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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 148
DROUGHT MONEY
STATE PAGE 5
NEXT BEST THING
TO CHOCOLATES
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 19
FEDS ANNOUNCE ANOTHER $14M FOR CALIFORNIA
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Keeping large superstores out of South
San Francisco is the focus of a potential
ordinance sparked by a 2012 effort by
Walmart to open a location that included a
grocery section east of Highway 101.
Walmart had been looking at purchasing
720 Dubuque Ave., the current location of
Lowe’s Home Improvement, said Vice
Mayor Richard
Garbarino.
The City Council
adopted an interim ordi-
nance in December 2012,
which put a citywide
moratorium on issuing
use permits, building
permits or any other
applicable entitlement
for large formal retail or
superstore uses. These same restrictions
were also put on the opening of stores with
grocery aspects east of Highway 101. Now,
the Planning Commission will take public
comment on a draft environmental impact
report for a permanent amendment to the
zoning ordinance.
“We had concerns from the community
that it would take money away from them,
which it probably would,” said Mayor Karyl
Matsumoto. “We were concerned for
Hernandez (a grocery store on Grand
Avenue) and smaller grocery stores.”
Matsumoto added she is open to looking
at use permits on a case-by-case basis, such
as putting in a Safeway superstore as long
as it wouldn’t affect the other grocery
stores. She is opposed to grocery stores
opening east of Highway 101 because of
traffic concerns.
City aims to limit superstores
Walmart’s desire to move into South San Francisco brings competition, traffic concerns
Karyl
Matsumoto
Officials seek emphasis on
environmental, social issues
City creates
Sustainability
Commission
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Water conservation, greenhouse gas emissions, climate
change, public health and the environment will be the focus
of a new Sustainability Commission the San Mateo City
Council formed Monday to bring new light on issues that
have sometimes fallen by the wayside.
In the past, issues relating to sustainability have fallen
on other commissions that may not be as equipped with
time or experience to carry out policy recommendations to
the council, said Kathy Kleinbaum, senior management ana-
lyst for the city who will help staff the commission.
“I think that there’s a lot of topics that are sort of
broached at various other commission meetings including
Planning, Public Works and Parks and [Recreation], that
would really be better served by a commission that’s focused
on sustainability. Because it’s a very complex issue,”
City officials weigh
in on Essex proposal
San Mateo Parks and Recreation looks at
eight-story downtown development plan
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Increased funding for park maintenance, enhanced land-
scaping and thorough reviews on the impacts a 75-foot
building would have on its neighboring Central Park were
the chief concerns of the San Mateo Parks and Recreation
Commission as they discussed the proposed Essex develop-
ment last night.
Essex Property and Trust submitted a pre-application to
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With Mercy High School
Burlingame ringing in the 100th
birthday of its Kohl Mansion, the
school is celebrating with a variety of
events.
To begin, the school will host a
local authors’ book night Feb. 25,
then a historical improv night in
March with Burlingame Historical
Society’s “Living History Presenters”
team, parties and night tours.
The mansion was built between
1912 and 1914 by Charles Fredrick
“Freddie” Kohl for his wife Bessie.
Kohl Mansion celebrates 100 years
Mercy High School Burlingame has activities planned throughout year
Mercy High School Burlingame is ringing in the 100th birthday of its Kohl Mansion this year.
See SSF, Page 20
See SUSTAIN, Page 20
See KOHL, Page 20 See ESSEX, Page 18
PANTHERS PROVE TOO
MUCH FOR KNIGHTS
SPORTS PAGE 11
Man dies after
wheelchair catches fire
RED BLUFF — ANorthern California
man has died after his wheelchair
caught fire, authorities say.
Red Bluff Police say they received a
report just after 5 p.m. Tuesday that 65-
year-old Garry Parish and his powered
wheelchair were on fire.
The blaze was extinguished by a wit-
ness on the scene, and Parish was taken
to St. Elizabeth Community Hospital,
where he died of his injuries.
The Record Searchlight newspaper
reported that police say a lit cigarette
may have caused the fire, though the
case is still under investigation.
Couple charged after
toddler calls 911 15 times
LOWVILLE, N.Y. — Authorities have
charged a northern New York woman
and her boyfriend because the woman’s
2-year-old daughter used their cell-
phones to dial 911 a total of 15 times
last month.
Village of Lowville Police Officer
Matthew Martin says the 23-year-old
mother and her 33-year-old boyfriend
told him they tried to keep their phones
away from the persistent toddler, but
the girl kept getting them and dialing
911.
Martin spoke to the couple
Wednesday after Lewis County 911 dis-
patchers reported that a child had called
14 times in January. Martin says the
child called 911 a 15th time later that
night.
He charged the couple the next day
with obstructing governmental admin-
istration.
Maine police investigating
screams find happy pig
CHINA, Maine — Police responding
to reports of screaming coming from a
home in Maine didn’t find a victim of
domestic violence as they feared.
Instead, they found an amorous pig.
State police say a woman called last
week after hearing what she believed to
be a fight coming from a neighbor’s
home in the town of China. The caller
said she heard screaming and thought
there was a domestic assault.
The Morning Sentinel reports that
four state troopers responded and talked
to the neighbor.
The neighbor explained that she rais-
es pigs and the screaming was coming
from an overjoyed male pig that had
been placed in a pen with five sows in
heat.
Police say there was no assault and
no disturbance “other than the scream-
ing male pig.”
Firefighter handcuffed
at California crash scene
CHULA VISTA — A firefighter
responding to a Southern California
crash site was handcuffed and held in a
patrol car for failing to move a fire truck
immediately after police asked him to.
U-T San Diego reports crews were
helping victims after a car overturned
Tuesday night on Interstate 805. One
person was taken to a hospital.
Chula Vista Fire Chief Dave
Hanneman says a fire engine was
parked behind an ambulance for safety
reasons when a California Highway
Patrol officer demanded it be moved out
of traffic lanes. The firefighter said he’d
check with his captain but was told to
move it immediately or face arrest.
Deputies in California
arrest three during pig seizure
SHINGLETOWN — Sheriff’s officials
in Northern California say they arrest-
ed three people while trying to seize
pigs from a rural home.
The owners of the property in
Shingletown in Shasta County were
allegedly raising too many of the ani-
mals.
Authorities tell the Record
Searchlight of Redding that officials
went there on Tuesday to take about 30
pigs, but the residents tried to stop
them.
Sheriff’s Sgt. Steve Grashoff says
sheriff’s deputies providing security at
the site arrested 58-year-old Lynn
Hamilton, and his 56-year-old brother,
Brian, on suspicion of obstructing offi-
cers.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Former NBC News
anchorman Tom
Brokaw is 74.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1952
Britain’s King George VI died at
Sandringham House in Norfolk,
England; he was succeeded as monarch
by his elder daughter, who became
Queen Elizabeth II.
“The first duty of a leader is to make himself be
loved without courting love.To be loved without
’playing up’to anyone — even to himself.”
— Andre Malraux, French author (1901-1976)
Actress Zsa Zsa
Gabor is 97.
Rock singer Axl
Rose is 52.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A statue by Tony Matelli titled ‘Sleepwalker’ stands in the snow on the campus of Wellesley College in Wellesley, Mass.
Thursday: Rain in the morning...Then
showers likely in the afternoon. Highs in
the lower 50s. Southeast winds 10 to 15
mph... Becoming west 5 to 10 mph in the
afternoon.
Thursday ni ght: Mostly cloudy. A
slight chance of showers. Lows in the
upper 40s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Mostly cloudy. Achance of rain. Highs in the mid
50s. South winds 10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 30 percent.
Friday night: Rain. Rain may be heavy at times after mid-
night. Lows in the upper 40s. South winds around 20 mph
with gusts to around 35 mph.
Saturday: Breezy...Rain. Highs in the upper 50s.
Saturday night through Sunday night: Rain likely.
Lows in the upper 40s. Highs in the upper 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1778, the United States won official recognition from
France with the signing of a Treaty of Alliance in Paris.
I n 1788, Massachusetts became the sixth state to ratify the
U.S. Constitution.
I n 1899, a peace treaty between the United States and
Spain was ratified by the U.S. Senate.
In 1911, Ronald Wilson Reagan, the 40th president of the
United States, was born in Tampico, Ill.
I n 1922, Cardinal Archille Ratti was elected pope; he took
the name Pius XI.
I n 1933, the 20th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution,
the so-called “lame duck” amendment, was proclaimed in
effect by Secretary of State Henry Stimson.
I n 1943, a Los Angeles jury acquitted actor Errol Flynn of
three counts of statutory rape.
I n 1959, the United States successfully test-fired for the
first time a Titan intercontinental ballistic missile from
Cape Canaveral.
I n 1973, Dixy Lee Ray was appointed by President Richard
Nixon to be the first woman to head the Atomic Energy
Commission.
I n 1992, 16 people were killed when a C-130 military
transport plane crashed in Evansville, Ind.
I n 1994, actor Joseph Cotten died in Los Angeles at age
88.
I n 1998, President Bill Clinton signed a bill changing the
name of Washington National Airport to Ronald Reagan
Washington National Airport. Pop music star Falco, who’d
had a 1986 hit with “Rock Me Amadeus,” died in a traffic
accident in the Dominican Republic; he was 40.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
ADAGE FLUID PEANUT OBJECT
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: After the horse’s girlfriend broke up with him,
he had a — LONG FACE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
LUWAF
CANET
BEGOIL
RASPIN
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
u
m
b
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p
u
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le

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in
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s

a
v
a
ila
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t

p
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Print your
answer here:
Actor Patrick Macnee is 92. Actor Rip Torn is 83. Actress
Mamie Van Doren is 83. Actor Mike Farrell is 75.Singer
Fabian is 71. Actress Gayle Hunnicutt is 71. Actor Michael
Tucker is 70. Producer-director-writer Jim Sheridan is 65.
Singer Natalie Cole is 64. Actor Jon Walmsley is 58. Actress
Kathy Najimy is 57. Rock musician Simon Phillips (Toto) is
57. Actor-director Robert Townsend is 57. Actor Barry Miller
is 56. Actress Megan Gallagher is 54. Country singer Richie
McDonald is 52. Singer Rick Astley is 48. Rock musician Tim
Brown (Boo Radleys) is 45. Actor Brandon Hammond is 30.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Eureka, No. 7,
in first place; California Classic, No. 5, in second
place; and Solid Gold, No. 10, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:40.86.
9 3 5
25 44 49 60 73 9
Mega number
Feb. 4 Mega Millions
8 17 32 57 59 24
Powerball
Feb. 5 Powerball
9 25 28 33 36
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
1 4 6 9
Daily Four
0 7 2
Daily three evening
34 39 40 45 47 18
Mega number
Feb. 5 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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REDWOOD CITY
Disturbance. Aman with a walker urinated
in public on Broadway before 4:41 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 4.
Disturbance. A person reported seeing a
man in an orange van mistreating and hitting
a dog every time it wagged its tail on
Broadway before 11:54 a.m. Monday, Feb. 3.
Petty theft. Awoman reported her cousin’s
iPod and ID were stolen from their green Ford
Explorer on El Camino Real before 9:55 a.m.
Sunday, Feb. 2.
Vandalism. A person reported their vehi-
cle’s tires were slashed for the second time on
Rolison Road before 7:45 a.m. Saturday, Feb.
1.
Vandalism. Three cars with their windows
smashed were reported on Bay Road before
9:05 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 1.
SAN CARLOS
Petty theft. Aburglary occurred on the 600
block of Elm Street at an unknown time on
Tuesday, Jan. 28.
Display false regi strati on. A man was
cited for having false registration on the
1100 block of Industrial Road before 11:55
p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 28.
Police reports
All worked up over nothing
Agroup of men were reportedly scream-
ing and yelling at no one on Woodside
Road in Redwood City before 7:12 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 1.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Two women, including a San Mateo
County resident, say in a class action law-
suit filed this week that the health claims
made by SkinnyPop popcorn are misleading
or downright wrong.
The women argue that despite claims of
being an alternative to “junk food” that can
aid weight loss, a four-cup serving of
SkinnyPop is comparable to Lay’s potato
chips and greater than a serving of Corn
Nuts or Tostitos corn chips.
In their suit, Rachel Dossey, of San
Francisco, and Louise Tang, of San Mateo
County, say they were deceived and would
not have purchased SkinnyPop popcorn had
they known the truth about its labeling.
But J. Noah Hagey, legal counsel for
SkinnyPop, said the packaging was
changed several years ago to reflect FDA
concerns about labeling regulations such as
the description of “low calorie.”
“All I can say is these seem like very
stale, very old claims and again they are not
challenging the product as being misbrand-
ed to the nutrition facts,” Hagey said.
An attorney representing the women did
not return an inquiry about Hagey’s asser-
tions.
On its website, SkinnyPop declares itself
“the simply delicious guilty-free snack” and
includes “premium popcorn kernel, sun-
flower oil and the perfect amount of salt.”
The product comes in original, black pep-
per, ultra lite white cheddar and naturally
sweet flavors, according to the site which
also posted photos of reality star Kris
Jenner pushing a shopping cart with a bag
on top and celebrity chef smiling above a
bag in her hand.
The lawsuit argues Illinois-based
SkinnyPop deliberately misidentifies its
health and fitness benefits to promote sales
and provides bloggers with free product
samples for reviews including phrases like
“low fat” and “low calorie” that the compa-
ny is not allowed to use itself. One review,
for example, said it was a “good idea” for
parents to feed young children an entire
700-calorie bag of SkinnyPop which con-
tains 45 grams of fat, the lawsuit states.
The company did not correct errors in the
reviews regarding nutrition but simply
thanked the authors, according to the law-
suit.
The “low calorie” implication on the
SkinnyPop Facebook page is unlawful and
demonstrative of a pattern of making false
and misleading health claims through social
media, the lawsuit states.
The suit also claims SkinnyPop misleads
consumers by noting the product is choles-
terol free because popcorn itself of any
brand is inherently free of cholesterol. The
company “misleadingly implies” the pop-
corn has been “processed or modified to
remove cholesterol that was never there in
the first instance,” the suit states.
Hagey points out that popcorn could have
cholesterol depending on what is put on it.
SkinnyPop also claims only 39 calories
per cup but a serving size is about four cups
and the label improperly states it is a
“great” source of fiber, the suit states.
Hagey said that is again an outdated claim
because the label now says it is a “good
source of fiber.” He also pointed out that
other popcorn brands also measure a serv-
ing size between 3 1/2 and 4 cups.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
‘Skinny’ popcorn buyers say no
kernel of truth in health claims
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
4
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
5
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
Man alleged to be high crashes into parked cars
ADaly City man who was allegedly high on marijuana
was arrested after driving into two parked cars in South
San Francisco on Tuesday night, police said.
South San Francisco police were contacted before
10:40 p.m. about an accident on the 400 block of Linden
Avenue.
When police arrived, they found the driver, 20-year-old
Alejandro Morales, still at the scene, according to
police.
Morales was screened by drug-recognition officers,
who determined that he appeared to be under the influence
of marijuana, police said. Morales allegedly admitted to
officers that he had been smoking marijuana earlier that
day and while driving, according to police.
Morales was arrested on suspicion of driving under the
influence of a drug and was taken to San Mateo County
Jail, police said.
Nobody was injured in the incident.
School district to look into Montessori program
The San Mateo-Foster City Elementary School District
Board of Trustees is voting on convening a planning
group to provide for more opportunities for Montessori
instruction for K-8 students in the 2015-16 school year.
The board is exploring various options to have the dis-
trict’s Montessori programming put on one campus.
North Shoreview and Parkside elementary schools both
operate Montessori programs.
It will also vote on moving Parkside, which is current-
ly operating two programs — a Montessori and a tradi-
tional school — to one single theme.
Last year, parent opposition to transforming Parkside
into a science, technology, engineering and math pro-
gram school caused the district to backpedal on its deci-
sion to make the change. There has been some concern
expressed by parents, who still believe the district is try-
ing to phase out the Montessori program in favor of
STEM grant money. Parent Rick Nava said he thinks the
consolidation of the Montessori programs for one sin-
gle, bigger one is being presented under that pretext, but
the district is aiming to eliminate it. Nava said he does-
n’t trust the district will follow through.
The board is meeting 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 6 at the dis-
trict office board room, 1170 Chess Drive in Foster City.
Local briefs
By Martha Mendoza
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — Former Federal
Energy Regulatory Commission
chairman Jon Wel l i nghoff said
Wednesday an April attack on Silicon
Valley’s phone lines and power grid
was terrorism — despite repeated FBI
statements that it had found no indi-
cations to back that up.
Wellinghoff, who was in office dur-
ing the incident, said he reached his
conclusion after consulting with
Defense Department experts about
the attack that involved snipping
AT&T fiber-optic lines to knock out
phone and 911 service, and firing
shots into a PG&E substation, caus-
ing outages.
Former federal official: Attack was terrorism
By Josh Lederman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Climate change is
already hurting American farmers and
rural residents, Agriculture Secretary
Tom Vilsack said Wednesday, warning
that the U.S. would regret any failure to
adapt and prepare for shifting weather
realities.
