You are on page 1of 20

European

WILDERNESS SOCIETY
WWW.WILDERNESS-SOCIETY.ORG
JOIN AND BE PART OF IT
European Wilderness
Journal
€ 7,50 Donation Fee No. 1/2014
2
European Wilderness Journal
Dear Friends of the wild!
In
the past 15 years a lot has been achieved for Europe’s wilderness. These 
achievements by various organisations were partially acknowledged by 
the 10th World Wilderness Congress, the WILD10 in Salamanca, Spain.
Our vision
Since we need to go further for future generations! The launch of the new 
Vision  for  a  Wilder  Europe  inspired  us  to  set  up  the  European  Wilderness 
Society,  which  is  a  new  entity  that  strives  for  more  and  better  protection  of 
wilderness in Europe. 
Our objectives
•  Identifying  and  assisting  in  the  management  and  lobbying  for  existing 
wilderness areas in Europe 
•  Increase the total designated wilderness area in order to balance our hu-
man footprint on the continent
•  Inspire Europeans to care for our wild places across the continent
Our mission
As  its  name  implies,  the  new  entity  focuses  its  efforts  on  wilderness,  on 
Europe and on joint actions involving the public. 
We  are  an  inclusive  entity,  which  will  be  supported  by  individuals,  gov-
ernment,  profit  and  non-profit  organisations.  Many  are  already  part  of  the 
European Wilderness Society but more are welcome to join and take part in 
our  mission.  Like  a  wast  network  of  partners,  scientists,  researchers,  nature 
conservationists, media experts, tourism specialists and management teams.
Join us
Our new society will also focus on the ambitious target of designating 5% of 
Europe’s land territory as wilderness. 
The engaged and very experienced team behind the European Wilderness 
Society  works  ambitiously  to  reach  this  goal.  But  together  with  you  we  can 
achieve  even  more!  In  case  you  are  keen  to  publish  anything,  would  like  to 
comment on our European Wilderness Society Web-page or would like fur-
ther information concerning the European Wilderness please let us know!

Welcome to the European Wilderness Society!
Te future of wilderness
in Europe
Follow, contact and talk to us
If you are interested in being notified about European Wilder-
ness you can register for our Wilderness Newsletter or follow 
us on Facebook, and Twitter, or join our open Linkedin group!
Our website is a one-stop-shop for information about the 
European Wilderness.
www.wilderness-society.org
Zoltán Kun, Chairman | Max A.E. Rossberg, Deputy Chairman | Vlado Vančura, Director Wilderness Development
Letter to the Editors
Wilderness is nowhere as important as it is in Europe, the
world’s most densely populated continent. The good news is
that, in the last 20 years, great and critical strides have oc-
curred to help raise awareness of and protect wild nature…but
this work has really only just begun. The European Wilderness
Society is the force needed to continue and build this momen-
tum. We all need to join, assist, and promote this important
initiative.
Vance G Martin,
President: The WILD Foundation, World Wilderness Congress
The newborn EWS does a great job. Your homepage is 
very attractive and well-made. Congratulations.
Bernhard Kohler 
WWF Austria
This is a very good initiative to save the population of wolves
especially in Europe where hunting is a serious problem!
Technical Specialist
UNESCO MAB Uganda
This a great opportunity for key core wilderness and wildlife 
areas. Excellent stuff.
Jim O.Donnell
Around the world in 80 Years
3
www.wilderness-society.org
Save the date
„None of Nature‘s landscapes are
ugly so long as they are wild.”
John Muir, Our National Parks, (1901),
Chapter 1, page 4.
Wilderness Ticker
Threat of winter tourism in the Tatra National Park
Iconic protected areas such as the Tatra National Park, Slovakia and the Rila 
National Park of Bulgaria are under threat by extractive industry and unsus-
tainable tourism development. Despite them having been recognised as IUCN 
Category II Areas and their inclusion in the EU Natura 2000 system, investors 
are suggesting massive ski lift developments in both areas.
February
International Congress on Rural Tourism of Navarre
Kingdom
20. - 21. February 2014, Pamplona, Spain
August
The 7th International Conference on Monitoring and
Management of Visitors in Recreational and Protected Areas  
20.-23. August 2014, Tallinn, Estonia 
www.tlu.ee/en/mmv7/
October
18th Forum 2000 Conference
12.-14. October 2014, 
in Prague, Czech Republic 
www.forum2000.cz/en/calendar/ 
November
IUCN World Parks Congress 
12.-19. November 2014, in Sydney, Australia 
www.worldparkscongress.org 
National Wilderness Conference 
15.-19. October 2014, in Albuquerque, USA 
www.wilderness50th.org/conference
European Natura 2000 Award
Wilderness areas form an important part of the Natura 2000 system with-
in the European Union. There is an opportunity to reward best practices of 
protecting  wilderness  through  nominating  your  area  for  the  Natura  2000 
Award  at  http://ec.europa.eu/environment/nature/natura2000/awards/# 
However our efforts should not stop here! Our team is currently working 
on drafting a new European Wilderness Convention that will recognise the 
importance of wilderness in halting biodiversity loss and in delivering pub-
lic benefits.
Wilderness and forest
Forests  are  important  to  the  ecosystem,  not  only  for  conserving 
Europe’s biodiversity but also to protect the last fragment of extreme-
ly rare wilderness. Forests are also a fundamental element of Natura 
2000. Nearly 50% of Natura 2000 habitats are forests and around 23% 
of  all  EU  forests  are  in  Natura  2000  sites!  So  if  European  forests  are 
among  the  main  repositories  of  European  biodiversity  then  conse-
quently (whether we like it or not) wilderness is also by definition an 
extremely important reservoir of European biodiversity. Particularly, 
wilderness forest is the kind of biodiversity reservoir that people have 
already been longing for so many years.


