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The Transition Guide

2012 Edition The Duke MBA Association (MBAA)

Contents
WELCOME........................................................................................................................................................... 5 SECTION 1 PRE-ARRIVAL CHECKLIST ......................................................................................................... 6 IN THE LAST THREE MONTHS ..................................................................................................................... 6 IN THE LAST WEEK ........................................................................................................................................ 7 ON THE DAY OF THE FLIGHT AT THE AIRPORT ..................................................................................... 7 ONCE OFF THE PLANE ................................................................................................................................. 8 SECTION 2A POST-ARRIVAL CHECKLIST FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS .......................................10 VISA REGISTRATION ...................................................................................................................................10 VISIT INTERNATIONAL HOUSE ..................................................................................................................10 SECTION 2B POST-ARRIVAL CHECKLIST FOR ALL STUDENTS .............................................................12 DO IMMEDIATELY ........................................................................................................................................12 DO LATER .....................................................................................................................................................12 SECTION 3 RELOCATION EXPENSE ESTIMATE .......................................................................................14 SECTION 4 CELL PHONES & LAPTOPS ......................................................................................................15 CELL PHONES ..............................................................................................................................................15 LAPTOPS.......................................................................................................................................................15 SECTION 5 BANKING ....................................................................................................................................16 Bank Accounts ...............................................................................................................................................16 Banking Cards................................................................................................................................................16 Checkbook .....................................................................................................................................................17 SECTION 6 FINDING A PLACE TO LIVE ......................................................................................................18 LIVING ON CAMPUS ....................................................................................................................................18 LIVING OFF CAMPUS ...................................................................................................................................18 POPULAR APARTMENTS CLOSE TO FUQUA ...........................................................................................18 TIPS FOR RENTING AN APARTMENT ........................................................................................................21 MOVING IN ....................................................................................................................................................21 SECTION 7 CARS ..........................................................................................................................................22 RENTING A CAR ...........................................................................................................................................22 LEASING A CAR............................................................................................................................................22 BUYING A CAR .............................................................................................................................................22 DRIVERS LICENSE ......................................................................................................................................26 DRIVING IN DURHAM ...................................................................................................................................27 OTHER USEFUL INFO ..................................................................................................................................28 SECTION 8 SHOPPING & EATING OUT ......................................................................................................29

SALES TAX....................................................................................................................................................29 EXCHANGES/RETURNS ..............................................................................................................................29 ALCOHOL & TOBACCO PRODUCTS ..........................................................................................................29 FOOD SHOPPING .........................................................................................................................................29 FURNITURE SHOPPING ..............................................................................................................................32 OTHER SHOPPING ......................................................................................................................................33 RESTAURANTS ............................................................................................................................................34 BARS .............................................................................................................................................................35 SECTION 9 FAMILY & MEDICAL CARE .......................................................................................................37 MEDICAL CARE ............................................................................................................................................37 FOR SPOUSES .............................................................................................................................................37 FOR CHILDREN ............................................................................................................................................37 FOR FAMILY..................................................................................................................................................39 IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH ..........................................................................................................................39 RELIGIOUS RESOURCES ............................................................................................................................40 SECTION 10 SSN & ITIN ...............................................................................................................................43 SOCIAL SECURITY CARD (SSN).................................................................................................................43 INDIVIDUAL TAX IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (ITIN) ..................................................................................44 SECTION 11 HOW TO INTERACT WITH POLICE OFFICERS ....................................................................45 SECTION 12 - U.S. CULTURE ..........................................................................................................................46 Introduction to U.S. Culture ............................................................................................................................46 Independence and Self-Reliance ...................................................................................................................46 Informality.......................................................................................................................................................46 Friendliness and Friendship ...........................................................................................................................46 Invitations and Visiting ...................................................................................................................................47 Giving and Receiving Gifts .............................................................................................................................48 Time and Schedules ......................................................................................................................................48 Tipping ...........................................................................................................................................................48 Sports Terms Used in Everyday Language ...................................................................................................49 Holidays .........................................................................................................................................................52 APPENDIX I CONVERSIONS ........................................................................................................................55 APPENDIX II - Map of Duke Campus ................................................................................................................57

Document Created For: 3

The Fuqua School of Business Incoming Students Duke University, Durham, North Carolina

Document Created: June 2008; Last Revised: June 2012

Editors in Chief: The Duke MBAA International & Diversity Cabinet

Contributors: The Duke MBAA The International Programs Office, Fuqua School of Business

WELCOME
Welcome classmates and new friends to the Duke MBA! Your next two years will be filled with excitement and new challenges. For many, this will be your first time living outside your country, your first time living in the US, or perhaps your first time living in the South. No matter where you come from, the transition to life at Duke can be overwhelming at times. Between your classes, career search, club activities, personal life, and learning a new culture, time has a way of evaporating. This makes it important to settle in to your new life as quickly as possible so that you can focus your full attention on school. Since we have already been through this process, we thought we would provide some guidance. This transition guide provides answers to common questions that students have about getting set up in Durham. It was prepared entirely by students and reflects the experiences and opinions of Fuqua students, not the school itself. This guide is intended for all entering students, however, students moving to Duke from other countries will find the content particularly useful. If you are moving from other parts of the US, the guide can be useful to you in locating an apartment and finding service providers that can help you to settle in to your new home. We also encourage you to visit Durhams official website, explore your new home before arriving.

www.durham-nc.com, in order to

You should use this guide immediately, as some of the advice needs to be acted on before you leave home. You should also read it while you still have access to the Internet, because to limit the length of the document, we have included hyperlinks to other key documents that do a good job of explaining how to perform transition activities. You should print any of these documents that you find useful before you leave home so that you can use them upon arrival. We also know that you might need help with specific issues and may not have time to read the entire guide, so feel free to browse through the dynamic table of contents to find the information you are looking for. If you have other questions, you should contact your Fuqua Buddy who will be able to answer your questions directly or put you in touch with someone who can. We are excited to meet you all soon!

Safe Travels,

The Duke MBAA

http://fuqua.campusgroups.com/mbaa/

SECTION 1 PRE-ARRIVAL CHECKLIST


IN THE LAST THREE MONTHS
Apply for Visa Book and Purchase Airplane Ticket - Some airlines (eg. AA) offer special student tickets, which may only be purchased by showing your F1 visa. - Pay close attention to luggage limitations set by each airline to guide your packing. - Read the information at http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/index.shtm, which lists the rules governing the contents of carry-on luggage and other useful guidance when flying into and within the US. Complete Immunizations - The Duke Immunization requirements can be found here: http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/studenthealth/new-students/immunization-requirements - Vaccines are comparably expensive in the US, eg. 1 dose Tetanus-Diptheria (TD) costs $40. - Be sure to get these done early! TD requires 3 doses, once each month; MMR requires 2 doses, once each month. Health Checkups (including dental and eye)

It is NOT required, but recommended. Also we suggest you bring: a copy of your medical prescriptions (if you take medication regularly) a copy of your health records (if you have serious or ongoing health problems) an extra pair of eyeglasses or contact lenses (if you need vision correction) a copy of your eyeglasses or contact lenses prescription basic medications (e.g. headache, cold) that you are accustomed to using

Additionally, we suggest that you have your prescriptions and health records translated into English. Purchase Parking Permit Online (Instructions will be sent by the school in June) The 751 Parking Lot is close to Fuqua, but is open to very few first year students. The Green Lot is cheaper, but is a 15-minute walk to Fuqua. http://www.parking.duke.edu Apply for Financial Aid http://www.fuqua.duke.edu/financialaid/ Learn to Drive

If possible, get a drivers license from your home country or get an International Drivers License. Learn to Cook

While many people buy lunch at school, youre usually on your own for breakfast and dinner. Purchase Suitcases (Keep the luggage size limitations of your airline in mind when purchasing these.) Follow the instructions of Fuquas Technical Support Center to install the software you need in your computer http://it.fuqua.duke.edu/software.htm Bring a Traditional Costume and Flag of Your Country (not a requirement, but it could come in handy for cultural events at school) Finish Computer Course, Math/Accounting Reviews and Other Pre-assignments. You will find the information and resources you need for these assignments in the Incoming Student Website.

You should complete the Basic Computer Applications course before arriving. Not everyone will need to take the Math and Accounting Reviews, but if you need to, make time to do so over the summer. You will not have enough time to complete these courses after you arrive without considerable stress. Failing to complete these may cause you to miss important events, as your regular course load and career search will occupy nearly all of your time.

Start speaking, reading, writing and thinking in English every day. Feeling comfortable communicating in English is the biggest challenge for many students from non-English speaking countries. A good way of preparing for the speed and dynamics in class, as recommended by the faculty of the Language Institute, is by watching the online videos of talk shows, such as Hardball on MSNBC (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3096434/).

IN THE LAST WEEK


Confirm your flight at least 3 days before your scheduled date Start packing at least 3 days before. Your packing will require a lot of organizing and thinking to prioritize the things that will be worth taking with you and keeping in mind the luggage size and weight limits. Let your bank(s) know about your travel plans so you wont have any problems when using your credit/debit cards and online bank services when arriving in the US.

ON THE DAY OF THE FLIGHT AT THE AIRPORT


Packing Have your name, address and phone number (preferably your US information) written both on the inside and outside of your checked bags. Tie a colorful ribbon on your checked bags to make them easy to identify at your destination. Make sure you get your bags checked all the way to Raleigh-Durham Airport (the airport code is RDU).

Be aware that you will still have to claim bags at your US port of entry (see below section U.S. Port of Entry) and go through immigration, and then pass them on for delivery to RDU. Make sure you do not have screwdrivers, nail files, nail clippers, cigarette lighters, scissors, knives, etc. in your carry-on luggage. They are not allowed on the flight to the US. Be sure you have packed luggage you will carry on the plane in compliance with US Homeland Security regulations, to avoid having liquids and other items confiscated at security. Again, see http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/index.shtm

Things to be Kept with You Important original documents (passport, I-20, visa, tickets, checked baggage tags) Money (some cash- especially some small bills for tipping, traveler's' checks, money order)

Copies of your photos (passport size) Contact addresses and phone numbers

ONCE OFF THE PLANE


Just before you land, the correct local time will be announced set your watch. Once you leave the plane, go straight to the Immigration counter - rush to beat the queue. It might take 30 minutes or longer to get through it. Have your I-20, passport, and visa ready to present.

