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CONCEPT PLAN / TEC SUBMITTAL ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES NEW MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

MEMORIAL LIBRARY
DCPL-2013-RFG-0004 FEBRUARY 7, 2014

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CONCEPT NARRATIVE
A LEGACY OF TRANSFORMATION In 1972, when the DC Central Library was dedicated to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., it was the first central library in a major US city named for an African American. Dr. King’s passionate appeals for social justice and freedom for all Americans galvanized our nation, bringing about extraordinary change within what had been tightly structured social constraints. His vision for a new world— shared in fiery speeches, deeply insightful writing, and nonviolent protest—was powerful and yet controlled and dignified. His legacy has been nothing short of transformational. The architect behind the building dedicated to this legacy, Mies van der Rohe, is himself connected to transformational works. After leaving Nazi Germany in 1937 to escape intellectual and artistic repression, he found in America a new beginning for his vision of a modern architecture. Mies aspired to create architecture with a structural order carefully balanced against the freedom of free-flowing open space. The rigorous and disciplined approach that he brought to his buildings was particularly well suited to the highly ordered character of mid-Twentieth Century libraries. His design of the DC Central Library placed the primary programmatic elements within the order of the structural grid, creating dynamic open vistas into and through the building. One could say that Mies applied his design tenets in a powerful and yet controlled and dignified manner. While these two Twentieth Century giants stand apart by circumstance, both Dr. King and Mies van der Rohe dedicated themselves to leveling hierarchies and overturning long-standing traditions. Moreover, their names have been, and will continue to be, connected through this landmark building. Indeed, the links between King and Mies—their powerful yet controlled and dignified approaches to their respective life’s work—have influenced our approach to the design of this new library. In recognition of Dr. King’s legacy of freedom and equality, the DC Central Library must be a public place for all. This imperative means universal access to collections, services, technology, tools and partnerships to acquire the skills to be successful. The streetscape that migrates from the city grid into and through the building reinforces this connection between our collective success and the resources we put into action. Our vision includes a visual reminder of Dr. King’s caution that “change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle.” A new mural, set to the scale of the Library’s newly expanded atrium, is visible from all points and supported by interpretive elements that reinforce the civil rights leader’s commitment to action and transformation. Reflecting Mies’ belief that “architecture is the will of an epoch translated into space,” we must first accept that our time has evolved. The reimagined Library will feature interconnected, free-flowing space carried vertically throughout the building. Our design respects the materiality of the ground floor/plaza. We will fully preserve one gracious reading room and deploy subtle detailing to help unfold a bold new future for the Library as a whole. We believe historic preservation is not an obstacle to be overcome but, rather, an opportunity to be seized and celebrated. The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library will, in its new form, continue to serve as an important memorial to the civil rights leader and a source of pride for the AfricanAmerican community. Building upon DC residents’ strong connection to this Library, we propose an assertive design that connects the Library to its vibrant host city while acknowledging its important position in our nation’s capital. A VIBRANT LANDMARK The Library not only serves the city and its people, it embodies the tangled complexities and wonderful diversity of the urban landscape. It is a microcosm of the city, imbued with rich resources that inspire residents to explore, connect, participate and create. It is also an intellectual extension of the city street—a public intersection where people share ideas and knowledge. As this historical landmark building, inextricably tied to the powerful legacy of its namesake, moves toward a new,
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transformational library design, our vision celebrates the vitality of the people who move through and around the nation’s capital. Markets, parks and public plazas are the vibrant centers of our cities. As one of the most public of buildings, the Library must embrace the ethos of those types of spaces. The corner of 9th and G streets is a dynamic intersection. Because of the staggered streets, the Library enjoys a high level of visibility, especially from the Verizon Center. Moving toward the building, residents and visitors alike pick up visual cues that something exciting is going on there. The color and materiality of new library spaces and programs are visible through and above the building’s restored façade. This effect is accentuated during the evening hours with interior and exterior lighting. We are not designing a monument to architecture. We are creating an urban stage—knowledge parks and resource markets—that showcases people engaging people. We are desegregating the silos of information and knowledge by creating hybrid places for sharing and connecting at the core of the library—the street that runs through the building. A PLACE OF ACTION AND IDEAS Like the streets that bring residents and visitors to its door, the Library is a place for engagement and creativity. It is a place of action and ideas. It provides customers the opportunity for exploration, participation, creation and connection. The visitor experience begins outside and continues as pedestrians are drawn into the main entrance. Subtle modulations in the existing granite pavers pull patrons into the generous vestibule and foyer to reveal the expansive atrium lobby, creating the quintessential “Aha!” moment. From this vantage point, the concept of “the landscaped path” becomes fully apparent. Cascading stairs and landings are punctuated with plantings, guiding visitors toward the major program components that are easily visible and accessible. The rooftop gardens and residential units are visible from longer views toward the Library. A café, amphitheater, and pedestrian walkway animate the roof program with constant activity. Moving toward and through the building, visitors immediately feel the organic connection from city to street— then street to Library—then Library to rooftop gardens, and back again. If a residential development were to be extended above the Library, the bucolic nature of the roof plane would provide an amenity that could also be enjoyed by those living on the upper two floors.