4
European Wilderness Journal
Importance of wilderness
Author: Allan Wattson US Forestry Service Member of NAWPA
Te general public ofen wonders why we researchers and increasingly the politicians 
are so supportive of the wilderness. Here are just some of the vital role the wilderness 
plays in dealing with challenges of industrial development.
The 
general public often wonders why 
we  researchers  and  increasingly 
the politicians are so supportive of the wilder-
ness.  Here  are  just  some  of  the  vital  role  the 
wilderness plays in dealing with challenges of 
industrial development.
Conserving Biodiversity
Protected  areas  are  essential  for  conser-
vation.  In  a  changing  climate,  they  are  safe 
havens  for  plants  and  animals  to  reproduce 
despite changing conditions.
Protecting Ecosystem Services
Wilderness  and  protected  areas  protect, 
restore  and  provide  essential  ecological,  so-
cial  and  economic  services,  like  clean  water; 
weather,  temperature  and  humidity  regula-
tion; soil conservation; and genetic reservoirs 
that may lead to the development of improved 
crops, new medicines and other products vital 
to human communities.
Connecting Landscapes
The unpredictable impact of climate change 
may  affect  the  ability  of  ecosystems  and  spe-
cies to adapt to changing environmental con-
ditions either in-situ or via migration to more 
suitable habitats. Protected area networks are 
one of the most effective approaches for sup-
porting  ecosystem  adaptation.  Connecting 
terrestrial and freshwater habitats across var-
ied  landscapes  enables  plants  and  animals  to 
shift ranges and thrive in new locations.
Capturing and Storing Carbon
Protected  areas  store  vast  amounts  of  car-
bon  in  ecosystems  such  as  boreal  and  tem-
perate forests, coastal areas, oceans, and grass 
lands.  These  natural  systems  help  reduce  the 
levels  of  greenhouse  gases  that  cause  global 
warming through natural biological processes 
that  draw  carbon  dioxide  out  of  the  atmos-
phere. 
Building Knowledge and Under-
standing
Wilderness in particular, offers unique op-
portunities  for  research  on  climate  change, 
because  these  areas  are  among  those  least 
modified  by  human  influence.  Applied  sci-
ence and research in protected areas can im-
prove  our  understanding  of  ecosystems  and 
species’  response  to  climate  change,  and  im-
prove information for planning and manage-
ment to help communities adapt.
Inspiring People
Inspiring  natural  surroundings  provide  the 
perfectsetting  for  tuning  into  nature,  learn-
ing  about  it,  appreciating  it,  respecting  it  and 
pledging  to  protect  it.  Managers  can  serve  as 
conveners, facilitators, and leaders who inspire 
and  engage  their  communities  in  partner-
ship  for  conservation  and  learning  promote 
resource  stewardship  to  ensure  a  sustainable 
future. ❀
Source: North American Protected areas as natural
solutions for climate Change (2012), North American
Intergovernmental Committee on Cooperation
for Wilderness and Protected Area Conservation
(NAWPA)
Is wilderness so
important for the
challenges of modern
days society?
Yes!
5
www.wilderness-society.org
WILD 10
Salamanca
Spain
6
European Wilderness Journal
European Wilderness Society: 
Mr. Meyer, the European Wilderness Soci-
ety has been founded to promote the con-
cept of Wilderness in Europe. Most of these 
wilderness areas are in less developed areas 
with  little  tourism.  As  you  have  been  very 
active  in  identifying tourism  trends,  what 
role  could  wilderness  play  in  the  future 
when it comes to alternatives to the main-
stream tourism concepts?
Michael Meyer: 
Wilderness areas already play a crucial role 
for  people.  These  areas  provide  ecosystem 
services  such  as  clean  water,  clean  air,  for-
est  products  (wood,  herbs,  game)  etc.  On 
top  of  this  main  function,  these  areas  are 
important  for  recreation  and  educational 
purposes.
In  the  future  this  role  will  be  even  more 
important.  People  tend  to  move  to  cities, 
rural  areas  are  abandoned.  That  means 
they  move  further  away  in  distance  and 
in  knowledge  from  what  nature  actually 
is.  In  addition,  our  world  moves  faster  in 
comparison to 50 or 100 years ago. People 
are  stressed  from  their  jobs  and  from  the 
daily pressures. In wilderness they can slow 
down  and  learn  about  nature  and  them-
selves.
European Wilderness Society: 
What  are  the  key  requirements  for  wil-
derness areas in attracting tourists?
Michael Meyer: 
Wilderness  areas  need  to  be  authentic 
and as unspoiled as possible. People living 
in  and  around  wilderness  areas  have  to  be 
proud in being there and invite tourists to 
learn about their daily living.
European Wilderness Society: 
What  are  the  key  success  factors  when 
developing  a  tourism  strategy  incorporat-
ing wilderness as its key element?
Michael Meyer: 
People consider wilderness areas as areas 
without  any  human  influence.  They  think 
no people live „there“. For most of the wil-
derness  areas  in  Europe  this  is  certainly 
not true. Therefore, one of the key success 
factors for a tourism strategy is the owner-
ship by local people for designing and im-
plementing  such  a  strategy.  Wilderness  is 
dependent on people and vice et versa. The 
second key element is the full support of all 
governmental bodies involved in managing 
a  wilderness  area,  no  matter  if  at  national, 
province, district or community levels.
European Wilderness Society:  
What  do  you  suggest  to  the  European 
Wilderness  Society  (EWS)  when  it  comes 
to incorporating tourism in its portfolio?
Michael Meyer: 
The  EWS  could  be  THE  platform  for 
promoting  sustainable  tourism  in  wilder-
ness  areas  in  Europe.  It  should  provide  all 
the existing tools and methodologies avail-
able to make sustainable tourism a success 
together  with  the  tourism  business  sector, 
governments, NGOs and science. ❀
Interview with
Michael Meyer
Interview: Max A.E. Rossberg
Michael Meyer is the Project Manager for the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) 
based in Germany. Michael Meyer started his career as a consultant on management of 
tourism facilities, working about 15 years on quality assessment and training of staf. 
