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I NDIAN I NSTITUTE OF S CIENCE E DUCATION AND R ESEARCH T HIRUVANANTHAPURAM

An autonomous institution under the Ministry of Human Resource Development, Government of India

G UIDE BOOK OF CURRICULUM AND REGULATIONS FOR THE I NTEGRATED P H . D. P ROGRAMME

2012-13 www.iisertvm.ac.in

The Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) is an Institution conceived and established by the Ministry of Human Resources Development (MHRD) of the Government of India. The mission of the Institute is to offer postgraduate level teaching of the highest international standards to school leaving (+2) students and also to conduct frontline research leading to Ph.D. Degree, in basic sciences like Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics and other Interdisciplinary Science subjects. The five IISERs established by MHRD are at Kolkata, Pune, Mohali, Bhopal and Thiruvananthapuram.

IISER T HIRUVANANTHAPURAM C AMPUS
IISER TVM started functioning in August 2008 at the transit campus in the Department of Computer Science of the College of Engineering, Thiruvananthapuram (CET). The Institute is residential. This means all students will reside in the Institute hostels. The phase-I construction of the permanent campus of IISER TVM at Vithura is expected to be completed in a year’s time.

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.D. . . . . . Leave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Removal from the rolls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Temporary Withdrawal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Comprehensive examination . Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Research work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Requirements for continuing to the Ph. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duration of the Programme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sample transcript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Research Seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring Research Progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Course work . Programme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enrollment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fellowship . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contents About the programme . . . . Selection procedure . . . . . . Course completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doctoral Committee . . . . . . . Starting of the research work and Supervisor . . . . . . . . . . Assessment . . . MOODLE and Course Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 5 5 5 5 7 8 8 9 9 9 11 11 11 11 12 vii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eligibility . . . . . . . . . . . Faculty Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . First four semesters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 13 13 13 13 14 14 15 15 16 17 17 17 18 19 21 21 22 24 25 26 27 29 29 29 30 30 31 32 32 34 35 35 36 36 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . School of Biology Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .viii Contents Thesis submission . . . . . . . . . . BIO 314 Evolutionary Ecology [3003] . . . . . . . . Research proposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . School of Biology . . . Ethical Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BIO 311 Neurobiology [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Obtaining Thesis Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BIO 413 Advances in Plant Biology [3003] . . . Conduct Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hostel Regulations . . . BIO 324 Neurobiology [3003] . . . Selection of Examiners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Theory Courses . . . . . . . . BIO 411 Developmental Biology [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Course codes . . . . . . . . . BIO 412 Biostatistics [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Further Processing of Thesis Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viva Voce Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . Integrated Ph. . . . . Thesis Examination . . . . . . School of Physics Curriculum . . . . . . School of Mathematics Curriculum . . . . . . . . Library Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thesis Submission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thesis Examiners’ Report . . . . . . . . . . . .D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . BIO 312 Immunology [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BIO 313 Advanced Cell biology [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BIO 322 Biophysics and Structural Biology [3003] . . Thesis Synopsis . . . . . . . . . . School of Chemistry Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BIO 321 Bacterial genetics [3003] . . . . BIO 323 Advanced Biochemistry [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHY 322 Advanced Molecular Spectroscopy [3003] . . CHY 415 Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory[0093] Mathematics Syllabus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laboratory Courses . . . . . . . CHY 325 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory[0093] . . . . . . . . . List of Electives in Biology . CHY 313 Stereochemistry: Principles and Applications [3003] . . . . . . BIO 422 Advanced Genetics [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHY 312 Quantum Chemistry [3003] . . . BIO 325 Advanced Lab-II [0093] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHY 413 Advanced Organic Chemistry II [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHY 324 Spectroscopic methods in structure determination [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHY 414 Bioinorganic Chemistry [3003] . . . . . Theory Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laboratory Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BIO 415 Advanced Lab-III [0093] . . . . . . School of Chemistry . . . . . . . . .Contents ix BIO 414 Genomics [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHY 321 Organometallic Chemistry [3003] . . . . . . . . . . 37 37 38 39 39 39 39 40 43 43 43 44 45 46 47 49 50 51 52 54 55 56 57 57 57 58 59 63 79 79 79 . . CHY 315 Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory[0093] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHY 412 Advanced Chemical Kinetics [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . List of Electives in Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHY 323 Advanced Organic Chemistry I [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Theory Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BIO 315 Advanced Lab-I [0093] . . . . . . . . . . . CHY 311 Advanced Coordination Chemistry [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . School of Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHY 314 Instrumental Methods [3003] . . . . . CHY 411 Chemistry of Solids and Materials [3003] . . . . BIO 421 Advanced Molecular Biology [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PHY 311 Mathematical Methods in Physics [3003] . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PHY 411 Experimental Methods [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 [3003] . . . . . . PHY 413 Quantum Mechanics . . . . . PHY 322 Condensed Matter Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . List of Electives in Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . School of Mathematics . . . . . . .x Contents PHY 312 Classical Mechanics [3003] . . . . . PHY 325 Advanced Physics Experiments II [0093] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PHY 412 Condensed Matter Physics . . . . . . . . . . PHY 324 Electrodynamics and special theory of relativity [3003] . Laboratory Coordinators . . . . PHY 415 Advanced Physics Experiments III [0093] . . . Administration . 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 90 91 92 93 93 94 95 96 97 99 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PHY 314 Quantum Mechanics . . . . . . PHY 321 Statistical Mechanics [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laboratory Courses . . .2 [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 [3003] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . School of Physics . . . . . . School of Biology . . . . . . . . . PHY 315 Advanced Physics Experiments I [0093] . . School of Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PHY 323 Electronics 2 [3003] . . . . . . . PHY 313 Electronics . . . . . . . . . . Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

iisertvm. The minimum requirement for admission to the programme is 55% marks or 6. Selection procedure Applications for the programme will be invited through press advertisement and announcement at the Institutes’ website: www.About the programme Integrated Ph.ac. candidates with a valid JEST scorecard will be called for the interview 1 . 3. 2. At the end of the successful completion. Short-listed candidates who have applied for School of Biology. The minimum requirement in the qualifying degree is relaxed to 50% or 5. Chemistry and Mathematics will be called for a written test and those shortlisted in the written test will appear for interview(s). The first three semesters will consist of core and elective courses specialized in one subject (Biology. under the 10+2+3/4 system. Master of Science and Ph.5 out of 10 CGPA for SC/ ST and PD candidates. Candidates admitted to School of Physics must have a valid score in Joint Entrance Screening Test (JEST). the student will continue with research leading to the Ph.D. Chemistry. degree.D. After the successful completion of comprehensive and project work. Mathematics or Physics). In the School of Physics. degree are awarded. The fourth semester will consist of advanced courses and project work.0 out of 10 CGPA in the Bachelor’s degree (as declared by the University). Eligibility 1. A Bachelor’s degree in Biological Sciences/ Chemical Sciences/ Mathematical Sciences/ Physical Sciences/ Engineering/ Technology and related areas as applicable to individual Schools. Programme is a research programme.in.D.

• Late registration after the first week of the semester can only be done with the permission of the Dean (Academics) or the Director of the institute. 10.D. • After 14 semesters. programme by producing originals of the required certificates and payment of the registration fees on the day prescribed for Registration. Fellowship The students will be awarded Institute scholarship of Rs. At the end of 14 semesters. After clearing the comprehensive examination the studentship will be made equivalent to that of UGC-CSIR JRF/SRF excluding the contingency grant and HRA. programme is 14 semesters.2 About the programme Enrollment The successful candidate has to register for the Integrated Ph.D.000/. The studentship will be paid for a maximum of .0.per month until the successful completion of the coursework and comprehensive examination provided the student maintains a minimum AGPA (annual grade point average) of 6.100/. continuation of the course registration must have approval of the senate (see below). • Registration involves payment of the prescribed fees for the semester. the registration will automatically be canceled and any re-registration must have the approval of the Academic council/Senate. • A fine of Rs.per day will be levied for late registration done after the first day of class. Registration • Every student must register for the courses of a semester on the first day (registration day) of the semester. Duration of the Programme The maximum duration of the Integrated Ph.

on bona fide grounds.Leave 3 14 semesters (including 4 semesters of course work) for each student provided (s)he is in good academic standing. Fellowship stands automatically terminated at the end of 14 semesters for which the student registered. No fellowship is provided during the period of a semester drop. The period of semester drop is not counted in the prescribed time limit for completion of the Programme. up to a maximum of two semesters in the entire duration of programme. Temporary Withdrawal A student may temporarily withdraw from the programme. . The withdrawal request is to be forwarded by the Faculty Advisor and Chairperson of the school (or DC) to the Dean and is to be approved by the Director. Leave Student must submit an application for leave (personal/academic) to the Department Head/Director forwarded by the faculty advisor/research guide.

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(a) The letter Grade and Grade Points are as follows: 5 .Course work Faculty Adviser Until the successful completion of the course work and comprehensive examination (details given below). Theory Courses : Assignments : 10% Mid-Semester Examination-I : 20 % Mid-Semester Examination-II : 20 % End Semester Examination : 50 % Practical Courses : Class experiments End Semester Examination : 70% : 30 % Grading Relative grading will be adopted. Assessment Continuous assessment will be adopted for all courses. the student’s research guide will serve as the faculty adviser. After the successful completion of the course work and comprehensive. every student is assigned a Faculty Adviser from the school who will guide the student in all academic and personal matters.

Summation is over all the courses credited by the student in all the completed semesters. Summation is over all the courses credited by the student in the semester. Cj is the credit for j th course. Gk is the grade point secured by the student. (c) Annual Grade Point Average (AGPA) is calculated as: AGPA = j Cj G j i Cj where. (d) Cumulative Grade Point Average is calculated as CGPA = k Ck G k k Ck where. . Ck is the credit for k th course.6 Course work A+ A B+ B C+ C D F I 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 0 Incomplete (b) Semester Grade Point Average (SGPA) is calculated as: SGPA = i C i Gi i Ci where. Summation is over all the courses credited by the student in the academic year. Ci is the credit for ith course and Gi = is the grade point secured by the student for the course. Gj is the grade point secured by the student.

5 8. M=Medical Leave a XYZ refers to BIO/CHY/MAT/PHY .8 8.0 8.9 D D B + Semester Grade Point Average: 6. B = 7. D = 4. F = 0. C = 5. Thiruvananthapuram G RADE T RANSCRIPT Integrated Ph.Sample transcript 7 Sample transcript Indian Institute of Science Education and Research. Vasanth Semester: January – May Grade Points: A+ = 10. B + = 8. A = 9. I=Incomplete.67 Cumulative Grade Point Average: 6. Academics Varsha Semester: August – December. Programme in Biology/Chemistry/Mathematics/Physics Name of Student: xxxx Batch Name: Batch xxxx Roll Number: IPhD 0XXXX Grades for Varsha xxx∗ C OURSE NAME C OURSE C ODE C OURSE C REDIT M AX P OINTS L ETTER G RADE O BTAINED G RADE P OINTS O BTAINED ATTENDANCE M AX 10 Course I Course II Course III Course IV Advanced Lab-I T OTAL XYZ1 311 XYZ 312 XYZ 313 XYZ 314 XYZ 315 3 3 3 3 3 15 30 30 30 30 30 150 B+ C + 24 18 12 12 24 100 8.0 8. C + = 6.67 Date: Thiruvananthapuram ∗ Dean.D.

Attendance will be recorded in the prescribed book in every class and attendance grade will appear in the grade transcripts. • A student who has more than two F and/or I grades in any semester will have to repeat ALL the courses of that semester. MOODLE and Course Feedback MOODLE (Modular Object Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment) is employed extensively in the teaching programmes. • A student with an F grade in a course may be given a repeat final examination. . assignments. Online course feedback by students will be done for every course. quizzes. • Make up examinations may be given to those who miss the mid semester or end semester examinations due to genuine reasons as determined by the Instructor. An F grade may be improved at best to a D grade as a result of the repeat final exam. Students with at least 80% overall attendance will only be permitted for that end-semester examination.8 Course work Course completion • Students are expected to attend all classes. • Repeat of a course where the grade obtained is D or above is not permitted. Only the new grades obtained in ALL the courses will be valid. • If a student does not clear a course even after writing the repeat final examination. he/she is required to repeat the course with the same course number when offered next taking all examinations. it is treated as a backlog in the student’s records. Until the course is repeated and cleared by the student. and course grades. This includes course contents. Dean and Director.

Failure to do will lead to the removal of the student from the Integrated Ph. Programme • The minimum number of credits required for the student to continue to the Ph. . programme. Programme.D. the student must pass a comprehensive examination in order to continue for the Ph. • CGPA must not be below 7. In exceptional cases the Director may at his discretion override any of the above provisions. programme is 60.D.0 in any two consecutive semesters will lead to automatic removal of the student from the rolls. Those who do not qualify to register for Ph. Programme.Removal from the rolls 9 Comprehensive examination • At the starting of the fourth semester. • A second failure in the comprehensive examination will result in the cancellation of the registration of the student from the Integrated Ph.D.D.D. Removal from the rolls • Failure to maintain the minimum CGPA of 4. • In case of a failure. Requirements for continuing to the Ph. shall do another year research work to receive a Master of Science degree. • Failure to clear any CORE course even after repeating the same course a second time will lead to the removal of the student from the rolls. Research work in the fourth semester will constitute six credits and will be graded.D. • Individual Schools are free to place additional requirements. • ALL courses and project work of the first two years must be successfully completed in a maximum of six semesters. Schools will also specify how the credits are split between theory and laboratory courses. a repeat comprehensive examination may be given within 6 months.

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Research work Starting of the research work and Supervisor After the successful completion of the first three semesters of course work and comprehensive. Monitoring Research Progress 1. the student presents the progress of his/her work. the doctoral committee will decide a minimum of three advanced courses which the student has to complete within the next one year. depending on the mutual research interest of the faculty and student. The major role of the Committee is to monitor the progress of the research work. the Institute will assign a research guide(s).D. At every subsequent meeting. The committee will consist of the Guide. the Chairperson of the School and two other members of the IISER faculty who are in research areas related to the proposed work of the student. degree. the student may present a rough plan of the research work to be under taken. The guide is primarily responsible for the research work and well being of the student. At the first meeting of the Committee. The Doctoral Committee will make semester-wise assessment of the progress of the research work of the student and report to the Dean (Academics). of the student up to the point of the award of the Ph. The Doctoral Committee will meet at least once every semester. Depending on the area of research and availability of courses. Doctoral Committee Each student will have a Doctoral Committee (DC) appointed by the School/Institute. The semester-wise report of the Committee on the student’s progress is mandatory at the time of the registration of the student in each semester. 11 .

