.and Rosa Parks. She is surrounded by the individuals
serving in San Mateo County this year as AmericaCorps members, who also share each year in the organizing of the MLK,
Jr. Day annual event. Jesse May was the same age as these young adults when she joined in serving with Rev. King and
Rosa Parks.
Gathering to commemorate Martin Luther King Jr.
TOMJUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
Bubbles & Bundts, held Jan. 24 at Nothing Bundt Cakes in Millbrae, was a sweet kick-off for the Mills-Peninsula Hospital
Foundation’s 13th Annual Women’s Health Luncheon and Lecture scheduled for May 2 at the San Francisco Airport Waterfront
Marriott-Burlingame.Proceeds from the luncheon,with speaker Sanjay Gupta,M.D.,support the Mills-Peninsula Women’s Center
and Breast Health Programs.Shown at Nothing Bundt Cakes are Luncheon Sponsor David Mendell of Kerns Fine Jewelry;Dayna
Sumiyoshi and Peggy Bort Jones, Luncheon and Lecture Co-Chairs; Carole Middleton, Honorary Co-Chair; Carol Bausch,
Owner,Nothing Bundt Cakes;Luncheon Sponsor Colleen Rafferty of Christensen & Rafferty Fine Jewelry;and Karen Malekos-
Smith, Director of Donor Relations, Mills-Peninsula Hospital Foundation. For information about luncheon sponsorship
opportunities or tickets, please call 650-696-5908 or email MalekoK@sutterhealth.org.
Mills-Peninsula hospital foundation takes the cake
LOCAL /NATION 21
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Paid Advertisment
in which one can speak to venture capital-
ists, as well as classes on business and web-
site preparation. The college will host some
classes as well.
“We’re trying to create a meeting place for
great minds,” said Susan Barnes, director of
the new center. “You could try on a new
product or see how to run a business effec-
tively. [To start a business], you have to be
attorneys, HR (human resource) people and
have auxiliary skills to be successful.”
Barnes has even initiated conversations
with Stanford University about helping
with business classes.
The incubator, located in a one-story
5,000-square-foot space at 458 San Mateo
Ave. in San Bruno, will host a soft opening
of the center Tuesday, Feb. 18.
“People can come in to kick the tires,”
said Barnes, who previously worked as an
economic development consultant for cities
like Redwood City. “We’ll start to offer
classes and do recruitment. … It’s open to
everyone and has a broad range of classes.”
The San Mateo County Community
College District funded the incubator for its
first year with $325,000 to cover costs,
including leasing the space. The center is a
separate entity though.
“We are looking for partners to continue
funding it,” Barnes said.
The center is located near Caltrain in
downtown San Bruno, which makes it a con-
venient location for those who wish to use
its services. She also sees this as an oppor-
tunity to help the downtown area.
“We’re looking forward to being part of
the renaissance for revitalization of the
city,” said Barnes, who grew up in San
Mateo and helped initiate Palo Alto’s busi-
ness improvement district. “I know these
cities really well and am able to play with
some of the niches we have. … I’ve been
working with businesses for a long time;
it’s a passion.”
Cherie Colin, director of marketing, com-
munications and public relations for
Skyline, said the incubator is like building
a bicycle while riding it. Barnes agrees,
noting the process of opening the center is
like operating a startup.
“At this stage, there are so many details to
get the incubator running,” said Barnes.
“We just got the keys two weeks ago.”
Barnes also notes it will be geared to two
tiers of entrepreneurs: one that needs basic
skills and for serial entrepreneurs.
Regina Stanback Stroud, Skyline’s presi-
dent, was tremendously visionary in sup-
porting project, Barnes said.
The target date for the grand opening of
the center is Thursday, May 8.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
SKYLINE
By Kimberly Hefling
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — There’s been
no real reduction in the number of
U.S. school shootings despite
increased security put in place
after the rampage at
Connecticut’s Sandy Hook
Elementary School in December
2012.
In Pennsylvania and New
Mexico, Colorado and Tennessee,
and elsewhere, gunfire has echoed
through school hallways, and
killed students or their teachers
in some cases. “Lockdown” is
now part of the school vocabu-
lary.
An Associated Press analysis
finds that there have been at least
11 school shootings this academ-
ic year alone, in addition to other
cases of gun violence, in school
parking lots and elsewhere on
campus, when classes were not in
session.
Last August, for example, a gun
discharged in a 5-year-old’s back-
pack while students were waiting
for the opening bell in the cafete-
ria at Westside Elementary
School in Memphis. No one was
hurt.
Experts say the rate of school
shootings is statistically
unchanged since the mid- to late-
1990s, yet still remains trou-
bling.
Ronald Stephens, executive
director of the National School
Safety Center, said there have
been about 500 school-associated
violent deaths in the past 20
years.
The numbers don’t include a
string of recent shootings at col-
leges and universities. Just last
week, a man was shot and critical-
ly wounded at the Palm Bay
Campus of Eastern Florida State
College, according to police.
Finding factors to blame, right-
fully or not, is almost the easy
part: bad parenting, easy access
to guns, less value for the sancti-
ty of life, violent video games, a
broken mental health system.
Stopping the violence isn’t .
“I think that’s one of the major
problems. There are not easy
answers,” Stephens said. “Aline I
often use is do everything you
can, knowing you can’t do every-
thing.”
Bill Bond, who was principal at
Heath High School in West
Paducah in 1997 when a 14-year-
old freshman fired on a prayer
group, killing three female stu-
dents and wounding five, sees few
differences in how shootings are
carried out today. The one consis-
tency, he said, is that the shooters
are males confronting hopeless-
ness.
“You see troubled young men
who are desperate and they strike
out and they don’t see that they
have any hope,” Bond said.
Schools generally are much
safer than they were five, 10 or
15 years ago, Stephens said.
While a single death is one too
many, Stephens noted that per-
spective is important. In
Chicago there were 500 homi-
cides in 2012, about the same
number in the nation’s 132,000-
plus K-12 schools over two
decades.
“I believe schools are much
safer than they used to be but
clearly they still have a good
ways to go,” Stephens said.
The recent budget deal in
Congress provides $140 million
to support safe school environ-
ments, and is a $29 million
increase, according to the office
of Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa,
chairman of the Senate Health,
Education, Labor and Pensions
Committee.