U.S. Port of Entry Your U.S. port of entry is the first US airport at which you land (usually Miami, NY-JFK / LaGuardia, Atlanta, Chicago, Washington D.C). You will have to clear US immigration and customs there. Before your flight lands (or once you get to the airport), you will be given 2 forms to fill out: o The first is your I-94 Arrival / Departure Card (assuming you are not a US passport holder). It has 2 parts: one is kept by the immigration officer, the other will be given back to you (most officers will staple this to your passport). Make sure you do not lose that small card, otherwise you will have trouble when leaving or re-entering the US. o The second is a Customs Declaration Form, which should be pretty self-explanatory (You will need to declare if you are carrying anything for sale/lots of cash/plants or animals of any sort). Going through Immigration is usually not an issue. You will have photographs and fingerprints taken, and answer a few questions, like Is this your first time to the US? Why are you traveling to the US? Which University? Once you have cleared Immigration, you need to pick up your bags (Note: carts for the bags will cost anywhere between $1 and $5 depending on the airport, so you may want to have a few dollar bills handy to use in the machines. Some places accept credit cards). Take the bags to customs to get them screened. When you locate your bags, give them to airport staff to be put on your next airplane (assuming you are continuing on your trip to RDU). The bag drop-off area is usually a few feet away from the customs area. If for some reason you do not find your bags, don't panic. Go to the airline office counter at the baggage claim area and report your 'lost' bags. They should be able to tell you where your bags are and will have them delivered to you when they arrive. (You will need to provide your address, baggage tags and a description of your bags.) Once you have checked your luggage, it is like flying a local flight within the US. Don't walk out to the arrivals area if you have another flight to catch: If you leave the departure area, you will have to go through security again. You will want to follow signs to the gate/terminal for your next flight.

ARRIVING AT RDU Pick up your bags at baggage claim and find the Airport Taxi station. The taxi fare is calculated by a meter, starting with an initial fee of $3.60, then $2 per mile after that (these prices are subject change and should be listed inside the taxi). It generally costs $35-45 (excluding the tip) from the airport to Durham. You need to tip the driver 10-15% of the cost of the fare. There are some taxi companies that offer a student discount (discounted student fare should be $25-$30 excluding the tip), one of them is called United Yellow and you can call to this number in order to make a reservation for your pick up (you need to say youre a student): +1 8

(919) 667-0000. The International House provides information about transportation in Durham, which can be found in the following link: http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/ihouse/transportation

SECTION 2A POST-ARRIVAL CHECKLIST FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS


VISA REGISTRATION
Register to Comply with Visa Requirements International students have 30 days to register upon their arrival in the U.S. There will also be a mandatory Visa Mass Registration for international students at Fuqua that takes place during the Language Institute and Orientation. The Mass Registration is a good time to handle your Visa Registration, but if for some reason you cannot attend one of the Mass Registration sessions, or you arrive in Durham early and want to do this registration as soon as possible, you can go on your own to the Duke Visa Services Office to register for either the 11am or 3pm sessions, Monday-Friday. Its a walk-in registration, but only offered twice per day, so be punctual! The session lasts approximately 40 minutes. It is highly recommended to do this registration as soon as possible after you arrive, as you need to do the registration before you can apply for your North Carolina Drivers License or ID. Documents to bring: your I-20, Passport with your Visa stamp and I-94 card (white card received at port-ofentry). For more detail, visit http://www.visaservices.duke.edu/

The Duke Visa Services Office is located at: Smith Warehouse: Bay 7-1st Floor 114 South Buchanan Boulevard Durham, NC 27708 Phone (919) 681-VISA (8472) Directions: http://www.visaservices.duke.edu/directions.html

VISIT INTERNATIONAL HOUSE


International House provides a lot of useful information (handouts) to he lp you settle down. Weve used a lot of these handouts in this guide. International House helps international students at all of the schools on campus settle into life at Duke. The International House website is http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/ihouse. The International House is located at the intersection of Campus Dr & Anderson St. 2022 Campus Drive Durham, NC 27708 Phone: 919-684-3585 Fax: 919-684-8241

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Map: http://maps.duke.edu/map/index.php?id=21&embedMrkId=2769&mapOnly=1

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SECTION 2B POST-ARRIVAL CHECKLIST FOR ALL STUDENTS


DO IMMEDIATELY
Purchase a Cell Phone This guide contains a section on how to purchase your cell phone. If you havent purchased a phone before you arrive, you should do so as soon as possible. This will make all of your other tasks a lot easier. Set up a Bank Account This guide contains a section on how to set up your bank account. Arrange for Housing This guide contains a section on housing options around Fuqua. Arrange for Utilities to be Connected See the housing section for a guide on setting up utilities.

DO LATER
Submit Immunization Forms and Complete Health History Online (If you havent done so already.) - You must enter your health history and immunization information online. Log in using your Duke Net ID, then click on the "Forms" link on the left menu bar (https://shc.duhs.duke.edu/). - Immunization requirements: http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/studenthealth/new-students/immunizationrequirements - Fax or submit forms to the Medical Records Office in the Duke Student Health Center. Visit http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/studenthealth/new-students - After submitting your records, if any additional immunizations are needed, you will be notified by message (Note: not by your Duke email, but by a message within the Heath Center Patient website where you completed your health history). Log in using your Duke Net ID (https://shc.duhs.duke.edu/). If you know that you need immunizations, make an appointment or visit the Student Health Clinic. Call for an appointment: 919-681- 9355.

Update ACES Information (address, health insurance decision, etc)

Login to FuquaWorld (http://www.fuquaworld.duke.edu/) using your NetID and password and select ACES Web under Key Links on the left side. Click ACES on the top row in blue.

Submit Surveys and All Other Requirements

You will receive emails over the summer with requirements to fill out some surveys and forms. It is important for you to devote the time needed to complete these requirements in a thoughtful way.

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Place Orders for Your Business Card and Name Tag

Instructions will be sent by the school on how to order these items online. These are essential for recruiting activities which start in September. One box of business cards and one name tag are sufficient. Once you know your cell phone number (the required information for your business cards) you should order these items as soon as possible. You will pick these items up at Orientation.

Apply for a North Carolina Drivers License

This guide contains a section on obtaining your license.

Purchase Used Car, Purchase Car Insurance, Register Car This guide contains a section on transportation.

Obtain Duke ID Card - With this student ID card, you can access Duke/Fuqua facilities after business hours and on weekends. - If you are attending the Language Institute (LI), you can wait until the LI starts, as the LI staff will handle the ID card application and take a photo for you. - Cards will be distributed at Orientation for those people that have already submitted their DukeCard application. If you have not yet submitted an application, you can have your picture taken during Orientation and set up your FLEX account as well. - If you prefer, you can go to the DukeCard office (Bryan Center, 100 West Union Building) - The Card Office is open Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Visit http://dukecard.duke.edu/

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SECTION 3 RELOCATION EXPENSE ESTIMATE


Accommodation Hotel: $70-150 per night First Months Apartment Rent: $400-2,000

Furniture and Household Supplies Mattress (including box spring and frame): $250-500, new. Other Furniture (bookshelf, desk, chair, couch): $200-400, used. Household Supplies (microwave, TV): $100-300, used.

Refundable Deposits (if you dont have a Social Security Number with credit history) Apartment: The equivalent to one month of rent Duke Energy: $200 Secured Credit Card: the deposit depends on the credit limit you want. $300-500 Cell Phone: $400-$500

Car Expenses (see attachment on How to buy a car) Car Rental: $70-150 per week (excluding insurance and GPS) Used Car Purchase: at least $2,500, Medium quality $3,500-5,000, A bit nicer $6,000-10,000 Car Insurance: if this is your first time with a drivers license in the US, youll be treated as a new driver and will get a new driver rate. Rates also vary by type of car. Generally, for 6-months of car insurance, Liability costs $800-1,500 and Comprehensive Coverage costs $1,500-3,000. Mechanics Check (before purchasing a used car): $30-60 Annual Car Inspection (required in North Carolina): $30 License Plates and Registration: varies by car, $150-250/year

Other Monthly Expenses ($/month) Cable: $50 Internet: $30-50 Landline Telephone: $30 Water+Trash+Sewer: $20-25 Electricity: $70-80 in winter/summer, $40-50 in spring/fall Gas: varies by car and use, $60-120 Cell Phone: $60-90 (varies by phone and service)

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SECTION 4 CELL PHONES & LAPTOPS


CELL PHONES
Mobile Phones handouts from International House provide useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/ihouse/living-essentials#node-1185. Remember to update you information in ACES after you get your new phone number.

ALL students should note that many cell phone carriers do not provide good coverage at Fuqua. Verizon and AT&T provide good coverage and are the most common choice at Fuqua. This is important to consider, given that your calls to some classmates will be free they will not count against your allotted minutes, because calls within the network of the same company are free. Duke students are eligible to receive a discount from AT&T.

If you dont have a Social Security Number (SSN) with credit history associated with it, you will need to make a refundable security deposit of $400-500 and commit to a 2-year contract. The security deposit is returned 12 months after the contract is signed.

LAPTOPS
The system requirements for computers at Fuqua can be found using the following link: http://it.fuqua.duke.edu/studentinfo.htm. Prices range from $600 to $2,000 as of 2012. Several options are listed below Location The Duke Store Address The Bryan Center, Duke West Campus New Hope Commons: 5454 New Hope Commons Dr, Durham Southpoint Mall: 7001 Fayetteville Rd # 113, Durham Southpoint Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919 474 6940 www.dell.com http://www.lenovo.com/us/en/ www.hp.com Comments This can be one of the more expensive options. The advantage: extended warranty. Wide range of choices.

Best Buy

Apple Store at Southpoint

The best option to purchase a mac in the area.

Dell website Lenovo website for ThinkPad laptops HP website

Some discounts available, about 2 weeks delivery time.