In 1999 he became a member of the board of Ecological
Tourism in Europe (ETE) to work on the topic of sustainable
tourism development in and around protected areas fore-
most within Central and East Europe. Since 2006 he is also
working for the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO)
giving advice to member states on sustainable tourism plan-
ning and biodiversity-based tourism product development.
He is a member of the roster of experts of the Convention
on Biological Diversity (CBD) and co-author of the Interna-
tional Guidelines on Biodiversity and Tourism Development
of the CBD. His specialties are coaching of tourism planning
processes, capacity-building of local communities and entre-
preneurs and sustainable tourism product development.
7
www.wilderness-society.org
One 
of the outcomes of the conference was something that has 
the  boring  title  of  Resolution  17.  What  does  this  number 
really mean? 
Milestone Resolution
This is a resolution which calls for improving the legal protection of 
wilderness  through  a  European  Wilderness  Convention.The  European 
Parliament passed a resolution on wilderness in February 2009, some of 
the recommendations having been realised through: 
•  the development of a definition of wilderness
•  the  development  of  guidelines  on  wilderness  management  in  the 
Natura 2000 network
•  and a wilderness register that documents and maps wilderness in a 
subset of countries in Europe
Finding wilderness
A review of status and conservation of wild lands throughout Europe, 
completed  for  the  Scottish  Government,  revealed  that  the  word  “wil-
derness” is not officially included in most of the national protected area 
legislation of European countries. However, strictly protected area types 
that are found in the national legislation in most of the European coun-
tries do give rise to areas across Europe that have wilderness character-
istics.  Some  of  these  areas,  like  the  Swiss  National  Park  in  Switzerland 
and the Lagodekhi State Nature Reserve in Georgia, have had this strict 
protection in place for 100 years or more.
Wild10 
We commend the Alpine Convention as an example of a supranation-
al  agreement  between  countries  that  share  geographical  regions,  with 
protocols for specific common actions defined and pursued by the de-
cision-making body of the Convention and through participation of the 
signatories to the regular meetings of the Alpine Conference. We recog-
nise the example of the ‘model law’ for Biosphere Reserves proposed by 
the UNESCO Man and the Biosphere Program, based on the analysis of 
various examples of existing legal translations of the biosphere reserves 
concept into national protected area legislation.
Join Together 
Therefore  our  society  along  with  other  organisations  calls  upon  all 
European Countries to join together in a European Wilderness Conven-
tion based on a framework that incorporates the wilderness definition, 
and has a ‘model law’ for wilderness as a protocol for its protection de-
rived  from  existing  national  legislation  for  strict  protection.  We  want 
to  ensure  that  the  framework  includes  a  commitment  on  Contracting 
Countries to explore the possibility of establishing additional strict wil-
derness reserves in their territories in line with the protocol.
And finally we also encourage Contracting Countries to incorporate 
their strict wilderness reserves in the European Wilderness Preservation 
System. ❀
Call for the Wild in
Legislation
Two of our colleagues are among
the initiators of the European
Wilderness Convention!
Te 10th World Wilderness Congress also known as WILD10 organised in Salamanca 
turned into a major milestone to promote wilderness protection in Europe. 
Author: Gaia Angelini, Policy and Project Director LuminaConsult and Zoltan Kun
8
European Wilderness Journal
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12 13
51 52
53
54
55
14
56
57
58
15
16
17
59
60
18
19
20
21
22
61
23
62
24
63
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
64
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
65
45
46
47
48
49
50
44
Berlin
Vienna
Bratislava
Lisboa
Madrid
Paris
London
Roma
Budapest
Bucaresti
Sofia
Tirana
Kiev
Warszawa
Dublin
Bern
Ljubljana
Minsk
Moskva
Tallinn
Helsinki
Riga
Vilnius
Stockholm
Oslo
Ankara
Baku
Tbilisi
Yerevan
Desertas Islands NP, Portugal
Garajonay NP, Spain
Vatnajökull NP
Iceland
Wilderness areas
in Europe
9
www.wilderness-society.org
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12 13
51 52
53
54
55
14
56
57
58
15
16
17
59
60
18
19
20
21
22
61
23
62
24
63
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
64
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
65
45
46
47
48
49
50
44
Berlin
Vienna
Bratislava
Lisboa
Madrid
Paris
London
Roma
Budapest
Bucaresti
Sofia
Tirana
Kiev
Warszawa
Dublin
Bern
Ljubljana
Minsk
Moskva
Tallinn
Helsinki
Riga
Vilnius
Stockholm
Oslo
Ankara
Baku
Tbilisi
Yerevan
Desertas Islands NP, Portugal
Garajonay NP, Spain
Vatnajökull NP
Iceland

Wilderness Areas
㆒ Peneda Gerês National Park, Portugal
㆓ Fulufället National Park, Sweden
叅 Majella National Park, Italy
㆕ Archipelago National Park, Finland