In case of continued lack of progress or initiative on the part of the student. the DC may consider it and recommend suitable remedy. . Both the seminars will be assessed by the Doctoral Committee and will be judged as satisfactory or unsatisfactory. a suitable course of action will be suggested by the DC. will discuss the major findings of the student that will go into the thesis. called the synopsis seminar . will essentially concern with the formulation of the research problem and survey of existing literature. In case of any dispute between the student and the guide. 4. to be given before the end of the seventh semester. The second seminar. In the latter case. the DC may recommend the cancellation of Fellowship or termination of the Registration.12 Research work 2. The synopsis seminar will be given just prior to the submission of the Thesis Synopsis to the Dean (see below) and with the approval of the Doctoral Committee. 3. Research Seminars The student has to give at least two research seminars to the department: The first one. The DC is also empowered to recommend to the Dean any disciplinary action in case of misconduct or unethical practices.

or no response is received within a fortnight. in which case. Each school will specify the publication requirements the student must satisfy before submission of the synopsis. The synopsis is evaluated by this committee. 1. another from the list is contacted. it must be revised and resubmitted. The Synopsis is presented by the student to the Committee consisting of the Dean and the DC members. Research in processing the accepted synopsis. The accepted synopsis is further processed by the office of the Dean. 2. The synopsis is sent to the selected examiners by email and their willingness to examine the thesis is ascertained. The list should contain their contact details. If any examiner is unwilling to accept the examinership. The research guide(s) will serve as the third examiner. Thesis Examination S ELECTION OF E XAMINERS The following steps are followed by the Dean. The committee may propose revisions to the synopsis.Thesis submission Thesis Synopsis The thesis synopsis is a Chapter-wise summary of the thesis. at the synopsis evaluation meeting. A panel of two external examiners is confidentially selected by the Dean from a list of a minimum of four possible examiners suggested by the DC. 3. This is prepared after the go ahead from the DC. T HESIS S UBMISSION Electronic copy of the thesis produced in the prescribed format are to be submitted to the Dean’s office within two months of the submission of the 13 .

the student is to prepare a detailed research proposal not directly connected with the thesis (not more than 4000 words) and submit it to the Doctoral committee within four weeks of the submission of the Ph. The thesis is acceptable as such without any revision. thesis.D.14 Thesis submission synopsis. I wish to see the revised thesis. . 3. The research proposal must provide details of the idea and supporting documentation which justifies its feasibility. R ESEARCH PROPOSAL In addition to the thesis. The revised thesis need not be sent to me. The thesis needs revisions along the lines I have suggested in my report. degree to the candidate subject to his/her satisfying the Viva Voce board about the questions/clarifications I have raised in my report. degree can be awarded to the candidate after the revisions are made to the satisfaction of the Doctoral Committee. degree of IISER-TVM to the candidate.D. 2. Specifically they will be asked to give one of the following verdicts: 1. I recommend the award of the Ph.D. The thesis needs revisions along the lines I have suggested in my report.D. I recommend the award of the Ph. 4. The idea of the research proposal is to provide a starting point of the students’ independent research career. The Ph. T HESIS E XAMINERS ’ R EPORT The thesis is sent to all the examiners for evaluation and for their comments on the originality and scientific merit of the findings of the author and to judge whether the work deserves the award of the PhD Degree of IISER-TVM. The thesis is acceptable as such without any revision. The thesis is to be forwarded to the Dean by the thesis Guide(s) and the Chairperson of the School with due certifications.

the Dean convenes the DC to discuss the reports and to take further action. • Monthly status report of the progress of reviewing is sent to the Chairperson of the School/Department. . The thesis is not acceptable for reasons I have given in detail in my report. The following guide lines may be observed by the DC in arriving at their decision: • If the verdicts from the two external examiners are either (1) or (2) . • The examiners are reminded of the report every fortnight. the Dean. If the third report in this case is also (5). the Dean. a new examiner may be appointed by the Dean. Research may constitute a committee of experts from the institute to recommend further action. O BTAINING T HESIS R EPORTS The following steps are taken by the Dean’s office after sending the thesis to the examiners. a third examiner may be appointed. • If no report is received within 3 months of sending the thesis.D. • Viva Voce examination can be held only when two final reports are positive. the DC may recommend holding the open Viva Voce Examination. • If one of the verdicts alone is (5).Thesis Examination 15 5. F URTHER P ROCESSING OF T HESIS R EPORTS On receipt of both the reports. Research may constitute a committee of experts from the institute to recommend further action. • If the verdicts from the external examiners are both (5). after an initial period of 3 weeks. I do not recommend the award of the Ph. degree of IISER-TVM to the candidate.

• Members consist of one of the thesis examiners and DC members. • At the discretion of the Director. • After the thesis presentation. If the Board declares the candidate to have performed satisfactorily and recommends that PhD Degree be awarded to the candidate. . thesis examination may be conducted via video conferencing. in situations where the thesis examination is delayed and student has left the country for another assignment. The Senate may then recommend the award of the Degree to the Board of Governors. • The examiners may seek answers to the questions raised in the thesis reports. the student will have to defend the research proposal submitted to the DC. the Dean forwards the recommendation to the Senate of the Institute.16 Thesis submission Viva Voce Examination • Once two external positive reports are received. the Dean approves the holding of an open Viva Voce Examination and appoints the Viva Board. The composition of the Board is as follows: Chairperson of the Board is the Chairperson of the School. • The Chairperson reports the result of the Viva Voce examination to the Dean. • Copies of the thesis are to be deposited in the Central library and School or Departmental Libraries along with an abstract. • In case of the absence of the DC members. Director may appoint another member from the School.

The student must sign and submit to the Institute the following Honour Pledge at the time of registration in the Varsha semester. I understand that violation of this pledge makes me liable to disciplinary action by the Institute. IISER TVM S TUDENT H ONOUR P LEDGE a. f.Regulations Ethical Regulations The student is expected to maintain high ethical standards in his/her conduct and professional work. c. (s)he is expected to observe the practice of acknowledging the sources of information reproduced in his/her thesis. d. I will not engage in plagiarism in my writings and will acknowledge the work of other authors according to international practises. Conduct Regulations 1. or cancellation of the awarded Degree at any time. I will not resort to any dishonest practice in examinations/assignments. or seminars. g. In particular. I will follow the Library and Hostel regulations of the Institute. The pledge must be counter-signed by the parent/guardian. I promise. I will not engage in overt/covert sexual harassment. reports.D. that I will conduct myself in the Institute and outside. I understand that ragging is unlawful and liable to prosecution by law enforcement authorities of the State besides any disciplinary action the Institute may take which may include dismissal from the Institute. IISER TVM and follow its rules and regulations b. Any instance of plagiarism will attract severe punishment including the cancellation of the registration for Integrated Ph. publications. on my honour. e. I will not engage in ragging. 17 . with decorum and decency befitting the high moral and ethical standards expected of the members of the National Institute.

Library remains open from 9 AM to 7. Silence has to be maintained by all users in the Library.iisertvm. 6.30 PM on Monday to Friday. provided they do not have any overdue book with them. Library hours: 1. Circulation of Books will be between 9. class rooms. All items taken out of the library are to be produced for verification by the check point staff engaged in front of the Library. 5. laboratories and exam hall is prohibited. Borrowing facility: BS-MS students can borrow a maximum of 4 books at a time for 2 weeks. 7. On Saturdays Circulation of Books will be till 12 noon. Membership: All BS-MS students are eligible for membership at the institute library 3. library remains open till 5 PM. the prescribed anti-ragging forms (see: www. Govt. During Exam Week : 9 AM to 10 PM 3. consumption of food and drinks are strictly prohibited in the Library. Use of Mobile Phones. . Use of mobile phones in the library. Issued books are allowed to be taken to the Library for return/renewal only. Users must leave their Bags and other belongings outside the Library. 4. 4. 2. of India.15 PM on Monday to Friday. however.ac.15 AM to 5. at the time of admission. Library Regulations 1. Always carry the Identity card and must be produced whenever asked for.18 Regulations Sd/Student Sd/Parent/Guardian 2. 5.in) as per the stipulation of the MHRD. Only notebooks and papers are allowed inside the library. 3. The student and his/her parent /guardian should sign. Sundays and Holidays: Closed 2.

g. Hostel Regulations IISER-TVM being a residential institute. all students are expected to reside in the institute hostel throughout their course. Users should obey the Library Rules and Regulations. If the book is part of a set or series they may be called upon to replace the whole set or series. In case of the lost books is untraceable in market or out of print Library committee reserves the right to decide appropriate penalty. Mutilation of books in any form (e. A fine of Re. Please do not make noise in the rooms. 2. Members who lose/mutilate library materials are liable to replace the book with latest edition of the books along with a penalty of 20% of the total cost of the book. TV. Please take utmost care not to damage furniture. washing machines. building structure. Violation of rules and any act of misbehaviour to the library staff will be brought to the notice of the Library Committee Chair. Return of book is mandatory before the due date. 9. writing on pages. electrical fittings etc. corridors and premises of the hostel especially during night. Keep your rooms and premises clean and tidy. .Hostel Regulations 19 8.10/. BS-MS students should return all the books they have borrowed before they go for vacation 12. A book may be recalled anytime before the due date if it is urgently required by another member. Before borrowing a book users should look at the condition of the book and bring to the notice of the library staff if any mutilation found. and will lead to strong disciplinary action. You are responsible for keeping your rooms clean. A late fee of Rs. 3. 1.per day per book thereafter will be levied. damaging the binding etc) will lead to a heavy fine or even replacement of the book. Renewal of a book is possible only if there is no pending reservation against it. 10/. 11. underlining. 10. All books replaced in this manner must be of the latest edition. tearing off pages.1/.per day per book for the first week of delayed return and Rs.per day per book will be imposed for the non-compliance with the requirement.

Cooking inside the rooms is strictly prohibited. contact the concerned warden. Please take care of your personal belongings. 14. accidents etc). Bringing illegal substances such as explosives. Guests are not allowed in hostel rooms. 7. 12. drugs. 10. 16. 6. if found otherwise. 11.00 pm. Smoking in public is a punishable offence. Permanent address including the phone numbers of the parent/guardian has to be given to the Warden/IISER office. 5. Leaving the hostel for a day or longer need prior permission from the concerned warden. narcotics and other illegal substances to the hostel /hostel premises is strictly prohibited.20 Regulations 4. Prior permission from the concerned warden has to be obtained in case the student need to go anywhere else. Anti-ragging regulations of the institute have to be strictly followed in the hostels too. 13. Also the address has to be updated whenever there is a change due to shifting/ change of phone number of the parent etc. All students must return to the hostel by 10. Any overt or covert sexual/caste/religion/creed/linguistic/color remark will lead to immediate removal of the offender from the institute rolls. Use of drugs/alcoholic beverages/tobacco products in the hostels is strictly prohibited. 15. including recovery of cost of electrical equipment/fitting/ appliances etc. Strictly avoid getting into arguments with fellow hostelites. localites and office staff. This has also to be recorded in the register kept for the purpose in the Hostel. Please switch off all electrical equipment after usage. 9. a fine will be levied. Students should be either in the hostel or in the IISER. 17. 8. . In case of any emergency (illness.

After the successful completion of comprehensive and project work. The fourth semester will consist of advanced courses and project work. Course codes The CORE and elective courses are numbered in the following format. PHY . XYZ YSC (LTPC) XYZ YSCC (LTPC) respectively.D. the student will continue with research leading to the Ph. Mathematics or Physics). The numbering may be understood as XYZ : Subject Code BIO .D.Biology. Chemistry.Chemistry MAT . CHY . Curriculum The first three semesters will consist of core and elective courses specialized in one subject (Biology. degree.Physics Y S C ( CC ) : : : Year Semester Number Number of the course (in a particular subject) in that year Lecture hours Tutorial hours Practical hours Credits L T P C : : : : 21 .Integrated Ph.Mathematics.

First four semesters A table outlining the course requirements (sample structure only) for the first four semesters are given below.D. First year S EMESTER 1 S L . Individual schools may choose to offer extra courses.22 Integrated Ph. C OURSE 1 2 3 4 5 Core 1 Core 2 Core 3 Core 4 Core 5 (Lab/Theory) C REDITS 3 3 3 3 3 Cumulative 15 Cumulative 0 Cumulative 15 C ORE C OURSES This Semester 15 E LECTIVES This Semester 0 T OTAL This Semester 15 . The total earned credits shown are minimum values. In the subsequent semesters students need to register for thesis research worth zero credit. Individual Schools are free to place additional requirements. N O . students need to take 300 level or higher level courses. CGPA must not be below 7. Over the first two years. Research work in the fourth semester will constitute six credits and will be graded. Curriculum Minimum Credit Requirement The minimum number of credits required to obtain an Integrated PhD degree from IISER-TVM is 60. Schools will also specify how the credits are split between theory and laboratory courses.

First four semesters 23 S EMESTER 2 S L . C OURSE 1 2 3 4 5 Core 1 Core 2 Core 3 Core 4 Core 5 (Lab/Theory) C REDITS 3 3 3 3 3 Cumulative 30 Cumulative 0 Cumulative 30 C ORE COURSES This Semester 15 E LECTIVES This Semester 0 T OTAL This Semester 15 Second year S EMESTER 3 S L . N O . C OURSE 1 2 3 4 Elective 1 Elective 2 Elective 3 Research work/ Advanced Electives C REDITS 3 3 3 C ORE COURSES This Semester 0 Cumulative E LECTIVES This Semester 15 Cumulative T OTAL This Semester 15 Cumulative 6 42 18 60 . C OURSE 1 2 3 4 5 Core 1 Core 2 Core 3 Elective 1 Core 5 (Lab/Theory) C REDITS 3 3 3 3 3 Cumulative 42 Cumulative 3 Cumulative 45 C ORE COURSES This Semester 12 E LECTIVES This Semester 3 T OTAL This Semester 15 S EMESTER 4 S L . N O . N O .

lant Biology Genomics Ad anced Biology &ab'III 3 3 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 ( 3 BIO "21 Ad anced Molecular Biology BIO "22 Ad anced Genetics BIO "201 #lecti e'I BIO "2" -esearch . Curriculum School of Biology Curriculum Course BIO 311 BIO 312 BIO 313 BIO 31" BIO 31% Semester –I Course Name Microbiology Immunology L 3 3 T P C 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 ( 3 Course BIO 321 BIO 322 BIO 323 BIO 32" BIO 32% Semester -II Course Name Bacterial Genetics Biophysics & Structural Biology Ad anced Biochemistry $eurobiology Ad anced Biology &ab'II L 3 3 3 3 0 T P C 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 ( 3 Ad anced !ell Biology 3 # olutionary #cology 3 Ad anced Biology 0 &ab'I Total Course BIO "11 BIO "12 BIO "13 BIO "1" BIO "1% 12 0 9 15 Total !umulati e credits at the end o) )irst year* 30 Semester –III Semester -IV Course Name L T P C Course Course Name +e elopmental Biology 3 Biostatistics Ad ances in .or/ 12 0 9 15 L 3 3 3 0 T P C 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 0 Total 12 0 0 15 Total !umulati e credits at the end o) second year* 00 For details of the courses offered ! the School of "iolo#!$ %lease tur& to Pa#e '29() 15 0 0 15 .24 Integrated Ph.D.