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Ever-present throughout the building is the “cloud”—a floating volume of creative production and interactive engagement, a “community kitchen” of ideas and innovation. The cloud houses new library programs associated with sharing, innovation and prototyping. The street extension that ascends through the Library extends over the top of the cloud to create new rooftop destinations, including an indoor/outdoor café, amphitheater, community gardens, and an urban oasis for relaxation above the bustling streets below. Physical displays and new media stream down core walls as if new data were precipitating from the cloud to mix with the more traditional collections below. As suggested in your own program document, the spaces and activities in the cloud do not exist in the Library today, or even in other libraries. Like the water vapor of actual clouds, it is an ever-changing frontier serviced by robust infrastructure in highly flexible, column-free spaces. The cloud maintains operational flexibility, as it can be accessed by an independent set of elevators that are outside the secure boundary of the Library. THE LIBRARY OF THE FUTURE Even as we look to create the Library of the future, we acknowledge that the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library’s legacy of transformation is embodied in its historically protected spaces. Mies created open vistas into and through the building that he then punctuated with finely crafted objects anchoring particular programs. This concept worked exceptionally well at the ground-floor level but has presented challenges as library components were positioned vertically on five floors. We believe in preserving this spirit of connectivity with new vistas that bridge the full vertical extent of the Library.

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CONCEPT PLAN TEC SUBMITTAL ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES | NEW MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMORIAL LIBRARY

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STUDIOS + FREELON

CONCEPT NARRATIVE (CONT.)

SITE PLAN

10TH STREET

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As we arrived on the concept of landscape and the reimagined Library, we were inspired by this idea of connections—to the city, to new experiences, to knowledge and to community. Creating an experience of transformation and animation is what drives the programs in the “new” Library: the blurring of landscape and program; light-filled spaces showcasing dynamic and creative offerings; people, once relegated to elevator and stair cores, now circulating through a landscape of people-activated spaces. The ground floor is still organized around fixed service points that acknowledge the building’s original scale and materiality, but new programs will physically reach down and through the structure to breathe fresh vitality into the arrival hall, which becomes a crossroads of old and new orders. Particularly as access to information through technology continues to expand, the library of the twenty-first century must be able to adapt to new ways of accessing, using and sharing information. The place where knowledge is sought and shared is critically important. The popularity of coffee shops and other informal gathering spaces is evidence that many people in urban settings seek out places to gather outside the home and workplace. Libraries can offer that “third place” with a potentially unlimited range of resources and services. The building evolves into a microcosm of the city, a place for all to enjoy and experience. Preservation is as much about protecting the founding institution as it is about maintaining its original fabric— each adapts to create a new composite experience where the past is informed by the future and vice versa. Our concept highlights the rationality of Mies with the passion and creativity of Dr. King while positioning the Central Library to play a vital role within the social and physical fabric of the city.