⓹ Soomaa National Park, Estonia
⓺ Cepkeliai-Dzukia National Park, Lithuania
柒 Retezat National Park, Romania
⓼ Rila National Park, Bulgaria
⓽ Central Balkan National Park, Bulgaria
❿ Oulanka National Park, Finland
⓫ Paanajärvi National Park, Russia
⓬ Küre Mountains National Park, Turkey
⓭ Borjomi-Kharagauli National Park, Georgia
⓮ Poblet National Park, Spain
⓯ Archipelago La Maddalena National Park, Italy
⓰ Swiss National Park, Switzerland
⓱ Hainich National Park, Germany
⓲ Hohe Tauern National Park Salzburg, Austria (Certifed)
⓳ Brandenburg Foundation‘s 4 territory, Germany
⓴ Unteres Odertal National Park, Germany
㉑ Kalkalpen National Park, Austria (Certifed)
㉒ Triglav National Park, Slovenia
㉓ Słowiński National Park, Poland
㉔ Gorce National Park, Poland
㉕ Prespa National Park, Albania
㉖ Nemunas Delta Nature Reserve, Lithuania
㉗ Kamanos Nature Reserve, Lithuania
㉘ Viesvile Nature Reserve, Lithuania
㉙ Punia-Prienai Forest Nature Reserve, Lithuania
㉚ Žuvintas Nature Reserve, Lithuania
㉛ Biebrza National Park, Poland
㉜ Belovezhskaya Pushcha National Park, Belorussia
㉝ Bieszczady National Park, Poland
㉞ Zacharovanyj Kray National Park, Ukraine
㉟ Natural Park Gradistea Muncelului-Cioclovina, Romania
㊱ Belasitsa Natural Park, Bulgaria
㊲ Rodna National Park, Romania
㊳ Aukštaitija-Labanoras National Park, Lithuania
㊴ Gorgany Nature Reserve, Ukraine
㊵ Calimani National Park, Romania
㊶ Cheile Bicazului-Hasmas National Park, Romania
㊷ Berezinsky Biosphere Reserve, Belorussia
㊸ Polistovsky Nature Reserve, Russia
㊹ Severo-Osetinskij Zapovednik, Russia
㊺ Khosrov Forest State Reserve, Armenia
㊻ Lagodekhi Protected Areas, Georgia
㊼ Arevik National Park & Boghagar State Reserve, Armenia
㊽ Shikahogh SR & Zangezur State Sanctuary, Armenia
㊾ Stepnoi State Nature Sanctuary, Russia
㊿ Astrakhan Biosphere State Reserve, Russia
Potential Wilderness Areas
® Desertas Islands National Park, Portugal
® Garajonay National Park, Spain
® Vatnajökull National Park, Iceland
© Wild Nephin / Ballicroy National Park, Ireland
© Cairngorms National Park, UK
© d‘Aigüestortes National Park, Spain
® Gran Paradiso National Park, Italy
© Jotunheimen National Park, Norway
© Dolomiti Bellunesi National Park, Italy
© Foreste Casentinesi National Park, Italy
® Alta Murgia National Park, Italy
® Duna-Ipoly National Park (Csarna valley), Hungary
® Slovensky raj National Park, Slovakia
© National Park Poloniny, Slovakia
© Kolkheti National Park, Georgia
10
European Wilderness Journal
The  
Wildland  Research  Institute 
(WRi) at the University of Leeds, 
UK,  is  a  world  leader  in  wilderness/wild-
land  research,  and  had  a  prominent  role  in 
WILD10,  the  10th  World  Wilderness  Con-
gress  last  October  in  Salamanca,  Spain.  WRi 
gave  two  plenary  talks  under  the  congress 
heading of „Make the World a Wilder Place“, 
contributed significantly to a new draft Vision 
for a wilder Europe, contributed to 5 congress 
resolutions,  moderated  6  sessions,  and  sub-
mitted 10 papers. So it is no surprise that WRi 
welcomes  the  new  European  Wilderness  So-
ciety  and  others,  such  as  Wild  Europe,  who 
support the ideals of wilderness. 
International Wilderness Research
WRi  aims  to  identify  and  develop  the  re-
quirements, strategies and policies for a tran-
sition to a greater presence of wild landscapes. 
In support of this specific intent WRi has de-
veloped  many  of  the  approaches,  tools  and 
methods used in mapping wildness at local to 
continental  scales  and,  together  with  World 
Universities  Network  (WUN)  funding,  WRi 
was the initiator of the International Wilder-
ness  Research  Network  (iWRN)  to  promote 
and develop a network of „mapping champi-
ons“ for wilderness throughout Europe. 
The Gold Standard
WRi also offers a body of knowledge about 
self-willed  land,  non-intervention  manage-
ment  and  the  gold  standard  for  wilderness 
(see  e.g.  Wild  or  natural  —  the  challenges 
Europe faces in setting aside wilderness). In-
terests  in  wildland,  wilderness  and  wilding 
are often interdisciplinary, so the activities of 
WRi  combine  social  and  natural  sciences,  as 
well  as  the  arts.  WRi  has  had  a  longstanding 
partnership  with  social  and  natural  scien-
tists  at  the  Aldo  Leopold  Research  Institute, 
Missoula,  USA,  working  with  tribal  and  in-
digenous  knowledge  and  helping  develop 
approaches to mapping wilderness character. 
This led recently to a new project about tradi-
tional phenological knowledge, funded by the 
US Forest Service. 
Interesting Times for Wildernistas
A new step in the development of recognis-
ing European wilderness is the WILD10 reso-
lution  on  establishing  a  supra-national  agree-
ment in all European countries for a European 
Wilderness Convention. The proposal is based 
on  a  framework  that  incorporates  the  wilder-
ness definition and has a ‚model law‘ protocol 
for  wilderness  protection  derived  from  exist-
ing  national  legislation.  Under  that  European 
wide  umbrella,  every  country  can  maintain 
differences in its legislation and in its cultural 
approach  to  wilderness  and  still  afford  essen-
tial protection to this threatened resource. 