Unveiling a new effort to coordinate
the government’s response, Vilsack
said extreme weather events have
already taken the U.S. by surprise, put-
ting ranchers and others out of busi-
ness. He pointed to the intensity and
frequency of recent storms, long
droughts, snowstorms and subzero
weather as evidence that climate
change is no longer hypothetical or in
the future.
“The combination of all those fac-
tors convinces me that the climate is
changing, and it’s going to have its
impact, and will have its impact, and is
having its impact on agriculture and
forestry,” Vilsack said.
Pine bark beetle that in years past
were killed off during harsh winters
have now infected about 45 million
trees in western states, leading to more
severe forest fires, posing flood risks
and threatening the timber industry,
Vilsack said. In the absence of adequate
forecasting and disaster assistance, he
said, an October snowstorm wiped out
entire cattle operations in the
Dakotas.
USDA chief: Climate change hurting farmers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Federal officials
on Wednesday pledged more money
to help California cope with its
severe drought as state fishing regu-
lators shut down recreational angling
on portions of two water-starved
rivers because of concerns about the
survival of salmon and steelhead
trout.
The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and
Natural Resources Conservation
Service announced another $14 mil-
lion for water management improve-
ments in the state, a day after
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack
committed $20 million.
The aid was announced as the U.S.
House of Representatives passed a
bill supported by House Speaker John
Boehner and Central Valley
Republicans that would temporarily
halt restoration of the San Joaquin
River and allow farmers to pump delta
water more freely.
Feds announce another
$14M for state drought
REUTERS
California has already taken steps to address concerns over the drought,including
cutting deliveries from the State Water Project to farms and cities, and urging
statewide conservation.
6
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The San Mateo Pl anni ng
Commi ssi on is holding its annu-
al review of the Stati on Park
Green Devel opment
Agreement Tuesday, Feb. 11. The
redevelopment proposal for the 12-
acre site at 1700 S. Delaware St. was
originally approved by the commission in 2011 and this
progress review is part of the terms and conditions of the
agreement. The meeting is 7:30 p.m. at City Hall, 330 W.
20th Ave., San Mateo.
• A review and discussion of Foster Ci t y’s smoking
ordinance will be held at a Ci ty Counci l study session
Monday, Feb. 24. The public can provide input as the
council considers expanding outdoor and indoor areas
where smoking is prohibited.
The meeting is 6:30 p.m. City Hall, 620 Foster City
Blvd.
• Arainwater harvesting and graywater reuse workshop
will be held 7 p.m.-9 p.m Wednesday, Feb. 26 at the
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave. Attendees can learn
innovative methods for harvesting rainwater and captur-
ing household graywater for use in gardens and landscape
to conserve water, energy and help lower utility bills.
Attendees will also discover techniques for assembling
and maintaining inexpensive rainwater harvesting and
graywater systems and irrigation methods. Capturing
rainwater can also reduce water run-off of pollutants from
entering waterways.
Admission is free. To RSVP call 349-3000 or sign-up at
bawsca.org. The workshop is sponsored by the Ci t y of
Mi l l brae Water Resources and Conservati on
Program, the Millbrae Library, Friends of the
Millbrae Library and the Bay Area Water Suppl y
and Conservation Agency.
• The city of San Bruno has current vacancies on the
Ci ti zens Cri me Prevent i on Commi t t ee,
Community Preparedness Commi ttee and t he
Bicycle and Pedestrian Advi sory Commi ttee.
Applications are available in the Ci ty Cl erk’s Offic e
in Ci ty Hal l, 567 El Camino Real in San Bruno. You can
also call 616-7058 or email cbonner@sanbruno.ca.gov
for an application.
Navy to rename D.C.
building where gunman killed 12
WASHINGTON — Officials are renaming the Washington
Navy Yard building where a gunman fatally shot 12 people in
September before he was killed by police.
Navy Vice Adm. William Hilarides said in an email to
employees on Tuesday that Building 197 will be named after
Joshua Humphreys, who designed the Navy’s first six frigates.
Hilarides said officials are also “exploring renumbering the
building.”
“I feel this is a critical step towards establishing a new sense
of place as we return to the Navy Yard next year,” Hilarides
wrote of the change to the building’s name and number.
Officials are currently working on renovations to the build-
ing, the headquarters for Naval Sea Systems Command, and its
approximately 3,000 employees have not worked in the
building since the shooting.
Around the nation
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A 22-year-old transient accused of
trying to rape a woman crossing the
San Mateo Caltrain Station’s under-
ground stairs last fall may not be men-
tally fit to stand trial on several
felonies, according to his defense
attorney.
Fernando Chamale-Boch has already
pleaded not guilty to charges of kid-
napping with the intent to rape,
assault with the intent to rape, false
imprisonment and battery. He was to
have a preliminary hearing on the evi-
dence but instead
defense attorney Ed
Pomeroy raised a
doubt about his
client’s ability to
aid in his own
defense. Ajudge put
criminal proceed-
ings on hold while
c our t - a ppoi nt e d
doctors determine
Chamal e- Boch’s
competency.
San Mateo police arrested Chamale-
Boch on Sunday, Oct. 20 after respond-
ing to a woman’s 911 call for help. The
woman said she spotted Chamale-Boch
standing in a dark hallway as she
approached the stairwell about 7 p.m.
that night and turned to go but was
grabbed. The suspect covered her
mouth as she screamed, and pulled her
6 feet down the stairs as she punched
and scratched at his face. After she
fought herself free, she called police
who found him nearby later that night
with scratches on his face.
Chamale-Boch remains in custody
on $2 million bail. Doctors will be
named at a Feb. 6 hearing.
Attempted rape suspect’s
mental fitness questioned
Fernando
Chamale-Boch
By Fenit Nirappil
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry Brown
on Wednesday urged California’s
largest public pension fund to act
quickly to address rising costs caused
by retirees’ longer life expectancies,
saying failure to do so would widen the
fund’s liabilities by billions of dol-
lars.
In a letter sent to the board of the
California Public Employees’
Retirement System, he urged members
to acknowledge the
d e m o g r a p h i c
changes immediate-
ly and phase in the
costs over three
years rather than
waiting two years,
as CalPERS’ staff
recommends.
“No one likes to
pay more for pen-
sions, but ignoring their true costs
for two more years will only burden
the system and cost more in the
long run,” Brown wrote.
The pension fund is $45 billion in
the red and will grow by $9 billion
because of retirees living longer, the
letter said. New projections show the
life expectancy of retirees growing as
much as two years.
CalPERS staff will make formal rec-
ommendations to the board next week
and has been reviewing its assump-
tions about contribution rates and
retiree life expectancy, the fund said in
a statement issued in response to the
governor’s letter.
Brown urges pension fund to address rising costs
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Two teenagers accused of breaking
into the Redwood City home of one’s
ex-girlfriend and demanding jewelry
from her mother while brandishing a
machete and handgun each pleaded no
contest to first-degree residential bur-
glary.
Juan Daniel Ceballos, 19, also
admitted special allegations of com-
mitting a serious felony and was
immediately sentenced to prison for
three years. Cristian Joshua Estrada’s
sentencing is scheduled for March 6
and he remains held without bail.
Prosecutors say Estrada and the vic-
tim’s daughter once dated and had
remained friendly.
On the afternoon of Wednesday, July
3, 2013, Estrada allegedly left the
Lanyard Drive home with the daughter
so Ceballos and another male suspect
could break in through the bedroom
window. Ceballos allegedly had a
machete and the other a handgun when
they encountered the mother and asked
her repeatedly, “Where’s the gold?”
After removing her jewelry and tak-
ing a jewelry box from another room,
the teens took the crying woman to the
garage and ordered her to open a safe.
When her nerves prevented her from
doing so, the pair left and, a few min-
utes later, Estrada and the girl returned.
Estrada’s cellphone had messages
implicating Ceballos and Ceballos’
home and car reportedly contained the
stolen property and machete.
Prosecutors do not believe the
daughter was involved.
Pair take plea deal for robbing ex’s mom with machete
Jerry Brown
NATION 7
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Wanted: Millions of
uninsured Americans willing to give
President Barack Obama’s health care law a
chance.
With time running out, it may not be so
hard for the administration and its allies to
find them. Astudy for the Associated Press
finds that the uninsured aren’t scattered
evenly across the country: half of them live
in just 116 of the nation’s 3,143 counties.
That means outreach targeted to select
areas can pay off big, reaching millions of
prospective customers needed to stabilize
the law’s new insurance markets.
The pattern also holds true for the
younger uninsured, the health care over-
haul’s most coveted demographic. The
study found that half of uninsured people
ages 19-39 live in 108 counties. Their pre-
miums are needed to offset the cost of care
for older adults.
With most of the bugs out of the
HealthCare.gov website, the Obama admin-
istration is using the geography of the
uninsured to write a playbook for its clos-
ing sign-up campaign.
Enrollment ends March 31 for subsidized
private insurance, available to people who
don’t have coverage at work. But many who
could benefit are procrastinating. Some
people are confused by the new law. Others
don’t think they will qualify for help.
“Our efforts are aimed at making sure we
can raise awareness in areas with the largest
concentration of uninsured people,” said
Julie Bataille, communications director for
the rollout at the federal Health and Human
Services Department.
The administration has done its own geo-
graphical research, drilling down even
below the county level. Officials said the
pattern coincides with the findings of AP’s
study, which was conducted by the State
Health Access Data Assistance Center at the
University of Minnesota.
Uninsured aren’t scattered
evenly across the country
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Barack Obama has lunch with five supporters of Obamacare at The Coupe restaurant.
By Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Conservative
Republicans on Wednesday ruled out any
immigration legislation in the House this
year, insisting that the GOP should wait
until next year when the party might also
control the Senate.
House GOP leaders unveiled their broad
immigration principles last week that gave
hope to advocates and the Obama adminis-
tration that the first changes in the nation’s
laws in three decades might happen in the
coming months.
Immigration legislation is one of the top
priorities for Obama’s second term.
But several of the conservatives were
adamant that the House should do nothing on
the issue this year, a midterm election year
when the GOP is angling to gain six seats in
the Senate and seize majority control.
Democrats currently have a 55-45 advantage
but are defending more seats, including ones
in Republican-leaning states.
“I think it’s a mistake for us to have an
internal battle in the Republican Party this
year about immigration reform,” Rep. Raul
Labrador, R-Idaho, told reporters at a gather-
ing of conservatives. “I think when we take
back the Senate in 2014 one of the first
things we should do next year after we do cer-
tain economic issues, I think we should
address the immigration issue.”
Labrador’s comments were noteworthy as
he was one of eight House members working
on bipartisan immigration legislation last
year. He later abandoned the negotiations.
“This is not an issue that’s ready for prime
time to move legislatively,” said Rep. Joe
Barton, R-Texas, who said Republicans
should use the principles to begin a dialogue
with Hispanics.
Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, said the House
should focus on the four bills dealing with
security that the Judiciary Committee
approved last summer. Absent any action on
those bills, Jordan said it would be tough to
do any immigration legislation this year.
The definitive statements from the conser-
vatives came as Douglas Elmendorf, the head
of the Congressional Budget Office, told a
House panel that the comprehensive,
Senate-passed immigration bill would have a
positive impact on the nation’s finances.
The Senate last June passed a bipartisan
bill that would tighten border security, pro-
vide enforcement measures and offer a path
to citizenship for the estimated 11 million
immigrants living in the United States ille-
gally.
The measure has stalled in the House where
Speaker John Boehner and other leaders
have rejected a comprehensive approach in
favor of a bill-by-bill process.
House conservatives rule
out immigration this year
“I think when we take
back the Senate in 2014 one
of the first things we should
do next year after we do certain
economic issues,I think we should
address the immigration issue.”
— Rep. Raul Labrador, R-Idaho
NATION/WORLD 8
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever been
entrusted to make
final arrangements
for a funeral?
Those of you
who’ve had this
experience know
that important decisions are required and
must be made in a timely manner. The next
of kin is many times required to search for
information about the deceased which may
not be easily accessible, and must answer
questions without the time to think things
out. Even though your Funeral Director is
trained to guide you every step of the way, it
is still best for you to be prepared with the
proper information if the need should arise.
Ask your Funeral Director what info is
needed before you meet with him/her.
Making funeral arrangements can be very
simple, or can become difficult at times if
you are not prepared. A good Funeral
Director is experienced in leading you with
the necessary requirements, and will offer
details that you may not have thought about
or previously considered as an option.
Allowing him/her to guide you will make
the arrangements go by quickly and easily.
A number of items should be considered
in preparation for the future:
1. Talk to your loved ones about the
inevitable. Give them an indication on what
your wishes are regarding the type of funeral
you want, burial or cremation, etc., and ask
them their feelings about plans for their own
funeral. This is only conversation, but it is
an important topic which will help break the
ice and prevent any type of confusion when
the time comes.
2. Talk to your Funeral Director. Write
down a list of questions and make a phone
call to your Funeral Director asking how to
be prepared. He/she will gladly provide
detailed information and can mail this
information to you for your reference.
Asking questions doesn’t cost anything and
will help you with being organized.
3. Make an appointment and Pre-plan a
Funeral. Many more people are following
through with this step by making Pre-Need
Arrangements. Completing arrangements
ahead of time makes this process more
relaxed, and putting these details behind you
will take a weight off your shoulders. Your
wishes will be finalized and kept on file at
the Mortuary. Your Funeral Director will
even help you set aside funding now as to
cover costs at the time of death. Families
who meet with us at the CHAPEL OF THE
HIGHLANDS are grateful for the chance to
make Pre-Need Arrangements. With their
final details in place it helps to make matters
more calming for surviving loved-ones.
4. Enjoy Life. There are those who dwell
on situations that can’t be controlled.
Taking time to stop and look around at
beauty in the world and appreciate good
things can be therapeutic. If you need to use
a negative statement, try re-wording it into a
positive. Change “I had a lousy day today”
into “Today was demanding, but it made me
appreciate my better days.” As the song
goes: “Accentuate the positive; Eliminate
the negative; Latch on to the affirmative.”
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Accentuating The Positive
Can Eliminate The Negative
ADVERTISEMENT
Experiment adds
sense of touch to artificial hand
WASHINGTON — To feel what you touch
— that’s the holy grail for artificial limbs. In
a step toward that goal, European researchers
created a robotic hand that let an amputee
feel differences between a bottle, a baseball
and a mandarin orange.
The patient only got to experiment with
the bulky prototype for a week, and it’s far
from the bionics of science fiction movies.
But the research released Wednesday is part
of a major effort to create more lifelike, and
usable, prosthetics.
“It was just amazing,” said Dennis Aabo
Sorensen of Aalborg, Denmark, who lost his
left hand in a fireworks accident a decade ago
and volunteered to pilot-test the new pros-
thetic. “It was the closest I have had to feel-
ing like a normal hand.”
This isn’t the first time scientists have
tried to give some sense of touch to artificial
hands; a few other pilot projects have been
reported in the U.S. and Europe. But this
newest experiment, published in the journal
Science Translational Medicine, shows
Sorensen not only could tell differences in
the shape and hardness of objects, he also
could quickly react and adjust his grasp.
“It was interesting to see how fast he was
able to master this,” said neuroengineer
Silvestro Micera of Switzerland’s Ecole
Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, who led
the Swiss and Italian research team.
U.N.:‘Unspeakable
suffering’ for Syria’s children
BEIRUT — Children in Syria have been
tortured, sexually abused and subjected to
“indiscriminate” attacks by President Bashar
Assad’s forces, and recruited for combat and
terror operations by the rebels fighting to
topple him during the country’s nearly 3-
year-old conflict, a new United Nations
report said.
The report to the U.N. Security Council by
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon highlights
the plight of children in the conflict from the
beginning of the uprising against Assad in
March 2011 until Nov. 15, 2013. It was
given to the council this week and posted on
the U.N. website Tuesday.
Ban said Syrian children have been sub-
jected to “unspeakable and unacceptable”
suffering during that time. “Violations must
come to an end now,” he said.
Meanwhile, the Syrian government
missed another deadline for destroying its
chemical weapons Wednesday, but pledged
to complete the process by June 30 as prom-
ised.
Under a timetable set up by the
Organization for the Prohibition of
Chemical Weapons, Syria was to have given
up its entire stockpile of chemical weapons
by Wednesday.
News briefs
By Sameer N. Yacoub
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD — Multiple explosions rocked
Baghdad on Wednesday, killing at least 34
people and sending plumes of smoke into
the sky across the street from a major gov-
ernment building in a brazen reminder of the
ability of insurgents to penetrate the heart of
the capital.
The attacks come as al-Qaida-led militants
are battling for control of mainly Sunni areas
to the west in the first test of the Shiite-led
government to maintain security in the
country more than two years after the with-
drawal of U.S. troops.
The deadliest of Wednesday’s attacks took
place across the street from the high-rise
building housing the Foreign Ministry, shat-
tering the windows of nearby apartment build-
ings. Two parked car bombs went off simulta-
neously in different parking lots, killing at
least 12 people, including three policemen,
and wounding 22, a police officer said.
Shortly afterward, a suicide bomber blew
himself up in a nearby falafel restaurant fre-
quented by officials or visitors waiting for
security escorts to take them inside the Green
Zone, a walled-off area that houses the prime
minister’s office and the U.S. and other for-
eign embassies. Five people were killed and
12 wounded in that attack, the officer said.