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SECTION 5 BANKING
Banking handout from International House provides useful information: http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/ihouse/living-essentials#node-1171

If you dont have a bank account in the US, we recommend that you bring an international credit card to use until you do. Open a checking account as soon as possible. You will need to go to a bank to fill out the required forms. Take your passport, I-20 with you, and proof that youre a Duke Student (some banks such as Bank of America offer special packages without monthly fees for students).

Bank Accounts
Checking Account This account allows for easy payment of expenses and may include: an account that you can use every day for deposits and withdrawals and may bear a minimum of interest a checkbook and bankcard (ATM, Debit/Check card) an annual service/maintenance fee at some banks

Some banks offer overdraft protection along with the checking account BY DEFAULT. Overdraft protection is a checking account feature in which a person has a line of credit to write checks for more than the actual account balance. Instead of getting charged about $25 for bouncing a check, overdraft protection will in effect provide the account holder with an instant loan. The interest rate will be extremely high, but if it is paid off quickly it is usually much less expensive than the bounced check fee. Some banks do charge a fee when an account balance falls below zero even if the account holder has overdraft protection, but it's still significantly less than the bounced check fee. If you do not want this option, please explicitly inform your bank to cancel it.1 Savings Account

This account is a safe alternative for storing money you won't immediately need and may include: an account that bears interest at a higher rate than that of a checking account limited usage (e.g. withdrawal limit per month)

Banking Cards
VISA Check/ Debit Card This card looks like a credit card, but the amount you spend will be deducted from your checking account immediately. You can also withdraw money from an ATM with this card (24-hour access). Many banks now combine the check/debit card and ATM card as one card. When you buy something at a grocery store with your check/debit card, you can ask the cashier for "Cash Back". You will receive cash from the register which is then deducted from your checking account. There is no fee charged for this service, however you can only do so when you make a store purchase. This can save you a trip to the ATM machine if you are already at the store and need cash.

http://www.investorwords.com/3544/overdraft_protection.html

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ATM (Automatic Teller Machine) Card

With this card you can withdraw or deposit money through a bank machine (24-hour access). If you withdraw money with your bank's ATM card at another bank's ATM, you will be charged a handling fee of between $2 and $3. You can also get "Cash Back" at the grocery store with this card, but you wont be charged a fee. Note: Wachovia is the only bank that has an ATM at Fuqua and a branch office on campus (in Duke Hospital South on West campus). Bank of America and SunTrust both have an ATM in the Bryan Center which is a 15minute walk from Fuqua. Credit Card

If you dont have a SSN and no established credit history in the US, you can apply for a SECURED credit card that limits your credit to the amount of a security deposit, usually between $300-500. So, if you make a deposit of $500, you can spend up to $500 on your credit card. If you pay your credit card bill on time for several months and build up a credit history, you can apply for a normal (unsecured) credit card and get your deposit back. Bank of America offers such a card.

Checkbook
The checks in your checkbook must have your name and your U.S. address on them. You can write a check to pay your bills, and money will be directly withdrawn from your checking account. When you want to cash a check written out to you, you will need to go the bank with photo identification. You can also deposit checks at ATMs. We suggest that you do not include your drivers license number or any other information besides your name and U.S. address. Below is an example of a check. If you pay an e-check online, the Bank Account Number, Routing Number and Check Number are needed.

The signature line

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SECTION 6 FINDING A PLACE TO LIVE


Finding a Place to Live, Apartments: Near Duke East Campus/West Campus, Near South West Durham, Chapel Hill and Temporary Furnished Housing handouts from International House provide useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/ihouse/living-essentials#node-1179

You may live on campus or off campus. For graduate students, on campus housing is very limited. Most Fuqua students live off campus.

LIVING ON CAMPUS
For more information, visit http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/hdrl/graduate-professional-students

LIVING OFF CAMPUS


A Fuqua alums blog http://www.markrice.com/duke/apartments.htm (scroll down to see specific comments). Note: prices and contacts are probably out of date, but some comments could be helpful. Duke Community Housing does annual surveys among graduate and professional students about their off-campus living experiences http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/hdrl/graduate-professionalstudents/graduate-student-living-campus/neighborhood-and-apartment. Linda Moiseenko works with graduate students to help them find a place to live. Her contact information, phone: 919-684-4304, fax: 919-660-1769, email: Linda.moiseenko@duke.edu. Your Fuqua Buddy can be of tremendous help in figuring out what could be the best place to live for you. Other popular public websites:

http://www.apartmentratings.com/rate/NC-Durham.html http://www.apartments.com/search/?query=Durham,%20NC&stype=CityStateOrZip http://www.rent.com http://www.move.com/apartments/main.aspx http://www.everyaptmapped.com/apartments/durham,north+carolina,nc/,,500,,,,,/rent-1.html

POPULAR APARTMENTS CLOSE TO FUQUA


The most popular choices among Fuqua students: Near East & Central Campus: Station 9, West Village Near West Campus: Lofts at Lakeview, Trinity Commons In South West Durham: Alexan Place, Alexan Garret Farms, Addington Farms, Pinnacle Ridge

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Popular Apartments Close to Fuqua

Apartment Near East & Central Campus Station Nine 2211 Hillsborough Road Phone: 919-286-3800 Fax: 919-286-3833 www.stationnine.com West Village 604 Morgan Street Phone: 919.682.3690 www.westvillageapts.com Near West Campus Lofts at Lakeview 2616 Erwin Road Phone: 919-382-8184 www.LoftsAtLakeview.com Trinity Commons 2530 Erwin Rd Phone: 919-309-1409 www.trinitycommons.com

Number on Map 1

Shortest Lease 9 Months

1 Bedroom ($/month) $940 1185

2 Bedroom

3 Bedroom

$1250 -1905

3 Months

$825-1400

$1000-2000

$1575-2100

3 Months

Studio - $979 1bdrm -$10491449 $955-$1505

$1679- 2399

3 (a block away from The

6 Months

$1805-2410

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The Belmont Luxury Apt 1000 McQueen Dr Phone: 919-383-0801 www.livebelmont.com Colonial Village at Deerfield 910 Constitution Drive Phone: 919-383-0345 Fax: 919-382-8483 www.deerfieldapt.com The Forest 800 White Pine Drive Phone: 919-383-8504 www.theforestapartments.com In West & South West Durham Alexan Place 100 Alexan Drive Phone: 919-490-6990 Fax: 919-490-6998 www.riverstoneres.com choose NC choose Alexan Place at South Square Alexan Garret Farms 240 Ivy Meadow Lane Phone: 919-401-4660 Fax: 919-401-4771 www.alexanfarms.com Note: also has townhomes and cottages Addington Farms 240 Ivy Meadow Lane Phone: 919-246-4656 www.addingtonfarms.com Pinnacle Ridge 3611 University Drive Phone: 919-490-0531 Fax: 919-490-6998 The Parc at University Tower 20 Morcroft Lane Phone: 919-419-9895 Evergreens 5512 Sunlight Drive Phone: 919-489-8788 Colonial Grand at Patterson Place 100 Northcreek Drive Phone: 919-490-6013 Fax: 919-490-4679 www.colonialgrandatpattersonpla ce.com Lenox at Patterson Place (formerly Alta Crest) 100 Rose Garden Lane Phone: 919-401-1912

Lofts) 4

3 Months

$899-919

$1125-1175

Flexible

$660 - 735

$659 - 970

1 Month

Studio -$4991350 1 bdrm -$5991650 $860 - 935

$675-1950

3 Months

$1065- 1170

$1275- 1330

3 Months

$870- 990

$1060- 1120

$1280- 1330

7 (next to Alexan Garret Farms) 8

3 Months

$950

$1190-1447

$1382-1692

3 Months

$591- 750

$800- 840

7 Months

$775-875

$900+up

$1100+up

10

3 Months

$720-750

$900-960

$1000-1029

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3 Months

$635- 900

$875-1000

$1,199

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6 Months

Studio- $575590 1 bdrm-$625700

$750 - 850

$900 - 1000

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TIPS FOR RENTING AN APARTMENT


It is never a good idea to rent an apartment over the phone. We recommend that you visit the apartment, have a friend visit the apartment, or at least ask your Fuqua Buddy to give you recommendations about the place where you want to rent, before signing a contract. Use the list price as a reference and ask for discount, especially for a lease that lasts for 1 year or longer. Some students mentioned they got a discount of 12% to 20% off list price. Some apartment complexes will give a bonus or discount to both the referrer and the applicant. You may want to end your lease in mid May, since every academic year ends on Apr 30. First-years leave for summer internships and second-years hang around until graduation, around May 10. The first floor apartments will be noisy, if air conditioners are outside your window, and there may be noise from occupants above you on all but the top floor. Take a camera along so that you can review specific features of different apartments as you consider your options.

MOVING IN
The Housing handouts include information about utilities, renters insurance and other useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/ihouse/living-essentials#node-1179 Internet Service handout tells you how to get the service http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/ihouse/living-essentials#node-1185

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SECTION 7 CARS
RENTING A CAR
Automobile Rental/Leasing handout from International House provides useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/u7/carrental_doc_11472.pdf

Durham is a car city. Until you buy one, it is convenient to rent a car to get around. If you dont have a US drivers license, check with rental companies to learn whether you can rent using your home countrys drivers license or an international drivers license. When renting a car, you should walk around the car with the service person to look for problems (e.g. scratches, dents). Make sure that you personally check for damage and point out any problems which the employee may miss. When making a rental car reservation, pick a company that has an office in Durham since it will make it easier for you to return the car (note: a taxi from the airport to Durham can cost $30-40. Also note that a rental company can charge you extra for returning the car at a different location from where you pick it up). The following companies have rental offices in RTP and Durham. - Budget www.budget.com - Avis www.avis.com - Enterprise www.enterprise.com (It will pick you up and drop you off to rent a car) - Thrifty www.thrifty.com (Only located in the airport) - Hertz www.hertz.com

LEASING A CAR
A company called First Choice Leasing (http://www.firstchoiceleasing.net/) caters to international visa holders who need a car while staying in the U.S. Leasing and purchasing options are available, in addition to insurance and financing options.