About 90 percent of districts
have tightened security since the
Newtown shootings, estimates
Randi Weingarten, the president
of the American Federation of
Teachers.
Many schools now have elabo-
rate school safety plans and more
metal detectors, surveillance
cameras and fences. They’ve
taken other steps, too, such as
requiring ID badges and dress
codes. Similar to fire drills, some
schools practice locking down
classrooms, among their
responses to potential violence.
The incident involving the 5-
year-old in Memphis led to the use
of hand-held metal detecting
wands inside elementary schools
in Shelby County’s school dis-
trict.
Attention also has focused on
hiring school resource officers,
sworn law enforcement officers
who are trained to work in a
school environment, said Mo
Canady, executive director of
the National Association of
School Resource Officers. He
said his organization estimates
there are about 10,000 of them
in the U.S.
Canady said it was such an offi-
cer who helped avert more blood-
shed at Arapahoe High School in
the Denver suburb of Centennial
when an 18-year-old student took
a shotgun into the building on
Dec. 13 and fatally shot another
student.
Despite safety emphasis, school shootings continue
Fight near middle
school sparks shooting
SAN JOSE — An argument led to a shoot-
ing near a middle school campus in San Jose
on Friday night that sent a young man to
the hospital, a police spokesman said
today.
Officers responded around 9:40 p.m. to
reports of a shooting in the 3100 block of
Oakgate Way and found a man suffering from
at least one gunshot wound, San Jose police
spokesman Officer Albert Morales said.
The man was taken to an area hospital
where he remained as of Saturday afternoon.
Morales said he did not have information
about the man’s condition.
The shooting was apparently sparked by a
fight between the victim and his friends and
the shooter and his friends in the area of
Quimby Oak Middle School at 3190
Quimby Road, the spokesman said.
Officers searched the campus and the sur-
rounding area but were unable to locate the
suspects, who had fled the scene.
Morales said it does not appear that the
gunman and victim knew one another
before the confrontation, nor does it appear
to be a gang-related attack.
Police continue to investigate the
shooting and are attempting to locate the
shooter.
Local brief
DATEBOOK
22
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
MONDAY, FEB. 3
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more informa-
tion call 523-0804.
Jewish Traditions in
Contemporary Debates. 2 p.m. to 3
p.m. PJCC, 800 Foster City Blvd.,
Foster City. How does the Jewish tra-
dition view religion’s role in shaping
political policies? How is it used and
abused in the polemics of contem-
porary political debates. Join guest
Scholar-in-Residence David
Saperstein to explore these ques-
tions and more. Free. For more infor-
mation go to www.pjcc.org/scholar.
Dr. Steven J. Hughes on 21st
Century Need for Montessori
Education. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Bowman
International School, 400 Terman
Drive, Palo Alto. The presentation will
focus on the adult lives of today’s
children who will not be tied to a sin-
gle job, employer or even industry
and will experience career paths
that were previously unimaginable.
Free. To register call 813-9131.
Dance Connection with Live Music
by Bob Gutierrez. Free dance les-
sons 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., open dance
7 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Burlingame
Woman’s Club, 241 Park Road,
Burlingame. Admission is $8 mem-
bers, $10 guests. Light refreshments.
Free admission for male dance hosts.
For more information call 342-2221.
Jesuit Priest To Discuss
Catholicism In Latino Culture. At
Notre Dame de Namur University. 7
p.m. Cunningham Memorial Chapel,
Notre Dame de Namur University,
1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. Mexican
hot chocolate and pan dulce will be
served following the presentation.
Free. For more email
ckaroly@ndnu.edu.
TUESDAY, FEB. 4
‘64/72’ — An exhibit and artist’s
reception by t.w.five. 11:30 a.m.
Building Nine, First Floor, Cañada
College Art Gallery, 4200 Farm Hill
Blvd., Redwood City. Celebrate the
new large-scale vinyl mural installa-
tion by the artistic due, t.w.five.
Exhibit runs through March 6. For
more information call 306-3336 or
email Robert Hood at
hoodr@smccd.edu.
Stress Busters for Job Seekers. 6
p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 1300
Easton Drive, Burlingame. CSIX
Peninsula Career Network invites
you to an interactive workshop with
Philippa Perkin, Educator and Life
Skills Coach. She will inform and
empower attendees in converting
the emotional stress of job search
into the effective, calming focus that
facilitates success. Free. For more
information email
gracehealey1@gmail.com.
Synthetic Biology with Dr. Drew
Endy of Stanford School of
Medicine. 7 p.m. Oshman Family
JCC, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto. $15.
For more information email gge-
hue@commonwealthclub.org.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more informa-
tion call 523-0804.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
4th Ave., San Mateo. Free admission,
but lunch is $17. For more informa-
tion call 430-6500.
Hillsdale Kid’s Club: Cirque de
Soleil Performs. 3:30 p.m. Hillsdale
Shopping Center, Macy's Center
Court, 60 31st Ave., San Mateo. Watch
the performers from Cirque de
Soleil's latest touring show Amaluna.
This exclusive Peninsula mall
appearance will feature beautifully
costumed artists performing stun-
ning acrobatic feats. Kids will have a
meet and greet photo opportunity
with the artists in costume after the
performance. Free. For more infor-
mation call 345-8222.
‘THE ART OF BULGARI’ ART DOCENT
LECTURE. Millbrae Library, 1 Library
Ave., Millbrae. This docent lecture
focuses on the jewelry design of
Bulgari, currently on exhibit at the
de Young Museum until February
2014. For more information call 697-
7607.
Relay for Life San Bruno Kickoff
Party. Free food and beverages! 6
p.m. to 9 p.m. San Bruno Veterans
Memorial Recreation Center, 251
City Park Way, San Bruno. Free. For
more information email sanbrunore-
lay@gmail.com.
‘The Art of Bulgari’ Art Docent
Lecture. 7 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1
Library Ave., Millbrae. This lecture
will cover the jewelry design of
Bulgari which is currently on exhibit
at the de Young Museum until
February 2014. For more information
call 697-7607.
Celtic Wednesdays at Angelica’s.
8:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Bell Stage
Supper Club, 863 Main St., Redwood
City. $12 reservations required and
ticket must be purchased in
advance. $18 tickets at the door. For
more information or to buy tickets
go to www.angelicasllc.com.