Finding Words for Wilderness
Some European languages don‘t even have 
a specific word for wilderness. An example of 
the  need  to  take  a  country-specific  approach 
is  the  work  of  WRi  in  Scotland.  This  began 
through  WRi  developing  a  method  to  map 
wildland  within  the  two  Scottish  National 
Parks.  The  approach  was  then  adapted  by 
Scottish  Natural  Heritage  to  map  wildness 
across all of Scotland. The mapping can now 
be  used  in  support  of  long  and  difficult  dis-
cussion  and  policy  making,  about  the  world 
famous Scottish wild land, (the Scottish High-
lands  are  visited  by  people  from  all  over  the 
world); about ecosystems services; and about 
renewable  energy  development.  For  further 
information  about  WRi  and  its  activities  see 
http://www.wildlandresearch.org ❀
Te Wildland Research
Institute (WRi) in Europe
Te general public ofen wonders why we researchers and increasingly the politicians 
are so supportive of wilderness. Here are just some of the vital roles which wilderness 
can play in dealing with challenges of industrial development.
Author: Mark Fisher, Steve Carver, Alison Parftt
11
www.wilderness-society.org
Berlin
Vienna
Bratislava
Lisboa
Madrid
Paris
London
Roma
Budapest
Bucaresti
Sofia
Tirana
Kiev
Warszawa
Dublin
Bern
Ljubljana
Minsk
Moskva
Tallinn
Helsinki
Riga
Vilnius
Stockholm
Oslo
Ankara
Baku
Tbilisi
Yerevan
Desertas Islands NP, Portugal
Garajonay NP, Spain
Vatnajökull NP
Iceland
The  
European Bison (Bison bonasus), 
also  known  as  Wisent,  is  exem-
plary  as  one  of  the  few  herbivore  wilderness 
species listed as vulnerable by the IUCN. Two 
subspecies are recognized, the lowland (Bison 
bonasus bonasus - extinct in the wild in 1919) 
and the Caucasian (Bison bonasus caucasicus 
- extinct in the wild in 1927). 
Safegard European Wilderness
The  EWS  works  to  safeguard  European 
wilderness,  the  continent’s  most  undisturbed 
areas  of  nature  for  future  generation.  The 
ambition of EWS in this long-term project is 
to  re-establish  a  viable,  self-sustaining  popu-
lation  of  European  bison  in  the  eastern  Car-
pathian Mountains in order to revive wilder-
ness values to this area and to  offer support to 
the  local  communities.  The  initiative  started 
within  a  Global  Environment  Facility  (GEF) 
operation  between  1999  and  2006:  a  World 
Bank  Project  on  Biodiversity  and  Conserva-
tion Management.
Bison Reintroduction
The  reintroduction  area  is  situated  in  the 
South  of  the  park,  a  potential  wilderness 
area  with  low  human  disturbance.  The  area 
(Cracăului Valley) is a forested area of around 
5000 ha.  The European bison has been roam-
ing free in this area since the program started 
in the spring of 2012. The releasing area was 
evaluated by Polish and Romanian specialists 
and was considered as being suitable for fur-
ther European bison reintroduction. 
The  project  includes  the  transfer  of  six 
captive-bred females from four samplings on 
the British Isles, to provide additional release 
stock  for  the  on-going  Romanian  European 
bison  population.  The  transport  of  the    ani-
mals from the British Isles is planned to take 
place  during  March  2014.  The  free  bison 
from  the  Cracăului  area  has  already  started 
to concentrate in the proximity of the fenced 
area and they are expected to stay there until 
spring. Therefore if everything will go accord-
ing  to  plan,  the  new  bison  coming  from  the 
UK  will  be  able  to  adapt  and  integrate  with 
the Cracăului bison.
Detailed Work since 2005
The reintroduction of Europe’s largest land 
mammal represents one of the most challeng-
ing  tasks  in  the  restoration  of  European  wil-
derness  heritage.  With  respect  to  bison  con-
servation, the first achievements were seen in 
2005 in Romania: there was the first quaran-
tine farm for European bison, the first genetic 
tests, the first regular system for veterinarian 
treatments,  the  first  bison  imports  of  genetic 
basis  from  Western  Europe,  the  training  for 
the  staff  involved  and  the  establishment  of  a 
“Bison Management Centre” (acclimatization 
enclosure  of  180  ha,  feeders,  facilities,  bison 
herd  dedicated  to  reintroduction  purposes, 
with 20 animals). 
Scientific Support
Technical  studies  undertaken  by  the  Ro-
manian  Forest  Research  Institute  -  ICAS 
(1994) and The Zoological Society of London 
(1998) revealed the suitability of the Vanatori 
Neamt  Natural  Park  to  support  a  viable  free 
roaming bison population. Further studies by 
Polish  and  Romanian  experts  confirm  these 
results. It is worth mentioning that during the 
GEF project, the program has benefited from 
the  assistance  of  a  team  of  Polish  consult-
ants:  ecologist  (Prof.  Kajetan  Perzanowski), 
genetician (Prof. Wanda Olech), veterinarian 
(Prof.  Wojciech  Bielecki)  and  bison  breeder 
(Mr.  Mieczyslaw  Hlawiczka)  with  a  huge 
experience in bison management. ❀
Bison reintroduction
Author: Vlado Vancura
Te European Wilderness Society (EWS) is engaged in the reintroduction of the 
European Bison to the Vanatori Neamt Nature Park in Romania.
European Wilderness Journal
12
Wilderness in Focus
Hohe Tauern NP, Austria
Author: Vlado Vancura
 Once bearded vultures were 
found in almost every moun-
tain range of southern Europe 
and the Alps. In numerous 
legends the bearded vulture, 
with its glowing red eyes, was 
feared and it was believed they 
attacked even young children. 
As a result, they were hunted 
and almost eradicated. Te 
vultures have been reintro-
duced in the Austrian Alps 
through a captive breeding 
programme by the Hohe 
Tauern National Park and its 
partners.