BUYING A CAR
Purchasing a Pre-Owned Car handout from International House provides useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/u7/purchasingpreowned_doc_13389.pdf Purchasing a car can be a stressful and time-consuming experience. July to September (the time before the school year starts) is a peak season for car demand in Durham and prices could be a little higher than those in non-peak seasons. The following 8 steps may help you in the purchase process. 1. Have a Target in Mind What kind of car do you want to buy? 22 A new car or used car?

An automatic or manual transmission car? - A manual car is much cheaper and tends to have fewer problems with the transmission. However, it is more difficult to learn to drive a manual and harder to sell. A Foreign or American car? - Japanese cars are more expensive than American ones due to their reliability (especially after 100K miles). Thus they depreciate more slowly and have a higher resale value. What is your price range?

2. Search for a Car You may buy a used car either from a dealer or from a private owner. Dealer Faster: you have more choices More reliable: dealer has checked and fixed any problems Easier: you can get a temporary car license plate and drive immediately. The dealer can also get the registration and plates for you. More expensive Private owner You have to wait for a good opportunity You must take the risk of any problems the car may have You need to obtain the license plate and registration on your own Cheaper

(1) Dealers When negotiating with a dealer, you need to bargain (the price the salesperson asks for is usually much higher than the amount he expects to collect!) North Carolina sales tax is applied to car purchases. To save some money, choose to get the license plate and registration on your own (the dealer can charge you about 5 times the actual cost to perform that service for you). While there are reputable dealers in Durham, Raleigh has more dealers with a larger variety of cars to choose from, so it may be worth the 30 minute trip. Look for car dealer advertisements in the weekend local newspapers (Durham Herald Sun, Raleigh News & Observer). (2) Private owners Recommended places to find private sellers: www.craiglist.org (Choose NC _ Raleigh/Durham/CH _ For Sale: Cars+Trucks). Many students find their cars here. In the peak season, you should be aware that many other students are also looking at the same postings. When you see a car that matches your requirements, you should contact the owner right away, otherwise the car may be sold before you have a chance to see it. Trading Post is part of Duke List and can be found at dukelist.duke.edu/ A popular post in the Duke community, sometimes you can get a good deal. www.cars.com www.autotrader.com http://autos.yahoo.com intlhouse@duke.edu (Intlhouse Listserv): a closed listserv used by internationals and community members for: selling and purchasing furniture, cars, searching for an apartment, roommate, looking for or

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sharing a ride. While this is a good source of information, you may be bothered by too many emails. Register at: https://lists.duke.edu/sympa/subscribe/intlhouse. Classified ads in local papers (Durham Herald-Sun, Raleigh News & Observer). Students find these resources less useful than Internet resources. Students graduating who are thinking about selling their cars are also worth contacting. Get in touch with students you met during the admissions process and check your class Facebook group to find out about any of these opportunities

Information you need to know from a seller: Total mileage Number of owners Accident history VIN number (Vehicle Identification Number) needed to check the vehicle history Arrange an appointment for a test drive

3. Check the Price You can check car price references at Kelley Blue Book http://www.kbb.com/ or www.edmunds.com. They can help you check whether a price is reasonable. Be careful with the following terms: Trade in Value: the price to sell a car to a dealer Private Party Value: the price of a car sold in private party (also different from seller and buyers perspectives) Retail Value: the price you need to pay to buy from a dealer

Basically, a good price is more than Trade in Value and less than Private Party Value if you buy from a private owner, or less than Retail Value if you buy from a dealer.

4. Check the Vehicle History Before you buy a car, it is important to check the vehicle history report at Carfax (www.carfax.com). You will need the VIN (Vehicle Identification Number, which you will find under the windshield on the dashboard, on the drivers side). Carfax charges a fee for unlimited reports for 30 days. It will tell you where the car has been driven, whether it has been in any reported accidents, whether it has a clean title or salvaged title, etc.

5. Mechanic Check Auto Mechanics handout from International House provides useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/u7/automechanics_doc_12811.pdf If you buy from a dealer, you can ignore this step. If you buy from a private owner, it is very important to have a mechanic check the car for any hidden problems. Based on the mechanics opinion of the cars condition and required repairs, you can decide whether the sellers price is fair and whether to accept the deal.

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One main thing to check is whether the Timing Belt has been changed, which must be replaced at an interval specified by the manufacturer. This interval may vary from 60K miles to 105K miles or comparative age (eg. 7 years), whichever comes first. It costs $300-600 to replace (very expensive!), which mainly you pay for the labor cost to disassemble and reassemble the engine (the belt itself is cheap). Its a good deal for you if the belt has been replaced.

6. Transaction Tip: paying cash will give you more bargaining power. Private owners only accept cash or cashiers check.

7. Buy Auto Insurance Auto Insurance in North Carolina handout from International House provides useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/u7/autoinsurance_doc_20753.pdf All motor vehicles registered in the US must be covered by an automobile liability insurance policy. You should always carry a copy of your insurance policy in the car. For specific requirements check http://www.ncdot.org/dmv/vehicle_services/registrationtitling/insuranceRequirements.html Very few insurance companies accept the drivers license from your home country, which sometimes results in a lower rate, e.g. AIG. For some insurance companies (e.g. Nationwide), each agent may make different decisions regarding whether to accept your driving history from your home country, and accordingly, offer different rates. You should speak with different insurance companies before purchasing insurance. Some international students found the following Nationwide agent accept their prior driving history: Whitehurst Agency, 2806 Guess Rd, Durham, 27705. 919-479-8200 But in general, any drivers license from your home country that is less than 2 years old will be treated as a new driver license and will not result in any discount. Some students have found that it is more expensive to get auto insurance with an international driver license than with a NC driver license. One student commented that he contacted many insurance companies for temporary insurance (insurance that lasted just 2 days) that he then used to obtain his NC drivers license (you must have a car insurance to get a driver license).

8. Title and Registration Tags and Registration for Vehicles handout from International House provides useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/u7/registertags_doc_20452.pdf

Relevant Documents A title is the official document that states the name of the car owner. You receive it when you purchase a new or used car. It is required to register a car in North Carolina and to purchase insurance. It should be kept in a safe place.

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Registration is the official document that states the car is officially registered under your name. You will receive it when you take your paperwork to the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to get the license plate. If you are ever stopped by the police, he will ask for it, so you should keep it in the car (keep a copy at home).

If you buy a car from a private owner First, the owner and you will sign the title in front of a Notary Public, who stamps the title to make the transaction official. You can get this Notary Public service in all banks. Second, you need to go to local Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to register. For specific registration instructions, DMV hours and locations check http://www.ncdot.gov/dmv/vehicle/title/ . Bring your insurance policy number, signed title and money (check or cash).

DRIVERS LICENSE
North Carolina Drivers License, Learners Permit or State ID handout from International House provides useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/DrivingLicense.pdf You can drive in NC with your home country drivers license for about two months. For the requiremen ts to get your NC drivers license, refer to the NC DMV website: http://www.dmv.org/nc-north-carolina/drivers-license.php http://www.ncdot.gov/dmv/driver/

Highlights Written Test and Traffic Sign Test: these need to be taken before the driving test. You need to study the Driver's Handbook to pass these tests. You can download the handbook from the DMV website or buy it from the DMV. Most students find this online study guide very helpful: http://www.jaytomlin.com/NCDMV/2006/09/study_guide.html If you failed a written test or traffic sign test, you can take it again on the next day. But if you failed a driving test, you need to wait for some time (about a week, the DMV staff will advise you) to take it again.

Restricted License: if you can pass a driving test, but have not yet purchased your own car, you can apply for a restricted license. The DMV requires your passport, I-20 and a proof of residency (eg. a lease agreement or utility bill). The DMV does NOT require auto insurance, however a restricted license can ONLY be used with rental cars. When you rent a car, you MUST purchase liability auto insurance from the rental car agency. After getting your own car and purchasing auto insurance, you can change your restricted license to a full North Carolina Drivers License at the DMV. Learners Permit: if you cannot pass a driving test and you havent purchased your own car, you can apply for a learners permit. You can obtain your learners permit by passing the written test and traffic

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sign test. The DMV requires a passport, I-20 and a proof of residency (lease agreement, utility bill). It does NOT require auto insurance. With your permit, you can drive on local roads, but you may only drive on the highway with a licensed driver over the age of 18. After purchasing your own car, auto insurance and passing the driving test, you can upgrade your permit to a full North Carolina Drivers License at the DMV. Full North Carolina Drivers License: if you can pass a driving test, have already purchased a car and have auto insurance, you can apply for your full drivers license. If you take the written test, traffic sign test and driving test at the same visit to the DMV, you can get your drivers license in about 2 hours. The key difference here is auto insurance. You can ONLY apply for a full Drivers License with auto insurance, however, in order to buy auto insurance, you must own a car. For most international students, buying a car may take some time. If you are in this situation, you may want to consider a Restricted License or Learners Permit; they are useful when you dont have your own car but need to drive.

DRIVING IN DURHAM
Before driving anywhere, make sure to have the correct directions. A GPS unit for your car can be very useful. Garmin and TomTom are popular brands. In addition, Google Maps (http://maps.google.com), Yahoo Maps (http://maps.yahoo.com/dd), and Mapquest (www.mapquest.com ) are helpful tools that you can use to find directions around town. What is AAA? American Automobile Association membership gives you access to road assistance, towing, etc. for a low yearly fee. For rates and benefits check its website at http://www.aaacarolinas.com/ What is an Inspection? According to North Carolina law, all cars must be mechanically inspected every year. You can have an inspection performed by mechanics and dealers providing car maintenance service. The inspection fee is standard ($30 in 2012). You must present your car Registration (a small white card mailed to you by DMV after you register your car) when you have your car inspected. It is important that you do not drive a car without a valid inspection. The inspection sticker is typically located on the front windshield, driver's side, and states the month and date of the last inspection. While driving around a smaller city like Durham is relatively easy, it can be a little tricky at times. (1) The following are all different streets and often very confusing for newcomers. Chapel Drive (on campus) Chapel Hill Street (turns into Duke University Road) Chapel Hill Road Chapel Hill Boulevard (commonly called "The Boulevard") Old Chapel Hill Boulevard

(2) The following are also three different streets and often confusing for newcomers. Duke University Road University Drive Duke Street

(3) Duke University Road turns into Chapel Hill Street at Kent Street (with no warning). (4) The freeway that runs through the center of Durham and connects to I-40 is often called 27

The Expressway or East-West Expressway The Durham Freeway 147 or S.R. 147 (S.R. means "State Road.")