G PLACE

G STREET

NEW NEW URBAN URBAN PLAZA PLAZA

CONCEPT PLAN TEC SUBMITTAL ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES | NEW MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMORIAL LIBRARY

9TH STREET

STUDIES
LIBRARY (PUBLIC)

DESIGN COLLABORATION
Inherent in the STUDIOS + FREELON culture is our shared belief in the benefits of collaboration. Collaboration to us means a true partnership, from visioning and design through implementation. Such a partnership is by no means the simplest way to approach the design process, but through experience we have learned that it is key to realizing the best results. A successful collaboration requires that team members possess mutual trust and a willingness to challenge each other. Design excellence results when team members leverage their expertise and maintain a strict focus on the success of the project. Our firms’ commitment to achieving design excellence through a collaborative approach makes STUDIOS + FREELON enthusiastic about our partnership on this project. Bringing together FREELON’s expertise with libraries (MLK in particular) with STUDIOS expertise with driving mixed-use development projects provided us with an immediate benefit — leveraging our individual strengths into a collective, unified vision for the entire project. Our entire process for this design competition involved an integrated team approach. We conducted our first design charrette at STUDIOS’ office where the team narrowed our focus to three case studies for further exploration: the Carve Scheme, the Invert Scheme, and the Continuous Landscape Scheme. Between design charrettes, inter-office idea exchanges occurred daily through webex meetings, emails, and video conferences. Our second design charrette took place at FREELON’s office. During this day-long design session, the team carefully evaluated the value of the design schemes. Although each scheme possesses sufficient merit for future exploration, we chose to pursue the Continuous Landscape scheme. This scheme creates an architectural expression that is intentionally distinct from the historic library. The strength of this scheme is its ability to seamlessly connect the experience of the rich library program with a new residential building in a way that brings life to the entire development. While the library experience of this concept is further enhanced through the addition of the mixed-use program, the idea remains strong even without the potential addition. Perhaps more importantly than the development of this scheme, our collective process of sharing, critiquing and discussing our ideas has made us a better team, enhanced the quality of our product, and prepared us to move forward with the DCPL and other stakeholders.

RESIDENTIAL (PRIVATE)

CARVE : ARCHITECTURE

The Carve scheme creates a residential addition that acts as an extension of the Miesian language of the existing library. The single-loaded residential bar forms a ring around a central courtyard that acts as a community amenity for residents. The architectural expression of carving away from the underside of the residential mass creates relief between the library and the new addition, and it allows for connections between the interior courtyard and the perimeter.

CONTINUOUS LANDSCAPE : EXPERIENCE

The Continuous Landscape scheme weaves a ribbon-like pathway of stairs, terraces and landscape through the entire site to create a seamless connection between the library and residential addition. The experience is one of ascension through a new four-story atrium where key library functions are primarily open and universally accessible – appropriately democratizing the public space. The journey continues to the activated roof of the library, and then further transitions up to the landscaped roof of the residential component.

INVERT : PROGRAM

The Invert scheme studies the complete reversal of library and residential programs. The historic Mies structure is imagined as new residential units around the perimeter, and a new library building extends through the center of the residential ring. The new library rises 3 stories above the existing structure giving it greater prominence over the residential program.