School of Chemistry Curriculum 25 School of Chemistry Curriculum Course CHY 311 CHY 312 CHY 313 CHY 31$ CHY 31& Semester –I Course Name L T P C 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 ) 3 Course CHY 321 CHY 322 CHY 323 CHY 32$ CHY 32& Semester .lective ## .II Course Name Organometallics Chemistry Advanced Molecular Spectroscopy Advanced Organic Chemistry # Spectroscopic Methods in Structure %etermination Advanced #norganic Chemistry 'a( L 3 3 3 3 0 T P C 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 ) 3 Advanced Coordination 3 Chemistry Quantum Chemistry 3 Stereochemistry !rinciples " Applications #nstrumental Methods Advanced Organic Chemistry 'a( 3 3 0 Total Course CHY $11 CHY $12 CHY $13 CHY $1$ CHY $1& 12 0 9 15 Total Cumulative credits at the end o* *irst year+ 30 Semester – III Semester .lective ### /esearch 0or1 Seminar CHY $2& Total 12 0 9 15 Total Cumulative credits at the end o* *ourth year+ 22 15 0 0 17 For details of the ourses offered !" the S hool of Chemistr"# $lease tur% to Pa&e '()*+ .lective # .IV Course Name L T P C Course Course Name Chemistry o* Solids " Materials Advanced Chemical -inetics Advanced Organic Chemistry ## .ioinorganic Chemistry Advanced !hysical Chemistry 'a( 3 3 3 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 ) 3 CHY $201 CHY $202 CHY $203 CHY $2$ 12 0 9 15 L 3 3 3 2 T P C 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 2 2 .

Total Course MAT "11 MAT "12 18 0 2 18 Total Cumulati!e credits at the end o/ /irst year0 33 Semester –III Semester -IV Course Name L T P C Course Course Name 3 3 3 3 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 MAT "201 &lecti!e2III MAT "202 &lecti!e2I3 MAT "203 &lecti!e23 MAT "20" &lecti!e23I MAT "20$ 15 0 0 15 L 3 3 3 3 3 T P C 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 1unctional Analysis )robability Theory * Random )rocesses MAT "13 %umber Theory and Cryptography MAT "1" Theory o/ -rdinary Di//erential &4uations MAT "101 &lecti!e2II ()rogramming * Data +tructures. Curriculum School of Mathematics Curriculum Course MAT 311 MAT 312 MAT 313 MAT 31" Semester –I Course Name Real Analysis Discrete Mathematics Abstract Algebra L 3 3 3 3 3 3 T P C 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 Course MAT 321 MAT 322 MAT 323 MAT 32" MAT 32$ Semester -II Course Name Complex Analysis Measure Theory and Integration alois Theory and Commutati!e Algebra Multi!ariant Analysis Topology L 3 3 3 3 3 T P C 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 Ad!anced #inear Algebra MAT 31$ %umerical Analysis MAT 3101 &lecti!e ' I ()rogramming * Data +tructures.26 Integrated Ph.-perations Research.-perations Research.D. MAT "1$ Reading +eminar &lecti!e23II 0 0 3 1 Total 15 0 0 16 Total Cumulati!e credits at the end o/ second year0 5" 15 0 0 15 For details of the ourses offered !" the S hool of #athemati s$ %lease tur& to Pa'e (6)*+ .

.+ For details of the ourses offered !" the S hool of Ph"si s# $lease tur% to Pa&e '(9)* 18 0 0 18 . T P C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 . 12 0 9 16 Total Cumulati%e credits at the end o# #irst year. Semester – II Course Name Statistical Mechanics Condensed Matter-I Electronics-II Electrodynamics S!ecial "heory o# $elati%ity 'd%anced Physics E(!eriments )a*-II Seminar L 3 3 3 3 0 0 T P C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 0 + 3 1 0 + 3 0 0 1 Total Course PHY 411 PHY 412 PHY 413 PHY 4101 PHY 4102 PHY 41& PHY 41. Electi%e-. Electi%e-. Electi%e-III Electi%e-I. Semester – I Course Name Mathematical Methods Classical Mechanics Electronics-I Quantum Mechanics-I 'd%anced Physics E(!eriments )a*-I Seminar L 3 3 3 3 0 T P C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 Course PHY 321 PHY 322 PHY 323 PHY 324 PHY 32& PHY 32.School of Physics Curriculum 27 School of Physics Curriculum Course PHY 311 PHY 312 PHY 313 PHY 314 PHY 31& PHY 31.I $esearch /or0 0 3 Total 15 0 12 19 Total Cumulati%e credits at the end o# second year.32 Semester – III Semester – IV Course Name L T P C Course Course Name E(!erimental Methods Condensed Matter-II Quantum Mechanics-II Electi%e-I Electi%e-II 'd%anced Physics E(!eriments )a*-III /or0sho! En1ineerin1 2ra3in1 3 3 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 + 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 PHY 4201 PHY 4202 PHY 4203 PHY 4204 PHY 424 12 0 9 16 L 3 3 3 3 .

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P. Prescott. 7-th edition 2. Cellular Microbiology. S. gene expression and genetic variations. 7-th edition 3. Harley and Klein’s Microbiology. Joanne Willey. organelle (flagella. growth and its control factors. Antimicrobial agents and their mode of action. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Bacillus. transformation and transduction as tools in bacterial genetics. Boquet. L. Trun and J. Rappuoli. sporulation. Microbial Pathogenesis: Types. N. and growth in Bacteria and Fungi. general characteristics. coli. J. Yersinia pestis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolisms. Viruses and Prions: Introduction. replication. Microbial Genetics: Gene structure. P. Fermentation. Normark and R. Joanne Willey. Sherwood and C. mode of infection with examples from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bioremediation. Cossart. Microbial development: Division. Pommerville. Overview of bacterial development in the perspective of E. 2nd edition 29 . use of bacteria in recombinant production. Caulobacter. pili.School of Biology Theory Courses BIO 311 N EUROBIOLOGY [3003] Microbial characterization: diversity. C. Woolverton. Fundamental Bacterial Genetics. Cell-Cell communication in microbes. extra-chromosomal genetic materials. Trempy. chemosensory apparatus etc) development. Mycobacterium and Streptomyces. 7th edition 4. Applied Microbiology: Biodegradation. Alcamo’s Fundamentals in Microbiology. viruses of Bacteria and Archea Microbial Physiology: Structure of microbes. transposition. nutrition. holdfast.

Microscopy. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. 6th Ed. Travers and M. antibody response and T cell response. M. Cell sorting.nucleus. fractionation of cellular components. endocytosis and exocytosis. Humoral immune response. Cell membrane . Autoimmunity Vaccines. 2. BIO 313 A DVANCED C ELL BIOLOGY [3003] Introduction to Cell Biology. R.packaging and organization. DNA & chromosomes . T cell mediated immunity. peroxisomes. Murphy. . K. Antigen and antibody structure and function. The development and survival of lymphocytes. radioisotopes and antibodies as a tool to study cellular functions. Immunoenzymes. Cellular and Molecular Immunology. P. A. Goldsby. Evolution of the Cell Methods used in Cell Biology . T. Cancer Immunotherapy. K. T-cell receptor and antigen recognition. T and B cell development. Abbas. lysosomes. A. membrane transport. plastids and chloroplasts. A. J. mitochondria. endoplasmic reticulum.. Elsevier. Beyond Immunity: Antigen-antibody interactions as tools for research and therapy. Pillai.30 School of Biology BIO 312 I MMUNOLOGY [3003] Immunology an overview: Innate and adaptive Immunity. Response to infections: Innate. Kindt and B.organization and composition of the cell membrane. Immune system gone awry: Allergies. Signaling through immune system receptors.. A. Garland-Science. Osborne Kuby Immunology. Cellular organelles and function . H. Lichtman and S. H. Walport Janeway’s Immunobiology. 8th Ed. golgi apparatus. W. Freeman and Company 3. hypersensitive reactions.

Cell-Cell signaling . 3rd edition. Lewis. Krieger. H. Berk. Cell cycle and its control . and bacterial adhesins. Scott. A. A. Johnson. P. G.Synthesis. Lodish. Frontiers in Cell and molecular biology research. Integrins. A. N. M. and cell cycle check-points. P. intracellular trafficking and targeting of proteins. intermediary filaments. Karp. K. cell surface receptors. Cell and Molecular Biology: Concepts and Experiments 5th Edition BIO 314 E VOLUTIONARY E COLOGY [3003] Mechanisms of evolution Evolution of the senses and sensory ecology Signaling and communication in plants and animals Asexual reproduction and the evolution of sex Evolutionary perspectives in circadian rhythms and chronobiology Population ecology and population genetics Evolutionary consequences of species interactions Community patterns I: stability. second messengers and regulation of signaling pathways. metapopulations and biodiversity T EXTBOOKS : 1. Kaiser. microtubules and motor proteins. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. cadherins. P. M. immunoglobulin superfamily. B. Bretscher.organization and function of actin. Matsudaira. H.overview of extracellular signaling. Molecular Biology of the Cell 5th Edition 2. A. Components of the cytoskeleton . Ploegh. Molecular Cell Biology 6th edition 3. selectins. M. J.Mechanisms of growth and division of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell. Gotelli. Walter. Raff. Sinauer Associates. Alberts. A primer of ecology. Roberts. 2001 . B. equilibrium and non-equilibrium hypotheses Community patterns II: niche theory. C.Theory Courses 31 Protein targeting .

proteins and their properties. membranes. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. mutator strains. Fundamental Bacterial Genetics BIO 322 B IOPHYSICS AND S TRUCTURAL B IOLOGY [3003] Principles of protein and nucleic acid structures:-Amino acids. Anfinsen and the protein folding problem. mechanisms of bacterial DNA repair. middle and highly repetitive DNA. Genetics of Bacteriophages. New York.Post translational modification in proteins. membrane proteins and their structures. Mapping of mutations. folds. non Covalent interactions and their roles in protein structure.Three-dimensional conformations of proteins. Roff. ionic interactions. Derek A. Hybridization. Nancy Trun and Janine Trempy. measuring mutations. motifs.Nucleic acid structure and composition. nucleotide sequence composition: unique. Recombination. Transposition. Helixcoil transition and zipper model. hydrophobic interactions. CRISPRs in bacteria. III Edition 2. SOS response). Van der Waals radii of atoms . mechanism of protein folding.32 School of Biology 2. Evolutionary ecology: concepts and case studies. Hydrogen bonding. Fairbairn.Covalent interactions. 2001 BIO 321 BACTERIAL GENETICS [3003] P REREQUISITE 1. Gene expression and regulation in bacteria. fibrous proteins. Charles W. Oxford University Press. Fox. Transduction. in protein folding. Plasmids. chaperones nucleosomes etc. and Daphne J. supercoiling of DNA. How important are kinetics? action of other biologically important molecules and molecular assemblies like ribosomes. Conformational analysis:. denaturation and renaturation kinetics. Transformation. disulphide bonds Secondary structural elements and organisation of tertiary structure. Ramachandran plot. Larry Snyder and Wendy Champness Molecular Genetics of Bacteria. Conjugation. BIO 311-Microbiology Mutations and repair in bacteria (Classes of mutations. Bacterial twohybrid systems.

RPHPLC. distortional energies. chemical shifts and J couplings.Structure analysis . What does it mean to be a protein? Routes to proteins: native/recombinant/ chemical/native chemical ligation. X-ray Crystallography in Structural Biology:.BLAST and FASTA .sequence comparison using Needleman and Wunsch method . Circular Dichroism. electrostatic interations. Illustrative examples of protein dynamics studied using NMR. forces. High resolution multidimensional NMR.distance matrices -examples. Paramagnetic effects and pseudo contact shifts.contact distance criteria. -bio molecular databases . van der Waals interactions. Chromatography: good vs bad validation and professionalism in chromatography. Protein alignment. hydrogen bonds. Introduction to bioinformatics:.dot matrices . Noncovalent forces determining biopolymer structure.data mining -homology v/s similarity .structural databases . computer simulation and graphics.External features and sym- . Proteomic tools. access and deposition derived and specialised databases . description of various interactions by potential functions. accessing global bioinformatics resources using the World Wide Web. hydrophobic interactions. alignment medium: residual dipolar couplings (RDC). Physical instruments and methods in biology:-Purification and Characterization of Proteins. principles of minimization of conformational energy. Why is purification needed? Principles of Chromatography. Structural methods in NMR and Protein Crystallography for determination of macro-molecular structures: Biological NMR in Structural Biology:Basics of NMR: Nuclear spins.Theory Courses 33 (equilibrium separation between non covalently bonded atoms) . are chromatographic notions changing in the present era of genomics and proteomics? Chromatographic needs of protein drugs. characterization of the large through fragmentation into the small: peptide mapping. NMR experiments for protein back bone as well as side chain assignments.Strategies for structure determination: Need for isotope labeling. searching and retrieval of information. Distance restraints from NOE. Characterization of molecules: large vs small.Biological databases: Organisation.Hash coding . Mass spectroscopy.X-ray diffraction. dispersion. characterization by coordinates in 2D gels. model building. NOESY experiments.details of organisation.sequence databases . Western Blot and Bioassay. Introduction to structure calculation.

X-ray diffraction . Protein Chem. . 1968 4. 283-437. Electron density equation. 1989 6. Jensen. Principles of protein structure. amino acid catabolism. glycogen and fatty acid metabolism. Introduction to protein structure.Structure factors.Bravai’s lattices . Volume 132.seven crystal systems . Stout and L. Ramachandran & Sasisekharan. biochemical strategies for protein purification. application of chromatography and mass spectrometry in characterization and identification of biological molecules. Freeman. Generation. Conformation of polypeptides and proteins. Ramachandran & Sasisekharan.point groups and space groups . John. biochemical strategies for enzyme inhibition Metabolism: Glycolysis. Biosynthesis of amino acids. nucleic acids. protein turnover. G. 1998 BIO 323 A DVANCED B IOCHEMISTRY [3003] Exploring proteins and proteomics Protein folding. Downing.H. protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interaction. Biochemistry. refinement and structural validation. Protein NMR techniques. citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. 28. Stryer. Garden Publishing 3. Introduction to protein structure determination using X-ray diffraction. Various phasing methods in crystallography.H. New York. Phase problem in crystallography.34 School of Biology metry . Enzymes: understanding their catalytic and regulatory mechanism. Adv. SpringerVerlag 2.unit cell and Miller indices . synchrotron radiation. Tymoczco. biochemical pathways in signal transduction. Bioinformatics methods and protocol. Jan Drenth. Schulz GE and Schirmer RH. 2004 5. K. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. detection and properties of X-rays-choice of radiation. Principles of protein crystallography 7. protein structure determination. Volume 278.Bragg’s law . Methods in Molecular Biology .. X-ray structure determination. Model building. Branden and Tooze. Wiley and Sons Inc. Berg. Methods in Molecular Biology. A.