(5) "NC 751" is often referred to by the following different names. 751 Cameron Boulevard University Drive Academy Street (After the Washington (WA) Duke Golf Course, NC 751 splits and becomes Academy for a short while before it comes to a "T" intersection to continue as University Drive.)

(6) "Regular" 15-501 is sometimes referred to as "The Bypass." (7) There are two different roads named Erwin: Erwin Road and Old Erwin Road. Erwin Road passes in front of the University Medical Center and eventually becomes Ninth Street. Old Erwin Road (sometimes called "The Erwin Road Extension) is connected to "751/Cameron" and can get you to the town of Chapel Hill. (This is referred to as "the back way to Chapel Hill.") It connects with 15/501 just before Franklin Street. The road sign just says Erwin Road.

OTHER USEFUL INFO


All these handouts from International House provide useful information (http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/ihouse/transportation): Taxis http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/u7/taxis_doc_35591.pdf Bicycles http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/Bikes.pdf Safe Rides http://www.duke.edu/police/services/vanrides.php Parking at Duke http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/u7/parking_doc_10882.pdf Getting Around Without a Car http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/ihouse/transportation/getting-around-withoutcar Getting Around by Bus http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/DurhamBuses.pdf The Duke Parking website also has some useful information on these subjects (http://www.parking.duke.edu)

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SECTION 8 SHOPPING & EATING OUT


In general, for most items in the U.S., the price marked on the item is the price you should expect to pay. A notable exception to this is the purchase of cars. If you have a question about if an item is negotiable, you should ask a sales associate or a classmate.

SALES TAX
In the U.S. each state has its own sales tax, charged as a percentage of the price of your purchase and always printed on your receipt. The price marked on the items you purchase is not the final price, because at the cashier, sales tax will be added. The same is true for the meal you eat in a restaurant. An exception is when you buy gasoline for your car. The amount stated on the pump is the actual amount you will pay. For gasoline, the sales tax is quite high and has already been added into the price. North Carolina charges the following sales tax amounts: 6.75% for all non-food items 2% for all food items

EXCHANGES/RETURNS
In the U.S. most stores accept returns of unworn clothing and unopened merchandise within 30 days of purchase, if you bring the original purchase receipt. Some stores will accept returned opened merchandise with the original packaging and purchase receipt. It is a good idea to ask the cashier about the store's return policy at the time of your purchase.

ALCOHOL & TOBACCO PRODUCTS


In North Carolina there are specific laws regarding the sale of alcohol and tobacco products. You must be 21 years of age or older to purchase alcohol products. Be prepared to show your ID (usually NC driver's license) to prove you are old enough. Grocery stores sell some alcohol products such as beer and wine. Other alcohol products such as brandy, whiskey, and rum are sold in special ABC (Alcoholic Beverage Control) Stores http://www.durhamabc.com/new/index.asp. On Sundays, you cannot purchase alcohol products before 12:00 noon. You must be 18 years of age or older to purchase cigarettes and other tobacco products in North Carolina. Be prepared to show your ID.

FOOD SHOPPING
Grocery Stores handout from International House provides useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/u7/groceries_doc_15098.pdf

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1. Grocery Stores/Supermarkets The following stores offer a large variety of vegetables, meat and groceries. With the exceptions of Super Target and Wal-Mart, most grocery stores offer free customer cards which can save you money on specially marked items. Be sure to get one at the stores customer service area. The store locations listed below are the closest ones to Chapel Hill Blvd. in Durham (close to Alexan Place, Alexan Garret Farms, Pinnacle Ridge and Colonial Village apartment complexes). Target

4037 Chapel Hill Blvd. http://www.target.com Wal-Mart

5450 New Commons Dr. http://www.walmart.com/ Kroger

(several Durham locations) http://www.kroger.com/ Food Lion (several Durham locations)

http://www.foodlion.com/ Harris Teeter

1817 Martin Luther King Pkwy, Commons at University Place http://www.harristeeter.com/ Whole Foods

A natural, organic food supermarket, located in downtown Durham. 621 Broad St. http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com The following discount clubs require a paid membership. These clubs tend to sell items in bulk which may be good for families: Sams Club

4005 Chapel Hill Blvd. (next to Target) http://www.samsclub.com/ Costco

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1510 North Pointe Dr. http://www.costco.com/

2. International Food Stores Asia Market (Chinese food)

2726 Chapel Hill Blvd, Durham Tel: 919-401-6666 Oriental Supermarket (Korean/Japanese food)

4411 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd, Durham Tel: 919-489-5116 Food World (Korean and other Asian foods. Also Central/South American food)

401 E.Lakewood Ave. Durham Tel: 919-680-4282 Little India (Indian food)

http://www.littleindiastore.com/ 4201 University Drive #110, Durham Tel: 919-489-9084 Shilla Oriental Market

http://www.shillamarket.com 2107 Allendown Dr. Durham Tel: 919-484-8244 Dong Yang Jang (Korean food)

3787 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd, Durham Tel: 919-489-5116 Toyo Shokuhin (Japanese food)

www.toyoshokuhin.net 748 East Chatham St. Suite L, Cary Tel: 919-319-1620 31

Compare Foods (Latin American Food) 1233 University Drive, Durham NC 27707 Tel: 919-419-8346

3. Farmers' Markets Farmers markets are a good place to buy fresh, locally grown produ ce, plants, flowers, and specialty items such as jams, jellies, honey, baked goods, and handmade crafts. The Carrboro Farmers' Market is probably the largest market with locally produced and organic goods. Durham Central Park, Durham

Saturdays 8 AM noon, April Nov Wednesdays 3:30 PM - 6 PM, May - Sept 919-484-3084 http://www.durhamfarmersmarket.com/ Carrboro 310 W. Main St. Carrboro Town Commons

Saturdays 7 AM noon, Late March - Dec. 25 Wednesdays 3:30 PM 6:30 PM, mid-April - Oct. 31 http://www.carrborofarmersmarket.com/ State Farmers Market, 1201 Agriculture Street, Raleigh

Sunday 8 AM - 6 PM, year round Monday - Saturday 5 AM - 6 PM, year round http://www.ncagr.com/markets/facilities/markets/raleigh/ Hillsborough Farmers Market, Hillsborough

Saturdays 8 am noon, Late April November, 128 N. Churton St. in SunTrust Parking Lot Wednesdays 4 pm - 7 pm, June Labor Day, 144 E. Margaret Lane in Sheriffs Parking Lot http://hillsboroughfarmersmarket.org/default.aspx

FURNITURE SHOPPING
Shopping handout from International House provides useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/u7/shopping_doc_11566.pdf 32

International House Listserv is also a good resource https://lists.duke.edu/sympa/subscribe/intlhouse The following information is a supplement to International Houses Shopping. Buying used furniture Esther (a really friendly person) sells affordable furniture owned by former Fuqua students. Her number is 919-402-4389.

Buying new furniture Sams Club, Costco, Wal-Mart, Target and K-Mart (4215 University Drive near South Square Mall) sell simple, inexpensive furniture. Rooms to Go, Havertys Furniture, Ashley Furniture, and Roomstore are other popular choices for midrange furniture. The closest IKEA is in Charlotte, North Carolina, which is approximately a 2-hour drive by car.

Renting furniture CORT Furniture Rental, 1905 New Hope Church Road, Raleigh, NC

Mattresses The Original Mattress Factory http://www.originalmattress.com/products/product_detail.asp Furniture Follies slightly damaged, new mattresses and used furniture - http://www.furniturefollies.com/

OTHER SHOPPING
Designer Discount Stores (Sell slightly flawed or discontinued name brand and designer clothes at a discount price) T. J. Maxx: 4600 Chapel Hill Blvd, Durham Marshall's: 5438 New Hope Commons Drive, Durham Old Navy: 5424 New Hope Commons Drive, Durham (similar quality and style as GAP) Ross: 4021 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd, Durham (next to Target) SteinMart: 1800 E. Franklin Street Suite 13, Chapel Hill

Malls Streets at Southpoint: the newest in the city, an upscale mall that has both department stores and brand name stores. It also has a food court, restaurant area and movie theater. For the list of stores go to http://www.thestreetsatsouthpoint.com/ Northgate Mall: features department stores and some brand name stores. http://www.northgatemall.com/

Outlets 33 Carolina Premium Outlets: in Smithfield about 80 minutes east of Durham, the largest in the region http://www.premiumoutlets.com/outlets/outlet.asp?id=48 Burlington Manufacturers Outlet Store: 45 minutes west of Durham http://www.bmocoutlet.com/

RESTAURANTS
Tips are usually from 15% to 20% Places Close to Campus handout from International House provide useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/closetocampus.pdf Restaurants in the Durham area provided by Fuqua CMC http://www.fuqua.duke.edu/mba_recruiting/recruit_now/on_campus/restaurants/

1. Italian Brixx Wood Pizza: 501 Meadowmont Circle, Chapel Hill Cinellis: 604 West Morgan Street Durham California Pizza Kitchen: Southpoint Mall Maggianos: Southpoint Mall Pops: 905 W. Main Street

2. Mexican Toreros: 800 W Main St, Durham El Rodeo: 4215 University Dr, Durham

3. Brazilian Chamas Steakhouse: Brightleaf Square, W Main Street

4. Chinese China Palace: http://www.mychinapalace.com/ 5210 Garrett Rd, Durham Shanghai: http://shanghai.ypguides.net/ 3433 Hillsborough Rd, Durham China Buffet: 3720 Mayfair Street, Durham Pao Lim: http://www.paolim.net/ 2505 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd, Durham NeoChina: http://www.neo-china.com/ 4015 University Drive, Durham Golden China: 1515 North Pointe Drive, Durham Red Lotus: http://www.redlotusasiankitchen.com/ 239 S Elliott Rd, Chapel Hill 35 Chinese: http://35.ypguides.net/ 143 W Franklin St, Chapel Hill Lantern: http://lanternrestaurant.com/ 423 W Franklin St, Chapel Hill 35 Chinese: 1135 Kildaire Farm Rd # 106, Cary