13
www.wilderness-society.org
Berlin
Vienna
Bratislava
Lisboa
Madrid
Paris
London
Roma
Budapest
Bucaresti
Sofia
Tirana
Kiev
Warszawa
Dublin
Bern
Ljubljana
Minsk
Moskva
Tallinn
Helsinki
Riga
Vilnius
Stockholm
Oslo
Ankara
Baku
Tbilisi
Yerevan
Desertas Islands NP, Portugal
Garajonay NP, Spain
Vatnajökull NP
Iceland
Believe  
it  or  not,  there  is  still 
wilderness  in  Central 
Europe  in  the  most  populated  and  modified 
mountainous area on our globe – the Alps. Dif-
ficult  terrain  provides  an  opportunity  to  safe-
guard the remains of wilderness that cannot be 
developed,  just  a  couple  hours  drive  from  big 
European  cities  such  as  Vienna,  Salzburg  or 
Munich.

Nationalpark Hohe Tauern Salzburg
One such place is certainly the Nationalpark 
Hohe Tauern Salzburg, where the very concep-
tual  pro-wilderness  approach  defined  almost 
10 000 ha of wilderness in a demanding Euro-
pean wilderness quality standard.

In the middle of Austria
Nationalpark  Hohe  Tauern  Salzburg  is  the 
largest national park in the Alps. A land of con-
trast  would  describe  it  shortly.  The  park  is  an 
area with a wild, primeval landscape and simul-
taneously  it  has  fields  cultivated  by  mountain 
farmers  over  several  centuries.  Wilderness  in 
the  Nationalpark  Hohe  Tauern  Salzburg  in-
cludes typical high Alpine zones and high level 
of  Alpine  biodiversity  e.g.  Alpine  ibex  (Capra
ibex),  Red  deer  (Cervus elaphus),  Chamois 
(Rupicapra rupicapra),  Alpine  marmot  (Mar-
mota marmota),  Mountain  hare  (Lepus timi-
dus),  Alpine  salamander  (Salamandra atra), 
bats, birds, lichens, etc. 
Research and Experience
Uniqueness  of  this  wilderness  area  is  high-
lighted  by  free-running  natural  processes  and 
original  landscapes,  the  high  Alpine  spacious 
glaciers, and it is an excellent area for research, 
monitoring  and  experiencing  sustainable  wil-
derness. ❀
European
WILDERNESS SOCIETY
WWW.WILDERNESS-SOCIETY.ORG
W
IL
D
E
R
N
E
S
S
The European Wilderness Society certifies that
NATIONALPARK
HOHE TAUERN SALZBURG
AUSTRIA
is a European Wilderness Preservation System Partner according
to the society´s independent wilderness principles and standards.
This diploma certifies that the Nationalpark Hohe Tauern Salzburg
joins the European Wilderness Preservation System by protecting
9.136 ha of wilderness representing the best of Europe‘s wilderness.
Given at 1st February 2014
valid until 31.01.2016
D
I P
L
O
M
A
Zoltán Kun
Chairman
Max A.E. Rossberg
Deputy Chairman
Vlado Vančura
Director Wilderness Development
JOIN AND BE PART OF IT
Nationalpark Hohe Tauern
Salzburg
Country: Austria
Area: 80.500 ha
Wilderness Area: 9.136 ha
Website: www.hohetauern.at
Te Nationalpark Hohe Tauern Salzburg has recieved the
European Wilderness Diploma 2014
14
European Wilderness Journal
Now 
more  than  ever  before.  As  such,  the  European  Wilder-
ness Society works in partnership with tourism compa-
nies who share common norms and values concerning wilderness. The 
interested vacationer can find several travel offerings from our partners 
on our special website www.wilderness-travel.org. 
Tourism as education tool
Tourism in our view is really not an industry: it is the education tool 
of the 21st century. It creates local jobs in rural, economically depressed 
regions, it highlights different culinary tastes, it offers income possbib-
lites to local guides and it brings people from different cultures togeth-
er. It also provides the visitor the opportunity to interpret wilderness in 
a unique setting.
Where does the idea stem from?
When many Europeans think of wilderness, they tend to refer to li-
ons and jaguars that can be seen on safari in Africa. But when we think 
about  places  like  Oulanka  National  Park  or  Soomaa  National  Park, 
which are two very wild landscapes in Europe, we seldom think about 
these destinations in the context of a unique travel experience in a true 
European wilderness area.  We realised that we needed to open people‘s 
eyes and raise awareness of these stunning places to achive our goal of 
safeguarding wilderness in Europe. Our tourism partners therefore play 
an important part in the preservation and conservation agenda in these 
wilderness  areas  and  not  only  entertain  but  also  educate  the  general 
public about the most pressing wilderness issues.
Travel2Wild
One of our partners in this endeavour is Travel2Wild.  Travel2Wild 
was founded by nature-lover travel enthusiasts, who realised that while 
Europe’s  wilderness  offers  so  many  wonderful  holiday  opportunities, 
people do not associate the words Adventure, Europe and Wilderness 
together. At the moment, Travel2Wild offers several tours to eight un-
dicovered wilderness areas in Europe. Their plan is to cover all of the 
wilderness locations across Europe in the next 3 years as an alternative 
to mass tourism. ❀
Making Europe’s wilderness
sexy again
Author: Janos Pereczes, Zoltan Kun
We  like to think of tourism as a tool to mobilise people for wilderness and not as an industry 
creating nature conservation problems. People are increasingly seeking adventure; 
Europe’s wilderness is in serious need of getting more public support.
We encourage all interested wilder-
ness advocates to consider the next
vacation in a European Wilderness
- there are many to pick from...
15
www.wilderness-society.org
There 
are very few wilderness areas in Europe that have al-
ready been protected for decades. Yet Berezinsky Bio-
sphere Reserve in Belorussia founded in 1925, covers an area of 85.192 
ha with 27.204 ha of wilderness, is definately one of them! Because of its 
biological diversity and unique combinations of natural conditions, the 
reserve is very important not only for Belarus but also for Europe. There 
are four types of ecological systems at the Reserve: forests, bogs, water 
reservoirs and meadows. 