The autonomic nervous system. Bear M. 2010 2. Gilbert S. et al. 4th Ed. Neurobiology of sensory systems. Developmental Biology.F. and recruitment. Evolution of body plan. Academic Press.. .. Motor functions of the spinal cord. Principles of development.. 2005 BIO 411 D EVELOPMENTAL B IOLOGY [3003] Introduction to positional information.Theory Courses 2. 2006 3. Sinauer and Associates. Physics and Mathematics of morphogen gradients and their interpretation. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Growth and differentiation. lateral inhibition. 3rd edition. Oxford University Press. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Principles of Biochemistry. McGraw-Hill Medical. induction. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Generation and Interpretation of gradient information and Pattern formation. et al. Introduction to learning and memory. Modes of cell-cell interactions during tissue organization: Self . 3rd Ed. Electrical properties of neurons. Commonly used experimental methods in developmental biology. et al. Neuroscience. 35 BIO 324 N EUROBIOLOGY [3003] Evolution and organization of the nervous system. Lehninger. Stem cell biology and tissue repair. axes. 2nd Ed. coordinates and morphogen gradients. Synaptic transmission. Development of the nervous system. Wolpert L. Cox and Nelson.. et al. Principles of Neural Science.. 2000 2. Sanes D. Development of the Nervous System. Ionic basis of membrane potentials and the action potential. Freeman. Embryogenesis in plants: Genes controlling embryogenesis.organization. Kandel E.

M. Prentice Hall. Biometry. Geometric. 4. 1998. Exponential. Blackwell. Patterning: Control of organ positioning in plants. regulatory module linking phyllotaxis (shoot organ positioning) and rhyzotaxis (root organ positioning). R. Logisitic. Cochran. Biostatistical Analysis. Gamma and Weibul Regression Analysis:-Linear. Introduction to Probability Models. Non-linear. Time-series analysis T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. 4-th edition.W. Normal. Snedecor and W. Rohlf. Poisson. link between cell fate and cell polarity. Sokal and F. 2003.H.R. 2. Multivariate Analysis: PCA. . BIO 413 A DVANCES IN P LANT B IOLOGY [3003] A general introduction to embryonic and post embryonic plant development. hormonal flux controlling the polarity.J. Hypothesis testing and experimental design. Analysis of Variance and Covariance Parametric and non-parametric statistics. 8-th edition. S. Multiple. plant hormones controlling architecture Evolutionary plant developmental biology: morphological diversity in different plant species utilising conserved regulatory modules. Stem cell and Regeneration: Nursery rhymes across the kingdom: regulatory network controlling the stem cell initiation and maintenance in plants. J. Freeman and Co. regulatory action of plant hormones in controlling the continuous patterning. cluster.36 School of Biology BIO 412 B IOSTATISTICS [3003] Discrete and continous distributions: Binomial. mechanism of onset of polarity in plant cell.G. Statistical Methods. 8-th edition. Ross. Prentice Hall. 3rd edition. 3. control of organ outgrowth in plants. Zar. molecular mechanisms of regeneration and reprogramming of cell fate in plants Polarity: Plant cell polarity. G.

Genomes 3. Strachan and Read. . Candidate gene approach. Blackwell 2003. Synthetic genetic array analysis. Recombination rates. Protein synthesis. Microarrays. Human Molecular Genetics. Genetic and physical maps. Inter-species variation. Haplotype analysis. A Primer of Genome Science. Screening genomic libraries. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. O. Co-relating genotype with phenotype: Forward and Reverse genetics.Theory Courses T EXTBOOK 1. Comparative genomic hybridization. Pulse field gel analysis. Genomics and Medicine: Human genome sequencing. 37 BIO 414 G ENOMICS [3003] Anatomy of the genome. 3rd Ed. Genetic incompatibilities. Muse. Day. In-dels. Mechanisms in plant development. Methods to study genomes: PCR. Transcription regulation. SNPs. Gibson and S. RNA processing. Gene duplication. Non-coding RNA. ploidy changes. Brown. Structural variation. Genome evolution: Plasticity of Genomes. Garland-Science 3. Sinauer. BIO 421 A DVANCED M OLECULAR B IOLOGY [3003] Gene Transcription. Personalized medicine. Insertional mutagenesis. A. G. Linkage Disequilibrium. 2. model genomes Scale of genome variation: mutations. Genome Mapping: Genetic markers. Complex Trait analysis.. Next generation sequencing technologies. V. Garland-Science. Linkage analysis. Leyser and S. T. Meiotic hotspots.

Crieghton. Transposition. Bacterial genetics: Mutations and repair in bacteria (Classes of mutations. Complementation. Recombinant DNA technology T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. CRISPRs in bacteria. Designing yeast genetic screens. BIO 422 A DVANCED G ENETICS [3003] Yeast and Mammalian genetics: Introduction to S. Plant genetics: Combinatorial genetics for floral organ patterning. Random spore analysis. Estimation of recombination frequencies. Wiley-Blackwell 2001. McMillan 1993. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES . suppression analysis. Chromatin and gene expression. Benjamin Lewis. Gene expression and regulation in bacteria. yeast vectors. Genetic screens to identify upstream regulators. measuring mutations. Jones-Bartlett 2007. making mutations in yeast. David Latchman. mechanisms of bacterial DNA repair. cell cycle. Experiments. yeast genome. cerevisiae (yeast as a model system. Conjugation. Dominant negative/high copy suppressors. Principles of gene manipulation. mutator strains. Stanley-Thomas Publishers 1998 3. Mapping functions. Transformation. molecular analysis to identify downstream regulators of patterning regulators (transcription factors). Recombination. Mapping disease genes in humans.38 School of Biology Protein folding. Protein folding. Meiotic recombination pathways. Crossover interference). 4. Recombination in humans and mouse. Enhancer and suppressor screens to design regulatory network. Transduction. Genetics of Bacteriophages. SOS response). Tissue specific mis-expression and Ectopic over expression studies and their implications. Gene regulation: A Eukaryotic perspective. transformation). Domestication of quantitative traits in plants. nomenclature. 2. Genes 1X. gene conversion. Meiosis (Chromosome synapsis. Plasmids. Tetrad analysis. Old and Primrose. Molecular genetic interactions to generate regulatory network controlling flowering time.yeast strain construction by crossing. Two hybrid analysis.

3rd Ed. 39 List of Electives in Biology 1. 3.Phase contrast and fluorescence. data collection.. Oxford University Press. Scott Hawley and Michelle Walker. Blackwell-Science 2004. 4. Separation of cells by density gradient. 5. Microscopy . 8. Cell Biology 1.Laboratory Courses 1. Fluorescent analysis of tubulin and actinhomologs in bacteria. Designing a semester long field study on the campus. Human Molecular Genetics 3. Advanced Genetic Analysis: Finding Meaning in a Genome. Philip Meneely. data analysis and report writing. Advanced Genetic Analysis: Genes. Strachan and Read. and Networks in Eukaryotes. 2. Analyses of cell cycle in bacteria. 7. 6. Analysis of bacterial chromosome replication by FACS. BIO 325 A DVANCED L AB -II [0093] Biochemistry . Genomes. 2. Cancer Biology Biodiversity Animal Behaviour Current topics in genetics and genomics Plant Morphodynamics Prokaryotic development Mathematical and Systems Biology Viva-voce and treatise in Molecular Structural Biology Laboratory Courses BIO 315 A DVANCED L AB -I [0093] Ecology 1.

9. basics of Visualizing molecules using Pymol. Refinement of MR solution and improvement. 4.Hydrophobic effects and other interactions like hydrogen. BIO 415 A DVANCED L AB -III [0093] 1. Basics of iterative cycles of model building and refinement. 7. Antibiotics susceptibility Testing. 6. Construction of bacterial gene deletions by homologous recombination(including primer designing. Molecular Replacement: Using AMoRestand alone package ’ express mode and less automated mode. CCP4. Plant Biology:Isolation of T-DNA insertion mutant defective in plant organ formation. Analyzing protein structures Procheck. Analysis of protein-protein interaction by biochemical techniques. Transformation and screening for knock-outs). a) Rigid body refinement b) Simulated Annealing and Positional refinement c) B-factor refinement. Microbiology & Molecular Biology Gene Induction. Protein Crystallization: Preparation of different forms of Lysozyme crystals with different conditions. 2. PDB and graphics visualization. Mutation mapping. shell scripts and the first C-programming. Graphics visualization in O and model fitting. plasmid isolation. Validation of the protein structures.40 School of Biology 1. 5. 4. Basic UNIX commands. Determination of binding parameters of protein-ligand interaction. X-ray diffraction and data collection (When X-ray in house source is available). Conjugation. 2. Identification of proteins by Western blotting Purification of proteins by chromatography techniques. HBPLUS. DSSP. Biophysics and structural biology 1. Sequence analysis at Expasy and PDB. cloning. MIC. Transduction. 3. PCR. 8. 2. Visualizing reciprocal lattice and diffraction through Ewald sphere using X-Ray View. 3. PCR. Bacterial motility assay. etc. Salt Bridges. Intra and Inter molecular interactions . Tissue-specific expression studies in time and space . Disulphide bonds.

. Biostatistics:Exercises in Research Methodology. Statistical ecology. Detection of genetic incompatibilities 4. Sampling. Mathematical statistics. Genomics:Measurement of Mutation rates in genomes.Laboratory Courses 41 3.

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photochemical properties of [Ru(bipy)3 ]2+ and its applications. Photochemical reactions of coordination compounds. p. electron transfer reactions. Orgel diagrams for complexes with various dn electronic configurations. nature of metal-metal multiple bonds including M-M quadruple and quintuple bonds. pentanuclear and hexanuclear cluster compounds. Dq. crystal field theory (CFT) and its application for interpreting electronic and magnetic properties of coordination compounds. nature of electronic transitions and their predictions from T-S diagrams. evaluation of Dq and other parameters from electronic spectra. inner sphere and outer sphere mechanisms.School of Chemistry Theory Courses CHY 311 A DVANCED C OORDINATION C HEMISTRY [3003] Overview on co-ordination compounds. photovoltaic systems. Tanabe-Sugano (T-S) diagrams for complexes with various dn configurations. circular dichroism of coordination compounds. Trans-effect. structure determination of coordination compounds using electronic spectra. photosubstitution & photoredox reactions. water-splitting (to H2 and O2 ) by photo-excited coordination compounds.and π -bonds involving s. IR and magnetic susceptibility measurements. symmetry adapted linear combination of ligand orbitals in coordination compounds. nature of d-d transition. chelate effect. trinuclear. dinuclear and polynuclear coordination compounds. 43 . ligand field parameters. (d − p)π and (d − d)π and (d − d)δ bonds. Racah parameter B and nephelauxetic constant b. metal-ligand σ . Ligand field theory (LFT) applied to coordination compounds. MLCT and LMCT transitions in coordination compounds. d and their hybridized orbitals. metal string complexes. solar energy conversion. Reactions involving coordination compounds. tetranuclear. Jahn-Teller theorem and its effect on the structural features of metal complexes. MO theory and MO diagrams of metal complexes. stability and labile nature of coordination compounds. understanding electronic spectra based on Orgel diagrams. photoisomerisation.

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Crown ethers and cryptands and their complexation properties with metal ions, coordination polymers, metal-organic framework (MOF) compounds, their structural and materials properties, porous MOFs and their applications in gas storage and separation. Lanthanide compounds, lanthanide contraction, coordination behavior of lanthanide ions, magnetic and spectroscopic properties of lanthanide complexes, photoluminescence properties of lanthanide compounds, fluorescence emission of N d3+ , Eu3+ , T b3+ compounds, Nd-YAG laser, lanthanide shift reagents. Mixed-metal oxides containing lanthanide ions and their properties, High Tc superconductors. Actinide compounds, coordination behavior of actinide elements and their coordination compounds, magnetic and spectroscopic properties.
T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. W. K. Li, G. D. Zou and T. C. W. Mak, Advanced Structural Inorganic Chemistry, Oxford Science Publication (2008). 2. W. W. Porterfield, Inorganic Chemistry- A Unified Approach, 2nd Ed., Academic Press (2008). 3. D. Banerjea, Coordination Chemistry, Asian Books Pvt Ltd. (2007). 4. N. N. Greenwood and A. Earnshaw, Chemistry of Elements, 2nd Ed. 5. N. Kaltsoyannis and P. Scott, The f-elements, Oxford Science Publications (2008). 6. J. E. Huheey, E. A. Keiter, R. L. Keiter and O. K. Medhi, Inorganic Chemistry: Principles and Reactivity, 4th Ed., Pearson Education, (2008). 7. F. A. Cotton, G. Wilkinson, C. A. Marillo and M. Bochmann, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, John Wiley, (2003). 8. P. Atkins, T. Overton, J. Rourke, M. Weller and F. Armstrong, Shriver & Atkins Inorganic Chemistry, 4th Ed., Oxford University Press (2008). 9. B. Douglas, D. McDaniel and J. Alexander, Concepts and Models in Inorganic Chemistry, 3rd Ed., Wiley (1994). 10. J. E. House, Inorganic Chemistry, Academic Press (2008).

CHY 312 Q UANTUM C HEMISTRY [3003] Fundamental Background: Review of postulates of quantum mechanics, Schr¨ odinger equation and its analogy with the classical wave equation, wave functions and requirements for an acceptable wave function, operator formalism, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues, expectation values, Hermitian operators, measurement, superposition of states, commuting operators, uncertainity principle. Exactly Solvable Problems: free particle, quasi-free particle (1-D, 2-D and

Theory Courses

45

3-D box problems), concepts of quantum numbers and degeneracies, applications in organic metals, quantum wells and dots, the simple harmonic oscillator, angular momentum, the hydrogen atom problem, atomic orbitals, quantum tunneling and scattering. The Variation Method: Rayleigh-Ritz method, simple examples like hy+ drogen and helium atoms, the H2 molecule-ion, screening constants, polarizabilities, the non-crossing rule, Hartree and Hartree-Fock models, Koopman’s theorem, other applications of the variation principle like LCAO-MO, molecular orbitals for diatomic molecules, block diagonalization, basis set choice and variational wavefunctions, H¨ uckel theory and applications across organic chemistry, tight-binding approximation, WKB, Kr¨ onig-Penney model, The extended H¨ uckel model, hybridization, why these approximations work: Hellmann-Feynman theorem. Time Independent Perturbation Theory: Formal development of nondegenerate perturbation theory upto second order, perturbation treatment of the ground state of helium atom, comparison with the variation treatment, excited states of helium atom, electron in a wire, Zeeman and Stark effects, Crystal Field Theory, The anharmonic oscillator, perturbation theory for a degenerate state, polarizability of H-atom in the excited state, Interaction between orbitals. Many Electron Atoms: The independent electron approximation, simple products and electron exchange symmetry, Slater determinants and Pauli principle, the self-consistent field, Slater type orbitals, Aufbau principle, spin-orbital angular momentum for many-electron atoms.
T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. 2. 3. 4. J. P. Lowe and K. A. Peterson, Quantum Chemistry, 3rd Ed., Elsevier. I. N. Levine and K. A. Peterson, Quantum Chemistry, 5th Ed., Prentice Hall. L. Piela, Ideas of Quantum Chemistry, Elsevier. F. L. Pilar, Elementary Quantum Chemistry, Dover Publications.