5. Korean Chosun OK: 2105 East NC Highway 54 #A, Durham, 919-806-1213 Vitgoeul: 2107 Allendown Dr. Unit # 101A, Durham, 919-361-9100 Seoul Garden: 4701 #131 Atlantic Ave, Raleigh, 919-850-9984 Korean Garden: 748 East Chatham St., Suite E, Cary

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6. Japanese Fuqua Japanese website provides useful information (in Japanese) http://mbaa.fuqua.duke.edu/aabc/Japanese/restaurant.html Kurama: http://www.kuramarestaurants.com/kuramadurham.htm 3644 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd., Durham. Kanki: http://www.kanki.com/durham.cfm 3504 Mount Moriah Rd, Durham Shiki Sushi: http://www.shikisushionline.com/ Homestead Market, 207 W NC Hwy 54, Durham Yamazushi: http://www.yamazushi.com/index.html 4711 Hope Valley Rd, Woodcroft Shopping Center, Durham Sushi Yoshi: 116 Old Durham Rd., Chapel Hill Oishi: 1129 M Weaver Dairy Rd. (Timberlyne shopping center), Chapel Hill, 919-932-7002 7. Indian Dales Indian Cuisine: www.dalesindiancuisine.com 811 9th St # 150, Durham, 919-286-1760 Sitar Indian Palace: www.sitarindiapalace.net 3117 Shannon Rd # D, Durham, 919-490-1326 Tandoor Indian Restaurant: www.tandoorinrtp.com 5410 Highway 55, Durham, 919-484-2102 Bombay Grill: 2223 E Highway 54, Durham, 919-260-8588 Spice & Curry: 2105 E Highway 54 Ste E, Durham, 919-544-7555 Azitra Indian Fare: 8411 Brier Creek Pkwy Ste 101, Raleigh, 919-484-3939 Udupi Caf: 590 E Chatham St, Cary, 919-465-0898

BARS
Be sure to bring your ID! Bars in Durham Most of Durhams nightlife is in downtown. Some of the places where Fuqua students usually hang out: Satisfaction: 905 W Main Street. Alivias: 900 West Main Street Durham The Tavern: 1900 West Markham Avenue

Others Charlies loud biker bar, live music occasionally Cosmic Cantina - Cheap California-style Mexican food The Federal relaxed atmosphere & good beer Francescas alternative, artsy hangout (no alcohol) James Joyce Durhams own Irish pub Parizade go for desserts and civilized drinks Vita small restaurant (Parizade next door) Vin Rouge Provencal themed bar; romantic atmosphere Six Plates Wine Bar relaxed atmosphere, extensive wine list, and tapas-style food West End Wine Bar - 601 West Main St # East Durham

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Bars in Chapel Hill Duke students also go to Chapel Hill for nightlife. Some of the popular places are: Top of the Hill Restaurant and Brewery: 100 E. Franklin Street. The Library: 120 E Franklin Street. Hes Not Here: 112 E Franklin Street. Baileys Pub & Grille: sports bar, 1722 N. Fordham Blvd (on the way to Chapel Hill).

Others 411 West Classic Italian with great wine Caffe Driade Coffee shop with beer & wine Caribou Coffee great place to read or study Carolina Brewery small, comfortable atmosphere 460 West Franklin Street Spankys casual but trendy restaurant and bar Spice Street Trendy restaurant with varied cuisines and drinks; salsa dancing West End Wine Bar Trendy, sophisticated bar that offers great selection of beer and wine

Do not drive after consuming alcohol. The penalties for driving while intoxicated are severe in the US.

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SECTION 9 FAMILY & MEDICAL CARE


MEDICAL CARE
_ Dentist

and Doctor handouts from International House provide useful information

Dentists: http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/Dentists.pdf Doctors: http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/Finding%20a%20Doctor.pdf Also, the Student Health website provides information on the Health Fee and Insurance: http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/studenthealth

FOR SPOUSES
Information for Spouses, Spouses Group, International Wives Group and Finding a Job handouts from International House provide useful information http://ihouse.studentaffairs.duke.edu/resources/handouts/spousesandchildren.html http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/u7/spousegroups_doc_18171.pdf Fuqua Partners provides support and activities for students significant others. You can find a survival guide targeted towards the needs of partners on their website. Join the Fuqua Partners listserv to receive information on upcoming events. For more information visit http://fuqua.campusgroups.com/partners/about-us/ Fuqua Partners Contacts: President: president@fuquapartners.org Vice-President: vp@fuquapartners.org International Co- Chairs: international@fuquapartners.org Graduate and Professional Student Council (GPSC) has an online handbook for incoming students. You can find it at http://www.duke.edu/gpsc/usefulInfo.html

FOR CHILDREN
Child Care, Daycares & Preschools, Private Schools, Durham Schools and Chapel Hill Schools handouts from International House in the Children section of their website provide useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/ihouse/living-essentials Classification of Schools for Young Children Pre-school: 4 years old Kindergarten: 5 years old st Elementary School: 6 years old start 1 Grade

Day Care Based on location, facilities and program, Duke Childrens Campus (located in Duke University), YMCA Day Care in Chapel Hill, Children's Campus in Chapel Hill and Southpoint Mall are top choices. Below is a specific introduction of Duke Childrens Campus based on some parents experience:

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Only Children's Campus accepts kids less than 3 years old. For Duke Childrens Campus, due to its high demand, it takes about 1 year to get accepted for full-time. In some cases, after a 3-month wait, kids may be accepted for part-time. Childrens Campus operates from 6am to 6pm. Breakfast is usually cereal and served befo re 9am. After breakfast, children either play in the classrooms or teachers read books to them before lunch. Lunch is at noon. From 1pm to 3pm is a 2-hour afternoon nap. There is a theme for every month. All activities, including learning songs and book readings, are based on that theme. Classrooms are also decorated based on those themes. There are a variety of art activities (clay plays, picture drawings). There are unique events on special days, such as Valentine's Day, Thanksgiving Day and Halloween. There is a meeting with teachers twice per year. Through these meetings you can learn about how your child is doing, what activities he/she is interested in and his/her general development.

Physical exams and immunization certificates are very handy if prepared beforehand. There are forms provided by the Day Care online, so you can prepare these before your arrival in Durham. If you come without these forms prepared, you may have a tough time completing them in time, since it may be difficult to contact your local pediatrician and complete these forms via fax. Kindergarten Kindergartens in the US are usually operated by Elementary Schools. Kindergarten is part of the public education system and no additional educational fees are required. Elementary School Elementary School continues from 1st to 5th Grade. 6th grade is a part of junior high school. Duke University is located in Durham but is also close to Chapel Hill (a 20-minute drive). There are different opinions on the quality of education in Durham and Chapel Hill. Some Fuqua students prefer to send their children to Chapel Hill schools despite the distance from Duke. Its best to talk to current parents of students in each school system before making a choice of where to send your child to school, and hence where to live. You can contact current partners at Fuqua to find a parent with children in each system. Most schools in Chapel Hill are similar to each other. Rashkis Elementary School is known for the high number of international students. The school organizes cultural events for different countries to help children better understand each other. The Lincoln Center at Chapel Hill determines which school you kid goes depending on the location of your residence. Registration is very simple. Visit the Lincoln Center with the necessary documents (passport, I-20 forms, proof of residence, immunization certificate, etc) and fill in a form there. It takes about one to two days to register, if school is already in session. If you register during the school summer vacation, at least one week before the school starts, the school will send you an informational pamphlet, and you can prepare accordingly. Lincoln Center 750 South Merritt Mill Road Chapel Hill, NC 27516 Monday Friday

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8am 12noon and 1 4:30pm

FOR FAMILY
International Spouses & Partners and Fun Things to Do in Durham handouts from International House provide useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/ihouse/international-spouses-partners http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/FunThingsRevised.pdf

Fun Things to Do on Campus Bryan Center: 120 Science Drive. It houses the University Store, an information desk, the Gothic Bookshop, three dining facilities, ATM machines, film and performing art theaters, the University Box Office, a post office, and a broadcast studio http://map.duke.edu/building.php?bid=7791 _ choose Facilities for all details Movie: http://www.duke.edu/web/movies/home.html Theater: http://dukeperformances.duke.edu/directions/reynolds-theater Sports: http://www.goduke.com/ Chamber Groups

Duke has an assortment of music ensembles: classical chamber groups, jazz ensemble, wind and orchestral symphonies, several choir groups, and musical companies. Look for posters on campus or look in the Duke Chronicle for information on performances. Duke Craft Center

The craft center offers an assortment of evening courses including photography, jewelry making, quilting, and pottery. Classes are offered at the beginning of each semester. Discounts are available for students and employees. Call 919-684-5578 for more information.

IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH


Durham Technical Community College ESL Classes, English as a Second Language Classes in the Area and Private English Language Tutor List handouts from International House provide useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/career/online-tools-resources/international-studentresources/developing-language-skills-and English as a Second Language (ESL) Durham Tech offers free ESL courses for adults age 18 and over at several locations in Durham. - All new students are required to take a placement test. Seating for the test is on a first-come, first served basis, so arrive at least one hour before the test begins. - If your spouse is interested in taking Fall 2012 courses from Durham Tech, schedule a placement test in Durham or Chapel Hill at the end of July 2012: http://www.durhamtech.edu/html/current/noncredit/esl.htm - Chi-cle: Chapel Hill Institute for Cultural and Language Education. A small institute that offers English classes, located in Carboro. http://www.chi-cle.com/

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Berlitz: 5974 Six Forks Road # A, Raleigh, 27609, 919-848-1888 Private Tutors: see the list of recommended teachers on the International House website Conversational Clubs: International House organizes some English Conversational Clubs and activities for spouses.