THURSDAY, FEB. 6
‘Annie Get Your Gun’ — Carlmont
High School. 7 p.m. Carlmont High
School Performing Arts Center, 1400
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Show runs through Feb. 9. Tickets
can be purchased at
h t t p s : / / a p p . a r t s -
people.com/index.php?theatre=chs.
Tickets range from $12 to $15.
Notre Dame de Namur University
Department of Theater presents
its annual Student Showcase. 7:30
p.m. NDNU Theatre, 1500 Ralston
Ave., Belmont. Featuring plays
directed by graduating senior stu-
dents. $10 general admission. Tickets
can be purchased at the door or
reserved by calling 508-3456 or
emailing boxoffice@ndnu.edu.
Hillbarn Theatre presents ‘The
Grapes of Wrath.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn
Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster
City. Set during the Great
Depression, John Steinbeck’s
Pulitzer Prize winning story of the
Joad family and their journey from
the dust bowl fields of Oklahoma to
the farmlands of California in search
of jobs and a future has become a
testament to the strength of the
human spirit. $23 to $38 for adults
and seniors. Students 17 and
younger with current student ID, call
349-6411 for pricing. For more infor-
mation go to hillbarntheatre.org.
‘Rx’ by Kate Fodor opens Dragon
Theatre’s 2014 Main Stage
Season. 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. The pro-
duction is rated R. Shows runs
through Feb. 9. $30 tickets. For more
information go to http://dragonpro-
ductions.net.
FRIDAY, FEB. 7
Free Dental Care to Low-Income
Children. San Mateo County den-
tists will provide free dental services
to low-income children, ages 1 to 18,
today (Give Kids a Smile Day). Give
Kids a Smile Day is a one day event
and residents are encouraged to call
San Mateo County Health Coverage
Unit at 616-2002 to schedule an
appointment.
San Mateo Sunrise Rotary Club
presents guest speaker Judge
Shelyna Brown of the Santa Clara
Superior Court. 7:30 a.m. Crystal
Springs Golf Course, 6650 Golf
Course Drive, Burlingame. Fee of
attending is $15 and includes break-
fast. For more information or to RSVP
call Jake at 515-5891.
Free Friday at the San Mateo
County History Museum. 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. In addition to free admission,
there will be two programs through-
out the day. For more information
call 299-0104 or go to www.histo-
rysmc.org.
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more informa-
tion call 523-0804.
Pacific Art League’s reception for
new ‘Abstraction’ and ‘Stamps on
Paper’ exhibits. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
227 Forest Ave., Palo Alto. Exhibit
runs through March 31 from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Admission is free. For more informa-
tion contact Anna Speaker at
gallerymanager@pacificartleague.or
g.
A Photography Exhibit. 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. Municipal Services Building, 33
Arroyo Drive, South San Francisco.
This exhibit features photography
by San Mateo County photogra-
phers and enthusiasts. Free admis-
sion. For more information go to
www.ssf.net.
Jann Klose and Clara Bellino per-
formance. 6 p.m. Angelica’s Bell Two,
863 Main St., Redwood City.
Admission is $11 in advance and $16
at the door. For more information
call 718-881-8183.
Time and Again, Weaving the Walk
Public Reception. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Gallery House, 320 South California
Ave., Palo Alto. For more information
go to www.annelamborn.com or call
408-761-2058.
Dad and Me at the Library. 6:30
p.m. Menlo Park Library, 800 Alma
St., Menlo Park. Free. For more infor-
mation go to www.fatherhoodcol-
laborative.org.
‘Annie Get Your Gun’ - Carlmont
High School. 7 p.m. Carlmont High
School Performing Arts Center, 1400
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Show runs through Feb. 9. Tickets
can be purchased at
h t t p s : / / a p p . a r t s -
people.com/index.php?theatre=chs.
Tickets range from $12 to $15.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
“Poverty looks different here,”
Jackson said.
A number of factors play a role in
the hunger gap in San Mateo County
and not all of them are quantifiable to
pinpoint if the 10 percent increase in
meal need also reflects other changes
in those needing a safety net.
However, Jackson said California as
a whole ranks last in states for food
stamp use among qualified individu-
als in part because each county oper-
ates its own system. San Mateo
County’s use hovers about 40 percent
while, in comparison, neighboring
Santa Clara County is more than 50
percent. Santa Clara County in gener-
al has a narrower meal gap in part
because its housing costs are lower,
Jackson said.
In San Mateo County, Jackson said
Second Harvest has two categories of
user — people whose need might be
short-lived and due to an unforeseen
circumstance and working families
who need help getting by. The second
group is more worrisome because the
cost of living isn’t going down,
Jackson said.
“It’s not episodic so how are you
going to bridge that?” Jackson said.
Looking forward, Jackson said her
two biggest worries include one
nationally and one closer to home.
The first is recent cuts to the
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance
Program, known as SNAP or more
commonly food stamps. The average
family receives between $240 and
$270 in benefits and will lose about
$90, Jackson said.
“Can we possibly make that up?
The answer is no,” she said.
The local issue on Jackson’s mind
is drought. More than half the food
distributed by Second Harvest Food
Bank is fresh food and produce. Alack
of rain means reduced crops and there-
fore less product for the food bank.
What is available is also likely to see
price spikes. With so much of the
fresh produce donated, Jackson said
the bank may not receive as much and
therefore be left needing to buy
replacements.
One silver lining to the Hunger
Index statistics is the increase in
food assistance even if it is lower
than other counties or states,
Jackson said. Literally one out of
every six people receive some type
of food assistance which makes it
more likely that people know some-
one who has visited a food bank, col-
lected food stamps or taken some
other type of aid. Recognition takes
away some of the stigma and encour-
ages the needy to have the courage to
ask for help, Jackson said.
“The toughest part is putting a face
on local hunger,” Jackson said.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
HUNGER
their four children in Half Moon Bay.
They’re dedicated stewards of their
land and manage strictly grass-fed
cows with strong heritage breed
bloodlines, Markegard said. They’ve
spent 26 years building on the genet-
ics of their cattle and their 1,000
acres of farmland is withering the
drought, Markegard said.
“This is by far the worst condi-
tions we’ve ever experienced,”
Markegard said.
They usually work on rotational
grazing but three years of minimal
rainfall has dried much of their land
so they’re supplementing with
expensive hay, Markegard said.