CHY 313 S TEREOCHEMISTRY: P RINCIPLES AND A PPLICATIONS [3003] Concept of chirality, Fisher projection formula, sequence rule, R and S notations in cyclic and acyclic compounds, optical isomerism of compounds containing one or more asymmetric carbon atoms; Stereochemistry of

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biphenyls, allenes, spirans etc., conditions for optical activity, R and S notations, stereochemistry of other cyclic molecules, atropisomerism, chirality due to folding of helical structures. Geometrical isomerism - E and Z notation of compounds with one and more double bonds in acyclic systems, inter conversion of geometrical isomers, stereochemistry of other classes of double bonded systems, asymmetric synthesis, illustration with examples. Chiral auxiliaries and chiral reagents. Difference between configuration and confirmation, factors affecting the stability, dipole interaction, bond opposition strain, bond angle strain, representation of different conformations; Conformation of acyclic compounds, interconversion of axial and equatorial bonds in chair conformation, distance between the various H atoms and C atoms in both chair and boat conformations, stereochemistry of substituted cyclohexane and related systems, conformations of decaline, adamentane etc. Effect of conformation on the course and rate of reactions in acyclic systems, illustration with examples, substitution, addition, elimination reduction and oxidation, reactions, important name reactions- Aldol, Perkin, Clainson, Dieckmann, Stobbe, benzoin condensation etc. Knoevenagel, Reformatosky, Wittig, Cannizaro, Mannich reactions etc., stereochemical aspects of estrification and hydrolysis.
T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. J. March, Advanced Organic Chemistry, 5th Ed., John Wiley and Sons, 1992. 2. E. L. Eliel, Stereochemistry of Carbon Compounds, Tata McGraw-Hill Edition 1975, 38th reprint 2008. 3. D. Nasipuri, Stereochemistry of Organic Compounds-Principle and Applications, 2nd Ed., New Age International Publishers, 2007. 4. P. S. Kalsi, Stereochemistry-Conformation and Mechanism, 7th Ed., New Age International Publishers, 2008.

CHY 314 I NSTRUMENTAL M ETHODS [3003] Basics of measurement; Separation Techniques: Separation based on increasing number of factors (volatility, solubility, interactions with stationary phase, size, electrical field), gas and liquid chromatography, electrophoresis (plates and capillary).

T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). electrochemical techniques. poly-nuclear metal carbonyls. Flame photometry. discussions .. fragment molecular orbitals of various ligands and MLn moieties. A-frame complexes. H. bonding of CO using its σ -donor and π -acceptor properties and stabilization of metals in low oxidation states. NO and CN. thermoanalytical techniques. Merritt and J. dinitrogen and dioxygen complexes. 5th Ed. emission spectroscopy. metal alkynes. comparison of donor and acceptor properties of CO. metallocenes. carbides and cyclobutadiene by MLn fragments through bonding. metal-olefins. A.moieties in their metal derivatives. D. Holler and T. detailed study on the structure and bonding in above compounds based on FMO approach.. 7th Ed. Structure and bonding in metal carbenes. stabilization of unstable moieties like carbenes. molecular orbitals of metallocenes. CHY 321 O RGANOMETALLIC C HEMISTRY [3003] Overview on organometallic chemistry.). orbital interaction diagrams involving fragments in metal carbonyls. optical rotatory dispersion. Brooks Cole. various modes of coordination of NO and its electron contribution to metals and associated structural features in such metal-nitrosyls. Mass spectrometry. Skoog. J. Nieman. organometallic compounds of main-group elements. Microscopic Techniques: Diffraction limit. Dean. half-sandwich compounds. metal-polyenes and metal-allyls. metal olefins. static and dynamic light scattering techniques. L. Spectroscopic Techniques: review of optical spectroscopic techniques. 2.Theory Courses 47 Analytical Techniques: Elemental analysis. metal nitrosyls. structural information of metal carbonyls from IR spectra. Willard. ionizing chamber etc. structure prediction based on 18electron rule. Wadsworth Publishing Company. dark field and confocal). techniques in nuclear and radiochemistry (GM counter. carbynes. Infrared absorption. carbonyl hydride complexes. scanning probe microscopy (STM and AFM). metallocenes. Instrumental Methods of Analysis. A. Principles of Instrumental Analysis. F. optical microscopy (bright field. metal alkyls. linear and circular dichroism. Tripledecker complexes. index of refraction. metal carbonyls having both terminally bound and bridging type CO’s.

New Age International Publication (2000). Pearson Education. Marillo and M.. Armstrong. synthetic gasoline. cyclometallation. C.. Ziegler-Natta polymerization of alkenes. Wilkinson. Organometallic Chemistry-A Unified Approach 2nd Ed.. Keiter and O. D. Concepts and Models if Inorganic Chemistry. (2008). Oxford Science Publication (2008). . L. 4th Ed. Mehrotra and A. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Overton. Collman. Tolman catalytic loops. 4. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. W. Atkins. R. water-gas shift reaction. A. E. A. P. R. activation of small molecules by metal ions. Li. oxidative addition reactions and reductive elimination reactions. Crabtree. D. Wiley-VCH (1997). ortho-metallation. Singh.2-insertion and β -hydride elimination reactions. 2nd Ed. (2003). The Organometallic Chemistry of Transition metals. 8. Fischer-Tropsch process. Wiley. Orgaonometallics and Complexes with Transition MetalCarbon Sigma Bonds. Fluxional organometallic compounds. F. McDaniel and J. M. John Wiley. Oxford University Press (2008). Atwood. Inorganic Chemistry: Principles and Reactivity. G.48 School of Chemistry based on orbital interaction diagrams in them. P. hydroformylation reactions and Heck and Breslow mechanism. R. J. J. 3. Keiter. Wilkinson’s catalyst and alkene hydrogenation. Principles and Application of Organo-transition Metal Chemistry. 3rd Ed. 6. Weller and F. nature of non-rigidity and their characterization by NMR spectroscopy. Wiley (1994). Shriver & Atkins Inorganic Chemistry. 1. Medhi. C. Alexander. J. C. 1. G.. Nortaon and Finke. B. Huheey. Cotton. Zou and T. W. T. H. 10. synthetic and catalytic aspects of organometallic compounds.. Inorganic and Organometallic Reaction Mechanism. A. (1987). isolobal concept and comparison of various MLn moieties with non-metal fragments. Bochmann. K. K. New York (1988) 7. migratory insertion reactions. 2nd Ed. M. Advanced Structural Inorganic Chemistry. 9. E. Bochmann. reactions of coordinated ligands. J.1-migratory insertion reaction. oligomerisation of alkynes.. Douglas. Rourke. Wacker process of catalytic addition of molecular oxygen to alkenes. Hegedus. 4th Ed. Mak. alkene metathesis. 2. Oxford Science publications (2005). metallacycles. D. 5.

nuclear spin and the Pauli principle. inversion centres. Electronic Spectroscopy of molecules: Molecular orbitals as LCAOs. products of symmetry operations. isotopic effects. Raman Spectroscopy: Review of light scattering and Raman effect. structure determination from rotational constants.Theory Courses 49 CHY 322 A DVANCED M OLECULAR S PECTROSCOPY [3003] Group theory: Symmetry elements and operations. theory of blackbody radiation. projection operators. classical and quantum models for scattering. time dependent perturbation theory. vibration-rotation transitions in diatomics. symmetric and asymmetric tops. Rayleigh and Raman intensities. Rotational spectroscopy: Nuclear motion in diatomics. lasers. direct products. anharmonicity and Morse oscillator. rotation axes. electronic spectroscopy of diatomics. symmetry point groups and examples. vibronic coupling. groups and classes. mutual exclusion rule for centrosymmetric molecules. term symbols. vibrational selection rules. polarizability tensor. rotational spectra and line intensities. Huckel molecular orbital theory. photodissociation and predissociation. group theoretical treatment of vibrations. rotation of rigid bodies. parity of diatomic energy levels. Frank-Condon principle. Interaction of radiation with matter: Electromagnetic radiation. ortho and para modifications of homonuclear diatomics. internal coordinates. the great orthogonality theorem. molecule and space fixed coordinate systems. Fermi golden rule. electronic spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules. vibrational and rotational structures. spherical. reflection planes. resonance Raman scattering. selection rules. separation of translational and relative motion. . normal coordinates. centrifugal distortion. symmetry adapted linear combinations. character tables. radiation density and intensity. Beyond the rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator approximation using perturbation theory. homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening. dissociation. lineshape functions. symmetry coordinates. Walsh’s rules. moment of inertia. The Wilson F and G matrices. Introduction to Molecular Spectroscopy: Molecular Hamiltonian. selection rules. selection rules. correlation to the Einstein coefficients of absorption and emission. vibrational motion of polyatomics. Vibrational Spectroscopy: Review of vibrational motion in diatomics. orbitals and states. dissociation energies. linear molecules. BornOppenheimer approximation.

symmetry allowed and symmetry forbidden reaction. stereoselectivity of Diels-Alder reaction. reduction of carbonyl groups. frontier orbitals. J. regioselectivity of hetero Diels-Alder reaction. reactions of ketenes. photochemical cross coupling of alkenes. intramolecular Diels Alder reaction. asymmetric synthesis. Photochemical Pericyclic reactions: photochemical pericyclic reactions. regioselectivity in photocycloadditions: Paterno-Buchi reaction. M. regioselectivity. W. J. requirements of diene and dienophiles. generalized WoodwardHoffmann rules in (i) cycloaddition (ii) electrocyclic reactions (iii) sigmatropic reactions (iv) group transfer reactions.50 T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. 1. Pearson Education. Levine. I. carbenes. Periselectivity and torquoselectivity. ozonolysis. photodimerization of alkenes. N. photocycloaddition to aromatic ring. catalytic hydrogenation. Thermal Pericyclic reactions: Diels Alder reaction. Electrocyclic rearrangements. endo rule. oxidizing agents. effect of Lewis acid on Diels-Alder reaction. Molecular Spectroscopy. L. John Wiley & Sons. aromatic transition state structure. sigmatropic rearrangements. Controlling geometry of double bonds: Unselective elimination. Chemoselectivity: Reducing agents. Hollas. four classes of pericyclic reactions. osmylation.3-dipolar cycloaddition. John Wiley & Sons. allenes. McHale Molecular Spectroscopy. Symmetry allowed but geometrically unreasonable reactions. Asymmetric synthesis: resolution. kinetic/thermodynamic control. chiral pool. Explanations for Woodward-Hoffmann rules. School of Chemistry P. photochemical Woodward-Hoffmann rule. Parson. 3. CHY 323 A DVANCED O RGANIC C HEMISTRY I [3003] Pericyclic reactions: Pericyclic reactions. Julia ole- . Oxford University Press. W. Other kinds of selectivity in pericyclic and related photochemical reactions: electrocyclic reactions. Spectra of Atoms and Molecules. dissolving metal reductions. 4. 5. F. correlation diagrams. chiral reagents and chiral catalysts. WoodwardHoffmann rules in (i) cycloaddition (ii) Electrocyclic reactions (iii) sigmatropic reactions (iv) group transfer reactions. geometrically reasonable but symmetry forbidden reactions. 2. Modern Optical Spectroscopy. other cycloadditions. Springer-Verlag. Ene reaction. Other pericyclic reactions: sigmatropic rearrangements. Bernath. Modern Spectroscopy.

Stereoselective reactions of cyclic compounds: Stereochemical control in 6-membered ring. Student Ed. transition metal complexes. 13C chemical shifts and structure correlations. Wiley VCH. Warren and P. NOESY experiments for connectivity information and illustrative examples in organic molecule structure determination. Zeeman splitting. anisotropic effects. I. Academic Press. J. introduction to 31P and 19F NMR. N. Greeves. Boltzmann distribution. conformational control in the formation of 6-membered rings. prochirality. 13C satellites. effect of magnetic field strength on sensitivity and resolution. Oxford University Press. .Theory Courses 51 fination. ionization methods. COSY. chemical shift. 1H-NMR. Advanced organic chemistry. sensitivity. Wittig reaction. DEPT and INADEQUATE pulse sequences. 3. Strong coupling effects. steroselective reactions of scyclic alkenes. coupling constants. examples of common types of fragmentation processes and deduction of structural information. R. Mass spectrometry: Basic principles. Bruckner. natural abundance. ESR spectroscopy: ESR spectra of organic free radicals and ion radicals. 2. chelation controlled stereoselectivity. steroselective addition to alkynes. Applications: Karplus relationship of J on dihedral angle. common spin 1/2 nuclei.. molecular ions. application of two-dimensional NMR. dynamic processes by NMR. factors governing fragmentation processes. Diastereoselectivity: Steroeselectiv ereactions. CHY 324 S PECTROSCOPIC METHODS IN STRUCTURE DETERMINATION [3003] Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Principle of NMR. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. 13C-NMR. restricted rotation. diasteroselctive addition to carbonyl groups. Molecular orbitals and Organic chemical reactions. Organic chemistry. Wothers. chemical and magnetic equivalence. spirocyclic compounds. cyclohexane ring inversion. Fleming. INEPT. sterochemistry of bicyclic compounds. S. isotope abundance. fused bicyclic compounds. steroselective aldol reactions. reactions with cyclic intermediates or cyclic TS. first order J splitting patterns and structure correlation. Reaction mechanisms. Peterson elimination. high resolution MS. . Clayden.

zeolites. Kalinowski and S. examples of UV chromopheres. Perovskite. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. reciprocal space. John Wiley. vibrational modes. 2007. Berger. one and two dimensional unit cells. Ilmenite). 1996. 6. hybrid materials. Brillouin zones. Illustrative examples of structure elucidation from spectra. New York. CHY 411 C HEMISTRY OF S OLIDS AND M ATERIALS [3003] Structures of Solids: Crystal structures. 4. Hongkong. Kemp. interplanar spacings. clay. coordination and metal carbonyl compounds. 2nd Ed. Rhenium Trioxide etc. reticular chemistry. R. Three dimensional unit cells. 5. Levitt. 1987. 2nd Ed. L. Neuhaus and M. Pauling ice rules. VCH. Field. VCH. crystallographic point groups. M. factors affecting the group frequencies. H. mixed oxides (Spinel. D. packing diagrams. Miller indices. The Nuclear Overhauser effect in structural and conformational analysis. vibrational spectra of ionic. 1989. 2. grain boundary. Cadmium Halides. phosphates. dislocations. John Wiley. body centered and primitive structures. 1991. W.52 School of Chemistry Infrared and UV spectroscopy: Review of basic principles. S. Spectrometric identification of organic compounds. M X2 (Fluorite and Antifluorite Structures. Structures of Important Ionic Solids: Ionic Radii. 2007. space groups.. 100 and more basic NMR experiments.. Weinheim. O. geometrical representation of various types. John Wiley. lattices. other crystal systems (Bismuth tri-iodide. 3. Corundum. translational symmetry elements. Williamson. D. group frequencies of organic systems. classification of UV absorption bands. mesoporous materials. Bassler and T. Kalmann. NaCl. Defects and Dislocations in Solids: Point defects. Morril. Organic spectroscopy. Rutile. C. examples in alloys and materials. Symmetry in crystals. Spin Dynamics. close packing. Organic structures from spectra. Anti-rutile. NiAs. Zinc Blende and Wurtzite Structures). silicates. study of hydrogen bonding effects. G. molecular solids and dispersion interactions. metallo-Organic and related open framework materials (MOF). phase boundary.). Silverstein. ionic solids with formula MX (CsCl. NonIonic Solids: Covalent solids. H. M. Sternhell and J. Braun. Synthesis of Solids: Gas to Solid Syn- . R. β cristobalite). C. ELBS. general features of IR spectra. S. arsenates and related extended systems.