Non Credit Courses Duke Continuing Studies offers a variety of courses throughout the year. For updated information on courses, schedules and fees go to http://www.learnmore.duke.edu/ Non Degree Undergraduate/Graduate Courses: you can take courses for audit. For procedures go to http://www.learnmore.duke.edu/academics/undergraduate/ Durham Techs Continuing Education Department offers a variety of educational opportunities to Triangle residents in technical and professional areas. For specific information go to http://www.durhamtech.edu/html/corporate/ Durham Arts Council (www.durhamarts.org) offers courses like photography, drawing, digital arts and design. Ninth Street Dance (www.ninthstreetdance.com) offers dance classes.

RELIGIOUS RESOURCES
Spiritual Resources Off Campus handout from International House provides useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/u7/spiritual_resources2011_pdf_57553.pdf Duke Campus Religious and Spiritual Institutions http://www.chapel.duke.edu/ BAHAI Raleigh Bahai Center 212 Linden Avenue, Raleigh Tel. 546.0922 www.bci.org/raleigh BUDDHIST Piedmont Karma Thegsum Choling Tibetan Buddhist Meditation 35 Perkins Drive, Chapel Hill, 27514, tel. 933.2138 www.piedmontktc.org Durham Meditation Center (W) Theravada, especially Vipassana meditation 1214 Broad Street, #2, Durham, 27705 Tel. 286.4754 Teacher: John Orr Email: bodhi@duke.edu Durham Shambala Center (W) Tibetan, Kagy 733 Rutherford Street, Durham, 27705 Tel. 286.5508 http://www.shambhala.org/centers/durham/ Kadampa Center for the Practice of Tibetan Buddhism 5412 Etta Burke Court, Raleigh, 27607 40

Tel. 919.859.3433 http://www.kadampa-center.org/ Buddhist Community at Duke (W) We welcome Buddhists and non-Buddhists from different backgrounds, as well as people who are just curious http://www.duke.edu/web/meditation/ CHRISTIAN African Methodist Episcopal Mt Olive AME Zion (W) 1515 West Club Boulevard, Durham, 27701 Tel. 286.4068 Baptist First Baptist Church (W) 414 Cleveland St., Durham, 27701 Tel. 688-7308 www.fbcdurham.org Watts St. Baptist Church (W) 800 Watts St., Durham, 27701 Tel. 688-1366 www.wattsstreet.org Catholic Immaculate Conception (W) 810 W. Chapel Hill St. Durham 27701 Tel. 682-3449 www.ic.durham.org Holy Infant 5000 Southpark Dr. Tel. 919-544-7135 Saint Thomas More Parish 940 Carmichael St Tel. 919-942-1040 http://church.st-thomasmore.org/ Episcopal Saint Josephs Episcopal (W) 1902 W. Main St., Durham 27701 Tel. 286-1064 www.saintjoseophsdurham.org Asbury United Methodist (W) 806 Clarendon St., Durham 27701 Tel. 286-0711 www.asburyunitedmethodist.com Duke Memorial United Methodist (W) 504 W. Chapel Hill St., Durham Tel. 683- 3467 www.dukememorial.org Trinity United Methodist (W) 215 N. Church St., Durham Tel. 683- 1386 www.trinitydurham.org

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Presbyterian Blacknall Presbyterian (W) 1902 Perry St., Durham 27701 Tel. 286-5586 www.blacknallpres.org First Presbyterian Church 305 E. Main St., Durham Tel. 682-5511 www.firstpres-durham.org Trinity Avenue Presbyterian (W) 927 W. Trinity Ave., Durham Tel. 682- 3865 www.trinityave.org Orthodox Greek Orthodox Church of Saint Barbara (W) 1316 Watts St. Durham, 27701 Tel. 682-1414 www.stbarbaraschurch.org Unitarian Universalist All Souls Church (W) 724 Foster Street, Durham 27701 Tel. 956-8494 www.allsoulsdurham.org Eno River Fellowship 4907 Garrett Rd, Durham 27707 Tel. 489-2575 www.eruuf.org Home Group Church Dayspring Fellowship (W) 922 Ninth Street, Durham 27705 Tel. 286-3135 www.dayspringfellowshipnc.org HINDU Hindu Society of North Carolina 309 Aviation Parkway, Morrisville, NC 27650 Tel. 919.481.2574 http://www.hsncweb.org/ New Goloka (ISKON) 1032 Dimmocks Mill Rd, Hillsborough 919-732-6492 http://www.newgoloka.com/ Sri Venkateshwara Temple 9421 Chapel Hill Road, Durham 919-468-0040 ISLAMIC Masjid Of Jamaat Ibad Ar-Rahman 3034 Fayetteville St., Durham, 27702 Tel. 683.5593 www.ibadarrahman.org Ar-Razzaq Islamic Center (W) 1009 Chapel Hill St. Durham, 27701 Tel. 493-1230 Islamic Center of Raleigh 42

808 Atwater St., Raleigh 27607 Tel. 919.834.9572 iar1@bellsouth.net www.islam1.org JEWISH Beth-El Conservative & Orthodox Synagogue (W) 1004 Watts St. Durham, 27701 Tel. 682.1238 www.betheldurham.org Chabad of Chapel Hill (Orthodox) Rabbi Zalman Bluming Chabad of Chapel Hill/ Duke University 919-630-5129 http://www.chabaddch.com/ Judea Reform Congregation 1933 W. Cornwallis Rd, Durham 27705 Tel. 489.7062 www.judeareform.org The Freeman Center for Jewish Life (Duke University) Corner of Campus and Swift jewishlife@duke.edu 919-684-6422 http://fcjl.studentaffairs.duke.edu NON-DENOMINATIONAL Faith Fellowship Church (W) 1323 Watts Street, Durham 27705 Tel. 682-3158 IMANI MCC (W) 1419 Broad Street, Durham 27705 Tel. 403-6881 SIKH GURUDWARA The Sikh Gurudwara of North Carolina 3214 Banner Street, Durham 27704 Tel. 220.0630 http://www.sgncweb.org/

SECTION 10 SSN & ITIN


SOCIAL SECURITY CARD (SSN)
Applying for a Social Security Number handout from International House provides useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/SSN.pdf With F-1 visa, you can ONLY apply for SSN in these situations: 43

You MUST have been in the USA for at least 10 days. When you get a job (either part-time or full-time, on campus or off campus), you can apply for it within one month before your start date.

INDIVIDUAL TAX IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (ITIN)


Obtaining an ITIN handout from International House provides useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/sites/default/files/u7/itin_doc_10762.pdf

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SECTION 11 HOW TO INTERACT WITH POLICE OFFICERS


Safety section from International House provides useful information http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/ihouse/living-essentials Please read carefully the following paragraphs extracted from a document prepared by the Fuqua International Center in 2001. The men and women of the Police Force, Highway Patrol, and Sheriff's Office are here to protect and help you. They are professionals and expect to be treated with respect. You will find that your contact with law officers will be much more pleasant if you are polite. Below are a few rules and guidelines for communicating with law enforcement officers. When speaking with a law enforcement officer, it is polite to address him/her with "Sir" or "Ma'am" or "Officer." If a law enforcement officer asks you a question, it is polite to answer with "Yes, Sir," "No, Sir," or "Yes, Ma'am," "No, Ma'am." Also, if you are stopped for a traffic violation, do not argue or negotiate with the officer. Absolutely never offer a member of law enforcement money. This is considered a bribe and a serious legal offense. You could go to prison for trying to bribe an officer. If you should get a traffic penalty ticket, you do not pay the officer. Penalty tickets can be paid by mail or directly at the court office. If an officer in a marked law enforcement car is following you with its blue light on, you should slow down and stop your car on the shoulder of the road as soon as it is safe to do so (see below). If you are stopped by the police, DO NOT get out of your car!!! If you get out of your car, the officer may think you are trying to run away or to attack, and he may pull out his gun for protection. Stay in your seat, keep your door closed, but roll down your window, and keep your hands on the steering wheel where the officer can see them. The officer will walk up to your car, identify himself or herself, and ask for your driver's license and car registration. Do not make any sudden moves. Be sure to tell the officer from where you will get your license and registration (glove compartment, purse, etc.) and do so calmly. Follow the officer's instructions. If an officer in an unmarked (unidentified) law enforcement car is following you with its blue light on, you should slow down and indicate that you will stop. You should stop in a populated place and remain in your car (see above). If a car flashing a blue light is following you at night on a lonely road, do not stop, but continue to drive slowly and put on your emergency flashing lights. Particularly, if you are a woman driving alone, you should continue to drive slowly to a well-lit, populated area such as a store or gas station. When you come to a stop, stay in your car and roll down your window just enough to give the officer your driver's license and car registration. If the officer asks you why you did not stop immediately, apologize and explain that in the dark you could not see if he was really an officer. In order to be safe, you waited until you came to a well-lit, populated area before stopping.

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SECTION 12 - U.S. CULTURE


(Section 12 is extracted from a document prepared by the Fuqua International Center in 2001.)

Introduction to U.S. Culture


Adapting to totally new surroundings can be quite challenging. Knowledge about U.S. culture can make this challenge a little easier. The most important thing to remember is that being different is not being wrong, it is only being different. Also, people are sometimes intimidated by difference and therefore may react to difference in an unexpected manner. All our lives we have been conditioned and socialized by our culture, and we make automatic judgments about people and situations based on this socialization. Often we are not even aware of this process, because it is so much a part of who we are. Part of the pain of culture shock is when we are forced to experience and realize that our cultural socialization may no longer serve our purposes well in a new culture. This realization can be the turning point toward a positive experience, by embracing new ideas and new ways of doing things, by accepting that different ways are not wrong, they are just different. Also, you should realize that during your time in the U. S., you are playing an important role in intercultural understanding. Just as you may tend to think that the Americans you meet are representative of all Americans, many Americans and other internationals may tend to think that you are representative of the people of your culture. In some small way, you and your family are ambassadors for your country. We sincerely hope that the following pages will help to explain some of the strangeness or difference you may experience, and that this information will help make your transition into U.S. culture a little easier.