Tracks of the past
Berezinsky has become a world-famous model of intact primeval na-
ture of forest, marsh, lake and river systems. Thanks to the enthusiasm 
of many generations of scientists, forest experts and naturists, over 6.000 
biological  species  are  found  here,  including  187  rare  ones  listed  in  the 
National Red Data Book of Belarus.
Natural heritage of Europe
The  reserve  is  situated  at  the  watershed  of  the  Baltic  and  the  Black 
Seas.  The  reserve  is  the  oldest  of  all  the  protected  sites  that  form  the 
wilderness heritage of Europe.
Ecology of the future
Covering nearly the whole spectrum of natural complexes of the Re-
serve - forests, mires, meadows, rivers and lakes - the ecological routes 
are  designed  for  different  kinds  of  visitors  and  welcome  organised 
groups accompanied by experienced guides and specialists. ❀
Author: Vlado Vancura
Wilderness in Focus
Te Berezinsky Biosphere Reserve in Belorussia is the oldest European 
preserved natural territory
Berlin
Vienna
Bratislava
Lisboa
Madrid
Paris
London
Roma
Budapest
Bucaresti
Sofia
Tirana
Kiev
Warszawa
Dublin
Bern
Ljubljana
Minsk
Moskva
Tallinn
Helsinki
Riga
Vilnius
Stockholm
Oslo
Ankara
Baku
Tbilisi
Yerevan
Desertas Islands NP, Portugal
Garajonay NP, Spain
Vatnajökull NP
Iceland
16
European Wilderness Journal
Welcome back home,
dear Wolf !
Author: Max A.E. Rossberg
We are responsible to care for animals that belong to the natural biodiversity. Te wolf 
is part of our natural heritage. Hunting and loss of their habitat as well as several myths 
have almost led to their extinction, but they are staging a comeback.
We
all  know  the  story  of  the  „big  bad  wolf “  in  fairy  tales  like 
„Little  Red  Riding  Hood“  and  the  gruesome  stories  about 
werewolves that even today return to the big screen in movies. But the 
mythology also tells the story that the founders of Rome, Romulus and 
Remus  were  raised  by  wolves.  This  cultural-historical  background  re-
veals the often difficult relationship between wolf and mankind leading 
to the ambivalent roles of the wolf as a hunter and as a prey.
Hunter or prey ?
Previously  mistaken  as  a  bloodthirsty  man-eater,  scientific  research 
has shown that the wolf is actually a very shy predator, that has primari-
ly deer and rabbit on the menu. But nevertheless, over the past centuries 
wolves in Europe have not fared well. Wolves were nearly eradicated in 
Central Europe since the beginning of the last century. Hunters made a 
living from the bounties paid by villagers, because they hated the wolf 
as a competitor threatening their farm animals and the local wildlife.
Enjoys highest level of protection
 Wolves are the most important and last missing natural predator in 
Central  Europe.  Without  the  wolf,  governments  for  example  need  to 
spend  immense  amount  of  resources  managing  the  deer  population. 
This is why more and more regions and countries are working so hard 
on  a  reintroduction  of  the  wolf  across  all  of  Europe.  According  to  the 
EU  legislation,  the  wolf  is  a  priority  species  and  therefore  enjoys  the 
highest level of protection in most European countries and a pan Euro-
pean anti hunting code was agreed upon.
 
Returning to their original home
Legal protection helped to increase the number of wolves quadruple 
since  the  70s.  They  are  rapidly  expanding  their  territories  in  Europe 
from eastern Europe into France, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, Austria, 
Poland  and  Italy.  Their  choice  of  territory  is  often  a  mystery  as  Hnuti 
Duha, who are dealing with the monitoring and conservation of large 
carnivores around the Czech-Slovakian border, have observed. For in-
stance, last year, the only one confirmed case was a dead female wolf hit 
by car near the town Valašské Meziříčí while in another instance a wolf 
was already seen in the Netherlands and at the time wolves have been 
observed in urban areas like Berlin, Hanover and Rome.
 
Chilling howling, but not dangerous
In  general  however,  wolves  are  so  shy  that  people  hardly  get  to  see 
them. The only way we are becoming aware of a wolf in our region is the 
chilling howling of wolves at night. The image of the wolf as a danger to 
man is still ingrained in the collective mind of Europeans even though 
it  is  scientifically  proven  to  be  incorrect.  We  tend  to  overreact  as  can 
be seen in the case of the derogation agreement, which permitted 120 
wolves to be killed annually in Slovakia. Our colleagues at Hnuti Duha 
as well as several in Slovakian and Polish environmental organizations 
and hundreds of letters written by citizens of these states has started a 
EU Commission investigation into this unnecessary killing of the pro-
tected wolves.
Improve the coexistence between carnivores and humans:
In former times, herds consisted of 200 to 300 sheep, watched by at 
least 3 or 4 shepherds and their dogs. The dogs wore special spiked col-
lars to fend off possible attacks from wolves. With the extinction of the 
large carnivores this skill and knowledge on how to protect the livestock 
has  been  lost.  The  herds  have  become  larger  while  the  shepherds  and 
dogs have become less – for instance up to 1000 sheep with one shep-
herd and no watch dogs has become common.
Old and new techniques
There  are  several  projects  to  reduce  the  impact  of  the  wolf  on  the 
agricultural sector while allowing it to take its role in the natural food 
chain. Instead of ignoring the hunting ban, old methods should be re-
called  and  used  in  combination  with  new  technology.  This  is  done  by 
using simple tools, such as electric fences around sheep pens, by using 
‘Wolf Patrols’ to monitor populations and guard against illegal hunting 
and trapping, and by protecting migration corridors from ongoing frag-
mentation through the purchase of land and replanting / regeneration, 
and undertaking a public awareness campaign using the data collected.
17
www.wilderness-society.org
Nö.
Stmk.
W.
Ktn.
Oö.
Sbg. T. Vbg.