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LIBR ARY

RESIDENTIAL

STUDIOS + FREELON

PLANS

A-LEVEL

support

WASHINGTONIANA STORAGE

workroom
storage

A-LEVEL ACCESS

QUIET

DISPLAY

BOOKS

MEET

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TECHNOLOGY
DISPLAY

SCREENING

SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
DIGITAL

PRACTICE

TECHNOLOGY

TRAINING

HELP RESEARCH

SHARE EXPERIMENT

PERFORM

OFFICES

CREATE
INSPIRING engage

LECTURE

COMFORTABLE

TECHNOLOGY FLEXIBLE

MEETING
LEARN
KITCHEN

LAB

FLEXIBLE PRESENT

MEETING

INSTRUCT

READ

BLACK STUDIES
ART
INTELLECTUAL CLASSROOM

HUB
tech

DIGITAL

WORK
FLEXIBLE

PRESENT

PROJECT

A-LEVEL ORIENTATION

ACCESS
WELCOMING

INSTRUCT LAB

A refreshing departure from today’s warren-like lower level, the graciously sized stadium seating and monumental stair descending from the Great Hall above floods the lower level with natural daylight and visual connectivity. From the A-Level, one can see the ascending landscape of active terraces climbing to the roof garden. The stair is a focal point that intuitively orients visitors while accommodating programs. A gallery that envelopes the stair doubles as a multipurpose event space, complementing conferencing programs as well as Washingtoniana events and displays.

STORAGE

TRAIN MUSIC
work VIEWING

STORAGE

MEET

SECURE
GROW

CONTROLS

DISPLAY

PRESERVATION
B-LEVEL

COLLECTION

CONFERENCE

COMPLEX

CONNECT

In this scheme, the B-Level remains unchanged. As such, we have not represented the plan here. In the mixed-use development scenario, we have modified the B-Level to support the needs of residential functions above (see page 15)

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CONCEPT PLAN TEC SUBMITTAL ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES | NEW MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMORIAL LIBRARY

OPEN

A-Level destinations are accessed via an expansive stair that cascades down to a branded entry to the Washingtoniana collection. Beyond lies a collection of technology enhanced meeting spaces that combine to form a multi-functional conference center. Like the historic lounge this space replaces, the gracious stairs can be occupied by casual visitors or by groups focused on more formal programs. In either case, an etched map of L’Enfant’s plan for the city of Washington is the featured backdrop that raises awareness of the unique collection beyond.

MAINTENANCE

FACILITIES

FLEX
LOUNGE

SUPPLIES

ACCESS

WORKROOM
LOCKERS

SHOWER

FUNCTIONAL BREAK

DIGITIZATION
PROCESS

HOLD

IT

COLLECTION
SERVER

GENEALOGY

TECH

LAB

TOUCHDOWN

PROCESSING

RECEIVING

PROCESS

STAFF

LOCKERS

CLEAN

FACILITIES

LOADING

ACCESS

open

SUPPORT

open

PLANS

1ST FLOOR

discover

share

connect

TECHNOLOGY
ASK

share

DISPLAY
BROWSE

engage

new

STUDY

WORK

WORK

EXPLORE

BROWSE

ACCESS
quick

READ

COLLECTIONS FICTION

READ

LIGHT

ADUL T

HELP DISPLAY

HELP
ask

ADUL T

TECHNOLOGY

quick

BOOKS

DISCOVER

share BOOKS EXPLORE

LOUNGE access

Just as the street flows into and through the library, the library emanates out on to the street. Illuminated displays punctuate the loggia with light, activity and content. At the southeast corner, the display module is wrapped in a glass enclosure to create an outdoor cafe that invites the public to pause and socialize amidst content and views into one of the exciting ground floor innovation spaces. It is an extension of the library’s marketplace into the vitality of the street.
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STREET LOGGIA

DISCOVER

exhibit

create

new
access

new

LOUNGE

MARKetPLACE
return welcome

cafe
ask secure wait

MEDIA

partner
INSPIRING

BROWSE

READ

STUDY

MEET

EXPLORE

connect

ENTRY
connect

MEET connect innovation
DISPLAY

engage

cafe

SERVICE POINTS

Moving away from the imposing counters of traditional libraries, the new service model is built around a partnering approach where staff and customers stand side-by-side to collaborate on projects and research. These mobile service pods can be reconfigured and reprogrammed to meet the changing needs of the library. Self-service kiosks are set on the louvered armature that reaches down from above to lightly touch-down in the historic hall.