All the roads leading to the blast sites
place were sealed off by police as workers
cleared debris and washed away bloodstains
from the sidewalks.
Another parked car bomb exploded in
Khilani Square, a busy commercial area in
central Baghdad, killing five people and
wounding 11, another police officer said.
Security forces sealed off the area as firefight-
ers struggled to put out the blaze ignited by
the bombing. Smoke billowed from several
stores and stalls as vendors hurriedly stuffed
their goods into big bags and carried them
away on their backs.
Shortly before sunset, a triple car bomb-
ing struck an outdoor market in the mainly
Shiite suburb of Jisr Diyala in southeastern
Baghdad, killing nine people and wounding
24. Minutes later, a rocket landed near the
western gate of the green zone, killing one
passer-by and wounding seven others, police
said.
Explosions rock Iraqi capital, killing at least 34
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — NEWYORK — It’s a skep-
tics’ market now. Just three weeks after
stocks reached all-time highs, the market
has turned volatile and investors have gone
from cheerful to suspicious.
They’re worried about reports of slowing
growth in the world’s largest economies,
disappointed by earnings that never seem
good enough and concerned about the stock
market’s frequent triple-digit swings.
It isn’t a surprise to most money man-
agers, who expected this year would be
rougher after last year’s almost 30-percent
surge. No stock market can go straight up.
But the fact that the volatility started so
early caught some investors by surprise.
Even with major indexes down 5 percent
or more, there is room for optimism.
There’s no sign the economy will backtrack
into a stock-killing recession and any big
stock-market drop is unlikely to last long.
What is going on with
stock market swings?
REUTERS
People gather at the site of an explosion in central Baghdad, Iraq.
OPINION 9
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
San Mateo water shortage
Editor,
With the statewide drought and our
diminished water resources available
for 2014 and 2015, there are good
options to minimize our increasing
water consumption. The future of
statewide water resources is dire. As
population density grows, water
demands will continue to increase.
Developers of all the new residential
units planned or already in progress in
San Mateo should be required by emer-
gency city regulation to include every
available option to minimize future
water usage at those thousands of new
living units. This would require limit-
ing landscaping to desert-like plant-
ings without green grass areas and
using only drought-resistant plants
that require minimal water.
Should swimming pools and spas
continue to be installed? Interior
plumbing plans should be reviewed to
insure that low-flow fixtures be
installed throughout. Perhaps private
laundries in apartments and condos
should be excluded, with common
shared laundries available instead. The
time to act is now, not later when water
resources can no longer fill our needs.
Tom Elliott
San Mateo
Keystone XL pipeline needed
Editor,
President Obama must approve the
Keystone XLpipeline. If for no other
reason than that the pipeline would
reduce, perhaps eliminate, our depend-
ence on oil from hostile Muslim coun-
tries. Our diplomats would finally be
able negotiate with Arab countries
without the threat of an oil embargo
hanging over their heads.
It would carry oil from Canadian oil
sands into the U.S. Midwest on the
way to Gulf Coast refineries. The
Keystone XL pipeline would be an
engine for the creation of sorely need-
ed jobs for our country.
Approval of the pipeline would not
alter the amount of oil that would be
removed from the Canadian oils sands
and contrary to the fears of environ-
mentalists, it would have no signifi-
cant impact on climate change.
According to the State Department,
oil extracted in Canada would still be
delivered to the United States by rail if
the Keystone Pipeline is not built. But
railways have a history of accidents,
including a crash in Quebec last sum-
mer that killed 47 people. Therefore,
with or without the pipeline oil from
Canada will still be imported in the
United States.
An article on page 8 of the Feb. 1
edition of the San Mate Daily Journal
says it all “Republicans and business
and labor groups have urged Obama to
approve the pipeline to create thou-
sands of jobs and move further toward
North American energy independence.”
Guy M. Guerrero
Burlingame
Election year
Editor,
Well, all your friends on Capitol
Hill are up for re-election, but the
president has two more years to go.
By way of executive order, he can do
anything he wants, and he wants
Congress to go along with him.
Since some congressional seats are
now up for election, they want things
to go their way which, now, may not
be agreeable with the president.
To remain in office, each member of
Congress must be able to please the
constituents in their home district.
The solution is to wait until after the
elections to vote on hot button
issues that Congress, voters, and the
president disagree on.
In the meantime, the fundraising
has already begun, with the president
making stops all over the country to
help raise funds needed to keep the
incumbents in office. It is important
that you are ready to participate by
setting aside some of your income for
campaign purposes. But wait, you
may be on limited income and not
able to do your part. Step aside and
let the Super PACs (political action
committees), supported by unions
and the wealthy 1 percent, who can
afford to make the big donations, just
as long as we know who they are.
Right?
Rick Zobelein
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
L
iability is often pointed to
when making certain deci-
sions. It is important to con-
sider liability, but it is not the sole
force that should guide decisions —
particularly when overall public safe-
ty is at issue.
Yet liability was the rationale
behind the Foster City Council’s
recent decision to remove a crosswalk
at the intersection of Edgewater
Boulevard and Port Royal Avenue after
a pedestrian-auto collision that sent a
17-year-old girl to the hospital.
It is the job of city staff, including
its attorney, to bring up all issues
when it comes to making a decision.
One of those issues is sometimes lia-
bility. Avoidance of liability issues is
the job of a city attorney, and there
should be no fault directed toward the
city attorney for bringing it up.
However, it is the job of the elected
City Council to accept that informa-
tion and ultimately make a decision
that is for the betterment of the com-
munity. We feel that wasn’t done this
week and that the topic needs to come
back for further discussion as soon as
possible.
First a primer on the situation.
Early in the morning on Jan. 24, the
girl was hit in the crosswalk at the
intersection. Her injuries were serious
and she was taken to the hospital. In
response, Councilman Herb Perez
brought the idea up of modifying the
intersection with the idea that a four-
way stop sign might be in order after
he heard from residents with serious
concerns about the intersection.
On Monday, the council heard the
issue and voted 3-1, with Perez recus-
ing himself because his business is
nearby and Councilman Steve
Okamoto voting no, to not only not
put in a stop sign, but to remove the
crosswalk and replace it with a flash-
ing light on the next block. The
rationale? City Attorney Jean Savaree
warned of the potential liability of
adding the stop sign because the
city’s traffic consultant said it was not
needed. The city is not liable for an
accident if it follows the direction of
design experts or professionals. In
addition, a pedestrian is still allowed
to cross at the location even without a
marked crosswalk because it has an
“implied” crosswalk.
So instead of making the situation
better, the decision has the very real
possibility of making the situation
worse. And that’s not OK.
It is understandable that not every
section of road that is the scene of an
accident requires city intervention.
However, it never requires city inter-
vention that has the potential to
make the situation worse. And liabili-
ty is a real concern in this day and
age. However, members of the City
Council are elected to represent the
people and respond accordingly when
the situation calls for it. This is one
of those situations. Councils make
policy, and policy often overrides
staff recommendations. The council
should take this opportunity to revis-
it the issue and determine if there is a
decision that will make the intersec-
tion safer. And that should happen
right away.
Foster City should revisit crosswalk issue
Settling redevelopment
lawsuits may cost as
much as state grabbed
The Vacaville Reporter
G
ov. Jerry Brown says he wants to use the state’s
newfound revenue surplus to pay down debt and
put aside money for a rainy day. Another good
reason to refrain from a spending spree is that
California may end up having to give back some of the
money it took from cities when it dissolved redevelop-
ment agencies.
Because the dissolution was handled so badly, the
state is fighting more than 100 lawsuits — and counting
— by cities and counties that are trying to hang onto
funds and properties they believe they are entitled to.
ASacramento Bee report last week indicated the state
could be on the hook for at least $3 billion if courts
uphold rulings that already have gone against it — and
perhaps more if those suits set precedents for other
cities to follow.
When the state shut down redevelopment in 2011 to
close a gaping budget hole, it expected to garner $2.5
billion the first year and $2 billion each following year.
That won’t seem like such a great deal if the state ends
up shelling out more in court than it gained by closing
down the agencies.
For all of the bluster about redevelopment becoming
slush funds that rewarded crony developers — a charge
that may have been accurate in some locations, but cer-
tainly not all — the shutdown of redevelopment was
nothing but a money grab. And had the cities simply
handed over the funds the state wanted, it is possible
those agencies would be back in business by now.
Instead, cities (and counties, in some cases) fought to
keep their money. Everybody lost when the California
Supreme Court ruled that the state had the right to shut
down the agencies.
Despite assurances from legislators that a new way
would be devised to replace the economic development
function the agencies provided local governments,
nothing has been done. What has that cost California,
in terms of bouncing back from the recession?
And if court cases and lost opportunities aren’t cost-
ing enough, there are still issues to be resolved from the
redevelopment shutdown. Vacaville, for instance, is
still fighting to keep its downtown public parking lots,
as well as a few other properties acquired by its redevel-
opment agency but which the state Department of
Finance has said don’t meet its definition of serving a
legitimate government function.
Last fall, the city appealed that ruling. It has argued —
and rightly so — that the parking lots are needed to ful-
fill federal handicap access laws, as well as city codes
requiring businesses to have adequate parking. Without
the public parking, downtown will be strangled, and
that will eventually affect the state in the form of lost
property and sales tax revenue.
The appeal also points out that some of the parking
lots in question were bought by downtown businesses
and maintained by the city even before Vacaville created
a redevelopment agency. The city later turned the lots
over to that agency, and before the agency was dis-
solved, it returned them to the city.
Because the law dissolving redevelopment did not
specify a time frame, it is uncertain when the state will
rule on Vacaville’s appeal. According to City Manager
Laura Kuhn, the city was notified a few weeks ago and
that a review of its appeal has begun. Ameeting
between city and state officials, facilitated with the help
of local legislators, is expected to be arranged in com-
ing weeks.
Now that the need to plug California’s budget hole has
passed, it is hoped that state officials will see reason
and overturn the ridiculous order that would require the
city to sell its parking lots, as well as the historic
Carnegie Library that houses the Chamber of
Commerce, the Harbison Events Center (including the
historic Harbison House and the Nut Tree Railroad), and
some odds-and-ends properties, including one that can’t
be developed and likely wouldn’t find a buyer.
And if the state doesn’t agree? Then it’s likely to face
one more lawsuit related to redevelopment.
Editorial
Other
voices
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Julio Lara, Angela Swartz, Samantha Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Ricci Lam, Production Assistant
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Theresa Daniels
Charles Gould Scott Jacobs
Paul Moisio Kevin Smith
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Mari Andreatta Arianna Bayangos
Kerry Chan Caroline Denney
David Egan Darold Fredricks
Dominic Gialdini Tom Jung
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Jeff Palter Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner Jacqueline Tang
Kevin Thomas Annika Ulrich
David Wong
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,440.23 -5.01 10-Yr Bond 2.67 +0.04
Nasdaq 4,011.55 -19.97 Oil (per barrel) 97.28
S&P 500 1,751.64 -3.56 Gold 1,257.30
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
CVS Caremark Corp., down 67 cents to $65.44
The drugstore will remove all tobacco products from its shelves by
October, which will cost about $2 billion in annual revenue.
3D Systems Corp., down $11.66 to $64.10
Stung by falling demand,the 3D printer company slashed its expectations
for the fourth quarter.
Ralph Lauren Corp., down $5.47 to $148.71
The fashion designer’s stock tumbled despite the company posting
strong quarterly profits and announcing a $500 million stock buyback.
Level 3 Communications Inc., up $3.14 to $34.55
The Internet and telecommunications company returned to a profit in
its fourth quarter and it issued upbeat guidance for 2014.
Nasdaq
The Hain Celestial Group Inc., down $5.55 to $85.44
The organic and natural-products company posted weak revenue for
its fiscal second quarter and analysts pointed to problems in the U.K.
Buffalo Wild Wings Inc., down $13.63 to $127.12
Light revenue numbers overshadowed stronger-than-expected profits
at the restaurant chain.
Google Inc., up $5.04 to $1,143.20
The search engine made some concessions in a fight with European
regulators, giving more visibility to three rival companies.
Myriad Genetics Inc., up $4.11 to $31.29
The molecular diagnostic company acquired Crescendo Bioscience for
$270 million and posted a 44 percent rise in quarterly profit.
Big movers
By Alex Veiga
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wall Street took a step backward
Wednesday. Then a tiny step forward.
Then back.
The tentative dance amounted to lit-
tle change for major U.S. stock index-
es, which ended the day just below
their prior day’s levels.
For the week, stocks remained down,
extending the sharp downturn for the
year.
“We’re seeing some buyers coming
in on the weakness, but not enough to
push the market higher,” said Joe Bell,
senior equity analyst with Schaeffer’s
Investment Research.
Stocks were down in premarket trad-
ing and continued to slide for much of
the day. Asurvey on U.S. hiring did lit-
tle to ease uncertainty over the health
of the American economy.
Many investors remain leery, wait-
ing to see if upcoming economic
reports and company earnings will
show that the U.S. economic recovery
is on track.
“This is about as flat as it gets,” said
Rex Macey, chief investment officer of
Wilmington Trust Investment
Advisors. “It’s a market looking for
direction.”
The Dow Jones industrial average
fell 5.01 points, or 0.03 percent, to
close at 15,440.23 Wednesday. The
Standard & Poor’s 500 index slipped
3.56 points, or 0.2 percent, to
1, 751. 64. The Nasdaq composite
dropped 19.97 points, or 0.5 percent,
to 4,011. 55.
Six of the 10 sectors in the S&P 500
finished lower. Telecoms and energy
stocks registered the biggest industry
declines.
Investors hammered trucking com-
pany C.H. Robinson Worldwide,
which a day earlier reported fourth-
quarter results that missed Wall Street
estimates. Its shares fell $5.48, or 9
percent, to $53.16, to lead the S&P
500’s decliners.
Cerner, a health care information
technology provider, and cosmetics
maker Estee Lauder were also among
the stocks posting large losses.
Cerner shares fell $3.39, or nearly 6
percent, to $53.21. Estee Lauder
slumped $3.83, or 5.5 percent, to
$65.36.
Markets started the week with a 326-
point drop in the Dow, triggered by
disappointing news about the U.S.
manufacturing.
The Dow, which fell as much as 104
points Wednesday, ended the day down
6.9 percent for this year. The S&P 500
closed down 5.2 percent so far in
2014.
A private survey on Wednesday
showed that U.S. businesses added
jobs at a steady but modest pace in
January, a sign that hiring has
rebounded after a disappointing figure
in December. Payroll processor ADP
said companies added 175,000 jobs
last month. That’s down from 227,000
in December, which was revised lower.
But it was much better than the gov-
ernment’s official figure of just 74,000
new jobs in December. The ADP num-
bers cover only private businesses and
often diverge from the government’s
more comprehensive report due out
Friday.
Investors are trying to get a clear
picture of the U.S. economy and the
prospect for corporate earnings
growth this year, but they’ve had to
sort through a bevy of mixed signals
in recent weeks.
There’s been encouraging news —
the nation’s economy grew at a 3.2
percent annual rate in the October-
December quarter on the strength of
the strongest consumer spending in
three years. But concerns are growing
that the U.S. and global economies
may be weakening due to slowing
growth in China and in other emerging
markets.
Add to this harsh winter weather,
which some analysts expect could
have had a negative impact on the
economy in December and January.
Stocks end downslightly, but cut losses
By Tom Murphy
and Michael Felberbaum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CVS, the nation’s second-largest
drugstore chain, is kicking the habit
of selling tobacco products as it con-
tinues to shift its focus toward being
more of a health care provider.
The company said Wednesday that it
will phase out cigarettes, cigars and
chewing tobacco by Oct. 1 in its 7,600
stores nationwide, in a move that will
help grow its business that works with
doctors, hospitals and others to
improve customers’ health.
The move is the latest evidence of a
big push in the drugstore industry that
has been taking place over several
years. Major drugstore chains have
been adding in-store clinics and
expanding their health care offerings.
Their pharmacists deliver flu shots and
other immunizations, and their clinics
now manage chronic illnesses like
high blood pressure and diabetes and
treat relatively minor problems like
sinus infections.
Among other things, they’re prepar-
ing for increased health care demand.
That’s in part due to an aging U.S.
population that will need more care in
future years. It’s also the result of the
millions of people expected to gain
health insurance under the health care
overhaul.
As CVS has been working to team up
with hospital groups and doctor prac-
tices to help deliver and monitor
patient care, Chief Medical Officer Dr.
Troyen A. Brennan said the presence of
tobacco in its stores has made for some
awkward conversations.
“One of the first questions they ask
us is, ‘Well, if you’re going to be part
of the health care system, how can you
continue to sell tobacco products?”’ he
said.
CVS Caremark plans to stop tobacco products sales
Twitter stock dips on
user growth worries
By Barbara Ortutay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Twitter beat Wall Street’s earnings and rev-
enue expectations in its first quarter as a public company.
But investors were looking for more — including faster user
growth — and the company’s stock fell more than 17 per-
cent in after-hours trading Wednesday.
Twitter’s shares fell $11.37, or 17.2 percent, to $54.59 in
extended trading after the results came out. The stock, which
peaked at $74.73 on Dec. 26, closed Wednesday’s regular
trading session at $65.97.