Bgld.
WÖLFE IN EUROPA
WÖLFE IN ÖSTERREICH
Im 19. Jhdt. ausgerottet
Seit damals immer wieder
sporadisches Vorkommen
von Einzeltieren
Gefährdungsstatus: Rote Liste
Österreich „Ausgestorben“
Wolfshinweise 2010, 2011 und
2012
Karelien
150-165 Geschätzte Zahl
Baltikum
870-1.400
Iberische Halbinsel
2.500
Italien
600-800
Skandinavien
260-330
AUT
STECKBRIEF WOLF
(CANIS LUPUS)
Lebt zurückgezogen und scheu
in Familienverbänden (Rudeln)
mit starken Bindungen
Größe: zwischen 100
und 160 cm
Gewicht: bis zu 38 kg
Reviergröße: bis zu 300 km
2
Alter: 8 – 13 Jahre
Nahrung: hauptsächlich Rehe,
Wildschweine, Hirsche
Westalpen
250
Balkan
3.900
Karpaten
3.000
©
WWF Österreich 2013
B
ild
e
r
: iS
to
c
k
p
h
o
to
, S
h
u
tte
r
s
to
c
k
Deutschland-Westpolen
150
Tourism and wolf
Landscape  and  nature  are  the  business  foundation  of  regional 
tourism.  Accordingly  new  media-friendly  wild  species  like  the  wolf 
actually  boost  regional  tourism  opportunities.  Tourist  regions  where 
wolves have returned not only have nothing to fear, but actually attract 
 
interested visitors. The wolf is not the devil, it is just an animal we must 
learn to live with again. Should you need more information concerning 
wolves please contact the Europe Wilderness Society. ❀
18
European Wilderness Journal
Wilderness Stuf
T
he European natural world could be even wilder than we might imagine.
Large herds of bison and wild horses, huge bears and rivers teeming with
salmon were once part of a wild Europe. As western civilisation grew, this
natural paradise disappeared centuries ago and it is hard to imagine how it might
once have been. But there are now places in Europe where the wilderness of yesteryear
returns. This film is a unique portrait of a pocket of European wild nature that has
not been witnessed for generations. This is a story about life in the ‘Wolf Mountains’
of the Eastern Carpathians.
Arolla Film Company was set up in 2009. The aim of the company is to use our unique
footage to inspire our audience with a passion for wildlife and by so doing to contribute to
the protection of particular areas of wilderness that could regenerate back to their former
glory if left alone.
Also in store
Keeper of
the wilderness
The wolf
Mountains
T
h
e

w
o
l
f

m
o
u
n
t
a
i
n
s
Aroll Film, s.r.o.,
Komenského 501/18,
033 01 Liptovský Hrdok,
SR, info@rollfilm.com
www.rollfilm.com
© 2013 Arollfilm
EN PAL 16:9
When buying this DVD you
support the Aevis Foundtion
www.evis.org
Willkommen zu Hause
Die Wölfe kehren zurück
10 – 14 Jahre (ISCED 2) Schülerarbeitshef
DVD - The Wolf Mountains
The European natural world could be even wilder than we might imagine. Large
herds of bison and wild horses, huge bears and rivers teeming with salmon were once
part of a wild Europe. As western civilisation grew, this natural paradise disappeared
centuries ago and it is hard to imagine how it might once have been. But there are now
places in Europe where the wilderness of yesteryear returns. This film is a unique por-
trait of a pocket of European wild nature that has not been witnessed for generations.
This is a story about life in the ‘Wolf Mountains’ of the Eastern Carpathians.
Magazine for Kids - Welcome Home
The WWF Austria has developed a series of educational and informational set of
material focusing on the return of the Wolf into Austria. Especially interesting is the
16 magazine targeted at the 10-14 year old teenagers informing them about the history,
habits, dietary plans, hunting skills and the role the Wolf plays in the food chain of our
natural environment.


19
www.wilderness-society.org
Join and be part of it!
Team
Zoltan KUN, Chairman of the Society, EU Advocacy and Fundraising,
Max A.E. ROSSBERG, Deputy Chairman, Sustainable Tourism Expert
Vlado VANCURA, Director Wilderness Development
Anni HENNING, Senior Editor, Marketing Communications
Susanne WERTH, Marketing Assistant, Marketing Communications
Gaia ANGELINI, International Policy Director
Bodo ROSSBERG, Art Director
We acknowledge our advisors
Stephen Carver, Wildland Research Institute
Mark Fisher, Wildland Research Institute
Allison Parfitt, Wildland Research Institute
Dr. Michael Jungmeier, E.C.O. Institute of Ecology
Michael Meyer, OETE Stiftung und UNWTO
© 2014 European Wilderness Society
Dechant Franz Fuchs Str. 5; 5580 Tamsweg; Austria
Phone: +43 (0)676 913 88 04
Email: info@wilderness-society.org | www.wilderness-society.org
All rights, errors and changes are reserved. 
Photo Credits: Stephen Carver, Michael Meyer, Max Rossberg, Bruno 
D’Amicis,  NP  Kalkalpen,  Wild  Foundation,  NP  Majella,  Berezinsky 
Biosphere  Reserve,  Vanatori  Neamt  NP,  Vlado  Vancura,  Sebastian 
Catanoiu, WWF, fotolia.de
Design: www.diemedienwerkstatt.info, 5580 Tamsweg, Austria
Printed in Austria
Subscription
Become one of our 2000 subscribers. If you want to subscribe visit our 
Website: www.wilderness-society.org
www.wilderness-society.org
We appreciate your donation to support
wilderness in Europe
European Wilderness Society
IBAN: AT98 3506 3000 0015 8089 BIC: RVS AAT2 S063
European
WILDERNESS SOCIETY
WWW.WILDERNESS-SOCIETY.ORG
JOIN AND BE PART OF IT