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STUDIOS + FREELON

PLANS

2ND FLOOR

restrooms

programs

literacy lab

staff
discover

train

discovery

center

ADULT READING

INSPIRING

ADUL T
MEET

EXPLORE

interactive

READ

SELF CHECK

PERIODICALS

CREATE

ASK development

story
family
HELP
BROWSE

explore

ACCESS

EXPLORE
BROWSE

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practice

HELP
zone

READ
LIGHT

MEET CHILDREN
gaming badges connect

MEDIA

BOOKS
seating FICTION read

TECHNOLOGY
DISCOVER
SELF CHECK

learn
ACCESS

learning school age LIGHT

ACCESS

explore

DISPLAY
BROWSE

MEET
DISCOVER

digital

hybrid

FLEXIBLE

INSPIRING

QUIET

tutor

BOOKS

EXPLORE learn

engage seating ASK

ASK DISCOVER

DISPLAY
WORK

STORY TIME

Rendered in playful colors, the Children’s Area is immediately visible from the entry hall. At the core of this second floor space is the Story Time zone defined by sculpted seating, mobile furniture and color activated wall and ceiling surfaces. With sightlines to and from the Great Hall, this space is easy to find and intuitively accessed.

COMFORTABLE

ASK

create

READ

ADUL T access

share

engage

TECHNOLOGY
create

learn

LIGHT

WORK

COLLABORATE

FLEXIBLE

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CONCEPT PLAN TEC SUBMITTAL ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES | NEW MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMORIAL LIBRARY

LOUNGE

DISPLAY

BROWSE

research

MEET

relax

BROWSE

BOOKS

FICTION

ASK

reflect

The primary adult reading room occupies a triple height space at the southeast corner of the second floor level. Customers will be drawn to this space for its commanding views down the G Street corridor and the auditorium cloud that floats above. The glass backed auditorium stage reveals active programs to the reading room below and the exterior street beyond.

CONSUL T ACCESS

FLEXIBLE tech ASK

STUDY

LISTEN

theater

SELF CHECK

lounge DISCOVER BROWSE COMFORTABLE READ seating

COLLECTIONS

QUIET

DISCOVER

WORK

craft

learn

PLANS

3RD FLOOR

COLLABORATE

QUIET

LISTEN

STREAM
ASK
ACCESSIBLE BROWSE

STUDY
LISTEN

CLASSROOM

MEET

EXPLORE

LIGHT

RECORD READ

COLLABORATE

reflect
SEARCH COMFORTABLE

TECHNOLOGY EXPLORE

HELP EXHIBIT

BROWSE SELF CHECK

READ

practice

perform

QUIET EXPLORE

LOUNGE

ACCESS STUDY
SELF CHECK

HELP
FLEX

BROWSE

MEET

ACCESS

READ
STREAM

SIT NON FICTION

ADAPTIVE SERVICES

DISPLAY

engage EXPLORE research PLUG IN READ QUIET ACCESS ADUL T FLEXIBLE REFERENCE digital ASK TECHNOLOGY MEET DISCOVER

SIT

INTERNAL STREET

WORK

BOOKS

As visitors ascend through the library, they are invited to rest, gather, and share their thoughts and ideas while reflecting back on the array of services and resources the library has to offer. This street is a place of connection. Stepped seating and lounge furniture clustered on intimately sized terraces draw people together in open conversation. Like a public winter garden, trees punctuate the crisp architecture and filtered natural light floods the space without offensive glare.
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TEEN
LOUNGE