“We’ve been having to import feed
like we’ve never have before and it’s
really costly and we’re having to
make some really difficult decisions
for our cattle operations,” Markegard
said.
Many cattle ranchers have two
options, grow their own grass or
depend on the increasingly expen-
sive imported feed, said Fred
Crowder, San Mateo County agricul-
tural commissioner.
“We have cattleman that are reliant
on winter grass and there just isn’t
any and they’re really concerned
because they’re having to buy grass
and feed,” Crowder said.
It’s a chain reaction; as the demand
for feed increases, prices skyrocket,
said Bill Gass, executive director of
the San Mateo County Farm Bureau.
“[The drought is] already affecting
them because they rely on new grass.
Usually new grass is already pretty
established by now,” Gass said. “So
there would usually be a fair amount,
but it’s not happening. Coupled with
the fact that hay prices have risen
dramatically, it’s prohi bi t i vel y
expensive for them to rely on grass
that’s [imported,]” Gass said.
With increasing costs, some will
sell off their livestock and thin their
herd to be more manageable during
the drought, Gass said.
Markegard’s family ranch is an ani-
mal welfare certified operation so
she said they’re not able to sell at
auction. They usually send younger
cows to slaughter but they’ve been
sending breeding cows instead.
When they’re forced to sell a healthy
heifer, they lose out on every calf
she could have born, Markegard said.
The drought is disrupting the genet-
ics they’ve spent decades refining,
Markegard said.
“We’ve brought in bloodlines and
we’ve been preserving this heritage
breed which has been very costly for
us to build up to this point and, with
this drought, it’s going to set us off
our trajectory,” Markegard said.
Although everyone’s situation is
different, those who are selling off
their livestock will eventually feel
the sting of the market after the
drought subsides, said Half Moon
Bay cattleman Bob Marsh.
“Everybody’s in the same situa-
tion, so the price would be sky high
to build their herd back,” Marsh said.
Being proactive and having new
wells drilled on farmland has also
become competitive, Gass said.
“Because of concerns about other
sources of water that might be
unavailable or curtailed, people
around the state are putting in new
wells. And I understand well drillers
are just swamped, they’re back-
logged, there’s a waiting list because
they’re so busy right now,” Gass
said.
With less access to water, they
grow fewer commodities and the job
market is plummeting, Muller said.
“It’s your income number one, and
employing individuals that help us
all on our farms. So we’re all very
concerned about employment and
also for the financial aspect that we
do need to have something to sell if
we’re going to survive and we’re all
looking pretty thin right now, ”
Muller said.
Produce growers are on the edge of
their seats, especially those whose
smaller wells or reservoirs are drying
up quickly. They’re trying to stay
positive, but weather conditions will
determine what people can afford to
grow, Muller said.
There’s still time for an easier
recovery if the county sees a signifi-
cant rainfall between now and March,
Gass said. But for many ranchers,
their livestock has already become
difficult to maintain and they’ve dra-
matically reduced production. As a
major national agricultural producer,
the effects of California’s drought
will extend far past state lines, Gass
said.
“The long-term effects of this
drought is more than one year, if it
goes into multiple years, we could
see a significant increase in the cost
of food,” Gass said. “It could affect
the whole system.”
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
FARMS
COMICS/GAMES
2-3-14
WEEKEND’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Orchestra’s place
4 Heart of the matter
8 Long-tailed animal
11 Burden
13 Ms. Petty
14 Cotton gin name
15 Long-active volcano
16 Winged it (hyph.)
18 Sprints
20 Go postal
21 Hack off
22 Draw on
24 Helen of Troy’s lover
27 Inelegant solution
30 Fidel’s country
31 Dig for ore
32 Ben & Jerry rival
34 Mumbai Mr.
35 Lisbon lady
36 Airport summons
37 Move up the ladder
39 Injures a matador
40 Bikini piece
41 Refrain syllables
42 Past due
45 Outcome
49 Like a diva’s voice
53 Not hard
54 Scottish river
55 Real thrill
56 Lingerie material
57 Double curve
58 “— Breaky Heart”
59 Shad’s eggs
DOWN
1 Answered a judge
2 Pinch
3 Makes into leather
4 Embrace
5 Lightning —
6 Web addr.
7 Seneca’s 12
8 Ms. McEntire
9 Shake — — (hurry)
10 Lunar phenomenon
12 Showy flower
17 Multiplied
19 Goddess of dawn
22 Arm bone
23 “A Boy Named —”
24 Hackers’ needs
25 Mystique
26 Box score stats
27 Warmhearted
28 Backpack contents
29 Margin
31 “— Lisa”
33 You bet!
35 Berlin article
36 Oater extras
38 Driver with a handle
39 Space
41 Fortunate
42 Prospector’s quest
43 Jungle swingers
44 Jeans go-withs
46 Rapunzel’s pride
47 Nobel Prize city
48 Little kid
50 APB datum
51 Twitch
52 I, for Wolfgang
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2014
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — If you trust friends
with your secrets, you can expect them to blow the
whistle. It is best not to depend on others. You can
make the most headway if you work alone.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Your energy should be
directed into moneymaking ventures. Don’t hesitate to
look into career opportunities that allow you to learn on
the job. You should use your creativity.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Superiors will
appreciate your skills, knowledge and expertise.
Network with contacts who will introduce you to
people in influential positions. Share your ideas.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Volunteer your
services to raise your profile. Contribute what
you can, and don’t be shy regarding input, but be
discreet about personal matters.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Don’t expect to get
a bargain. Avoid buying anything that you don’t
really need. Decisions made in haste will lead to
regret. Be cautious while traveling and don’t make
promises you cannot keep.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You will gain support
and assistance if you ask for help. A healthy debate
will show your loyalty and dedication and make
inroads with people you want to get to know better.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Travel for business or
pleasure in order to make interesting connections.