Twitter ended the final quarter of 2013 with 241 million
monthly users, up 30 percent from a year earlier. But
Twitter’s growth is slowing. The company added just 9 mil-
lion new monthly users in the fourth quarter, only 1 million
of which came from the U.S. That’s a deceleration from ear-
lier in the year, when the company was adding an average of
16 million new accounts each quarter.
Another closely watched metric, which measures how
engaged users are with Twitter, declined during the quarter,
further spooking investors. Twitter said its “timeline
views,” or how many times users refresh Twitter feeds, visit
Twitter or look at search results, declined 7 percent from the
previous quarter, to 148 billion from 159 billion.
Microsoft smart to play
it safe with CEO pick?
By Michael Liedtlke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — After compiling a list of more than
100 CEO candidates, Microsoft settled on Satya Nadella a
home-grown leader who joined the software maker in the
early 1990s. That’s back when Google’s founders were
teenagers and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was in ele-
mentary school.
Tuesday’s hiring of Nadella as Microsoft’s CEO after a
five-month search is a safe move that’s likely to be greeted
with sighs of relief around the company’s Redmond, Wash.
headquarters, industry analysts say. But the methodical,
almost predictable decision is likely to reinforce percep-
tions that Microsoft Corp. is a plodding company reluctant
to take risks as it competes against younger rivals who rel-
ish going out on a limb.
While Google founder and CEO Larry Page boasts about
his company taking “moon shots” and Zuckerberg promis-
es to “move fast and break things,” Microsoft has fallen
behind the technological curve after underestimating the
importance of Internet search more than a decade ago and
reacting too slowly to the rise of mobile devices during the
past seven years.
<<< Page 12, Shaun White
pulls out of Olympic slopestyle event
STANFORD KNOCKS OFF RIVAL: THE CARDINAL EARN AN 11-POINT WIN OVER CAL >> PAGE 15
Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
College of San Mateo offensive
lineman Hanitelli Lousi sat in a
chair in Building 10, Room 195
on the CSM campus holding on to
his dream.
He kept looking at it, holding
onto it, like it might actually van-
ish.
There was hustle and a bit of bus-
tle all around him as joy filled the
classroom-turned-cloud nine, but
for a couple of minutes, it appeared
that nothing in the world existed
to Lousi other than him and a piece
of paper he had just signed.
His dream was coming true right
before his eyes.
Room 195 in Building 10 was
filled to the brim with family,
friends, Bulldogs and emotion as
seven members of the latest CSM
transfer classed signed their letters
of intent and scholarships to play
college football at the next level.
What might have appeared as just a
couple sheets of paper and a few
ounces of ink to most symbolized
a ton to the Bulldogs on hand. And
throughout the afternoon’s festiv-
ities, each one chose to express
their gratitude in different ways.
What didn’t change though, was
Bulldogs sign on dotted lines
PATRICK NGUYEN
Members of the CSMfootball transfer class pose with their national
letters of intent, friends and faculty members.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It appears the only Peninsula Athletic
League South Division team capable of beat-
ing the Burlingame boys’ basketball team is
the Panthers themselves.
Because the rest of the PAL hasn’t figured
out how to beat the Panthers. Burlingame
jumped out to a 10-0 lead against visiting
Hillsdale Wednesday night and were never
threatened as they cruised to a 76-55 victory
over the Knights.
So how does coach Peter Harames keep his
team sharp?
“We try to have tough practices,” Harames
said.
Those practices have honed Burlingame
(9-0 PAL South, 18-3 overall) into an effi-
cient, lethal basketball machine. Watching
the Panthers is like watching a luxury sports
car run through its gears. First and second
gear is getting center Nick Loew involved in
the offense early. Loew responded with 11 of
his 24 points and seven of his game-high
17 rebounds in the first quarter alone.
Once Loew is humming along offensive-
l y, the Panthers shift into third gear with
point guard Frankie Ferrari. As the defense
sags to deal with the 6-8 Loew, Ferrari steps
up and unleashes long-distance bombs and
slashing drives to the basket.
Ferrari scored 25 of his 29 points in the
first half.
Once Loew and Ferrari get in a groove, its
time for Burlingame to put it fourth gear and
pull away from the opposition. Fourth gear
is wing player Justin Gutang, who finished
with 10 points, and the rest of the
Burlingame squad.
“I love that,” Harames said. “I like to see
that.”
Wednesday’s game against Hillsdale (5-4,
11-10) was all but over after the first quarter.
Burlingame started the game with a 10-0 run
over the first 3:08 of the first quarter and
kept the pedal to the metal. Loew and Ferrari
took turns gashing the Knights defense in
the first eight minutes, with Loew throwing
down two big dunks as the Panthers finished
the opening period with a 26-9 lead.
Burlingame: Too good
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Burlingame’s Justin Gutang slashes to the basket to score two of his 10 points during the
Panthers’ 76-55 win over visiting Hillsdale Wednesday night.
I
f you’re a regular reader of the Daily
Journal, you will soon see some
changes in the sports section as
sports reporter Julio Lara is moving on to
become a project manager for a marketing
and branding startup.
It’s the end of Daily Journal Sports
Department 2.0. Version 1.0 was uber-
reporter Emanuel Lee. After a brief glitch,
Julio began version 2.0 and there were
not a whole lot of bugs.
Julio joined the Daily Journal in 2009
as a graphic/produc-
tion assistant before
sliding smoothly
into the No. 2 chair
in the sports depart-
ment at the begin-
ning of 2011.
“Smoothly” as far
as I was concerned. It
was anything but for
Julio, who was still
working toward his
degree at San
Francisco State
University. But he
took care of business on both ends, earn-
ing his degree in creative writing while
also becoming a solid, award-winning
sports writer. Julio brought a certain flair
to his writing, undoubtedly a result of his
degree.
As good as his writing was, his graphic
work might have been better — which is
what led him to his new position. Awiz
with Photoshop, Julio could turn a bland,
boring layout (one that I would do) into
an attention grabber. He never seemed
fully satisfied with his work, as he always
felt he had settled for less than his best.
The fact of the matter was, it was
always more than just “good enough.”
Atrue team player, Julio did what was
needed to get the job done. My biggest
thanks to him is covering for me last
spring as my dad was dying. I took a lot
of time off, shuttling back and forth
between home and Reno. It made things
Change in
the lineup
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Last week, after handling business against
Hillsdale High School, the Mills girls’ bas-
ketball gave themselves a bit of breathing
room atop the Peninsula Athletic League
South Division standings.
But it would appear that Carlmont felt like
a bit of the oxygen up there belongs to them.
The Scots withstood a furious 19-point
fourth quarter comeback by the Vikings to
secure a 47-46 victory over Mills and move
into a first-place tie with the Vikings atop
the PAL South standings
Carlmont led by double digits for most of
the game but allowed Taylor Cormier to tie
things up at 44-44 in the wanning seconds of
the game on back to back steal-and-basket
plays as the Scots tried to inbound the ball.
But a couple of free throws in the final sec-
onds, and some big misses by Mills on the
interior allowed Calrmont to survive.
“I think we came out and played really
tough defensively,” said Carlmont head
coach Dan Mori. “We had a strong defensive
intensity today. The girls made a commit-
ment to playing defense. Mills is a great
team and we needed that intensity to come
out in top.”
“The first half (was the difference),” said
Mills head coach Dave Matsu. “They played
hard the whole time and we didn’t. We picked
a tough day to play our worse game of the
year.”
The number back Matsu’s observation.
Mills shot 39 percent from the floor in the
game, but were it not for that furious fourth
Carlmont knocks Mills from unbeaten ranks
See LOUNGE, Page 15 See BOYS, Page 15
See GIRLS, Page 14
See SIGNINGS, Page 14
CSM waters run deep as seven head to the next level
SPORTS 12
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Boys’ soccer
Sacred Heart Prep 4, Crystal Springs 2
The Gators scored three times in the first
half to build a comfortable 3-0 lead at half-
time on their way to a win over the
Gryphons Wednesday.
Philip Petrakian opened the scoring in
the 16th minute, off an assist from Frankie
Hattler. Four minutes later, SHP(9-0 WBAL,
10-4-1 overall) got an unassisted goal from
Will Mishra. Andrew Segre rounded out the
first-half scoring in the 30th minute, turn-
ing a Hattler pass into a goal.
The Gators upped their lead to 4-0 less
than five minutes into the second half as
Hattler hooked up with Mishra to put SHPup
4-0.
Crystal Springs (4-5) did not go down
without a fight. Ayo Agunbiade scored yet
again for the Gryphons, off an assist from
David Madding in the 50th minute. Ten min-
utes from the end, Madding picked up an
unassisted goal to round out the scoring.
Girls’ basketball
Pinewood 69, Sacred Heart Prep 43
The Gators were outscored 32-13 in the
second and third quarters as the the Panthers
steadily pulled away from SHP after a close
first quarter that saw Pinewood leading just
17-15 Tuesday night.
Meaghan Holland led SHP (3-4 WBAL
Foothill Division, 12-9 overall) finishing
with a game-high 16 points. She was the
only Gator to score in double figures.
Boys’ basketball
Pinewood 60, Sacred Heart Prep 58 OT
The Panthers handed the Gators their first
West Bay Athletic League loss of the season
Tuesday night, pulling Pinewood into a
first-place tie with SHP.
Pinewood (8-1 WBAL, 16-3 overall) led
14-5 after the first quarter, but SHP (8-1, 12-
6) turned the tables in the second half,
outscoring the Panthers 21-10 to take a 26-
24 lead at halftime.
Pinewood regained the lead in the third
quarter, but SHP rebounded to outscore the
Panthers 18-14 in the fourth quarter to force
overtime.
James McLean scored a game-high 19
points to lead the Gators, while Corbin
Koch added 17, but Pinewood countered with
three players scoring in double figures.
College softball
Northwest Nazarene University 5,
Menlo College 3
Northwest Nazarene University 8,
Menlo College 4
After splitting a doubleheader Tuesday,
the Lady Oaks were swept by the Crusaders
in another twin bill Wednesday.
Justine Roscoe, who picked up the first
win of the year in Game 1 Tuesday, was the
loser in Game 1 Wednesday, allowing five
runs on eight hits in five innings pitched.
NNU took a 1-0 lead in the top of the first
inning, tacked on another in the fourth
before scoring three times in top of the fifth
for a 5-0 lead.
Menlo scratched out a run in the fifth and
two more in its final at-bat, but came up
short.
The Oaks managed only four hits in Game
1, with Kayla Cisneroz, Nicole Larson and
McKenna Vega each driving in a run.
Game 2 saw Menlo score in the bottom of
the first inning, but the Crusaders put up a
five-spot in the top of the third. The Oaks
responded with three runs in the bottom of
the frame, but NNU put the game on ice fol-
lowing a three-run fifth.
Kelly Hager took the loss in the circle for
Menlo, giving up three runs on three hits as
she worked into the third inning.
Jessica Soliai drove in a pair of runs for
the Oaks, while Larson added two more hits.
Local sports roundup
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — Stanford already had one of
the Pac-12’s best recruiting classes lined up
before high school players began sending
in national letters of intent Wednesday.
The Cardinal added to that with a major
surprise on signing day.
Riding the wave of a second straight con-
ference championship, Stanford received a
big boost when Solomon Thomas — one of
the most sough-after defensive ends in the
country — committed to the Cardinal. The
6-foot-3, 255-pounder from the Dallas sub-
urb of Coppell selected Stanford over
Arkansas and UCLA on national television
by pulling out a small tree and putting on
black “nerd” glasses with white tape over
the bridge.
Thomas’ decision put the finishing touch-
es on a class that showed just how much the
Stanford brand has expanded in coach David
Shaw’s first three seasons.
Stanford had secured most of its key
recruits well before signing day after they
academically qualified weeks — and, in
some cases, months — ago. The program
sealed up a 20-player class coming from 12
different states Wednesday, the first day
players could sign national letters of intent.
The group includes quarterback Keller
Chryst, one of the most decorated pocket-
passers in the country and the son of San
Francisco 49ers quarterback coach Geep
Chryst, from right across the street at Palo
Alto High School; top tight end Dalton
Schultz (South Jordan, Utah); and offensive
tackle Casey Tucker (Gilbert, Ariz.).
Stanford seals strong recruiting class
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BERKELEY — Coach Sonny Dykes is
pleased with California’s recruiting class
even if the ranking didn’t live up to his lofty
prediction.
Dykes brought in a top 50 class on
national signing day Wednesday that fin-
ished in the bottom half of the Pac-12
despite coming off a one-win season. Dykes
had said in December that he would be
shocked if the Golden Bears didn’t have one
of the top three classes in the Pac-12.
Cal managed to hold on to talented run-
ning back Tre Watson and make some key
defensive additions late after the hiring of
defensive coordinator Art Kaufman last
month.
Cal’s class was ranked 45th by Rivals and
43rd by Scout. Both recruiting services
pegged the Bears eighth in the conference,
failing to achieve Dykes’ prediction of a top
three ranking.
The final player to commit to Cal’s class
was three-star outside linebacker Hamilton
Anoa’i from San Mateo. Anoa’i had been
committed to Northwestern before the late
switch gave the Bears another potential
defensive playmaker.
Anoa’i joins other late commitments like
receiver Erik Brown and linebackers
Chandler Leniu and Aisea Tongilava, who
signed with Cal after committing earlier to
other schools.
Running back was another need that was
filled, led by Watson and Downs. Watson
rushed for 3,734 yards and 50 touchdowns
last season, averaging 9.0 yards per carry.
Cal recruits to improve on 1-win season
SPORTS 13
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Eddie Pells
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia — Shaun
White jammed his wrist on one jump and
watched the world’s best snowboarders join
him in tumbling down the supersized, super-
scary Olympic slopestyle course.
Quickly, his choice became clear: Time to
step away from the danger, and give himself
a better chance in the
event he knows he can
win.
The world’s most
famous snowboarder
pulled out of the new
Olympic event
Wednesday, saying that
after much deliberation,
he has decided to bypass
a chance at winning two
gold medals at these
games and instead concentrate on the half-
pipe, where he’ll have a chance to win his
third straight title next week.
“With the practice runs I have taken, even
after course modifications and watching fel-
low athletes get hurt, the potential risk of
injury is a bit too much for me to gamble my
other Olympics goals on,” White said in a
statement.
The world’s most decorated rider in a sport
known for its risk-takers, White’s decision
was a stunner that dealt yet another blow to
the still-to-start Sochi Games. They have
been wracked by security threats and politi-
cal dust-ups, along with the loss of at least
one other headliner, injured American skier
Lindsey Vonn.
White isn’t leaving, but his departure
from an event that was essentially intro-
duced at the Olympics this year to take
advantage of his star power certainly can’t
make the folks at the IOC or NBC too
happy.
“He’s a notable person and he probably
would have brought more viewers to
slopestyle,” said Nick Goepper, an
American who competes in the skiing ver-
sion of the event.
IOC spokesman Mark Adams downplayed
the idea that the course is too dangerous.
“I don’t think that’s an issue,” he said. “A
lot of the athletes have said they’re very
happy, they like the venue.”
Slopestyle qualifying starts Thursday, the
day before the opening ceremony.
Snowboarding’s newest and most-hyped
Olympic event is a judged sport — a speed-
packed trip down the mountain, filled with
rails, bumps and, most notably, steeply
angled jumps that allow riders to flip two,
sometimes three times, before landing.
White hurt his wrist on one of the takeoff
ramps, which were built “kind of obnox-
iously tall,” according to one top rider,
Canadian Mark McMorris.
White, who had already hurt his shoulder
and ankle in the lead-up to the Olympics,
deemed his latest injury — the jammed wrist
— as nothing serious and said reports about
it were overblown. But he said there
remained serious issues with the slopestyle
course.
“There are definitely concerns about the
course,” he said. “It’s been interesting to
see how it’s developed and changed over the
past couple days. The big question is if it
will continue to change. Because every day,
they have riders meetings and they give
feedback. Sometimes there’s changes,
sometimes there’s not.”
Reaction to White’s decision came from
several corners, not all of it positive.
“Mr. White... It’s easy to find excuses to
pull out of a contest when you think you
can’t win,” said Canadian rider Sebastian
Toutant in a tweet that was later deleted.
Maybe so, but White certainly wasn’t
alone in questioning the course.
Australian Torah Bright, the defending
women’s halfpipe champion who is trying
to compete in three events this year — half-
pipe, slopestyle and a racer’s version called
White scrubs Sochi slopestyle
Shaun White
By Will Graves
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia — The
ambitious slopestyle course that sent Shaun
White sprinting for the serenity and apparent
safety of the halfpipe isn’t the only Olympic
event at Sochi’s Extreme Park turning heads
and sending riders tumbling down the moun-
tain.
Things have been nearly as dicey in
moguls. The U.S. was among several coun-
tries to unsuccessfully ask officials
Wednesday to tweak the course, expressing
concerns about unusual sequencing along the
700-foot sprint across bumps and jumps that
make for a unique mixture of daredevil down-
hill racing and aerials.
“There’s a lot of issues with the course,”
American Patrick Deneen said.
Deneen, however, cautioned against confus-
ing “issues” with “danger.”
“Everybody is scrambling a little bit,” he
said. “This isn’t what anybody expected, but
it’s really good. We’re really liking it. They
made a few mistakes while they were building
the course and we’re fighting those ... but they
also did some pretty cool things.”