HELP
stream

share

connect

MEET

record

COLLABORATE
GAMe

lab

MUSIC
hub

PRACTICE

sandbox ASK digital
media tech INNOVATE INSPIRe

EXPERIMENT
zone

WORK

digital

training
hub research

CONNECT

TECHNOLOGY

media

explore

share

NEXT

CO

PLUG IN

PERFORMANCE

LIGHT

GEEK OUT

DISPLAY

exhibit

CREATE

CONSUL T

lab

MEET

network
share

art

discover perform craft

INNOVATION + engage PROTOTYPING learning REACT STUDIO

act

project FLEX

STREETFRONT MEETING

tech

Technology enhanced meeting rooms open to terraces along the internal street. These spaces showcase new collaborative technologies from low tech writable surfaces to the most sophisticated media sharing tools that enhance collective learning and group problem solving. Set within the most public zone of the street, these spaces are intended to foster hybrid programs that blur the distinctions between silos of library collections and services.

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STUDIOS + FREELON

PLANS

4TH FLOOR

TECHNOLOGY

OPERATIONS

OFFICES CONFERENCE

WELCOMING

COMMUNICATIONSLIGHT

INTERGOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS

EXECUTIVE

The 300-seat raked floor auditorium will be equipped with state of the art technology and set within the east end of the column free innovation cloud. Taking advantage of the G Street offset, the back of the stage can be opened to reveal a glass wall that visually places the audience directly above the street below. Overlooking the adult reading room below, this transparent relationship activates both spaces in a dynamic and shared relationship.

MARKETING

AUDITORIUM

TRAINING

PUBLIC RELATIONS PUBLIC SAFETY

BREAK

MANAGEMENT

STAFF
IT

COMMUNICATIONS TRAINING RECEPTION FINANCE LOUNGE MEETING LIGHT RESTROOMS LEGAL HUMAN RESOURCES

MODERN

EXECUTIVE

FUNCTIONAL GRAPHICS MODERN BOARD ROOM

FLEXIBLE

CAPITAL

SAFETY

CREATE

LIBRARY ACQUISITIONS FOUNDATION IT
work

PROFESSIONAL

FLEXIBLE

TECHNOLOGY work meet
CREATE

MEETING

DISPLAY

INSPIRING

LIGHT

INSPIRING

FLEXIBLE

tech

MUSIC CREATE
engage

STREET TERRACES

Cascading terraces at the core of the building create public meeting zones while also allowing for connectivity across the atrium. Granite paving and intermittent street trees reinforce this area as an extension of the street with its multitude of storefronts and micro-plazas.

EXPERIMENT

lab

CREATE MEET MEET PRE FUNCTION DISPLAY LIGHT perform STORAGE LECTURE STORAGE STUDIO MUSIC explore PERFORM

PRACTICE

INSPIRING COMFORTABLE RESTROOM green rm TECHNOLOGY

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CONCEPT PLAN TEC SUBMITTAL ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES | NEW MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMORIAL LIBRARY

PERFORMANCE

LIGHT

PRACTICE DISPLAY

STUDIO

GALLERY innovation

INSPIRING

KITCHEN

EXPERIMENT

connect

AUDITORIUM

MUSIC

FLEX

engage

MEET

perform

9

STAFF

share
practice

work

explore

FLEXIBLE

LEGAL FINANCE

MODERN

OPERATIONS

WELCOMING

FOUNDATION

MANAGEMENT

TECHNOLOGY

PLANS

ROOF PLAN

PARK IN THE SKY

As the interior landscape extends onto the roof, it wraps around the southeast corner of the building and continues to climb upward. Once outside, the interior street becomes a terraced landscape oasis for relaxation, events, or an outdoor respite from the bustle of the street below. The roof-park is accessible via elevators outside of the library secure zone making it a 24-hour amenity for the community. A rooftop cafe invites visitors to linger and doubles as a service point for scheduled events.

green roof

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open air theater event
A ROOM WITH A VIEW
The terraced roof-park offers uninterrupted vistas over the portrait gallery to the southeast. As the path extends upward through the park, it leads visitors to an outdoor amphitheater.