(Indian Ed. Smart and E. C. Pauli paramagnetism. P. sol-gel methods. TB model solutions for square lattice and honeycomb lattice (graphene). Electronic Structure of Solids: Free electron theory. Kronig-Penney Model. tight binding (TB) model. A. Drude model. the effective mass concept. 2. Fermi Surface.) 4. The Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Solids. liquid quenching.. G. KCl. order-disorder transitions. hydrothermal methods. 2010.Theory Courses 53 thesis: Vapour deposition.. Wiley-VCH. Moore. glass. Other Methods: Microwave reactions. some Exact results. exchange coupling. ReO3 . ceramics. A. 3. direct and indirect band gaps. ferroelectric effect. periodic potentials in solids. analysis of Bands. electronic structure of metals and alloys. Cambridge University Press (1987). Wiley Student Ed. Solid State Chemistry: An introduction. R. Hoffmann. West. combustion synthesis. N. New Directions in Solid State Chemistry. Liquid to Solid Synthesis: Crystal growth from melt. explanation for Hume-Rothery rules. 5. multilayer ceramic capacitor. Jiles. 2010 (Indian Ed. tunneling and colossal magnetoresistance. α-quartz. sputtering. 2nd Ed. the Hall effect. band model for transition metal alloys. Solid State Chemistry. (2003) (Indian Ed. the localized electron model for magnetism (lanthanides). Cox. band structure. S UGGESTED R EADING 1. Bloch Functions. Magnetic and Dielectric Properties of Solids: Magnetization. chemical vapour deposition (CVD/MOCVD). . ion-exchange and intercalation. Solid to Solid Synthesis: Solid state reactions. R. high temperature superconductors. spin-up and spin-down half bands. LCAO for monoatomic chain. Springer (2004). Physical Foundations of Materials Science. Curie law and Curie-Weiss law.). Taylor and Francis. concept of Fermi level. Oxford Science Publications (1987). T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Nelson Thornes Ltd. band structure for some simple solids: AgCl.) 6. Gottstein. giant. L. A. 2nd Ed. density of states. mean field approximation. 1988. E. Gopalakrishnan. 3rd Ed. types of magnetic materials.. binary chain (Peierls Theorem). Si. D. Solids and Surfaces: A chemist’s view of bonding in extended structures. band electron theory for magnetism.. high pressure synthesis. Introduction to the Electronic Properties of Materials. partial density of states (PDOS) and crystal orbital overlap population (COOP). Rao and J. electrical polarization. piezoelectric crystal. R.

H-scales. and consecutive reactions. effect of pressure. explosion reactions. HO. potential energy surfaces for various reactive and nonreactive scattering processes. Kinetics in the excited electronic states: Jablonskii diagram. Chain reactions: normal and branched chains. pulsed radiolysis. the Laplace transform. Lindemann . excimers. Brooks-Cole (1976). Acid-Base Catalysis: Specific and general catalysis. resonance energy transfer. S. free radical polymerisation. Kinetics of natural light induced processes including photosynthesis and vision. Solid State Physics. Acidity function. collision cross section. macroscopic reaction rates from microscopic properties. flash photolysis. D. secular equation and eigen values. prototropic and protolytic mechanisms. methods of analysis. conventional transition state theory. primary quantum yield. N. measurement of rates. Wiley India (1998). light induced electron transfer and Marcus equation. and information theory. molecular beams. exciplexes and sensitisation. lasers photolysis. replacement of time with area variable. Mermin. Theory of chemical kinetics: Kinetic theory of collisions. mechanism of the decay of singlet excited state and Stern-Volmer equation. elementary gas phase reactions. small perturbation. W. Eyring equation. opposing reactions. The Physics and Chemistry of Solids. kinetics of unimolecular photophysical and photochemical processes. CHY 412 A DVANCED C HEMICAL K INETICS [3003] Introductory kinetics: Determination of order of reaction. integration of rate equations. Ashcroft and N. overlap method. Marcus’ electron transfer theory. Fast reaction kinetics: relaxation methods. parallel reactions. bimolecular photophysical and photochemical proceses. mechanism.54 School of Chemistry 2. Reactions in solution: Nature of liquids. photoisomerisation. dielectric constant and ionic strength. secondary salt effect. designing of light induced systems and tuning . photostationary states. Time scales of photophysical processes.Hinshelwood mechanism and the RiceRamsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theory for unimolecular reactions. Kramers’ theory. large perturbation. Skrabal diagram. Laser photochemistry including pulsed laser and multiphoton excitation. Goldfinger scheme. Elliot. RiceHerzfeld mechanism. 3. laser flash photolysis in various time scales. complex reactions. the steady state approximation. examples. state-to-state dynamics.

adsorption isotherms. M. 3rd Ed. Atkins. 2. pyridazines. N. pyrimidines. S. Biodegradable polymers and plastics. isoxazoles. Radiation chemical processes including pulse radiolysis. C. dimers. Springer. R. isoquinolines. Wothers. Ramamurthy and J. proteins. Physical Chemistry. 5. chemiluminescence. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. . Polymerization: Monomers.Theory Courses 55 of their rates. 7. polymerization by electrophilic substitution. ring closing reactions to make heterocycles. heat of adsorption. polymerization by nucleophilic attack on isocyanates. K. 3. hydrated electrons. Laidler. Chemistry of Life: Primary metabolism.. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. pyridines. D. reaction of heterocycles. nucleotides nucleic acids.). R. Warren and P. Springer. Greeves. Aromatic heterocycles: pyrroles. peptides. Surface reaction kinetics : Physical and chemical adsorption. Clayden. Oxford University Press. J. tetrazoles. Macmillan India. Principles of Fluorescence Spectroscopy. reaction of polymers. Rajaram and J. Kinetics and mechanism of chemical transformation. Scaiano. C. G. Wright. 4. V. polymerization by SN2 reaction. J. S.. pyrazoles. 8. 6. Aminoacids. University Science Books. Organic chemistry. cross-linked polymers. J. thiophenes. polymerization by carbonyl substitution. Upadhyay. Turrro. quinolines. polymerization of alkenes.. Pearson Education (Indian Ed. Fischer Indole synthesis. 3rd Ed. Kuriacose. Billing and K. P. co-polymerization. kinetics of solid state reactions. An Introduction to Chemical Kinetics. Chemical Kinetics. light induced processes and environment. nucleosides. V. anomeric effect. lipids. furans. Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Dynamics. Introduction to Molecular Dynamics and Chemical Kinetics. Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanism. conformation of saturated heterocycles. oligomers. 8th Ed. Lakowicz. carbohydrates. N. K. J. J. CHY 413 A DVANCED O RGANIC C HEMISTRY II [3003] Saturated Heterocycles: Introduction. Mikkelsen.

John Wiley. picketfence porphyrins. R. Cobalamines including vitamin and coenzyme B12 . Catalases and peroxidases. Huheey.catalysed oxidation of water to O2 . Pearson Education. Gold-containing drugs. Cytochrome P-450 and oxygen transfer from O2 to non-activated substrates. transport and storage of dioxygen. Cytochromes. 2. Inorganic Chemistry: Principles and Reactivity. capped porphyrins. K. Photosynthetic process. Biological functions of the non-metallic inorganic elements. Function and transport of K + . Perutz mechanism. G. Complexes of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions with macro-cycles. Catalysis through hemoproteins. Copper containing proteins. Bioinorganic chemistry of the quintessentially toxic metals. Photodynamic therapy. Coordination by proteins and enzymatic catalysis. F.. E. Cis platin and its mode of action. C. Biological functions of various metal ions. A. Biological lig+ ands for metal ions. (2008). oxygen activation and metabolism of inorganic intermediates. Metalloporphyrins. Fe-S and other non-heme iron proteins. Uptake. Type 2 and type 3 copper centres in O2 -activating proteins. Type 1 blue copper centres. Bochmann. Cotton. (2003). Chemotherapy with compounds of some non-essential elements. Cooperative effect in haemoglobin. ‘Zinc-finger’ and other gene regulatory Zn-proteins. Metals in the centre of photosynthesis-Mg and Mn. Keiter and O. Ion pumps. Biomimetic chemistry. Haemerythrin and haemocyanin. Ferredoxins. Ca+ 2 and M g2 ions in biological systems. Ni-containing enzymes. Uptake. Generation and function of organic free radicals. Catalysis and regulation of bio-energetic processes by alkaline earth metal ions. Reactions involving coenzyme B12. Zinc in biological systems. Mn. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Electron transfer. Tetrapyrrole ligands and other macrocycles. Mo-containing enzymes. Model compounds. Keiter. E. metalloenzymes. A. J. Marillo and M. 4th Ed. . Haemoglobin and myoglobin and their functions. Ion channels. Bio-mineralization. N a+ . availability and biological functions of inorganic elements in organisms. Medhi. transport and storage of iron. ferritin. Carboxypeptidase A. transferrin. L. Wilkinson.56 School of Chemistry CHY 414 B IOINORGANIC C HEMISTRY [3003] Occurrence. A.

Overton. Wiley-VCH (1997).. Extraction of eugenol from cloves by steam distillation 6. 1-4 2. Atwood. Oxford Science publications (2005). Wiley (1994).Alder reaction) Diels-Alder reaction of furan and N-phenylmaleimide.. Laboratory Courses CHY 315 A DVANCED O RGANIC C HEMISTRY L ABORATORY [0093] 1. 4th Ed. Bioinorganic chemistry: Inorganic Elements in the Chemistry of Life. W. Schwederski. M.. B.Laboratory Courses 3. Estimation of nitrogen in the given organic compound by Kjeldahl’s method 5. Multistage preparations and spectroscopic characterization (a)Conversion of bromobenzene to triphenyl carbinol and then to tritylchloride (b)Preparation of vanilline and its derivatives fron p-hydroxybezaldehyde (c)Benzaldehyde to methylstyrene and to 1-phenyl 1. (a)Determination of moisture content in the organic solvents using Karl-Fischer titration (b)Drying of organic solvents 4. preference for endo or exo-product formation 7. 5.2-dihydroxypropane . T. 7. (a)Claisen-Schimidt reaction. Separation and quantification of ternary mixtures. SN1 and SN2 reactions 3. 3rd Ed. D. Bochmann. Oxford University Press (2008). 57 L IST OF E LECTIVES IN C HEMISTRY Details of the electives will be announced later.cyclobutane carboxylic acid 8. Shriver & Atkins Inorganic Chemistry. J. Orgaonometallics and Complexes with Transition MetalCarbon Sigma Bonds. Alexander. Atkins. Weller and F. Mixtures No. J. M. 2nd Ed. Concepts and Models if Inorganic Chemistry. Determination of purity by melting points and TLC. Armstrong. 4. Cycloaddition reaction: (Diels. D.Preparation of benzal acetophenone (b)Malonic ester synthesis. Wiley (2006). Kaim and B. McDaniel and J. P. 6. Rourke. Inorganic and Organometallic Reaction Mechanism. Douglas.

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(d)Preparation of benzotriazole from o-nitroaniline (e)Preparation of sys-tribromobenzene from aniline (f) Validity of Huckel’s 4n+2 rule: Synthesis of triphenyl methyl fluoroborate and tropyllium iodide (a)Chemiluminesence: Synthesis of cyalume and chemiluminescence 9. Molecular rearrangement (a)Green photochemical reaction (Photoreduction of benzophenone to benzopinacol and then to benzopinacolone) (b)Rearrangement of diazoaminobenzene to p-aminoazobenzene (c)Benzil Benzilic acid rearrangement (d)Preparation of caprolactum from cyclohexanone and nylon-6 10. Ionic liquids • Preparation of tetrabutylammonium tribromide (TBATB) and Bromination of Chalcone • Preparation of 1-pentyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (pmIm) and Preparation of 2-phenylbenzothiazoles catalyzed by ionic liquid. 11. Phase transfer catalyst • Wittig reaction: The preparation and purification of trans-stilbenes 12. Microwave oven assisted organic syntheses 13. Multi-step synthesis coenzyme catalyzed synthesis of Benzoin and derivatives • • • • Part 1: Synthesis of Benzoin Part 2: Synthesis of Benzil Part 3: Synthesis of Benzilic Acid Part 4: Synthesis of Benzoic acid from Benzaldehyde

CHY 325 A DVANCED I NORGANIC C HEMISTRY L ABORATORY [0093] 1. Simple Gravemetric analysis of Ni, Cu, etc. 2. Synthesis of a solid acid, 12-Tungstosilicic acid, H4 Si W12 O40 .7H2 O • Synthesis of Zeolite ZSM-5

Laboratory Courses

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3. The preparation of Potassium tris(oxalato) ferrate(III) trihydrate K3 [F e(C2 O4 )3 ] and its characterization 4. The Mechanism of Aquation of trans - dichlorobis (1, 2 - diaminoethane) cobalt(III) chloride 5. Preparation of Ferrocene and its reactions 6. Sequential synthesis of several complexes containing Mo – Mo quadrupole bond 7. Synthesis and reactions of Potassium tetrathionate 8. Synthesis and magnetic properties of tetragonal Ni(II) complexes 9. Synthesis of Co(III) complexes and characterization 10. Microwave assisted synthesis of 5,10,15,20 - tetraphenylporphyrin 11. Synthesis and characterization of an oxygen-carrying Cobalt complex which mimics Haemoglobin 12. Binding of a small molecule to a Metalloprotein: Determination of the Equilibrium Binding Constant 13. Reduction potential of cytochrome C 14. Ammonia-Borane related N-B-H compounds and materials 15. Olefin epoxidation with Mn (salen complex) 16. Synthesis and kinetics study of Wilkinson’s catalyst 17. Studies on ligand field strength: Chromium complexes with ligands of different ?0 18. Common geometries of pentacoordinate complexes: preparation of acetylacetonate complexes CHY 415 A DVANCED P HYSICAL C HEMISTRY L ABORATORY [0093] 1. Determination of molecular weights by cryoscopic method (a)using water (b)benzene (c)Camphor as the solvents 2. Viscosity measurements (a)Determination of coefficient of viscosity using Ostwald’s viscometer (b)Variation of viscosity of a liquid with temperature