A lasting relationship or business partnership will
develop. Make sure you are precise regarding
what you have to offer.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Love and romance
are on the rise, and an interesting development will
take place with someone you know through work or
extracurricular activities. Nurture minor ailments.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23): Social events will lead
to unusual opportunities. Your openness and
sophisticated way of dealing with situations will attract
someone who has plenty to offer in return.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Look for someone
unusual who will inspire you to pursue a lifelong
dream. Working with others will encourage you to
broaden your horizons and take on challenges.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Travel will lead
to adventures, but don’t be surprised if you end up in
debt due to unexpected expenses. A friendship may be
tested if someone withholds information.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Domestic problems
will surface if you can’t get along with the people you
live or deal with daily. Listen to any complaints being
made, and be mindful of others’ needs.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 23
THE DAILY JOURNAL
24
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
110 Employment
BUS DRIVER
JOBS AVAILABLE
Requires willingness to obtain Class B
CDL Learner’s Permit with Passenger
Endorsement. Classes Forming.
CALL TODAY, (415)206-7386
GREETER /
SALES PERSON
Greet customers and up-sell car
wash and detail services. $8.00 +
commission. Potential for $15-$30
per hr. Jacks Car Wash. 3651 S. El
Camino Real, SM. 650-627-8447.
110 Employment
CAREGIVER -
Novelles Developmental Services is hir-
ing direct care staff to work with adults
with physical and developmental disabili-
ties. Mon-Fri, day shift. Interested appli-
cants should complete an application,
Mon-Fri, 9am-3pm at 1814 Ogden Drive,
Burlingame.
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
CUSTOMER CONTACT -
OUTSIDE POSITION
FULL TIME/PART TIME
$15.62 per hour start
to $35 per hour
with bonuses
Full training and expenses
Mr. Connors (650)372-2810
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
FINANCIAL ANALYST
Analyze solar projects and investment vi-
ability and return. Conduct profitability
analysis on new and existing solar proj-
ects. Prepare plans for investment. Pro-
vide analysis to support project plans.
Study and model U.S. federal and state
solar incentives and tax policies and in-
terpret their effect on investment.
Requirements: BA/BS in Finance or
Business Administration. 2 years Finan-
cial Analyst Exp.
Job Location: Burlingame, CA
Employer: Hanergy USA Solar Solutions
Ltd.
How to apply:
Mail Resume to Fiona Fang,
1350 Bayshore Hwy, Suite 825
Burlingame, CA 94010
or e-mail: jobs@hanergyamerica.com
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff (easy job)
$9.00 per hr. Apply in Person at or email
resume to info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $500
Guaranteed per week. Taxi Permit
required Call (650)703-8654
25 Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
º work well with others
º Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
º A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
110 Employment
TECHNOLOGY
INFORMATICA Corporation has the fol-
lowing job opportunities available in Red-
wood City, CA :
Professional Services Senior Consultant
(RC38NAR) - Work with customers and
business partners, both on short-term as-
signments to provide on-the-spot Infor-
matica expertise and on longer-term ef-
forts to ensure a support project is deliv-
ered in accordance with the customer's
expectations. Position may require travel
to various, unanticipated locations.
Senior Software Engineer (RC39AMA) -
Architect, design, and develop software
solutions for the next integrated develop-
ment environment (IDE) for data integra-
tion.
Technical Support Engineer (RC40UCH)
- Diagnose and resolve customer inqui-
ries related to operating Informatica soft-
ware products in customer’s environ-
ment.
Submit resume by mail to: Attn: Global
Mobility, Informatica Corporation, 2100
Seaport Blvd., Redwood City, CA 94063.
Must reference job title and job code.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 525781
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Caleb John Gomez
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Mark Ramin filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Caleb John Gomez
Propsed Name: Caleb John
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on February 26,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 01/06/ 2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 12/30/2013
(Published, 01/20/14, 01/27/2014,
02/03/2014, 02/10/2014)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259276
The following person is doing business
as: Kerry J Nemo Consulting, 147 Ave.
Granada, EL GRANADA, CA 94018 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Kerry J. Nemo, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 01/09/2014.
/s/ Kerry J. Nemo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/17/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/20/14, 01/27/14, 02/03/14, 02/10/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259104
The following person is doing business
as: Le Juin Foot Spa, 440 Ellsworth Ave.,
San Mateo CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Le Juin,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
N/A.
/s/ Hong Ma /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/02/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/27/14, 02/03/14, 02/10/14, 02/17/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259105
The following person is doing business
as: Le Juin Acupuncture & Wellness,
654 N. El Camino Real, #103, San Ma-
teo CA 94401 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Le Juin, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Hong Ma /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/02/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/27/14, 02/03/14, 02/10/14, 02/17/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259106
The following person is doing business
as: Le Juin Day Spa, 155 E. 5th Ave.,
San Mateo, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Le Juin,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
N/A.
/s/ Hong Mai /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/02/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/27/14, 02/03/14, 02/10/14, 02/17/14).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND in San Bruno. Call
(650)616-7100
210 Lost & Found
295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ART: 5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”,
signed Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all.
650-345-3277
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! (650)430-6556
G.E. ELECTRIC DRYER - New, pur-
chased Sept 2013. Paid $475. Will sell
for $300. Excellent condition. Call SOLD!
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
(650)430-6556
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL REFRIGERATOR great for of-
fice or studio apartment . Good condition
$40.00 SOLD
STOVE AND HOOD, G.E. XL44, gas,
Good condition, clean, white.. $250.
(650)348-5169
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
THERMADOR WHITE glass gas cook-
top. 36 inch Good working condition.
$95. 650-322-9598
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 SOLD!
SCHWINN 20” Boy’s Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, SOLD
120 Foreign (70), U.S. (50) USED Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$5.00 all, SOLD
19 TOTAL (15 different) UN postage-
stamp souvenir cards, $70 catalog value,
$5, (650)-366-1013.
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
255 US used postage-stamp blocks &
strips (1300 stamps) and more, mounted,
$20, (650)-366-1013.
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRAMED 19X15 BARBIE USPS Post-
mark picture Gallery First Day of issue
1960. Limited edition $85.
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
298 Collectibles
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
299 Computers
1982 TEXAS Instruments TI-99/4A com-
puter, new condition, complete accesso-
ries, original box. $99. (650)676-0974
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
RADIO FLYER All Terrrain Cargo Wag-
on, with sideboards. Cost $149.99. Sell
for $75.00. 650-591-4141
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL floor lamp, marble
table top. Good condition. $90. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL table lamps, (2),
shades need to be redone. Free. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
30" SHARP T.V. w/ remote - $65.
(650)333-5353
32 “ FLAT SCREEN TV - Slightly Used.