5TH FLOOR
Below the elevated roof gardens is a 5th Floor event space. It is adaptable for events and board meetings, or it can simply support outdoor programs given the direct rooftop access. Like the Auditorium, this space has 24-hour access outside of the secure zone of the library which makes it ideal for after hour community use and revenue generating events.

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STUDIOS + FREELON

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

BUILDING SECTIONS

public staff egress

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SECURITY DIAGRAM

TRANSVERSE SECTION LOOKING EAST

after hours access staff access

LONGITUDINAL SECTION LOOKING SOUTH

CONCEPT PLAN TEC SUBMITTAL ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES | NEW MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMORIAL LIBRARY

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STUDIOS + FREELON

DEVELOPMENT NARRATIVE + SECTIONS
The development option extends the design strategies formulated for the library to include a residential microcosm in our newly formed urban landscape. A high-density residential neighborhood connected by park and streetscape to the civic institution of the library is a natural extension of our approach. The residential development becomes the armature supporting the public program of the library as the ribbon-like pathway of indoor terraces and landscape extend up through the roof to become a public rooftop landscape experience. The simple residential bar is a calm, unified expression intended to differentiate itself from the Mies structure below. As the residential architecture wraps around the site, it appears to “float” above the library. Where Mies used rigid structure to impose order on the library program, the new development takes a different approach by reinforcing experience over order. The skin of the residential development is a continuation of the screen cladding the auditorium within the library. As the screen extends up to the residential addition it transforms into a more porous skin that can accommodate a variety of different sized openings that respond to the residential program.
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DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY

+/- 115,000 GSF Additional Development Community Gardens & Learning Orchard +/- 2000 sf support space at upper roof After-hours 9th Street lobby Residential: +/- 100 units on three levels, 9’ ceilings +/- 28 Two Bedroom (avg. 1,100 sf) +/- 50 One Bedroom (avg. 750 sf) +/- 22 Efficiency / Studio (avg. 500 sf) Residential amenity +/- 3,000 sf 9th Street Lobby +/- 1,000 sf at northeast core

DC Central Library Identical to library only scheme Rooftop Cafe: +/- 5,400 sf at existing roof level After-hours 9th Street lobby Reconfigured parking at B level +/- 155 cars self-parking for staff and residents two-way, reduced slope access ramp

As a part of the residential development new programs have emerged to support the public experience. The roof-park acts as an extension of the urban street within the library. An indoor/outdoor café creates a unique rooftop amenity. As the development extends above the library, an outdoor amphitheater acts as a rooftop feature for public events. The development roof plane continues upward to become a rooftop community garden and learning orchard. Sustainable features such as stormwater management and solar arrays are visible technologies incorporated into the roof design.

TRANSVERSE SECTION LOOKING EAST

LONGITUDINAL SECTION LOOKING SOUTH

CONCEPT PLAN TEC SUBMITTAL ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES | NEW MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMORIAL LIBRARY

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STUDIOS + FREELON

DEVELOPMENT NARRATIVE + 1ST FLOOR - DEVELOPMENT ACCESS
The development option provides a new residential entry and circulation sequence distinct from that of the public library. Residents enter a discreet, secure lobby just off of 9th Street. By reconfiguring the northeast building core, a new set of elevators dedicated to the residential development has been added to the building. These elevators begin at the B level to provide secure parking garage access to residents. The development option offers to the public a 9th Street entrance and direct vertical connection to the rooftop café as well as the learning orchard at the highest level of the site. This new entry and dedicated elevators allow after-hours access to public rooftop events. A new two-way parking ramp, significantly less steep than the existing, is incorporated along the G Place side of the building. The new ramp permits comfortable self-parking while maintaining the Miesian column structure. RESIDENTIAL STORAGE RESIDENTIAL PARKING Conceptually, the development design focuses the loads of the new addition within the envelope of the historic building cores while maintaining a light touch on the open plan columns. This is apparent in the new parking level plan. The geometry of the B level allows for storage units to be associated with parking spaces for residents of the development. EMPLOYEE