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(c)Verification of J. Kendall’s equation and determination of the composition of a mixture of two liquids (d)Determination of radius of glycerol molecule (e)Determination of molecular weight of polymers 3. Surface tension (a)Determination of surface tension of the liquid by drop weight and drop number method (b)Determination of the composition of two liquids by surface tension measurements (c)Determination of limiting cross sectional area by surface tension method (d)Determination of atomic parachor 4. Thermochemistry (a)Determination of heat of neutralization of strong acid against strong base (b)Determination of heat of neutralization of weak acid and hence its heat of ionization (c)Determination of calorific value of fuels using bomb calorimeter 5. Refractometry (a)Determination of refractive index of liquids and hence specific and molar refraction (b)Determination of molar refractivity of liquids and hence refraction equivalents of C, H and Cl atoms and refraction equivalent of -CH2 group (c)Determination of molar refraction of solid by dissolving in a liquid 6. Spectophotometry (a)Test the validity of Beer-Lambert’s law (b)Determination of composition of binary mixture of KM nO4 and K2 Cr2 O7 (c)Determination of dissociation constant of weak acid/ weak base (d)Study the complex formation between Fe(III) and salicylic acid, and find the formula and stability constant of the complex (e)Investigate the complex formation of (a) Fe(III) and thiocyanate (b) Ni(II) and ethylenediamine by Job’s method

Laboratory Courses 61 7. Fuel Cells . Electrolytic conductance (a)Determination of dissociation constant of weak acid (b)Determination of solubility of sparingly soluble salt (c)Verification of Onsagar equation. Equilibrium and dissociation constant (a)Determination of equilibrium constant of keto-enoltautomerisation of ethyl acetoacetate (b)Determination of equilibrium constant of esterification reaction between acetic acid and ethanol. 13. Chemical Kinetics (a)Study the kinetics of iodination of acetone by (a) Visual (b) Titrimetric and (c) Spectrophotometric methods (b)Electrochemistry 10. Electromotive force (a)Single electrode potential and verification of Nernst equation (b)Thermodynamics of electrochemical cells (c)Determination of equilibrium constant (d)Determination of solubility of sparingly soluble salt. 11. Transport number • Determination of transport number by moving boundary and Hitroff methods 12. Dipole measurement (a)Determination of dipole moment of liquids and variation of dipole moment with temperature 8. Surface Chemistry • Adsorption of oxalic acid/ acetic acid on charcoal and verification of Freundlich and Langmuir’s adsorptionisotherms 14. (c)Determine the equilibrium constant of the reversible reaction 2Ag + + CaSO4 Ag2 SO4 + Ca2+ 9.

calculation of vibrational frequencies. 18. Corrosion • Determination of rate of corrosion of a material at different conditions 16. Polarimetry (a)Rate constant of hydrolysis of cane sugar (a)Determine the percentage of two optically active substances in a given solution 19. anharmonicities and bond energies. 17. Electronic potential energy surfaces • Absorption spectra of molecular iodine. Concept of particle in a box • Determination of C = C length from absorption spectra of conjugated dienes. Dissociation equilibria of ampholites and determination of isoelectric point .62 School of Chemistry • Determination of Faraday efficiency and Energy efficiency 15.

total variation. Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem. open sets. uniform convergence and continuity. properties of the integral. compact sets. Cauchy sequences. Sequences and series of functions: Pointwise and uniform convergence. subsequences. definition of Riemann-Stieltjes integral. existence of the integral. McGrawHill. The Riemann-Stieltjes integral: Functions of bounded variation. continuous functions. Ascoli’s theorem. continuous functions of bounded variations. converse of Heine-Borel theorem. mean value theorems. limit points. continuity and connectedness. Stone-Weierstrass theorem. 3rd Edition. fundamental theorems of integral calculus. sub cover. connected sets. derived sets. neighbourhood. uniform convergence and differentiation. closed sets. uniform convergence and integration. Heine-Borel theorem. sufficient condition for uniform convergence of a series. continuity and compactness. 1976. convergent sequences. equicontinuity. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. refinement.Mathematics Syllabus MAT 311: Real Analysis [3003] Metric spaces: Properties and examples. open cover. supremum. Cantor intersection theorem. adherent points. completeness. Walter Rudin. nested intervals. bounded variation functions as difference of monotone functions. Principles of Mathematical Analysis. cover. infimum. integration by parts. closure of a set. partitions. 63 .

1987. Terence Tao. graph colouring.64 2. Pigeonhole principle. Ghorpade and B. discrete probability. 5. Set operations.R. Tremblay and R. Sherbert. 2nd Edition. A Course in Calculus and Real Analysis. Rosen. 1985. P. Kraft’s inequality. McGraw-Hill. Discrete Mathematics and its Applications. Wiley. Elements of Discrete Mathematics. spanning trees. 1974. paths and cycles. principle of inclusion and exclusion. Methods of Real Analysis. predicates and quantifiers. 3. Norman L. 7. Kruskal’s algorithm. Prim’s algorithm. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Springer. Hindustan Book Agency. Liu. Undergraduate Analysis. Introduction to Real Analysis. 1976. Mathematics Syllabus T. Eulerian and Hamiltonian circuits. countable and uncountable sets. truth tables. Serge Lang. 4th Edition. Wiley. Permutations. injective. Trees. 4. Manohar. Finite state automata. 1996. C. Limaye.M.V. breadth-first and depth-first traversals. . Discrete Mathematical Structures with Applications to Computer Science. Linear recurrence relations. surjective and bijective functions. 2nd Edition. Church-Turing thesis. 2006. 6. Goldberg. 2006. NP-hard and NP-complete problems. Halting problem and undecidability. Oxford University Press. 6th Edition. Biggs. mathematical induction. binomial theorem. S. complexity of algorithms. 4.R. 2011. McGraw-Hill. McGraw-Hill. asymptotic growth of functions. Huffman codes. Bartle and D. equivalence relations. MAT 312: Discrete Mathematics [3003] Propositional logic. Analysis II. well-ordering principle. binary trees. J. multisets. 2002. representation of graphs. Mathematical Analysis. Discrete Mathematics. 2006. Richard R. Kenneth H. isomorphism. 2nd Edition. Addison Wesley. 2. Apostol. combinations. axiomatic systems. 2nd Edition. 3. 2nd Edition.G. Graphs and digraphs. L. rules of inference. Springer. Russell’s paradox. R.

3. basis. Jacobson. elementary canonical forms. PIDs. A First Course in Abstract Algebra. Fraleigh. 1985. modules over a PID. nilpotent and solvable groups. dual space. direct sum decomposition. 2002. Vol-1. Herstein. 1975. 2011. D. projective. Phi Learning Pvt. Foote. Introduction to Modules: Modules. annihilating polynomials.B.S. New Age International. group action on a set. Cayley-Hamilton theorem. subspaces. simultaneous triangulation. orthonormal basis. adjoint operators. inner product spaces. Addison Wesley.M. isomorphism theorems of Noether. cosets and quotient groups. N. simultaneous diagonalization. Introduction to Ring Theory: Rings.. change of basis. quotient spaces. N. 7th Edition. spectral theorem for self . self adjoint operators. 1986. fundamental Theorem of Abelian groups. invariant direct sum. Jordan-Holder theorem. eigenvalues and eigenvectors. 2nd Edition. 4. I. Algebra. Freeman. Jordan form. projection. cyclic groups. injective and free modules. Advanced Group Theory: Sylow theorems. normal and unitary operators. Topics in Algebra. theorems of Lagrange & Cauchy. MAT 314: Advanced Linear Algebra [3003] Linear Algebra: Vector spaces. symmetric & dihedral groups. 2nd Edition. UFDs & Euclidean rings. University Algebra. Dummit and R. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. direct products. polynomial rings & formal power series. ideals and homomorphisms. Wiley India. Wiley. 3rd Edition. J.N. Ltd. Gauss’ theorem on UFDs. 6.Mathematics 65 MAT 313: Abstract Algebra [3003] Introduction to Group Theory: Groups. 5. linear functional. Eisenstein’s criterion for irreducibility. subgroups & homomorphisms. 2011. the primary decomposition theorem.S. homomorphisms & exact sequences. 2. Gopalakrishnan. New Delhi. Abstract Algebra. invariant subspaces. normal subgroups. 2nd Edition. Gram-Schmidt process. Basic Algebra. Michael Artin.

Numerical Linear Algebra. iterative methods . Herstein. 7. higher order Taylor methods. John Hopkins Univ Press. singular value decomposition. 2006.N Trefethen and David Bau. Pearson Education. New Delhi. .S Watkins. accelerating covergence. 1997. Springer. improper integrals. MAT 315: Numerical Analysis [3003] Roundoff errors and computer arithmetic. Dummel. 1997. sensitivity analysis of singular values and singular vectors. Gauss-Seidel and successive over relaxation method. Matrix computations. divided differences. 2nd Edition. Cholesky decomposition. error analysis. adaptive quadrature. J. orthogonal matrices. Runge-Kutta methods. Numerical differentiation. Applied Numerical Linear Algebra. Fundamentals of Matrix Computations. bisection method.Gauss-Jordan. 4. Axler. 5. zeroes of polynomials and Muller’s method. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Wiley and Sons. Romberg integration. Topics in Algebra. 2nd edition. Linear Algebra. K. stability. multistep methods. fixed point iteration. C. error analysis for iterative methods. Gaussian elimination.D. SIAM. Richardson’s extrapolation. 1996. Newton-Cotes formulas.66 Mathematics Syllabus adjoint operators.W. composite numerical integration. G. 2001. Givens rotations. S. Wiley. condition numbers. Linear Algebra Done Right. I. 1991. Gaussian quadrature. Regula-Falsi method. D. Meyer. L. 8. LU decomposition. stability of QR factorization. Newton’s method. solutions of stiff differential equations. cubic spline interpolation. 1997.N. Initial value problems (IVP) for ordinary differential equations: Euler’s method. 6. Numerical Linear Algebra: Linear systems. Householder transformation. 1996. 3. Matrix Analysis and Applied Linear Algebra.H Golub and C. Hoffman and R. positive definite system. SIAM. 2. SIAM . Kunze.F Van Loan. least square problems. Hermite interpolation. Interpolation and the Lagrange polynomial. QR factorization.

Numerical Analysis.F. analytic functions: limits. Schwarz lemma. open mapping theorem.L. quotient of analytic functions. Weierstrass theorem on limits of analytic functions. 4.. 1989. MAT 321: Complex Analysis [3003] P REREQUISITE 1. Introduction to Numerical Analysis. sufficient conditions. linear fractional transformations.D. the functions w = z n . harmonic conjugate. D. 2nd Edn. the logarithmic function and its branches. power series representation of analytic functions. 3rd Edn. residue theorem. Morera’s Theorem. MAT 311-Real Analysis Geometric representation of complex numbers. 2. Faires. NewYork. Brookes/Cole. Gerald and P. 3. 5. evaluation of improper real integrals. Burden and J.Mathematics 67 Boundary value problems (BVP): Finite difference method.. Applied Numerical Analysis. John Wiley. Conte and Carl de Boor. w = ez . Laurent’s theorem. Elementary Numerical Analysis . C. collocation method. 2011. Mapping by elementary functions: Linear functions. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. the function 1/z . Rouche’s theorem. classification of singularities. poles.O. zeros of analytic functions. special fractional transformations. R. improper integrals involving trigonometric functions. argument principle. the principal part of a function. McGraw Hill. Wheately. maximum modulus theorem. Cauchy-Riemann equations.an algorithmic Approach. Hildebrand. 1994. Galerkin method. McGraw Hill. Kendall E. 5th Edn.B. Addison Wesley. S. Cauchy Riemann equations in polar form. Cauchy’s theorem and Cauchy’s integral formula for convex regions. An Introduction to Numerical Analysis. 1974. . Atkinson. 1980. derivatives. F... 7th Edn.

T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Springer-Verlag. Function Theory of One Complex Variable.W. Lp -spaces: Definition and properties. 4. 2001. Bak and D. Lebesgue integral of nonnegative functions.V.H. monotone convergence theorem. Fatou’s Lemma. Mathews and R. Narosa. bounded convergence theorem. Complex Analysis. . Complex Analysis. M.V. Vol.G. Krantz. Differentiation and integration: Differentiation of monotone functions. J. Lebesgue measure and its properties. bounded linear functionals on Lp spaces. T. Borel sets. 3rd Edition. 2006. Complex Analysis. 2009. normal families.W. Gamelin. Springer. Lebesgue integral of a bounded function over a set of finite measure. absolute continuity. Mcgraw-Hill. 3. Newman. Egoroff’s theorem. 2008.Series on Analysis. measurable functions. 2010. GSM.W. Greene and S. approximation in Lp .68 Mathematics Syllabus Homology and homotopy versions of Cauchy’s theorem. Lebesgue convergence theorem. L. Riemann mapping theorem. the general Lebesgue integral. outer measure and its properties. Ahlfors. Complex Analysis . simply connected regions. 5. Howell. Vol 2. convergence and completeness of Lp . Applications and Computation. 2. Complex Analysis for Mathematics and Engineering. J. Littlewood’s three principles. Lebesgue integral: Simple functions. UTM. 7. R. Complex Analysis. Mcgraw-Hill. Lusin’s theorem. 6. 2009. AMS. Minkowski’s inequality and H¨ older’s inequality. MAT 311-Real Analysis Lebesgue measure: σ -algebras of sets. J. differentiation of an integral. World Scientific. 40. Churchill and R. σ -algebra of measurable sets. MAT 322: Measure Theory and Integration [3003] P REREQUISITE 1.W. functions of bounded variation. 1980. Brown. Wong. 3rd Edition.J. a non-measurable set.

Noetherian rings & Noetherian modules. Measure Theory and Integration. 2011. 2nd Edition. The Radon-Nikodym theorem. M. G. 2. W. Vol. normal extensions. Measure Theory and Integration. L. 2011. 2. general convergence theorems. Mcgraw-Hill Education (India) Ltd. Royden. The Chevalley-Warning theorem. MAT 323: Galois Theory and Commutative Algebra [3003] P REREQUISITE 1. 3rd Edition. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. N. Halmos. T. G. McDonald. Phi Learning Pvt. Hilbert’s basis theorem. ruler & compass constructions. Rudin. integration. Introduction to Commutative Algebra. quadratic residues and reciprocity. 2006. Debarra. K. Michael Taylor. 2009.Mathematics 69 General measure and integration theory: Measure spaces. Lahiri. 2005. Algebra. Westview Press. H. MAT 313-Abstract Algebra Field extensions.G. 8. 5. 6. cyclic & cyclotomic extensions. Folland. M. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1.. Phi Learning.Fubini’s theorem and Tonelli’s theorem. Hilbert zero theorem. Michael Artin. Real Analysis: Modern Techniques and Their Applications. product measures . Real Analysis. solving equations by radicals. American Mathematical Society. 1999. Springer. integral extensions. construction of regular polygons. Paul R. Princeton University Press. John Wiley & Sons. Shakarchi. Tao. Atiyah and I. An Introduction to Measure Theory. Stein and R. 1994. Galois extensions. 7. 2006. fundamental Theorem of Galois theory. 3rd Edition. 2007. Athreya and S. splitting fields. Measure theory. Real Analysis: Measure Theory. 126. finite fields. and Hilbert Spaces. Integration. AMS. measurable functions. Measure Theory. algebraic closure. signed measures. E.F. New Age International. separable and inseparable extensions. 2009. B. 9. Real and Complex Analysis. 1981. B. 3. Ltd. Hindustan Book Agency. New Delhi. localization. 4. . discrete valuation fields. GSM.

existence of curves with prescribed curvature functions. rotation number. Curves: Definition of a curve.S. third fundamental form. Frenet-Serret formula.70 Mathematics Syllabus 3. rank theorem. Meusnier’s theorem. principal. 5. invariance of the first fundamental form.M. Basic Commutative Algebra. quadratic form. Umlaufsatz. surface and volume integrals. Weingarten map. Dummit and R. Westview Press. 1997. geodesics. Frenet equations. moving n-frame. tangent vector field. Graduate Texts in Mathematics. 3rd Edition. MAT 314-Advanced Linear Algebra Functions of several variables: Differentiation. Fubini’s theorem. directional derivatives. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Algebra. the existence and uniqueness of a distinguished Frenet frame. Foote. normal. vector field. tangent vector field. first fundamental form. Thomas Hungerford. Integration: Integration over a rectangle. . mean and Gauss curvatures. vector field. second fundamental form. normal representation for a space curve. Munkres. change of variables formula. Frenet-n-frame. examples of surfaces. surfaces of constant mean curvature. Balwant Singh. energy of the curve. 2011. Springer. characterization of the circle. MAT 311-Real Analysis 2. Analysis on Manifolds. 2011. inverse function theorem and Implicit function theorem. 4. Smooth surfaces: Definition of a surface. D. Gauss map. Curves on smooth surfaces: definition. orientability. J.R. chain rule. MAT 324: Multivariate Analysis [3003] P REREQUISITES 1. World Scientific. curvature and torsion of a space curve. unitspeed curve. Wiley India. Abstract Algebra. partitions of unity. characterization of straight lines. 2005.