Still, Deneen admitted it was a “battle”
when the U.S. team arrived for its first practice
earlier this week. The course had barely been
completed when the Americans popped on
their skis and went careening down the hill at
speeds of up to 35 mph.
Things didn’t go so well. During practice
Tuesday, the 26-year-old Deneen caught an
edge entering the second of the course’s two
jumps and slammed into it.
“There was no way around it,” he said. “It
was like crashing into a wall. It’s just not
going to feel good no matter what happens.”
Deneen underwent X-rays for an unspecified
injury and plans to be ready when the men’s
competition begins next week. There’s a
chance by then the course’s rough edges will
have been smoothed out.
There’s not that much time for the women,
who begin qualifying Thursday. American
Heidi Kloser, making her Olympic debut,
called the course “challenging,” but pointed at
improvements during three days of training.
“The course is pretty safe now,” she said.
“The first day it was a little bit rough because
no one had skied it and we were worried about
the bottom of the course being more danger-
ous.”
She’s no longer concerned about the final
moments of her run being any more perilous
than any other event on the World Cup circuit.
She fell on Tuesday, but chalked that up to the
inherent risk that comes with flinging your-
self over dozens of balance-testing bumps and
two jumps, where skiers mix a combination
of spins and flips.
“It’s not normal training if you don’t fall,”
she said with a laugh. “You’re not pushing
yourself.”
Maybe, but Deneen and Kloser echoed the
sentiments of snowboard riders who are ques-
tioning whether the slopestyle course —
located about a half-mile down the mountain
from the moguls run — pushes the boundaries
of safety a little too far.
White bailed on his bid to leave Sochi with
multiple gold medals when he pulled out of
slopestyle partly out of fear an injury in that
event could harm his chances of capturing a
third straight gold in halfpipe.
Several other riders expressed surprise over
the size and the speed of the slopestyle route,
which includes a mixture of rails and big-time
jumps designed to allow competitors enough
air time to pack in two or three flips.
Yet for every detractor, a list that includes
White and defending women’s halfpipe gold
medalist Torah Bright of Australia, there have
been those, such as American Sage
Kotsenburg, praising its sheer audacity.
Deneen sees both sides of the argument.
Yes, it’s different than what he’s used to. He’s
not entirely sure that’s a bad thing. Yeah, the
moguls are bumpy, but isn’t that kind of the
point?
“This is a moguls skiing competition,” he
said, “so it’s good to have some crazy moguls
in there.”
Freestylers question setup
Billie Jean King won’t
attend Sochi opening
NEW YORK — Billie Jean King will not
attend Friday’s opening ceremony of the Sochi
Olympics in Russia because her mother is ill.
King, who was selected to help lead the U.S.
delegation to the Games, has been outspoken
in her opposition to Russia’s anti-gay law.
She also planned to attend ice hockey and fig-
ure skating events and meet U.S. athletes dur-
ing her three-day visit to the games.
The White House
announced Wednesday that
former U.S. hockey player
Caitlin Cahow, originally
scheduled for the closing
ceremony, will take King’s
place.
King told The Associated
Press that because of her
mother’s “failing health, I
will not be able to join the U.S. Presidential
delegation at this week’s opening ceremonies
of the Sochi Olympics.”
Olympic brief
Billie Jean King
SPORTS 14
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
quarter, that percentage was barely touching
30 for the first three quarter and was just 20 in
the first half.
“We were getting great looks,” Matsu said.
“I wasn’t disappointed at the looks. I was
happy with the looks we were getting. We
just can’t finish. We got everything we want-
ed. So, shame on me, shame on us. But, I tell
you what, they won. Kudos to them. They’re
a good team. We just picked the worst day to
play our worst game.”
And still, to Mills’ credit, they hung
around to give Carlmont a bit of a scare. The
Scots used quarters one and two to be more
efficient with their offense and thus build a
double-digit lead. The exclamation point
came in the final minute of the second quarter
when Rachel Lum hit a 3-pointer and Anisah
Smith followed that with a running 3-point
bomb at the buzzer to give Carlmont a 23-13
lead at the half.
“They were pretty excited,” Mori said of
his team at the half. “We said we have to look
at it like it’s a 0-0 game. They are going to
come out with even more intensity. Their
coach is going to have them ready to play the
second half so we’re going to have to make
sure we come out with the same focus and
intensity to meet that aggressiveness.”
Mori was right, the Vikings did come out
and were much more productive on the offen-
sive side of the ball. But to Carlmont’s cred-
it, they kept Mills from going on any
extended runs. It wasn’t until the two-minute
mark of the third quarter when the Vikings
finally hit consecutive baskets to cut the
deficit to six.
But a small surge at quarter’s end ensured
the Scots would take a nine-point advantage
heading into the fourth.
Mills kept showing signs of a run as they
chipped away at the Carlmont lead. For sev-
eral moments, the deficit hovered around six
or seven points and, through the shooting of
Aubrie Businger, Mills actually cut the lead
to four points with under a minute to play.
It was after timeout that it looked like
Mills just might have the championship
mentality to steal a win on the road. In a mat-
ter of seconds, Cormier stole two inbound
passes and scored from right under the basket
to tie the game at 44.
But that is where the comeback finished for
the Vikings. They got a decent look at the
hoop with Carlmont up 46-44, but Julia
Gibbs’ shots hit front iron and sent Mills
with the loss.
Smith led all scorers with 26 points.
“Anisah has been great,” Mori said. “She
is our leading scorer but the other thing she’s
really learned to do is involve the other play-
ers offensively. We got some contributions
from other people which is huge because that
prevents the defense from focusing on just
her.”
Mills had three players score in double fig-
ures, led by Jamie Martz’s 11 points.
“This league is good,” Matsu said. “It’s our
first loss, not our eighth loss.”
Continued from page 11
GIRLS
By Phuong Le
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE — Hundreds of thousands of noto-
riously loud Seahawks fans cranked up the vol-
ume Wednesday, cheering, chanting and going
berserk during a parade and ceremony to cele-
brate the first Super Bowl victory in the histo-
ry of the franchise.
The mood in Seattle was electrified as the
parade featuring the NFL champions began
near the Space Needle and made its way to
CenturyLink Field, the home of the team.
At a ceremony inside the stadium, the team
thanked its loyal followers — the 12th Man —
capping a day of boisterous celebration that
drew an estimated 700,000 revelers to Seattle.
Players were introduced by the order of their
jersey numbers and ended with No. 3, quarter-
back Russell Wilson, who walked onto the
field pumping the Lombardi Trophy in the air
to thunderous applause. “Our plan is to win
another one for you next year,” Wilson said
later.
Coach Pete Carroll led the crowd in a
“Seahawks! Seahawks!” chant and said the
team will be back. “We’re just getting warmed
up, if you know what I’m talking about,” he
said.
Nick Sutton watched the parade from
Westlake Center and considered it a highlight
when he threw a football to one of the players
who threw it back to him. “It’s surreal. It’s hard
to believe. Seeing this now, it’s finally sink-
ing in,” he said.
Hundreds of thousands of fan lined the
streets of downtown Seattle early in the day
and cheered as the players rolled by.
Thousands of students apparently skipped
school to attend.
Seattle honors Seahawks with parade
the overwhelming sense of community and
brotherhood that emanated from that class-
room — on Wednesday afternoon, the tears
that flowed from some of the biggest, bad-
dest junior college football players on the
planet were proof of that.
“I’m gonna tell you like this,” said former
South City lineman turned California
Defensive Player of the Year Rika Levi, “All
those years in the hood playing football as
kids in the parking lot, I never thought it
would take me this far. I’m going to take
this and run with it. This is not the end, it’s
just the beginning.”
Levi signed to play football with the
Texas Tech Red Raiders and will be taking
off in April to enroll in school. He was
joined at the front of the classroom by
Lousi, Dominick Jackson, Sam Atoe,
Deshane Hines, Semisi Mataele and Viliami
Fukofuka.
More often than not, as the players rose
from their chairs to speak to the 100 plus in
attendance, they were overcome with emo-
tion and tears.
“I wish my dad was here to see this,
because all I do is for him,” Lousi, whose
father died while he was still in high
school, said. “It’s crazy, two years ago, this
dream didn’t exist. Out of high school, I had
nowhere to go, I had no options. And now,
the next dream is just two years away. ”
Lousi will suit up for the University of
Oregon. Joining him in the Pac-12 is Sam
Atoe, who is headed to Cal-Berkeley after
originally committing to Texas Christian
University. Hines, a fellow defensive back,
will suit up for Utah State University. While
Mataele (of Menlo-Atherton) and Fukofuka
(of Aragon) will remain teammates and play
for the Grey Hounds of Eastern New Mexico.
Still, the highlights of the afternoon
came from the speeches by Levi and
Jackson — arguably the two best players of
last season’s 10-1 CSM football team that
fell a victory shy from appearing in the
Northern California championship game.
Both succumbed to tears while speaking.
“It ain’t easy,” Levi said, “A lot of us
come from the same background. Not too
many people from the hood can say they
have a scholarship. It’s kind of hard to
believe. Right now, y’all have to do what-
ever you can to build that foundation. I love
everyone of y’all. Everyone that I played
with. Every down. Y’all know me, every
down, we’re gonna get it. Every down. I
don’t care who it is. Anyone who got that
wrong color on is going to get hit, right?
We ain’t ever going to replace that — that
’13 season.”
Jackson, sporting a University of
Alabama jacket, acknowledged his family,
teachers and coaches, before focusing on
his CSM teammates who were with him
through personal hardships.
“Two years ago, anyone at this table can
tell you, this was just a dream. Coming out
of high school, thinking we all that, to
coming here and realizing we were just get-
ting started. Words can’t even explain how I
feel. You guys know me, this (Alabama) is
the best school in the country. A kid from
California, from JUCO, people never even
heard of me to go to the best school in the
country, to play with the best, the best of
the best. For a kid like me, raised by a sin-
gle mom. Man. Man.”
Continued from page 11
SIGNINGS
SPORTS 15
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much easier knowing the Daily Journal sports section was
being capably handled by Julio. I knew the job would get
done and he’d hold down the fort, and he did it all without
complaint.
For that, I’ll always be grateful.
So, I am now in the process of programming version 3.0
Daily Journal Sports Department. Versions 1.0 and 2.0
were pretty damn good. Let’s hope No. 3 works out just as
well.
***
Apair of Canadian national team snowboarders took
Twitter shots at American Shaun White, after the snow-
boarding megastar withdrew from the inaugural appearance
of slopestyle — a discipline during which riders move
down the hill over rails and huge jumps, performing tricks
all the while trying to get the bottom as quickly as possi-
ble.
Canadian rider Sebastian Toutant basically tweeted White
was afraid of losing.
While White had just as good a chance to win Olympic
gold in slopestyle — he dominated the circuit several
years ago before deciding to focus on the halfpipe — he
just wasn’t the prohibitive favorite like he is in the half-
pipe.
White has had a sketchy season in slopestyle competi-
tions this season. He took a big hit while training for the
Olympic qualifier and took another on the Olympic course
Tuesday while practicing, a course that is already being
questioned as being too big and too fast by many other rid-
ers and national teams. It has already claimed another
favorite, Norwegian Torstein Horgmo, to a broken collar-
bone.
Half of a Shaun White Olympic performance is better
than none, so to bow out of the slopestyle event was the
smart call to increase his chances of staying healthy for
the halfpipe — his signature event.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by phone: 344-5200 ext. 117 or by
email: nathan@smdailyjournal.com. You follow him on
Twitter@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
Even Harames said he sometimes gets caught watching
his team run its offense to near perfection. He said he’ll let
the Panthers run up and down the court, knocking down
shots,” Until you see something (to tell you otherwise),”
Harames said.
It was more of the same in the second quarter as the
Panthers’ onslaught continued with another 26-point peri-
od. In addition to Loew and Ferrari combining for 14 points
in the second quarter, Gutang finally got involved, scoring
eight of his 10 points as Burlingame pushed its lead to 52-
17 at halftime.
Hillsdale, meanwhile, could not manage much offensive-
ly in the first half. Justin Ono finally broke the seal on the
Knights’ basket when he knocked down a jumper with 3:45
to play in the first quarter.
But points were few and far between for Hillsdale.
To put in perspective, Hillsdale scored one less point in
the third quarter (16) than the Knights did in the first half
(17).
The Panthers also did a good job neutralizing Hillsdale’s
Brian Houle, who came into the game averaging nearly 20 a
points per game in PAL play.
Wednesday night, Houle finished with 17 points, but only
four points in the first half.
Harames said he didn’t do anything special defensively to
contain Houle.
“We just tried to deny (him getting the ball),” Harames
said. “And then brought help.”
With Houle all but locked down most of the game, Ryan
Nurre tried to pick up the offensive slack, finishing with a
team-high 26 points.
Credit Hillsdale, however, for coming out and playing
much better in the second half. While the fourth quarter was
mostly about the reserves for Burlingame — with the
Knights outscoring them 20-5 over the final eight minutes
— the third quarter showed that when Hillsdale is on their
game, the Knights can hang with the Panthers.
In the third quarter, Hillsdale opened with a 9-0 run, forc-
ing Burlingame to take an early timeout.
The Panthers responded with a 12-0 run, as they pushed
their lead to 64-28. The last three-plus minutes of the quar-
ter saw both teams go right at each other. When the quarter
buzzer sounded, Hillsdale was only outscored 19-16 for the
period.
But that is the biggest difference between Burlingame,
Hillsdale and the rest of the PAL South. Nearly every team
can keep pace with the Panthers for a quarter, but not over
the course of four quarters.
“I think (our offensive) barrage is pretty relentless,”
Harames said.
Continued from page 11
BOYS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BERKELEY — Dwight Powell had his third
double-double in five games and Anthony
Brown scored 11 points in the final 10 minutes
to help Stanford beat California 80-69 on
Wednesday night.
Brown finished with 16 points and six
rebounds while Powell had 22 points, 11
rebounds and six assists for Stanford. He con-
trolled the paint in the first half when the
Cardinal built an 18-point lead and went 11 of
14 from the free throw line.
Chasson Randle added 19 points for the
Cardinal (15-7, 6-4 Pac-12), who have won
three of the last four in this series between the
two Bay Area rivals.
Justin Cobbs had 24 points and five
rebounds for California (15-8, 6-4), which
sputtered offensively in its first game since
upsetting then-No. 1 Arizona last week.
Tyrone Wallace added 21 points and four
rebounds.
The Golden Bears were within 52-47 with 13
minutes left when Brown took over for
Stanford.
He made an 18-foot jumper as part of an 8-0
run then added two free throws to make it 64-
51. Cobbs stopped the run with a three-point
play and later added a free throw to make it 62-
51 but Brown scored nine of the next 11 points
for the Cardinal and Stanford took advantage of
multiple turnovers by Cal down the stretch.
It marked a rare conference road win for
Stanford, which lost to the Bears 69-62 on Jan.
2. The Cardinal are 3-2 in the Pac-12 away from
Maples Pavilion this season and only 15-34
since 2008-09.
They handed the Bears just their second
home loss this season and moved into a tie
with Cal for third place in the conference.
A week after losing to Arizona 60-57,
Stanford controlled most of the first half and
led by as much as 18 before the Bears made a
late run to close out the half.
Powell provided the bulk of the offense,
scoring nine points as part of a 15-4 run.
Stanford’s second-leading scorer also had one
of six 3-pointers by the Cardinal in the first 20
minutes.
Cal sputtered offensively until the final 6:30
when Cobbs sparked the Bears’ best run of the
game.
Stanford men pick up important win over Cal
Stanford 80, Cal 69
16
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 26 22 .542—
Brooklyn 21 25 .4574
New York 19 30 .3887 1/2
Boston 17 33 .34010
Philadelphia 15 35 .30012
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 34 13 .723 —
Atlanta 25 23 .521 9 1/2
Washington 24 24 .500 10 1/2
Charlotte 22 28 .440 13 1/2
Orlando 14 37 .275 22
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 38 10 .792 —
Chicago 24 24 .500 14
Detroit 19 29 .396 19
Cleveland 16 33 .327 22 1/2
Milwaukee 9 40 .184 29 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 36 13 .735 —
Houston 33 17 .660 3 1/2
Dallas 29 21 .580 7 1/2
Memphis 26 22 .542 9 1/2
New Orleans 21 27 .438 14 1/2
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 40 11 .784 —
Portland 35 14 .714 4
Denver 24 23 .511 14
Minnesota 24 25 .490 15
Utah 16 32 .333 22 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 34 17 .667 —
Golden State 29 20 .592 4
Phoenix 29 20 .592 4
L.A. Lakers 17 32 .347 16
Sacramento 16 32 .333 16 1/2
Wednesday’sGames
Orlando 112, Detroit 98
Boston 114, Philadelphia 108
San Antonio 125,Washington 118,2OT
L.A. Lakers 119, Cleveland 108
Houston 122, Phoenix 108
Oklahoma City 106, Minnesota 97
Dallas 110, Memphis 96
New Orleans 105, Atlanta 100
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 55 36 16 3 75 167 120
Tampa Bay 56 32 19 5 69 163 139
Montreal 57 30 21 6 66 139 139
Toronto 58 30 22 6 66 171 180
Detroit 56 25 19 12 62 146 158
Ottawa 57 25 21 11 61 164 182
Florida 56 22 27 7 51 137 175
Buffalo 55 15 32 8 38 107 164
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 56 39 15 2 80 178 133
N.Y. Rangers 57 31 23 3 65 150 141
Columbus 56 29 23 4 62 167 156
Philadelphia 57 28 23 6 62 157 165
Carolina 55 25 21 9 59 138 153
New Jersey 57 23 21 13 59 133 142
Washington 57 25 23 9 59 164 173
N.Y. Islanders 58 22 28 8 52 160 191
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 58 34 10 14 82 205 161
St. Louis 55 37 12 6 80 189 130
Colorado 56 36 15 5 77 168 148
Minnesota 58 30 21 7 67 142 145
Dallas 56 26 21 9 61 161 161
Winnipeg 58 28 25 5 61 163 167
Nashville 57 25 23 9 59 142 172
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 58 40 13 5 85 191 143
San Jose 57 35 16 6 76 170 139
Los Angeles 58 30 22 6 66 137 127
Vancouver 58 27 22 9 63 143 152
Phoenix 56 26 20 10 62 160 167
Calgary 56 21 28 7 49 132 175
Edmonton 58 19 33 6 44 150 196
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Tuesday’sGames
Pittsburgh 5, Buffalo 1
Chicago at Anaheim, late
Dallas at San Jose, late
Thursday’sGames
Calgary at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m.