Independence and Self-Reliance


Two important U.S. American values are independence and self-reliance. These values are identified with strength. People in the U.S. may prefer to do something themselves rather than ask for help, as they do not want to impose on another person. They do not like being dependent on others, or having others dependent on them. Also, U.S. Americans sometimes feel uncomfortable if someone seems too needy, calls too often, or wants to get together every day. They may wish to spend less time with their friends or extended families than is usual in other cultures. This can create a misunderstanding with people from cultures with more interdependent relationships, who assume more obligations from friends. It is good to keep in mind that in the U.S. the individual is often more important than the group or family.

Informality
American culture may be much less formal than your culture in regard to clothing, relationships between people, and methods of communication. If you come from a more formal culture you may initially think this is a lack of respect or lack of concern for rules of society. However, the rules of American society permit this informality. One sign of this informality is that Americans frequently use first names, even when they are introduced for the first time. If people are approximately your own age, you are expected to address them by first name. For a person who is clearly older than you or for a teacher, professor, or "boss," it is better to use Mr., Mrs., Ms., Dr., or Professor with their family name when you address them. They will then let you know if and when it is okay to address them by their first name.

Friendliness and Friendship


For people who go to work or study in another culture, especially in a culture that is very different from their own, making friends in the new culture can be very difficult. In the United States, international visitors may have an impression that all U.S. Americans are extremely friendly people; however, they are disappointed and hurt by what seems to be a superficial interest and friendliness by U.S. Americans. There is a big 46

difference between friendliness and friendship. Although U.S. Americans are warm and approachable at first, it is often hard to get beyond the initial small talk and establish a close friendship. Because of this initial friendliness, many international students may think that the friendliness of U.S. Americans is superficial and that Americans do not know how to be friends. What the international student may not realize is that they have not yet reached the stage of being good friends with the U.S. American. They need to go over some higher walls before reaching the center and a good friendship. Alternatively, U.S. Americans living in a country where people are more reserved and not as initially friendly as in the U.S. may sometimes become discouraged about ever making friends in that country. They may feel that people in their host country are very unfriendly. In the United States, there are no words to differentiate the wide range of "friendly" relationships. The single term friend may be used to introduce a classmate, an acquaintance, or a close friend. Americans have different types of friends, friends just to do activities with, close friends, and best friends. In some countries, people reserve the word friend for a few people who are very close. Therefore, your understanding of what a friend represents may be different from the way the word is used in the U.S. In this country friends are not expected to do everything with one another all the time. We hope this information does not discourage you from trying to make friends with U.S. Americans, since most are very accepting of new people into their social groups. One of the best ways to meet Americans is by doing something with them. Americans prefer doing something as they are getting to know people. Whether youre eating, dancing, singing, working out, or cooking, doing an activity makes people more comfortable and willing to talk.

Invitations and Visiting


At some point during your time here, you may receive an invitation from a U. S. American either verbally or in writing. You should always answer a written invitation, especially if it says "RSVP" which is French for "please reply." It is not impolite to say no to an invitation if you cannot come or do not want to attend. However, if you say yes, then you are expected to come. Saying yes to an invitation and then not attending is considered very impolite and rude. It is acceptable to ask your host about appropriate clothing to wear (formal or informal) and if there is anything you can bring (for example, food). Also, at the time that you accept the invitation, you should let your host know if you have any dietary restrictions. For dinners and special parties, it is important that you arrive on time. If you will be late for more than 15 minutes, it is polite to call your host to explain that you will be arriving late. It is not necessary to bring a gift unless it is a special occasion like a birthday or at Christmas. However, it is always a good idea to ask your host if there is anything you can bring. When you are invited to someone's home, you may always ask if there is anything you may do to help in preparing the meal or cleaning up afterwards. If you are invited as a houseguest to stay for several days, it is nice to bring a small gift, such as flowers or wine. When you visit an American home, especially for dinner or a party, you may be asked what you would like to drink. You do not need to drink an alcoholic beverage if you do not wish. Some homes may not even serve alcoholic beverages. If you have been invited for dinner, in the U.S. it is polite to leave one or two hours after dinner is over, unless a special party has been planned or you are asked to stay longer. It is very formal and polite to send the host and hostess a thank you card or note saying how much you enjoyed the evening. If the dinner was more informal, it is okay to call or e-mail the host and thank him/her for a wonderful time.

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"Potluck" or "covered dish" dinners are very common in the U.S. These terms usually mean that each guest or family member brings part of the meal. The person organizing the dinner will tell you what part of the meal (salad, vegetable, meat, or dessert) you are expected to bring. It is a great idea to bring a typical dish (food) from your country. For American students, parties (not dinner parties) usually begin later in the evening, sometimes after 8 or 9 pm and last for several hours. These types of parties are usually very informal and it is not so important to be on time or to dress appropriately. At student parties, most people wear jeans or shorts and T-shirts. It is a good idea to ask the person having the party if there is anything you can bring. American students generally like to drink beer and eat "munchies," which are potato chips, corn chips, pretzels, etc. Sometimes you may be asked to "pitch in when the hat goes around," which means that your host expects the guests to contribute a few dollars to help pay for the refreshments.

Giving and Receiving Gifts


Americans generally give gifts only to family members and close friends. Although it is acceptable to give a gift to a host or hostess or to someone who is a casual friend, it is not required or usual to do so. Also, it is not common to give gifts to people in official positions. Such gifts may be misunderstood as a way to gain favor or special treatment, which is considered inappropriate. It is more common to send and receive cards, especially thank you cards. In the U.S., special occasions for gift giving are Christmas, birthdays, weddings, graduations, and the birth of a child. Wedding showers (a party before the wedding to give gifts) and baby showers (a party before the birth of the child to give gifts) are quite common. Gifts are also sometimes given to someone who has moved into a new house or is moving away. Gifts are not expected to be very expensive. Usually people give something that the recipient needs, wants, or would enjoy. Greeting cards are more appropriate for someone who is not a close friend. In the U.S., people usually open gifts in the presence of the giver. After opening the gift, it is appropriate to say thank you. If you have opened the gift in the absence of the giver, you should send a thank you note specifically mentioning the gift. Sending thank you notes is very important and lets the giver know that you liked the gift.

Time and Schedules


In the U.S. it is usually acceptable for you to call someone at home between 9 am and 9 pm. Most U.S. American families do not like to be called during the evening dinnertime, which can be any time from 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm. Most businesses have office hours from 8 am to 5 pm, and many stores are open until 9 pm at night. Many larger stores are open on Sunday, but usually only from about 1 pm to 6 pm.

Tipping
The question of whom to tip and how much can be confusing since custom may be quite different in your country. As a rule, you should always remember to give a tip to 48 Waiters/waitresses* (15-20 percent of the total amount of the bill) Bartenders and cocktail waitresses (10 percent of the bill) Parking valets (one or two dollars for bringing your car) Hairdressers and barbers (10 to 15 percent) Shampoo person (one dollar) Taxi drivers (10 to 15 percent) Coat room attendants in restaurants and theaters (a dollar)

Bellboys in hotels (a dollar per piece of luggage carried) Luggage carriers in airports and train stations (a dollar per piece of luggage carried in addition to any fees already charged by the airline) People in large cities (such as NYC and LA) tend to expect larger tips as the cost of living is higher

Although the tip is not added to your bill in the restaurant, a tip is expected and needed by employees who rely on them for a large part of their income. Wait staff is usually not paid minimum wage. If the restaurant service has been satisfactory, you should leave a tip in cash on the table before you leave or add it onto the credit card bill. Tips are generally 15%, but may even be 20% in larger cities or more expensive restaurants, or for exceptionally good service. Tips are not expected in "fast food" restaurants or cafeterias.

Sports Terms Used in Everyday Language


(The sports section provided courtesy of Dr. John B. Jensen and the American Translators Association) Sports play an important role in U.S. culture. This importance is reflected in the frequency that sports terms are used idiomatically in both business and social settings. If you are working or studying on a team with U.S. Americans, you may find the following tables helpful in understanding your team members.

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Holidays
Holidays are very important in the U.S. They reflect the mixture of the many cultures that contribute to this country. In order to be as comprehensive as possible and to promote ethnic and cultural awareness, we have included national, popular, and ethnic and religious holidays in Table 1. On observed holidays, government offices, post offices, public schools, and most banks are closed. Company and university observance policies may be different from those of the government. Refer to Fuqua 2012-2013 Academic Calendar for holidays observed by Fuqua: http://www.fuqua.duke.edu/student_resources/academics/academic_calendars/daytimecalendar-2013/

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APPENDIX I CONVERSIONS
Liquid Measure Conversions 1 Gallon = 2 Half Gallons, 4 Quarts, 8 Pints, 16 Cups Cups x 0.237 = Liters Ounces x 0.0296 = Liters Liters x 4.23 = Cups Weight Conversions (Goods) When shopping, here are a few basic weight relationships to keep in mind. 454 U.S. Grams (gm.) = 1 U.S. Pound (lb.) = 16 ounces (oz) ~ 1/2 Kilogram (Kg) Conversion Formula: Ounces (oz) x 28.349 = Grams (g) Grams (g) x 0.0353 = Ounces (oz) Temperature Conversions - Celsius (C) to Fahrenheit (F) Formula: Fahrenheit = Celsius x 9 5 + 32 Celsius = Fahrenheit 32 x 5 9 Distance Conversions Conversion Formula: Miles = (Kilometers 8) x 5 1 Mile = 1.61 Kilometers 1 Kilometer = 0.62 Miles Weight Conversions (People) Formula: Kilograms (kg) x 2.2 = U.S. Pounds (lbs.) U.S. Pounds (lbs.) x 0.45 = Kilograms (kg) Height/Length Conversions 12 inches (in.) = 1 foot (ft.) = 2.54 cm 3 feet (ft.) = 1 yard (yd.) = 30.48 cm Often symbols are used to express feet and inches. For example, if you are five feet and eight inches tall (68 inches), it could be written as: 5 ' 8 " U.S. Time Zones These time zones are given from West to East. Please note that Durham is in the Eastern Standard Time

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Zone (EST) and participates in Daylight Savings Time, a system of time keeping where clocks are set ahead one hour in the spring and set back again one hour in the fall.

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APPENDIX II - Map of Duke Campus

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