HDMI 1080, $100 SOLD
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
303 Electronics
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPAD 4, brand new! 16 GB, Wi-Fi, black,
still unopened in box. Tired of the same
old re-gifts? Get yourself something you
really want... an iPad! $500. Call
(954)479-8716 (San Carlos)
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
VANDERSTEEN speakers, pair, model
2, 15" x 36", Denon tuner, cassette deck
$50 (650)726-6429
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE SET, round 42" glass table,
with 4 chairs, pick up Foster City. Free.
(650)578-9045
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINNING ROOM table with chairs excel-
lent condition like new. $99.00 SOLD
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - Five Drawer - $30.
(650)333-5353
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
SOLD!
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
KITCHEN TABLE, tall $65. 3'x3'x3' ex-
tends to 4' long Four chairs $65.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, SOLD
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
26
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
304 Furniture
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
SOLD!
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $80
RETAIL $130 OBO (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable
coast $600.00 sacrifice $80.00 SOLD
RECLINING CHAIR (Dark Green) - $55.
(650)333-5353
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SMALL VANITY chair with stool and mir-
ror $99. (650)622-6695
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 SOLD!
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO
(650)345-5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
SOFA- FABRIC, beige w/ green stripes
(excellent cond.) - $95. (650)333-5353
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
T.V. STAND- Excellent Condition - $35.
(650)333-5353
TABLE 4X4X4. Painted top $40
(650)622-6695
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. SOLD.
TWIN BED including frame good condi-
tion $45.00 SOLD
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
304 Furniture
WHITE METAL daybed $40. 650-726-
6429
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BBQ, WEBER, GoAnywhere, unused,
plated steel grates, portable, rust resist-
ant, w/charcoal, $50. (650)578-9208
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS (3) stainless steel
21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5 gal. - $10 all
(650)574-3229
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
308 Tools
13" SCROLL saw $ 40. (650)573-5269
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 SOLD!
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench 20-150 lbs,
warranty & case $25 650-595-3933
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 1/2" drill press $40.50.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
308 Tools
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN10" TABLE saw & stand,
$99. (650)573-5269
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
WINCHESTER POCKETKNIFE scis-
sors, bade, sdriver file $10 650-595-3933
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
PANASONIC FAX machine, works
great, $20. (650-578-9045)
310 Misc. For Sale
16 BOOKS on Histoy if WWII Excllent
condition $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ATT 2WIRE Router, working condition,
for Ethernet, wireless, DSL, Internet.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used(
26"x49") aqua - $15 each (650)574-3229
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CALIFORNIA KING WHITE BEDDING,
immaculate, 2 each: Pillow covers,
shams, 1 spread/cover, washable $25.00
(650)578-9208
CEILING FAN 44", three lights, Excel-
lent condition, white or wood grain rever-
sible blades. $25. 650-339-1816
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRIC OMELET Maker quesadillas
& sandwich too $9 650-595-3933
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 San Bruno
(650)588-1946
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 SOLD!
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
310 Misc. For Sale
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7, SOLD!
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO SOLD!
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 SOLD!
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 SOLD!
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SHOWER CURTAIN set: royal blue
vinyl curtain with white nylon over-curtain
$15 (650)574-3229
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm SOLD!
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR no brand $65
SOLD!
311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM,” MARINA Cool 10”, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
PET TAXI, never used 20 by 14 by 15
inches, medium dog size $20. (650)591-
1500
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $10
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
316 Clothes
MINK JACKET faux, hip length, satin lin-
ing. Looks feels real. Perfect condition
$99 OBO 650-349-6969
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB LOUNGE exercise machine cost
$100. sell for $25. Call SOLD!
BASEBALLS & softballs 6 in all for only
$5 650-595-3933
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 SOLD!
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 SOLD!
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
27 Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 NetZero and
AOL
5 Winter
precipitation
9 “Poison” plant
14 NBAer O’Neal
15 Classic film
character whose
last word was
“Rosebud”
16 “The Devil
Wears __”
17 Linus’ trademark
in “Peanuts”
comics
20 Bone: Pref.
21 U-shaped river
bend
22 USN rank
23 NYC dance
troupe
25 Daunting duty
27 1959
Hudson/Day film
33 Emulated
Michael Phelps
36 School subj. with
a lab
37 Link with
38 Stable newborns
39 Chatter
40 Mistaken
42 Wine, on le menu
43 Increasing in vol.,
musically
45 __ firma
46 Decline
47 Rope material
48 Song publisher’s
output
50 Othello’s
confidant
52 Barnyard clucker
53 Former Texas
governor
Richards
55 Church keyboard
59 Say
63 Waistline
concern
66 Without a break
67 “Not a problem”
68 Sky bear
69 Fizzy fountain
drinks
70 Lowly laborer
71 CPR pros
DOWN
1 “That __ last
week!”
2 Females
3 War-ending
agreement
4 Rat on the gang
5 Hit the slopes
6 Belg.-based
peacekeeping
gp.
7 Black stone
8 Jack who played
Sgt. Joe Friday
9 Breed, as
salmon
10 Keats’ Grecian
vase
11 Disturbs the
status quo
12 Port in Yemen
13 Litter box users
18 Like some high-
tech machines
19 Search (for)
24 Bed with a mate
26 GI show gp.
27 TV show about a
consultant
thought to have
ESP
28 “As if __!”
29 Having similar
opinions
30 Canines and
molars
31 “But only God
can make __”:
Kilmer
32 “The Maltese
Falcon” actor
Peter
34 Suspect’s story
35 “Hardball” airer
38 Case of false
incrimination
41 Surg. branch
44 Restful retreat
48 Achy
49 False
51 Olympians’
dreams
53 “Famous” cookie
guy
54 Chile boy
56 Surprised sound
57 Fluish feeling
58 Wolfe of
detective fiction
60 Time in office
61 Sunrise
direction
62 Nutritional stds.
64 Forensic ID
65 D.C. bigwig
By Peter Schaefer
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
02/03/14
02/03/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
318 Sports Equipment
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
WOMAN'S BOWLING ball, 12 lbs, "Lin-
da", with size 7 shoes and bag, $15.