Edmonton at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m.
Colorado at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Winnipeg at Washington, 4 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
THURSDAY
Girls’ soccer
Menlo School at Castilleja, El Camino at Westmoor,
South City at Capuchino,Terra Nova at Oceana, Jef-
ferson at Mills,Menlo-Atherton at San Mateo,3 p.m.;
Harker at Crystal Springs, 3:30 p.m.; Aragon at
Burlingame,Hillsdaleat Sequoia,Carlmont atWood-
side, 4 p.m.
Wrestling
Oceanaat Aragon,Burlingameat Mills,Menlo-Ather-
ton at Hillsdale,Terra Nova at Capuchino,Half Moon
Bay at South City, El Camino at Sequoia, 7 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Crystal Springs at Castilleja, 6:30 p.m.; Notre Dame-
Belmont at Valley Christian, 7:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
Boys’ soccer
Menlo School at Sacred Heart Prep,King’s Academy
at Crystal Springs,2:45p.m.;TerraNovaat Capuchino,
HillsdaleatWestmoor,El Caminoat Mills,Jeffersonvs.
SouthCity at SkylineCollege,Burlingameat Aragon,
3 p.m.; Woodside at Sequoia, Half Moon Bay at
Menlo-Atherton, San Mateo at Carlmont, 4 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
SacredHeart Prepat MenloSchool,6p.m.;Aragonat
San Mateo, Burlingame at Mills, Capuchino at Hills-
dale, Woodside at Sequoia, Carlmont at
Menlo-Atherton, Half Moon Bay at Oceana, South
City at Westmoor, El Camino at Terra Nova, 6:15 p.m.
Boys’ basketball
Crystal Springs at Priory,6:30p.m.;SacredHeart Prep
at Menlo School,Valley Christian at Serra, 7:30 p.m.;
Aragonat SanMateo,Burlingameat Mills,Capuchino
at Hillsdale,Woodsideat Sequoia,Carlmont at Menlo-
Atherton, Half Moon Bay at Oceana, South City at
Westmoor, El Camino at Terra Nova, 7:45 p.m.
SATURDAY
Boys’ basketball
Serra at Bellarmine, 7:30 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
I.C.A. at Mercy-Burlingame, Presentation at Notre
Dame-Belmont, 6:30 p.m.
Boys’ soccer
Mitty at Serra, 11 a.m.
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ior manager of partnership marketing and Bill
Marriott manager of coporate partnership sales.
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with
1B/OF Bryan LaHair on a minor league contract.
TEXAS RANGERS — Announced RHP Chaz Roe
rejected outright assignment and elected free
agency.
National League
LOSANGELESDODGERS—Agreed toterms with
INF Justin Turner on a minor league contract.
NEWYORKMETS—Named Haeda Mihaltses ex-
ecutive director, external affairs.
WASHINGTONNATIONALS —Agreed to terms
with C Koyie Hill on a minor league contract.
NFL
ATLANTAFALCONS—ReleasedCBAsanteSamuel
and LB Stephen Nicholas.
HOUSTONTEXANS—NamedRomeoCrennel de-
fensive coordinator and signed him to a three-year
contract.Retained Bob Ligashesky as special teams
coordinator.Named Mike Vrabel linebackers coach,
Paul Dunn offensive line coach, George Godsey
quarterbacks coach,Sean Hayes assistant strength
and conditioning coach,Stan Hixon wide receivers
coach,Tim Kelly offensive quality control coach,Will
Lawing defensive quality control coach, Charles
London running backs coach, Anthony Midget as-
sistant secondary coach, John Perry tight ends
coach, Anthony Pleasant assistant strength and
conditioning coach,Jim Bernhardt director of foot-
ball research, John Butler secondary coach, Doug
Colman assistant special teams coach and Craig
Fitzgerald strength and conditioning coach.
NEWORLEANSSAINTS—NamedMikeNeuquar-
terbacks coach.
NEWYORKJETS—Named Thomas McGaughey
special teams coordinator.
Major LeagueSoccer
MLS—Announced David Beckham exercised his
optionfor anexpansionteam,whichwill belocated
in Miami. Signed M Benji Joya.
VANCOUVER WHITECAPS — Acquired M/F Se-
bastian Fernandez on loan and M/F Nicolas
Mezquida by transfer from Boston River (Uruguay).
TRANSACTIONS
NFL awards Thursday
contract to CBS
NEW YORK — The NFL has
decided to shift eight of its
Thursday night games to a broad-
cast network, and announced
Wednesday that CBS won the bid
to showcase more of television’s
hottest property.
CBS will air the games during
the first eight weeks of the season
with its top broadcast team of Jim
Nantz and Phil Simms, simulcast-
ing them with the NFL Network.
The league’s cable network will
show six Thursday night games
alone later in the season, produced
by CBS with Nantz and Simms
also in the booth. Two Saturday
games are included in the deal, but
it is unclear whether they will be
on CBS or the NFL Network.
The NFL said the contract is for
one year, and the league has an
option to extend it for 2015.
Financial terms were not dis-
closed.
Curt Schilling
announces he has cancer
BRISTOL, Conn. — Former star
pitcher turned television analyst
Curt Schilling has announced that
he is battling cancer.
Schilling on Wednesday released
a statement through his employer,
ESPN, saying he plans to
“embrace this fight, just like the
rest of them, with resolute faith,
and head on.”
Sports briefs
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Ask a Designer: Multi-faceted master bedroom
By Melisa Rayworth
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
We’re told a well-designed master bedroom should be an
oasis of romantic calm. It’s also supposed to be the practi-
cal place where you store clothing and get a good night’s
sleep, and it may also be where you watch television, pay
bills and even set up a home office.
That’s a lot to ask of a single room.
On the bright side, says interior designer Brian Patrick
Flynn, you have plenty of decorating freedom. “Since bed-
rooms are all about self-expression and comforts,” he says,
“you can break the rules as much as you want.”
We’ve asked Flynn, founder of Flynnside Out Productions,
and two other design experts — Betsy Burnham of Burnham
Design and Molly Luetkemeyer of M. Design Interiors —
for tips on breaking those rules with style to create the ulti-
mate master bedroom.
ONLY THE CALMEST COLORS
Forget trendy shades or your favorite bright colors.
Burnham advises sticking to a soothing palette of ivory and
white, evoking a luxury hotel room. “You can layer color
into that if you want to,” she says.
If your idea of peace and quiet involves deeper colors,
Flynn suggests navy blues or black-brown tones.
And if you really want bolder color or patterns,
Luetkemeyer recommends using a single pattern throughout
your bedroom. This “en suite” look involves using the same
fabric for curtains and bedspread, and even covering the
walls in the same pattern.
“Even a busy pattern won’t feel too chaotic if you’re con-
sistent” in using it throughout the room, she says.
BIG BEDS IN SMALL ROOMS
Think your medium-size or small bedroom can’t handle a
gorgeous four-poster bed? Burnham says a bed like that can
serve as “a statement piece” that brings lots of style. It actu-
ally frees up space, because you won’t need any extra, deco-
rative pieces of furniture for pizazz.
Flynn agrees, as long as the bedroom isn’t extremely
small and the nightstands are in proportion. One of his pet
peeves is a large bed flanked by tiny tables, which can make
the tables look like they belong in a dollhouse.
SOFTEN EVERYTHING
These designers are seeing a trend toward upholstered beds
and headboards, and even upholstery fabric used on walls.
“It’s this idea that you’re being completely cocooned and
buffered from the world,” Luetkemeyer says. For some
clients, she has also upholstered the inside of armoires or
other storage pieces to create a complete sense of softness.
With softness in mind, Flynn suggests using more than
one layer of window treatment: “I usually layer black-out
shades with custom, pleated drapery panels,” he says. “This
softens the hard edges of the room, helps with noise control
and also allows the homeowner to sleep in as late as they
want.”
If you’re worried that all that softness will make the room
too feminine, Burnham suggests adding just a few sharper,
See BEDROOM, Page 18
Closed storage at bedside is a wise move for most people.It keeps necessities handy,but hides clutter to make your sleeping
area look organized even when it isn’t.
18
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
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cleaner lines for balance. Choose
sleek, mid-century vintage lamps to
place on either side of an upholstered
bed. Or opt for a dresser with simple,
clean lines rather than a piece that’s
ornate and curvy.
BANISH ELECTRONICS
It may sound radical, but
Luetkemeyer hears from clients now
that they’re ready to remove the TV
and all gadgets from their bed-
rooms.
“People are saying, ‘I’m in such
overload all day long, and I’m reach-
able within an inch of myself,” she
says, “and I want to have one place
where it’s really mine.”
Burnham sees the beginnings of a
similar trend, though for many people
the habit of checking e-mail in bed or
watching TV before they go to sleep
is a hard one to kick.
If you have a desk in your bed-
room, consider relocating it. And
try plugging in your phone and
other gadgets somewhere else in
your home at night so you won’t be
tempted to check them.
SKIP NIGHTSTANDS
Flynn suggests using 30-inch-tall
dressers or chests instead of tradition-
al nightstands: “I’ll hit up flea mar-
kets and find two different chests with
very similar proportions,” he says,
using these less expensive pieces to
flank a more expensive custom head-
board or platform bed.
Luetkemeyer agrees that closed
storage at bedside is a wise move for
most people. It keeps necessities
handy, but hides clutter to make your
sleeping area look organized even
when it isn’t.
Continued from page 17
BEDROOM
build an eight-story, 117 one- and two-bed-
room complex with 260 above, below and
ground level parking spaces on the approx-
imate 1.2 acres currently used as a publicly
accessible parking lot on the corner of East
Fifth Avenue and South San Mateo Drive.
“This is preliminary, we recognize there’s
a lot of embellishments and further clarity
that needs to be done,” said John Eudy,
executive vice president of development for
Essex. “We put in a lot of thought and tried
to come up with different options ...we’re
going to be enhancing landscape and try
and connect it to the park and spend the
money trying to enhance the walkway from
Fourth to Fifth. … We’re going to make sure
we try to hit every mark so we can clarify
the impact will be minimized.”
Unlike typical development proposals,
the commission reviewed Essex’s pre-appli-
cation due to its proximity to Central Park,
said city architect Dennis Frank. Studies
about the wind, glare and shadow impacts a
large building might have on the park will
need to be done before any action is taken,
Frank said.
Commissioner Clifford Robins said lin-
ing the base of the building with more retail
space would encourage people to come
shop, eat and then frequent the park. The
city is developing its Central Park Master
Plan and its important Essex doesn’t detract
from its goal to tie the park to downtown,
Robins said.
“I would like the developer to think as to
how they can play into that. Anything you
can do to enhance the people flow and not
impede it,” Robins said.
Resident James Steinrock frequents
Central Park and doesn’t want a 75-foot
building to make it feel enclosed.
“[Central] park is the place my wife and I
grew up and it’s ringed now pretty much by
parking lots and I don’t want it to feel like
it’s boxed,” Steinrock said.
The city wants to ensure the building pro-
vides access from the park to downtown and
has suitable landscaping to make it a more
natural connection, Frank said.
The building will have numerous ground
level planters as well as story level cascad-
ing plants to try and tie the building’s aes-
thetics to those of the park, said Russ
Naylor, Essex’s primary design architect for
the project. It will bulb out the sidewalk
from it’s current eight feet to more than 16
feet and create a plaza area with retail and
café tables on the corner to be more invit-
ing, Naylor said.
Essex is proposing “El Paseo,” a walk-
through within the building connecting
Fourth and Fifth avenues that will be well
maintained with plants and inviting to the
public, Naylor said.
Because of the proposed height of the
building, it needs to follow Measure P
requirements and provide a public benefit or
amenity to be considered suitable.
Resident Kara Cox said she doesn’t think
El Paseo is much of an increased benefit
because it’s a public right-of-way that Essex
would already need to maintain.
“I’m very supportive of development
when it’s done in the right way because I
know San Mateo needs housing. But this
certainly doesn’t benefit the public or the
park to any degree more than is already
existing,” Cox said.
It’s in the early stage of the application
process so city and developers haven’t
defined what type or to what extent Essex
will have to provide a public benefit.
But the commissioners will indicate they
anticipate needed increased finances to sup-
port new Essex park goers, Robbins said.
“I think the good news is there will be
more people using central park,”
Commissioner Stan Watkins said. “The bad
news is if the department doesn’t have suffi-
cient funds to keep it going. There needs to
be sufficient funds.”
The City Council will ultimately deter-
mine what would be considered a suitable
public benefit, said Julia Klein, associate
planner for the city.
The Planning Commission will hear the
Essex at Central Park pre-application 7
p.m. Feb. 25 at City Hall, 330 W. 20th
Avenue. For more information about the
project visit www.cityofsanmateo.org.
Continued from page 1
ESSEX
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
With Valentine’s Day coming up,
thoughts naturally turn to chocolate. How
nice it would be for gardeners to give their
beloved a living, growing, chocolate
expression of affection.
Alas, chocolate, native to steamy equato-
rial lowlands, is not usually productive
when grown as a houseplant. Even if you
could get the football-sized pods dangling
from the trunk of a chocolate tree, fairly
intricate processing is needed before you’d
have something worth sinking your teeth
into.
But there are some chocolate-y alterna-
tives:
ALMOST CHOCOLATE
A number of plants — Chocolate Ruffles
coral bells, Chocolate Cake gladiola and
Sweet Chocolate pepper, for example —
have chocolate-y looking leaves or fruits.
Let’s shy away from them, though, because
their chocolate is only skin deep.
Plants with chocolate-y aromas offer
instant gratification more akin to Hershey’s
Kisses. For an affair on shaky ground and
needing a quick horticultural chocolate fix, I
suggest a peppermint geranium plant.
Peppermint geranium makes a nice house-
plant for a sunny windowsill, and, in
spring, feathery white blossoms add to the
sensual pleasure. OK, it’s not chocolate, but
there is that common association of pepper-
mint and chocolate.
The Chocolate Mint variety of pepper-
mint is another plant that shares its aroma
as soon as it is in hand. Close your eyes and
this one’s a stand-in for a Peppermint Patty.
I’m not sure there’s really any chocolate in
that peppermint-y aroma; perhaps it’s the
chocolate-y hue of the leaves and the power
of suggestion. Chocolate Mint, like other
mints, is easy to grow and multiply. Mints
do become scraggly indoors, so plan on
eventually planting chocolate mint out-
doors in a sunny garden bed.
Wax plant (Hoya carnosa) is an easy-to-
grow houseplant with a genuine, sweet,
chocolate-y aroma, though it might require
some patience. The aroma comes from the
flowers, which are not borne continuously.
Still, if you and that special person can
stand the wait, just hold hands and admire
the way the fleshy leaves twist around in
their waxy smoothness. The pure chocolate
aroma is worth waiting for.
ANNUAL AND
PERENNIAL CHOCOLATES
Other plants could cement a romance with
the smell of chocolate in the months and
years ahead. Despite its name, summer
snowflake offers up its fragrance — admit-
tedly slight and, to some noses, just sweet
rather than chocolate-y — in spring. The
“snowflake” part of the name is apt, howev-
er, for this bulb’s nodding blooms are indeed
snowflake white, much like those of anoth-
er bulb, snowdrops, except larger.
Summer brings chocolate-y scents from
two annual flowers: chocolate cosmos and
birds’ eyes. This cosmos has dark, almost
black blossoms. Chocolate cosmos grows
from a fat tuber, which you lift in the fall and
replant each spring, just as you do dahlias.
Birds’ eyes (Gilia tricolor) was once a popu-
lar half-hardy annual, loved for its profu-
sion of creamy white flowers, which have
dark brown throats and petals edged in pur-
ple blush. The chocolate scent is there, but
slight.