B-LEVEL

RESIDENTIAL STORAGE RESIDENTIAL PARKING ramp up 12%

+/- 75 RESIDENTIAL PARKING SPACES

resi. EMPLOYEE PARKING

EMPLOYEE

+/- 80 EMPLOYEE PARKING SPACES
reinforcement structural

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EMPLOYEE PARKING

residential and cafe service

RESIDENTIAL

RESIDENTIAL PARKING
PUBLIC

RESIDENTIAL STORAGE

CONCEPT PLAN TEC SUBMITTAL ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES | NEW MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMORIAL LIBRARY

RESIDENTIAL STORAGE

RESIDENTIAL PARKING

DEVELOPMENT PLANS

RESIDENTIAL 1ST FLOOR

2 BR

1 BR

1 BR

1 BR

1 BR

1 BR

resident AMENITY

rooftop CAFE

PUBLIC ACCESS CAFE

1 BR

1 BR

1 BR

1 BR

1 BR

ST

At the top of the interior landscape is a publicly accessible café. Nestled under the overhang of the residential development, the café provides an indoor/ outdoor dining experience directly connected to the roof-park.

1 BR

1+ BR 1+ BR

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1 BR

1 BR

2BR 2BR 2BR 2BR 2BR

roo ftop EVEN T

ST

ST

ST

ST

ST

ST

2BR

SKY EVENT

SKY EVENT

As the residential development ascends up through the roof of the library, the bucolic nature of the roof plane provides a unique amenity for the public and residents. This terraced roof plane acts as an outdoor amphitheater supporting individual activities as well as public events. The amphitheater connects the experi-

As the residential development ascends through the roof of the library, the bucolic nature of the roof garden provides a unique amenity to the public and residents. This terraced roof plane maximizes vistas and doubles as an outdoor amphitheater supporting individual activities as well as public events. The amphitheater connects the experience of the roof-park with the community gardens.

STUDIOS + FREELON

DEVELOPMENT PLANS

RESIDENTIAL TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN

PREMIUM APARTMENT

2 BR

1 BR

1 BR

1 BR

1 BR

1 BR

1 BR

1 BR

ST

2 BR

2 BR

The residential development includes a number of premium two bedroom apartment units with prestigious views of the city. This south-facing unit overhangs the roof garden claiming unique views extending down 9th Street.

2 BR 1 BR 1 BR 1 BR 1 BR 1 BR ST ST 2 BR

1 BR
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1+ BR 1+ BR

1 BR

1 BR

ST

ST

ST

ST

ST

2BR

2BR 2BR COURTYARD APARTMENT
With only three levels residential development, all courtyard apartments have great sky exposure as well as unique vistas into the ribbon of landscaped terraces and activity within the library.

2BR

2BR

2BR

CONCEPT PLAN TEC SUBMITTAL ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES | NEW MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMORIAL LIBRARY

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STUDIOS + FREELON

DEVELOPMENT PLANS

ROOF PLAN

LEARNING ORCHARD

garden support

The Learning Orchard acts as a bookend to the library experience and provides the public with a quiet, contemplative outdoor space removed from the more active roof-park below. The orchard exists at the end of the community gardens and is accessible by elevator. As a public viewing platform, the orchard is situated at the highest point of the development and affords unparalleled tree-shaded views to the Washington Monument.
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LEARNING ORCHARD

mechanical

COMMUNITY GARDENS

COMMUNITY GARDENS

As an extension of the public roof-park, the Community Gardens provide another opportunity for community engagement. We envision the garden to be alive with fruit trees, organic produce, and composting. Fresh produce from the garden could be used to support the cafe. Stormwater management benefits are also realized through the community garden.

CONCEPT PLAN TEC SUBMITTAL ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES | NEW MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMORIAL LIBRARY

roo ftop EVEN T

storm water management

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STUDIOS + FREELON