(650)578-9045
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
LAWN MOWER – Solaris Electric Cord-
less 21” self propelled. Excellent work-
ing condition.$85. 650-593-1261
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
380 Real Estate Services
REX HOME BUYER SEMINAR
PRESENTED BY SHARPERBUYER
MIKE LYON TO DISCUSS
UNIQUE DOWN PAYMENT
METHODS
Saturday, FEB 8th, 1pm-2pm
850 Burlingame Ave
Burlingame, CA 94010
FREE
RSVP at http://bit.do/rexpresentation
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
SAN MATEO 1 furnished room available
in 3 bdrm house. $600/month, utilities in-
cluded. Ladies only. (650)799-5425
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2,400 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
ISUZU ‘96 RODEO, V-6, 153K miles,
clean body, red, no dents, immaculate in-
terior. Kenwood stereeo with boom box
included. Great car! Asking $3,750.
SOLD!
TOYOTA ‘05 TUNDRA, 4WD, Access
Cab, low mileage, $14,000. Call Joe,
(650)589-3002
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
FORD WINDSTAR 2002 7-Pass, Prefer-
red Cust Pkg, , Pwr Windows, Hi Mile-
age, Eng Excel Cond. More Features.
$2250/obo (650)867-1122.
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
MA'S AUTO
REPAIR SERVICE
Tires • Service • Smog checks
***** - yelp!
980 S Clarem’ont St San Mateo
650.513.1019
704 N San Mateo Dr San Mateo
650.558.8530
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUNNING BOARDS – Dodge Ram fac-
tory chrome running boards. $99 (650)
995-4222
RUNNING BOARDS- Dodge Ram facto-
ry chrome running boards in great condi-
tion. $99 (650)995-4222
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
28
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
MyErrandServicesCA.com
Concrete
Construction
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
THE VILLAGE HANDYMAN
Remodels • Framing
• Carpentry Stucco • Siding
• Dryrot • Painting
• Int./Ext. & Much More...
(650)701-6072
Call Joe Burich ... Free Estimates
Lic. #979435
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTERS AND ROOF
REPAIR
• New Installation seamless,
• Cleaning and Screening,
• Commercial and Residential
Power Washing
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1985
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED
DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters, Faucets,
Toilets, Sinks, & Re-pipes
(650)461-0326
Plumbing
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
29 Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
Food
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
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Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
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CA License 0C60215
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Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
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By Todd Pitman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BANGKOK — Thailand held
nationwide elections without
bloodshed Sunday despite wide-
spread fears of violence. But the
country’s bitter political crisis is
far from over, and one of the next
flash points is likely to be an
effort to nullify the vote.
Although balloting was largely
peaceful, protesters forced thou-
sands of polling booths to close
in Bangkok and the south, disen-
franchising millions of registered
voters. Not all Parliament seats
will be filled as a result, meaning
the nation could stay mired in
political limbo for months with
the winning party unable to form a
new government.
The struggle to hold the vote
was part of a 3-month-old conflict
that has split the country between
supporters of Prime Minister
Yingluck Shinawatra and protest-
ers who allege her government is
too corrupt to rule.
The crisis, in which demonstra-
tors have occupied major intersec-
tions across Bangkok and forced
government ministries to shut down
and work elsewhere, overshadowed
the poll’s run-up to such an extent
that campaigning and stump speech-
es laying out party platforms were
virtually non-existent.
Rather than “a contest among
candidates, it was about whether
the election itself could happen,”
said Sunai Phasuk of Human
Rights Watch. “That in itself says
a lot about the fate of democracy in
Thailand — it’s hanging by a
thread.”
Television stations, which nor-
mally broadcast electoral results,
were reduced to projecting graph-
ics not of party victories and loss-
es, but of which constituencies
were open or closed.
Official results cannot be
announced until a series of by-
elections are held and all districts
have voted. The first will take
place Feb. 23.
In Bangkok, protesters sur-
rounded government offices hous-
ing ballot papers, preventing
them from being delivered. They
also pressured electoral officials
not to report for duty, and in some
cases physically preventing peo-
ple from voting.
Infuriated voters cut the chains
off polling stations that had been
locked, futilely demanding that
they be allowed to cast ballots. In
one downtown district, they hurled
bottles at each other and one
demonstrator fired a gunshot after
several people tried to push past a
blockade. After authorities called
off voting there, angry crowds
stormed into the district office.
“We want an election. We are
Thais,” said Narong Meephol, a
63-year-old Bangkok resident
who was waving his voter identifi-
cation card. “We are here to exer-
cise our rights.”
Thai elections peaceful, but crisis far from over
REUTERS
Anti-government protesters spell “No Vote”with Thai baht banknotes while
marching through Bangkok.
By Aron Heller and Moshe Edri
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM — Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on
Sunday rejected U.S. Secretary of
State John Kerry’s warning
against a growing boycott move-
ment against the Jewish state
should peace talks with the
Palestinians fail, saying the
stance undermined Israel’s legiti-
macy and the chances of reaching
a peace agreement.
The latest brush-up with the
United States comes as Israel is
negotiating with the Palestinians
against a backdrop of increasing
international pressure to reach a
deal, coupled with a growing call
for boycotting Israel over its set-
tlements in areas it captured in the
1967 Middle East war.
A small but growing number of
European businesses and pension
funds have begun to drop invest-
ments or limit trade with Israeli
firms involved in the West Bank
settlements. At a security confer-
ence in Germany this weekend,
Kerry warned that a breakdown in
Israeli-Palestinian talks would
accelerate this trend and could
threaten Israel’s economic pros-
perity and its safety.
“You see for Israel there’s an
increasing de-legitimization cam-
paign that has been building up.
People are very sensitive to it.
There are talk of boycotts and
other kinds of things,” Kerry said.
“Today’s status quo absolutely, to
a certainty, I promise you 100 per-
cent, cannot be maintained. It’s
not sustainable. It’s illusionary.
There’s a momentary prosperity,
there’s a momentary peace.”
At the opening of his weekly
Cabinet meeting, Netanyahu said
international pressure on Israel
would backfire and only cause the
Palestinians to harden their posi-
tions.
“Attempts to impose a boycott
on the State of Israel are immoral
and unjust. Moreover, they will
not achieve their goal,” he said.
While Netanyahu refrained from
taking aim at Kerry, some of his
ministers were harsher.
Intelligence Minister Yuval
Steinitz, of Netanyahu’s ruling
Likud party, called Kerry’s com-
ments “offensive, unfair and
insufferable.”