Chocolate daisy (Berlandiera lyrata) is a
perennial flower that is strong in scent and
tough in disposition. And the plant’s also
pretty, displaying characteristic daisy heads
of yellow petals around green eyes for weeks
and weeks through summer. Cut some blos-
soms, plunk them into a vase of water, and I
guarantee your lover will be looking for hid-
den chocolate bars or “Kisses.”
These plants are the next best thing to chocolate
Chocolate daisy is a perennial flower that is strong in scent and tough in disposition.
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, FEB. 6
‘Taste and Talk’ Series. 6 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. Oak Room, Main Library, 55
W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Free. For
more information go to www.sus-
tainablestreetssanmaateo.com.
‘Annie Get Your Gun’ — Carlmont
High School. 7 p.m. Carlmont High
School Performing Arts Center, 1400
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Show runs through Feb. 9. Tickets
can be purchased at
h t t p s : / / a p p . a r t s -
people.com/index.php?theatre=chs
. Tickets range from $12 to $15.
Notre Dame de Namur University
Department of Theater presents
annual Student Showcase. 7:30
p.m. NDNU Theatre, 1500 Ralston
Ave., Belmont. Featuring plays
directed by graduating senior stu-
dents. $10 general admission.
Tickets can be purchased at the
door or reserved by calling 508-
3456 or emailing
boxoffice@ndnu.edu.
Hillbarn Theatre presents ‘The
Grapes of Wrath.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn
Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd.,
Foster City. Set during the Great
Depression, John Steinbeck’s
Pulitzer Prize winning story of the
Joad family and their journey from
the dust bowl fields of Oklahoma to
the farmlands of California in search
of jobs and a future has become a
testament to the strength of the
human spirit. $23 to $38 for adults
and seniors. Students 17 and
younger with current student ID, call
349-6411 for pricing. For more infor-
mation go to hillbarntheatre.org.
‘Rx’ by Kate Fodor opens Dragon
Theatre’s 2014 Main Stage
Season. 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre,
2120 Broadway, Redwood City. The
production is rated R. Shows runs
through Feb. 9. $30 tickets. For more
information go to http://dragonpro-
ductions.net.
FRIDAY, FEB. 7
Free Dental Care to Low-Income
Children. San Mateo County den-
tists will provide free dental services
to low-income children, ages 1 to
18, today (Give Kids a Smile Day).
Give Kids a Smile Day is a one day
event and residents are encouraged
to call San Mateo County Health
Coverage Unit at 616-2002 to
schedule an appointment.
San Mateo Sunrise Rotary Club
presents guest speaker Judge
Shelyna Brown of the Santa Clara
Superior Court. 7:30 a.m. Crystal
Springs Golf Course, 6650 Golf
Course Drive, Burlingame. $15
includes breakfast. For more infor-
mation or to RSVP call Jake at 515-
5891.
Free Friday at the San Mateo
County History Museum. 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Free admission. Two programs
throughout the day. For more infor-
mation call 299-0104 or go to
www.historysmc.org.
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more informa-
tion call 523-0804.
Pacific Art League’s reception for
new ‘Abstraction’ and ‘Stamps on
Paper’ exhibits. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
227 Forest Ave., Palo Alto. Exhibit
runs through March 31 from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Admission free. For more informa-
tion contact Anna Speaker at
gallerymanager@pacificartleague.o
rg.
A Photography Exhibit. 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. Municipal Services Building, 33
Arroyo Drive, South San Francisco.
This exhibit features photography
by San Mateo County photogra-
phers and enthusiasts. Free admis-
sion. For more information go to
www.ssf.net.
Jann Klose and Clara Bellino per-
formance. 6 p.m. Angelica’s Bell
Two, 863 Main St., Redwood City.
Admission is $11 in advance and
$16 at the door. For more informa-
tion call (718) 881-8183.
Time and Again, Weaving the
Walk Public Reception. 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. Gallery House, 320 S. California
Ave., Palo Alto. For more information
go to www.annelamborn.com or
call (408) 761-2058.
Dad and Me at the Library. 6:30
p.m. Menlo Park Library, 800 Alma
St., Menlo Park. Free. For more infor-
mation go to www.fatherhoodcol-
laborative.org.
‘Annie Get Your Gun’ — Carlmont
High School. 7 p.m. Carlmont High
School Performing Arts Center, 1400
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Through Feb. 9. Tickets can be pur-
chased at https://app.arts-
people.com/index.php?theatre=chs
. Tickets range from $12 to $15.
‘Shored Up!’ 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Community Center of the Sharp
Park Library, 104 Hilton Way, Pacifica.
The film, which has been selected
for San Francisco’s Green Film
Festival, asks hard questions about
coastal communities and impend-
ing sea-level rise. State Sen. Jerry Hill
and San Mateo County Supervisor
Dave Pine will give opening
remarks. Light refreshments to be
served. Free. For more information
call 438-6378.
San Mateo High School
Performing Arts Presents HAIR-
SPRAY. 7:30 p.m. San Mateo
Performing Arts Center, 600 N.
Delaware St., San Mateo. Runs
through Feb. 9. For more informa-
tion go to smhsdrama.org or call
558-2375.
‘The Mikado’ by Gilbert &
Sullivan. 8 p.m. Dinkelspiel
Auditorium, 471 Lagunita Drive,
Stanford. This is a Stanford
Savoyards production. Shows run
two and a half hours. Tickets range
from $10 to $20. For more informa-
tion and to purchase tickets go to
http://savoyards.stanford.edu.
Hillbarn Theatre presents ‘The
Grapes of Wrath.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn
Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd.,
Foster City. Set during the Great
Depression, John Steinbeck’s
Pulitzer Prize winning story of the
Joad family and their journey from
the dust bowl fields of Oklahoma to
the farmlands of California in search
of jobs and a future has become a
testament to the strength of the
human spirit. $23 to $38 for adults
and seniors. Students 17 and
younger with current student ID, call
349-6411 for pricing. For more infor-
mation go to hillbarntheatre.org.
‘Rx’ by Kate Fodor opens Dragon
Theatre’s 2014 Main Stage
Season. 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre,
2120 Broadway, Redwood City. The
production is rated R. Through Feb.
9. $30 tickets. For more information
go to http://dragonproductions.net.
SATURDAY, FEB. 8
San Bruno AARP Chapter General
Meeting. 10 a.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road,
San Bruno. There is a pre-meeting
social from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Millbrae Library Outdoor Bargain
Book and Media Sale. 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Children’s and adult’s book
25 cents and 50 cents, respectively.
From 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., a bag of books
is $5. For more information call 697-
7607.
Orion Alternative School’s 12th
Annual Author and Illustrator
Fair. 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Orion
Alternative Elementary School, 815
Allerton St., Redwood City. Free.
Mushroom walk at Filoli. 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. Filoli, 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. $15 for adult members,
$20 for adult non-members. $5 or
child members, $10 for non-mem-
ber children. For more information
go to www.filoli.org.
San Bruno AARP Meeting. 10 a.m.
San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno. For
more information call 583-4499.
A Photography Exhibit. 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. SSF Municipal Services
Building, 33 Arroyo Drive, South San
Francisco. This exhibit features pho-
tography by San Mateo County pho-
tographers and enthusiasts. Free
admission. For more information go
to www.ssf.net.
E2 Fitness and Breakfast:
Whipped! with Mario Flaherty. 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. Whole Foods Market,
1010 Park Place, San Mateo. For
more information contact hsu-
lien.rivera@wholefoods.com.
Protein Based Breakfast Class. 11
a.m. 907 Newbridge St., Suite A, East
Palo Alto. Free. For more information
call (408) 903-6049.
Lunar Fest and Free Day at
History Museum. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
San Mateo County History Museum,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City.
There will be outdoor performances
and activities to celebrate the Lunar
New Year. Free. For more informa-
tion call 299-0104.
Buy One, Get One Free at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage
Lane, Twin Pines Park, Belmont.
Proceeds benefit the Belmont
Library. For more information call
593-5650.
Make a Valentine. 2 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library — Book Bubble, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 522-7838.
St. Veronica School Crab Feed. 6
p.m. to midnight. 434 Alida Way,
South San Francisco. $65 per person
includes a full meal. There will also
be a raffle and dancing. Checks can
be made out to St. Veronica Men’s
Club. For questions call the school at
589-3909 or email registration
chairperson Gina Rafael at
anglf4@aol.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Kleinbaum said.
Some of the future commissioners’
projects will include updating and
implementing the Sustainable
Initiatives Plan, the Climate Action
Plan and the Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Reduction Program, Kleinbaum said.
“I’m excited about the Sustainability
Commission,” Deputy Mayor Maureen
Freschet said. “It’s more than just about
being green. Right now we’re looking
at a lot of environmental issues, the
drought especially, but there’s so many
different issues related to the environ-
ment that the City Council on its own
couldn’t do all of the research on and
this way we have a commission help
guide us. So having a Sustainability
Commission is very timely.”
The push for water conservation poli-
cies and the city’s Landscape Water
Efficiency Ordinance started before the
drought, but the state’s current climate
emphasizes their urgency. One of the
commission’s first roles will be to
coordinate with the California Water
Service Company to develop a supply
and conservation plan, Kleinbaum said.
The commission will provide critical
assistance to get the city to adhere to
state requirements such as reducing its
greenhouse gas emissions 15 percent
by 2020 and complying with the Bay
Area Air Quality Management District
guidelines, Kleinbaum said.
“Staff is recommending the commis-
sion initially focus on the larger envi-
ronmental issues and then, once they
gain their footing, fold in social justice
and economic aspects of sustainabili-
t y,” Kleinbaum said.
Future topics will include the city’s
beekeeping ordinance, looking at
health concerns for transit-oriented and
affordable housing communities that
are located near freeways or more
“toxic” parts of the city and reinvigo-
rating the San Mateo Acting
Responsibly Together community out-
reach programs, Kleinbaum said.
Councilman David Lim said he’s
thrilled the commission has gained trac-
tion since it was previously stunted by
budget cuts and department audits.
“We just have a lot more environmen-
tal and social equity issues that need to
be addressed through a commission ded-
icated to those issues. We had a lot of
problems with sustainability issues
falling through the cracks,” Lim said.
In years past, the city had to pay
fines and was under a cease and desist
order by the Bay Area Water Quality
Agency because San Mateo’s waste-
water treatment plant was leaking into
the Bay, Lim said.
As the commission progresses, it
will also help develop policies related
to the economic and social sustain-
ability of the city, Freschet said. She
wants to make sure everyone in the
community has access to what the city
has to offer and for San Mateo to
become sustainable in every sense of
the word, Freschet said.
“Sustainability is the connection
between our environment, but also our
economy and society. There’s three
prongs to it … you have to have a
healthy environment and a vibrant com-
munity and economy and that’s going to
foster growth” Freschet said. “And I
think the Sustainability Commission is
going to help achieve that.”
San Mateo residents interested in
being part of the commission and pro-
viding advice to the council can apply
now. The city welcomes those who have
expertise in related fields but it isn’t a
requirement and anyone with strong
interests in social and environmental
policies is encouraged to apply. For
more information and to apply for a
commissioner position visit www.city-
ofsanmateo.org.
Continued from page 1
SUSTAIN
After his death in 1921, the mansion
was sold to the Sisters of Mercy for
$230,000.
“It’s pretty amazing in how it all
started as a private home,” said Dianne
Devin, associate director of events at
the Kohl Mansion. “It’s developed into
an incredible high school and a venue
for corporate events and parties. It’s a
big celebration for all of us on cam-
pus.”
After purchasing the home, the
Sisters used the mansion as a convent
and a motherhouse until 1931 when
they opened Mercy High School for
Girls. Aclassroom wing was eventually
added and additional expansion proj-
ects followed. Today, the 63-room
Kohl Mansion serves as the heart and
soul of Mercy High School, Mercy
Center and the Mercy Convent.
In 1982, the mansion was even
entered into the National Register of
Historic Places, which lists historical-
ly significant sites throughout the
United States.
Although there are no events planned
involving the students yet, the girls
may get involved at some point, Devin
said.
Other activities to be held at the man-
sion to celebrate the anniversary
include a lecture on the history of the
mansion by Michael Svanevik, a pro-
fessor emeritus at College of San
Mateo, on April 29. There will be a
100th birthday party on the green Aug.
10 with music, mansion tours, a classic
car show, a slice of birthday cake and
proclamations presented by communi-
ty leaders and public officials. It’s open
to the public and no RSVP is needed.
Additionally, the mansion will host
its traditional holiday events Dec. 8
and 14. Space is limited for both the
Café de Kohl and Grand Finale celebra-
tions.
Registration for docent led night
tours of the mansion will begin Feb.
10. A$15 donation is requested to help
fund Kohl Mansion’s restoration and
enhancement projects.
For a full list of birthday events, and
to register for each, visit kohlman-
sion.com.
Continued from page 1
KOHL
The timing for the EIR has to do with
the fact the moratorium, which was
extended on Jan. 26, 2013 for 16
months, will expire soon on May 23.
Adraft ordinance suggests prohibiting
superstore use in all zoning districts
within which a superstore use may cur-
rently be allowed, prohibiting grocery
use east of Highway 101 and revising,
updating and/or adding new definitions
(convenience market, large format
retail, grocery store, supermarket and
superstore) to clarify the city’s intent.
The draft EIR states adoption of
these amendments would not result in
significant and unavoidable environ-
mental impacts. It also states develop-
ment of a superstore would not be con-
sistent with several general plan poli-
cies related to business retention,
business climate and other economic
criteria if a superstore were developed,
even if the size of the zoning for a
superstore were limited, according to a
staff report put together by the city’s
Planning Manager Gerry Beaudin.
Waiting and seeing what various
pieces of data show is Garbarino’s
mindset at this time, he said.
“We have to look at the sales tax rev-
enue,” he said. “I’m not too keen on
their (Walmart’s) personnel practices,
but you can’t say no to somebody
because you don’t care for them. Do we
really want a big retail outlet over
there? If we limit size, that’s one
thing. Walmart is just generally on
main streets and that’s (720 Dubuque
Ave.) awkward to get to.”
The Planning Commission should
be giving recommendations to the
City Council on the proposed ordi-
nance sometime this month or next.
The 45-day public comment period
ends Feb. 24. The commission meets 7
p.m. Thursday, Feb. 6 at Council
Chambers, 33 Arroyo Drive to take
public comment on the draft EIR.
Continued from page 1
SSF
COMICS/GAMES
2-6-14
WEDNESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Steamy dance
6 Pantyhose color
10 Neigh
12 Galvanize
14 Mexican state
15 Least cooked
16 Rio rhythms
18 Rap artist Dr. —
19 Eye shadow
21 Mo. expense
23 Puppy noise
24 Scientific principle
26 Turnpike
29 Film director — Kazan
31 Itinerary word
33 Garfield dog
35 England’s — Blair
36 Get nosy
37 Stovetop items
38 Dates regularly
40 Environmental prefix
42 Glove compartment item
43 Short play
45 Net
47 Vagrant
50 Thought the world of
52 Dream up
54 Birches
58 Aerie builders
59 Obi wearer
60 — -back (easygoing)
61 Wyoming range
DOWN
1 Pair
2 Gotcha!
3 Veto
4 Grind one’s teeth
5 Available (2 wds.)
6 Sketcher’s need
7 Herd animal
8 Regretted
9 Cold War inits.
11 Candied item
12 Inland sea of Asia
13 Bastille Day season
17 Become aware of (3 wds.)
19 2.2-pound units
20 Speculate
22 Henhouse
23 So far
25 Filmdom’s Gardner
27 Sixth president
28 Singer — Washington
30 Pro votes
32 Canine registry
34 Mind reader’s letters
39 Zipped over the ice
41 Diner fare
44 “Et tu” time
46 A funny Murphy
47 Prior to yr. 1
48 Europe-Asia range
49 MHz part
51 Scrap of cloth
53 Boxing’s greatest
55 Ballpark fig.
56 Pi follower
57 — Francisco
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Investments will pay
off. Fixing up something you want to sell will add to its
value and give you a seller’s advantage. Don’t worry
about pleasing everyone. Do what’s best for you.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Participate in
community events to develop new friendships. A
journey that takes you somewhere mentally, spiritually
or physically will be enlightening. Strive for perfection.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Discuss your plans with
someone you respect or trust and you will find a way to
make your dreams come true. Concentrate on what’s
important; taking on too much will deter progress.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Review your personal
situation and consider how you can make an
important relationship better. Special plans will help
bring you closer to the one you love.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Look for ways to get
ahead and come up with a plan. Lady Luck is in
your corner so take advantage of a moneymaking
endeavor. A contribution will raise your profile.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Participate in
something in order to make interesting connections.
Trips will prove eye-opening and adventurous.
Friends will help bring greater clarity to a situation
that you’ve been questioning.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Don’t make unrealistic
gestures. Think twice before you retaliate. Make sure
you have the correct facts. Focus on what’s important
and what will help you get ahead.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Mixing and mingling
will bring you satisfaction and greater confidence.
Your social attributes will put you in a good
position, resulting in popularity. Take advantage of
an opportunity.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Invest in your skills,
talent and knowledge, and you will raise your profile.
Instigate a move and make decisions that will allow
you greater freedom to explore avenues of interest.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Emotions will
escalate if you have ignored a situation that can
af fect your personal life. Don’t overreact when
stability is required. Put your energy into physical
rather than mental encounters.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Throw a creative
slant into the mix when it comes to your work, and you
will outshine any competition you encounter. Make a
purchase that will grow in value. Invest in yourself.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Social events
should also broaden your outlook and bring you
in contact with interesting people. You will gain
popularity through your ability to please others. Love is
highlighted and romance encouraged.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
º work well with others
º Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
º A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
110 Employment
BUS DRIVER
JOBS AVAILABLE
Requires willingness to obtain Class B
CDL Learner’s Permit with Passenger
Endorsement. Classes Forming.
CALL TODAY, (415)206-7386
GREETER /
SALES PERSON
Greet customers and up-sell car
wash and detail services. $8.00 +
commission. Potential for $15-$30
per hr. Jacks Car Wash. 3651 S. El
Camino Real, SM. 650-627-8447.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
CUSTOMER CONTACT -
OUTSIDE POSITION
FULL TIME/PART TIME
$15.62 per hour start
to $35 per hour
with bonuses
Full training and expenses
Mr. Connors (650)372-2810
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff (easy job)
$9.00 per hr. Apply in Person at or email
resume to info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TAXI & Limo Driver, Wanted, full time,
paid weekly, between $500 and $700
cash, (650)921-2071
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $500
Guaranteed per week. Taxi Permit
required Call (650)703-8654
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259200
The following person is doing business
as: North Coast Seaweed, 135 Mesa
Verde Way, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Cassandra Bergero and Randy Tan,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Randy Tan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/14/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/14, 01/23/14, 01/30/14, 02/06/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259179
The following person is doing business
as: Esprit de Vie, 336 El Camino Real,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Valerie
Spier, Po Box 547, El Granada, CA
94018. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Valerie Spier /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/10/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/14, 01/23/14, 01/30/14, 02/06/14).
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
23 Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259199
The following person is doing business
as: Ninja Sushi & Tofu, 681 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: S & J
Total Enterprise, Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ He Jin Park /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/14, 01/23/14, 01/30/14, 02/06/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259298
The following person is doing business
as: 12 Point Productions, 1308 Bayshore
Hwy., Ste. 107, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: KSG Enterprise, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Kevin Gonzales /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/21/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/23/14, 01/30/14, 02/06/14, 02/13/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259203
The following person is doing business
as: Brightstar Care, 1700 S. Amphlett
Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Good
Shepherd Holdings Copr., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Edward Sayson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/14/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/23/14, 01/30/14, 02/06/14, 02/13/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259188
The following person is doing business
as: Pamplemousse Patisserie & Cafe,
2401 Broadway Ave., REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94063 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Toute Sweet, Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Kelli Manukyan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/23/14, 01/30/14, 02/06/14, 02/13/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259228
The following person is doing business
as: Kohnke Investments, 2224 Armada
Way, SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is hereby
registered by the following owner: John
David Kohnke, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ John Kohnke /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/15/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/23/14, 01/30/14, 02/06/14, 02/13/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259268
The following person is doing business
as: Hospitality Link, 2004 New Brunswick
Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Hol-
den Lim, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/23/2009.
/s/ Holden Lim /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/17/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/23/14, 01/30/14, 02/06/14, 02/13/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259333
The following person is doing business
as: On Track Motorsports, 2929 Middle-
field Rd., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Mike Tannous, 2009 Forest Ave., Bel-
mont, CA 94002. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Mike Tannous /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/23/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/30/14, 02/06/14, 02/13/14, 02/20/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259396
The following person is doing business
as: Calstar Entertainment, 1551 South-
gate Ave., Apt. 254, DALY CITY, CA
94015 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Calstar Entertainment, LLC.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Lim-
ited Liability Company. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Nan Hu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/28/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/30/14, 02/06/14, 02/13/14, 02/20/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259339
The following person is doing business
as: Jalisco Taste, 532 San Mateo, SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Rigoberto Calza-
da, 602 San Felipe Ave., San Bruno, CA
94066. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Rigoberto Calzada /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/23/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/30/14, 02/06/14, 02/13/14, 02/20/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259154
The following person is doing business
as: San Jalisco Taste, 532 San Mateo,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Rigoberto
Calzada, 602 San Felipe Ave., San Bru-
no, CA 94066. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Rigoberto Calzada /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/08/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/30/14, 02/06/14, 02/13/14, 02/20/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259395
The following person is doing business
as: Revelry Indoor Cycling & Fitness, 10
E. Third Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Third Avenue Enterprises, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Scott Roth /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/28/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/30/14, 02/06/14, 02/13/14, 02/20/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259308
The following person is doing business
as: Jescom, 90 17th Ave., SAN MATEO,
CA 94402 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Aurelio Pagani, 16 Valley
View Ct., San Mateo, CA 94402. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/2014.
/s/ Aurelio Pagani /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/22/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/30/14, 02/06/14, 02/13/14, 02/20/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259480
The following person is doing business
as: Homesmart Platinum Living, 1060 El
Camino Real, #G, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Realtorchristina, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 02/03/2014.
/s/ Christina Nguyen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/14, 02/12/14, 02/19/14, 02/26/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259283
The following person is doing business
as: The Traveling Dancer, 100 McLellan
Dr., #1077, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Shashonna Chiles, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Shashonna Chiles /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/17/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/06/14, 02/13/14, 02/20/14, 02/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259466
The following person is doing business
as: Davis Associates - TIC, 800 S. Clare-
mont St., Ste 201, SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: 1) Helen M. Raiser, Trustee
of JHR Marital Trust, 2256 Hyde St., San
Francisco, CA 94109, 2) Helen M. Rais-
er, Trustee of JHHR Bypass Trust, 2256
Hyde St., San Francisco, CA 94109, 3)
Harvey E. Chapman, Trustee H. Chap-
man Living Trust, 269 St. Andrew Dr.,
Napa, CA 94558, 4) Colleen C. Badell,
Trustee of C. Badell Living Trust, 269 St.
Andrew Dr., Napa, CA 94558. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Joint Venture.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on January 1,
2007.
/s/ Helen M. Raiser /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/06/14, 02/13/14, 02/20/14, 02/27/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259513
The following person is doing business
as: Terrificuts, 289 El Camino Real Suite
B, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Lorna
Quiambao, 76 Cielito Dr, San Francisco
CA 94134. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 1/2/01
/s/ Liza Quiambao /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/05/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/06/14, 02/13/14, 02/20/14, 02/27/14).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #M-231419
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Ter-
rificuts, 289 El Camino Real Suite B,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066. The fictitious
business name was filed on 3/7/09 in
the county of San Mateo. The business
was conducted by: Lorna Quiambao and
Liza Palarca, 76 Cielito Dr, San Francis-
co CA 94134
/s/ Lorna Quiambao /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 02/05/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 02/06/2014,
02/13/2014, 02/20/2014, 02/27/2014).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ART: 5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”,
signed Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all.
650-345-3277
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! (650)430-6556
G.E. ELECTRIC DRYER - New, pur-
chased Sept 2013. Paid $475. Will sell
for $300. Excellent condition. Call SOLD!
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
(650)430-6556
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
296 Appliances
STOVE AND HOOD, G.E. XL44, gas,
Good condition, clean, white.. $250.
(650)348-5169
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
THERMADOR WHITE glass gas cook-
top. 36 inch Good working condition.
$95. 650-322-9598
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 SOLD!
SCHWINN 20” Boy’s Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
19 TOTAL (15 different) UN postage-
stamp souvenir cards, $70 catalog value,
$5, (650)-366-1013.
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
255 US used postage-stamp blocks &
strips (1300 stamps) and more, mounted,
$20, (650)-366-1013.
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRAMED 19X15 BARBIE USPS Post-
mark picture Gallery First Day of issue
1960. Limited edition $85.
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
HO TRAIN parts including engines, box-
cars, tankers, tracks, transformers, etc.
$75 Call 650-571-6295
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
299 Computers
1982 TEXAS Instruments TI-99/4A com-
puter, new condition, complete accesso-
ries, original box. $99. (650)676-0974
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL floor lamp, marble
table top. Good condition. $90. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL table lamps, (2),
shades need to be redone. Free. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
30" SHARP T.V. w/ remote - $65. SOLD!
32 “ FLAT SCREEN TV - Slightly Used.
HDMI 1080, $100 SOLD
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
303 Electronics
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPAD 4, brand new! 16 GB, Wi-Fi, black,
still unopened in box. Tired of the same
old re-gifts? Get yourself something you
really want... an iPad! $500. Call
(954)479-8716 (San Carlos)
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE SET, round 42" glass table,
with 4 chairs, pick up Foster City. Free.
(650)578-9045
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - Five Drawer - $30.
(650)333-5353
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
SOLD!
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
24
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
304 Furniture
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
KITCHEN TABLE, tall $65. 3'x3'x3' ex-
tends to 4' long Four chairs $65.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, SOLD
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
SOLD!
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $80
RETAIL $130 OBO (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
RECLINING CHAIR (Dark Green) - $55.
(650)333-5353
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SMALL VANITY chair with stool and mir-
ror $99. (650)622-6695
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 SOLD!
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO
(650)345-5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
SOFA- FABRIC, beige w/ green stripes
(excellent cond.) - $95. SOLD!
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
T.V. STAND- Excellent Condition - $35.
SOLD!
TABLE 4X4X4. Painted top $40
(650)622-6695
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
304 Furniture
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. SOLD.
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE METAL daybed $40. 650-726-
6429
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BBQ, WEBER, GoAnywhere, unused,
plated steel grates, portable, rust resist-
ant, w/charcoal, $50. (650)578-9208
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS (3) stainless steel
21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5 gal. - $10 all
(650)574-3229
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
308 Tools
13" SCROLL saw $ 40. (650)573-5269
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 SOLD!
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench 20-150 lbs,
warranty & case $25 650-595-3933
308 Tools
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 1/2" drill press $40.50.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN10" TABLE saw & stand,
$99. (650)573-5269
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
WINCHESTER POCKETKNIFE scis-
sors, bade, sdriver file $10 650-595-3933
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
PANASONIC FAX machine, works
great, $20. (650-578-9045)
310 Misc. For Sale
16 BOOKS on Histoy if WWII Excllent
condition $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ATT 2WIRE Router, working condition,
for Ethernet, wireless, DSL, Internet.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used(
26"x49") aqua - $15 each (650)574-3229
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
310 Misc. For Sale
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CALIFORNIA KING WHITE BEDDING,
immaculate, 2 each: Pillow covers,
shams, 1 spread/cover, washable $25.00
(650)578-9208
CEILING FAN 44", three lights, Excel-
lent condition, white or wood grain rever-
sible blades. $25. 650-339-1816
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
ELECTRIC OMELET Maker quesadillas
& sandwich too $9 650-595-3933
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 San Bruno
(650)588-1946
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITANICA Free to
Senior Center, educ./service facility. No
response free to anyone. (650)342-7933
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 SOLD!
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7, SOLD!
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO SOLD!
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
310 Misc. For Sale
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 SOLD!
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 SOLD!
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SHOWER CURTAIN set: royal blue
vinyl curtain with white nylon over-curtain
$15 (650)574-3229
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR no brand $65
SOLD!
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM,” MARINA Cool 10”, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
312 Pets & Animals
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
PET TAXI, never used 20 by 14 by 15
inches, medium dog size $20. (650)591-
1500
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, $10 (650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK JACKET faux, hip length, satin lin-
ing. Looks feels real. Perfect condition
$99 OBO 650-349-6969
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
25 Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Easter season:
Abbr.
4 62-Across coat
7 Interest fig.
10 Long, on
Molokai
11 Experience with
enthusiasm
13 Pi follower
14 “Out” crier
15 Chic “Bye”
16 Charged
particle
17 Detox place
19 Bridal
emanations
21 Reminiscent of
venison
22 Dweeb
23 Red state?
26 Easy gaits
29 Given a hand
30 Annabella of
“The Sopranos”
31 Chased (after)
32 Whirling
34 Farm feed
35 Computer that
once came in
“flavors”
37 Biscuit, maybe
38 Strokes a 62-
Across
39 Greek cheese
40 First name in
one-liners
41 Actress
Charlotte et al.
42 Fountain near
the Spanish
Steps
44 Buddy
45 __’acte
48 Flute part
50 Big enchilada
57 Babysitter’s
handful
58 New evidence
may lead to one
59 Fawn spawner
60 With 62-Across,
a hint to the
starts of this
puzzle’s four
longest Down
answers
61 Slogan sites
62 See
60-Across
DOWN
1 Bit of
mudslinging
2 Fruit of ancient
Persia
3 Vatican Palace
painter
4 Pet rocks, e.g.
5 News agcy.
since 1958
6 Regret bitterly
7 Preceding
8 Numbskull
9 Bunches
11 Daedalus’
creation
12 Combativeness
18 Cremona
artisan
20 Red Square
honoree
23 Lacking
purpose
24 Juice extractor
25 Grab, as a line
drive
26 D.C. network
27 Like most
bawdy films
28 Lays down the
law
33 Fig. on 26-
Down
36 Gave in
38 Groom with
care
43 Unmoving
44 Hull stabilizers
46 “__ bien!”
47 Big name in
IRAs
48 Rustle
49 “Take __!”
50 Aflame
51 Angst-filled genre
52 Killer Birds, e.g.
53 Calendar abbr.
54 Recipe
instruction
55 Soft murmur
56 Barrel at a bash
By Jill Denny and Jeff Chen
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
02/06/14
02/06/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo SOLD!
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB LOUNGE exercise machine cost
$100. sell for $25. Call SOLD!
BASEBALLS & softballs 6 in all for only
$5 650-595-3933
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
318 Sports Equipment
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 SOLD!
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
WOMAN'S BOWLING ball, 12 lbs, "Lin-
da", with size 7 shoes and bag, $15.
(650)578-9045
322 Garage Sales
SATURDAY 9:30 - 4pm
750 FRANCISCO ST
EL GRANADA
Power/Hand Tools, Luggage,
Furniture, Yarn, Bedding/Linens,
Camping Equipment, Photo
Equipment, Jewelry, Freezer,
Bicycles, Tiller, and More!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
LAWN MOWER – Solaris Electric Cord-
less 21” self propelled. Excellent work-
ing condition.$85. 650-593-1261
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
REX HOME BUYER SEMINAR
PRESENTED BY SHARPERBUYER
MIKE LYON TO DISCUSS
UNIQUE DOWN PAYMENT
METHODS
Saturday, FEB 8th, 1pm-2pm
850 Burlingame Ave
Burlingame, CA 94010
FREE
RSVP at http://bit.do/rexpresentation
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBILE ‘99 Intrigue, green, 4
door sedan, 143K miles. $1,500.
(650)740-6007.
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2,400 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
ISUZU ‘96 RODEO, V-6, 153K miles,
clean body, red, no dents, immaculate in-
terior. Kenwood stereeo with boom box
included. Great car! Asking $3,750.
SOLD!
TOYOTA ‘05 TUNDRA, 4WD, Access
Cab, low mileage, $14,000. Call Joe
SOLD!
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
FORD WINDSTAR 2002 7-Pass, Prefer-
red Cust Pkg, , Pwr Windows, Hi Mile-
age, Eng Excel Cond. More Features.
$2250/obo (650)867-1122.
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
MA'S AUTO
REPAIR SERVICE
Tires • Service • Smog checks
***** - yelp!
980 S Clarem’ont St San Mateo
650.513.1019
704 N San Mateo Dr San Mateo
650.558.8530
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUNNING BOARDS – Dodge Ram fac-
tory chrome running boards. $99 (650)
995-4222
RUNNING BOARDS- Dodge Ram facto-
ry chrome running boards in great condi-
tion. $99 (650)995-4222
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
MyErrandServicesCA.com
Concrete
Construction
LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955
Dry Rot • Decks • Fences
• Handyman • Painting
• Bath Remodels & much more
Based in N. Peninsula
Free Estimates ... Lic# 913461
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
THE VILLAGE HANDYMAN
Remodels • Framing
• Carpentry Stucco • Siding
• Dryrot • Painting
• Int./Ext. & Much More...
(650)701-6072
Call Joe Burich ... Free Estimates
Lic. #979435
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTER’S CLEANING
• Roof and Gutter Repair
• Screening & Seal
• Replace & New Gutters
Free Est. Call Oscar
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1985
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
L.C PAINTING
(650)271-3955
Interior & Exterior
Sheetrock/Drywall Repair
Carpentry Repairs
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic. #913461
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED
DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters, Faucets,
Toilets, Sinks, & Re-pipes
(650)461-0326
Plumbing
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
Champagne Sunday Brunch
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
President's Day Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
INTERSTATE
ALL BATTERY CENTER
570 El Camino Real #160
Redwood City
(650)839-6000
Watch batteries $8.99
including installation.
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
$29
ONE HOUR MASSAGE
(650)354-8010
1030 Curtis St #203,
Menlo Park
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)
(650)212-2966
1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
www.unionspaand salon.com
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP serving your mid-Peninsula
real estate needs since 1976.
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
BRE LIC# 1254368
Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY
Where every child is a gift from God
K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco
(650)588-6860
ww.hillsidechristian.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
28
Thursday • Feb. 6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
º 0eaI With £xperts º 0uick 8ervice
º 0nequaI 0ustomer 0are
www.8est8ated6oId8uyers.com
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 2/28/14
WEBUY
$â0
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR

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