Israeli premier rejects Kerry’s boycott warning
WORLD 31
Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
V
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By Ryan Lucas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — Syrian government
helicopters and warplanes
unleashed a wave of airstrikes on
more than a dozen opposition-held
neighborhoods in the northern
city of Aleppo on Sunday, firing
missiles and dropping crude barrel
bombs in a ferocious attack that
killed at least 36 people, including
17 children, activists said.
Aleppo has been a key battle-
ground in Syria’s civil war since
rebels swept into the city in mid-
2012 and wrested most of the east-
ern and southern neighborhoods
from the government. Since then,
the fighting has settled into a
bloody grind, with neither side
capable of mounting an offensive
that would expel its opponents
from the city.
But over the past two months,
President Bashar Assad’s air force
has ramped up its aerial campaign
on rebel-held areas of Aleppo,
pounding them with barrel bombs
— containers packed with explo-
sives, fuel and scraps of metal —
that cause massive damage on
impact.
On Sunday alone, Syrian mili-
tary aircraft targeted 15 opposi-
tion-controlled neighborhoods,
said an activist who goes by the
name of Abu al-Hassan Marea.
The Britain-based Syrian
Observatory for Human Rights
monitoring group said the Tariq al-
Bab district on the eastern edge of
the city was the hardest-hit, with at
least eight barrel bombs raining
down on it Sunday. Marea said one
of the air raids in the neighborhood
struck a vegetable market and
another landed near a mosque.
The Aleppo Media Center
activist group said the strike near
the Abdullah bin Masoud Mosque
killed more than 10 people.
The Observatory put the day’s
death toll in the air raids at 36,
including 17 children. Marea said
that more than 50 people were
killed in the airstrikes, although he
did not have an exact count.
An amateur video posted online
showed a helicopter circling in the
blue sky, and then a barrel plum-
meting from the aircraft until it
slams into buildings on the hori-
zon, sending a pillar of smoke and
dust into the air. The video
appeared genuine and corresponded
to other Associated Press reporting
of the events depicted.
This is not the first time that
Assad’s air force has waged an
intense campaign over Aleppo. In
December, military helicopters
pounded rebel-held districts of the
city with barrel bombs, leveling
buildings, burying people under
the rubble and killing more than
500 people over a two-week
stretch.
The misery in Aleppo was then
compounded in early January by an
outburst of rebel-on-rebel fighting,
which has weakened the opposi-
tion’s grip on parts of the city.
Over the past two weeks, Assad’s
forces have slowly chipped away at
the rebels’ hold on neighborhoods
in southeastern Aleppo. While the
advances have been small, they
still mark the most significant
government gains in the divided
city since opposition fighters
seized the areas in mid-2012.
As intense as the airstrikes have
been, the rebels’ position in the
city and across northern Syria has
been undermined to a greater
degree by the bloody bout of
infighting that pits the al-Qaida-
linked Islamic State of Iraq and the
Levant against an array of ultra-
conservative brigades and more
moderate factions.
The rebel clashes have killed
more than 1,400 people since they
began a month ago, and the fight-
ing shows little sign of coming to
an immediate close.
On Saturday, a twin suicide
bombing killed 26 people, includ-
ing a senior military commander of
the Tawhid Brigade, a prominent
rebel group opposed to the Islamic
State.
The attack, widely blamed by
both pro- and anti-al-Qaida
activists on the Islamic State, tar-
geted the base of its rivals in the
Tawhid Brigade and killed senior
leader Adnan Bakkour, said
Observatory director Rami
Abdurrahman.
The Islamic State also killed
another prominent commander,
Abu Hussein al-Dik of Suqour al-
Sham, on Saturday near the central
city of Hama, the Observatory said.
Abdurrahman said al-Dik was killed
in an ambush outside of Hama,
where he was traveling to try to
help rebels encircled by Islamic
State fighters.
Both the Tawhid Brigade and
Suqour al-Sham are part of the
Islamic Front, a powerful alliance
of seven Islamist rebel factions
that united in November. The
Islamic Front has emerged as a
heavy weight in northern Syria,
and has been a driving force in the
fight against the Islamic State.
Syrian air raids kill at least 36in Aleppo
REUTERS
People gather at a site hit by what what activists said was an air raid by forces
loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, in al-Myasar district in Aleppo.
By Binsar Bakkara
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOUNT SINABUNG, Indonesia
— The death toll from an
Indonesian volcano that has been
rumbling for months rose to 16
Sunday after rescuers found anoth-
er charred corpse and a critically
injured college student died in a
hospital, officials said.
Mount Sinabung erupted again
Saturday just a day after authori-
ties allowed thousands of vil-
lagers who had been evacuated to
return to its slopes, saying vol-
canice activity was decreasing.
Rescuers found 14 bodies and res-
cued three people with burn
wounds, said National Disaster
Mitigation Agency spokesman
Sutopo Purwo Nugroho.
Rescue efforts resumed Sunday
and rescuers found another body
about three kilometers (two
miles) from the volcano’s peak,
said Lt. Col. Asep Sukarna, who
led the operation. Another resi-
dent, a 24-year-old college stu-
dent died in an intensive care unit,
said an official at the Efarina
Etaham hospital.
Among the dead were a local tel-
evision journalist and four high-
school students and their teacher
who were visiting the mountain
to see the eruptions up close,
Nugroho said. At least three other
people were injured and authori-
ties fear the death toll will rise.
Sinabung in western Sumatra
has been erupting for four
months. Authorities had evacuat-
ed more than 30,000 people,
housing them in cramped tents,
schools and public buildings, but
many were desperate to return to
check on homes and farms.
On Friday, authorities allowed
nearly 14,000 people living out-
side a five-kilometer (three-mile)
danger zone to return after believ-
ing volcanic activity had
decreased. Others living close to
the peak have been returning to
their homes over the past four
months despite the dangers.
On Saturday, a series of huge
blasts and eruptions thundered
from the 2,600-meter (8,530-
foot) volcano. Television footage
showed villages, farms and trees
covered in thick gray ash.
Death toll rises to 16 from Indonesia volcano
REUTERS
Mount Sinabung is seen during an eruption from Naman Teran village in
Karo district, Indonesia's North Sumatra province.
32 Monday • Feb. 3, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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