Completely regular spaces. Prentice Hall. The Urysohn metrization theorem. C. Dugundji. The Urysohn lemma. 2nd Edition. Basis for a topology. 4. The order topology. J. Introduction to Topology and Modern Analysis. 2000. The separation axioms. 5. Simmons. Thorpe. I. connected sets in the real line. Local Connectedness. 1965. 1976. G. MAT 411: Functional Analysis [3003] P REREQUISITES . Pugh. 3. Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces.M. M. Singer and J. Connectedness and Compactness: Connected spaces. The product topology. Boston. Westview Press. Closed sets and limit points. Engelwood.Mathematics 2. The subspace topology. Compact sets in the real line. 3. 2010. NJ. Prentice Hall. 71 MAT 325: General Topology [3003] P REREQUISITE 1. The Stone-Cech compactification. The quotient topology. 1971. A Comprehensive Introduction to Differential Geometry.C.A. M. Components and path components. Compact spaces. Calculus on Manifolds. PrenticeHall. Paracompactness. MAT 311-Real Analysis Topological Spaces and Continuous Functions: Topological spaces. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Springer. Spivak. 1976. The metric topology. McGrawHill. The Tychonoff theorem. Springer. 1970. do Carmo. Topology. Countability and Separation Axioms: The countability axioms. Local compactness. Vol. 1963. Michael Spivak. Publish or Perish. Continuous functions. Munkres. F. Limit point compactness. J. Real Mathematical Analysis. Lecture Notes on Elementary Topology and Geometry. 2. Topology.R.P. 4. 1.

Functional Analysis: An Introduction. MAT 321-Complex Analysis 2. Introduction to Topology and Modern Analysis. divergence of Fourier series. Gram-Schmidt ortho-normalization. unitary. Bessel’s inequality. Operator norm. Tosio Kato. 1963. open mapping theorem and some applications. Milman and A. projection theorem. Academic Press. Bounded operators on Hilbert spaces: Adjoint. separable Hilbert spaces. orthogonal projections. 1995. Peter D. Fundamental theorems: Hahn-Banach theorems. Functional Analysis (Methods of Modern Mathematical Physics . compact operators. normal. 1981. Banach spaces. 2009. continuity and boundedness of linear maps on a normed linear space. orthonormal set. Principles of Functional Analysis. uniform boundedness principle. Tsolomitis. Bollabas.72 1. Lax. closed graph theorem. Perturbation Theory for Linear Operators. statement of spectral theorem for bounded self adjoint operators. Projection and Riesz representation theorems: Orthonormal complements. Functional Analysis.F. Press). weak and weak* convergence. Dual spaces and adjoint of an operator: Duals of classical spaces. Eidelman. Hilbert spaces: Inner product spaces. 2002. Y. selfadjoint operators. M. 6. 1999. orthonormal basis. Vol. Wiley-Inter Science. adjoint of an operator. Reed and B. Riesz lemma. Martin Schechter. Mc-Graw Hill. MAT 322-Measure Theory and Integration Mathematics Syllabus Normed linear spaces. Spectral theorem: Spectral theorem for compact self adjoint operators. 5. 7. 2004. Riesz representation theorem. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1.Volume 1). 4. 3. Cambridge University Press (Indian Edition). AMS. GSM. Unbounded operators. 66. 2. Linear Analysis. B. V. characterization of finite dimensional spaces. AMS (Indian Edition. Springer. Uni. Simon. G. Simmons. .

Mathematics 8. Prokhorov’s theorem. 2. distributions and expectations. 2006. Probability: Theory and Examples. integration. MAT 322-Measure Theory and Integration Review of measure theory: measure spaces. Martingales: filtration and semi martingales. application to random walks. 1989. Wiley. 2010. Varadhan. 2nd Edition. Rudin. 9. S. Kolmogorov’s strong law of large numbers. Kreyeszig. compact support functions.S. stable laws. strong limit theorems. weak convergence. product spaces. Weak convergence: characteristic functions. transformations. Doob decomposition theorem. W. Skorohod’s theorem. Probability Theory. Tata McGraw Hill. Khintchine’s weak law of large numbers. Functional Analysis. series of independent random variables. Rick Durrett. E. moment generating functions. 2001. 73 MAT 412: Probability Theory and Random Processes [3003] P REREQUISITE 1. Introduction to Functional Analysis with Applications. Sum of independent random variables: independence and convolution. Cambridge University Press. stopping times and renewal times. Markov chains. Khintchine’s law of iterated logarithm. conditional expectation and conditional probability. Dependent random variables: conditioning. 4th Edition. stopping times. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Markov chains. Lebesgue measure. The central limit theorems: tight families of probability distributions. martingale convergence theorems. infinitely divisible distributions. . Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. the central limit theorem.R.

2. law of quadratic reciprocity. Introduction to Probability and Measure. Springer. Quadratic residues. Pollard’s rho method. Probability and Measure.74 Mathematics Syllabus 3. 2nd Edition. 2nd Edition. H. 2nd Edition. O. Bertrand’s postulate. HardyLittlewood circle method. fundamental theorem of arithmetic. An Analytic View. Shiryaev. Oxford University Press. best approximations. 3. Lagrange’s theorem. 2nd Edition. Jacobi symbol. Euler’s theorem. Wilson’s theorem. Cambridge University Press. Congruences. 1995. 2008. S. 2010. Arithmetic functions. 2005. 2nd Edition. 6th Edition. Euclid’s algorithm. 7. Jean Jacod and Philip Protter. complete and reduced residue systems. Probability. continued fractions. Foundations of Modern Probability. Fermat’s little theorem. Algorithms for primality testing. public key cryptography. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Probability Theory. Euler’s totient function. Wright. K. An Introduction to the Theory of Numbers. G. . prime numbers. M. A. Montgomery. 9. N. 3rd Edition. Stroock. discrete logarithm problem. Hardy and E. Probability Essentials. 1994. Probability. Springer. Diffie-Hellman key exchange. binary quadratic forms. Classical cryptography. Leo Breiman. Pythagorean triples. 2004.R. zero knowledge protocols. Zuckerman and H. Springer. Chinese remainder theorem. 4. Billingsley. Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. P. 5. 8. Wiley. Mobius inversion formula. quadratic irrationals. Fermat’s Last Theorem. 5th Edition. I. 2010. Niven. block ciphers. Linear diophantine equations. L. RSA cryptosystem. Pell’s equation. Springer. 6. quadratic sieve. Wiley (India). pseudoprimes. Waring’s problem. 2008.W. 1992. Kallenberg. An Introduction to the Theory of Numbers. Hindustan Book Agency. D. Parthasarathy. Neal Koblitz. Irrationality of e and π . MAT 413: Number Theory and Cryptography [3003] Divisibility. perfect numbers. Elliptic curve cryptosystems. H. primitive roots. prime number theorem. Fermat’s factorisation. A Course in Number Theory and Cryptography. 1991. Legendre symbol.

asymptotic behaviour of solutions of linear systems. Coddington and N. separation of variables. 4. Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations.. periodic linear systems. variation of parameters. 75 MAT 414: Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations [3003] P REREQUISITE 1.Mathematics 4. Existence and uniqueness of initial value problems: Picard-Lindel¨ of theorem. Linear systems: existence and uniqueness of solutions of systems. 3rd Edn. MAT 311-Real Analysis Review of various solving techniques: integrating factor method. 2001. Peano’s existence theorem. Elementary Number Theory. McGraw-Hill. systems with constant coefficients. limit cycles and periodic solutions. 2. 2002. Kenneth Ireland and Michael Rosen. right derivates. Springer. Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems. fundamental matrix solution. 2nd Edn. method of undetermined coefficients. two-dimensional autonomous systems. maximal and minimal solutions. Stability theory: stability of quasi-linear systems. Springer. 1990. 2006. Cauchy-Peano existence theorem. Lyapunov’s direct method for autonomous and non-autonomous systems. eigenfunction expansion. 2nd Edition. dependence on initial conditions and parameters.. Boundary value problems: Linear BVP. Agarwal and Donal O’Regan. A Classical Introduction to Modern Number Theory. Levinson. Lawrence Perko. Ordinary Differential Equations. James K. 5. general properties of linear systems. 3. maximum principles. Philip Hartman. differential inequalities. An Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations. Ravi P. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. 2008.A. Poincar´ e-Bendixson theory in two-dimension. Gronwall’s inequality. Strayer. Green’s function. SIAM. Springer. E. . Waveland Press. 1984. uniqueness theorems. Sturm-Liouville theory.

McGraw-Hill. Differential Equations with Applications and Historical Notes. 1974. G..76 Mathematics Syllabus 5. 2004. Academic Press.F. Hirsch and Smale. . New York. 2nd Edn. Simmons. 1979. G. Wiley.. 4th Edn. Differential Equations. 8. Green’s Functions and Boundary Value Problems. 7. Ordinary Differential Equations. Birkhoff and G-C Rota. Wiley. 1991. Ivar Stakgold. 6. Dynamical Systems and Linear Algebra.

5. 13. 9. 15. 20. 12. Functional Analysis Partial Differential Equations Combinatorics and Graph Theory Differential Geometry Algebraic Geometry Algebraic Number Theory Algebraic Topology Rings and Modules Lie Groups and Lie Algebras Representation Theory Nonnegative Matrices and Applications Advanced Combinatorics Diophantine Approximations Harmonic Analysis Operator Theory Advanced Partial Differential Equations Stochastic Analysis Control Theory Mathematical Finance Mathematical Fluid Dynamics Calculus of Variations Operations Research Programming and Data Structures Finite Element Methods . 2. 19. 24. 4.Mathematics 77 Partial List of Electives 1. 3. 10. 22. 18. 6. 7. 11. 23. 16. 8. 14. 17. 21.

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Ordinary differential equations: Linear equations: Solution space. analytic functions. J. Cauchy. Conservation laws and Noethers theorem. Applications to contour integration. Methods of mathematical physics. Bessel and spherical Bessel functions. Central force 79 . method of characteristics. Academic press. Courant and Hilbert. Arfken and H. G. 2. Green Functions. B. origin of eigenproblems. Wiley.School of Physics Theory Courses PHY 311 M ATHEMATICAL M ETHODS IN P HYSICS [3003] Calculus of Variations: Equations of mathematical physics as variational problems. Legendre functions. self-adjointness. PHY 312 C LASSICAL M ECHANICS [3003] Review of Newtonian mechanics. R. examples from electrostatics. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Complex Analysis: Complex differentiability. Taylor. Dover. shocks and weak solutions. Mathematics for Physicists. Generalized coordinates. continuous spectra and Fourier integrals. linear independence. Integral Equations: Solution via Fourier and Laplace transforms.Symmetries. solution of differential equations and asymptotics. Poisson’s equation. Mathematical methods for physicists. The Lagrangian for a free particle and for a system of particles. 3. momentum and angular momentum. Wronskians. Partial Differential equations: Classification of PDE’s. Eigenvalue problems: Boundary conditions. Weber. Heat equation: solution by integral transforms. The principle of least action. Dennery and Andre Krzywicki. and Laurent theorems. Hyperbolic equations: wave equation. Conservation of energy. Fourier series. completeness of eigen functions. Conformal mapping and its physical applications. Integrating the equations of motion: motion in one dimension. Elliptic equations: Dirichlet and Neumann problems. Lagrange multipliers. Lagrange’s equation. spherical harmonics. Abel’s equation.

Emitter bias. Euler angles. Euler’s equations. Diode approximations. forward bias. Transistor switch. D. Hamilton-Jacobi theory and action-angle variables. static and dynamic resistance. PN junction. current gain . Motion of a rigid body. 2000. forced. Invariance properties of the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian descriptions. DC load line. CE. Heterojunction.1 [3003] Basic concepts of semiconductors. diode characteristics. Landau and E. Voltage and current source. Poisson and Lagrange brackets. Collector feedback bias. Group properties and methods of constructing canonical transformations. Filters Capacitor. Motion in a non-inertial frame. Diode circuits — Rectifiers – half wave and full wave – efficiency and ripple factor. M. saturation and cut-off regions. The Hamilton equations of motion. clipper and clamper circuits. Angular momentum. Pergamon Press. 3rd Ed. damped and anharmonic oscillations. H. L. and . Voltage multiplier. Transistor biasing . T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Voltage divider bias.80 School of Physics motion and Kepler’s problem. common emitter and common collector configurations. Thevenins and Nortons theorems. Mechanics. 2. Tunnel diode. Varactor. scattering and Rutherfords formula. Angular velocity. Collisions: elastic collisions. 2005. Classical Mechanics. Goldstein. The Kepler problem in action angle variables. Safko. equivalent circuit. Cyclic coordinates. conduction and doping. PHY 313 E LECTRONICS . 1 of course of Theoretical Physics. transistor current components. Modes of operation. The harmonic oscillator as an example. Legendre transformations. Zener and avalanche breakdown. Routhian. Bipolar Junction transistor. the transistor action. AddisonWesley. C. Q-point. Small oscillations: simple harmonic. CC configuration. Poole and J. Stability factor. Special purpose diodes – Zener.Base bias. Canonical transformations. Moment of inertia. Schottky diode. Currentvoltage characteristics of CB. RC and LC filters. Self bias. reverse bias. commonbase. . Vol. junction capacitance. Early effect. Lifshitz.

Normalization. 4. 555. eigenvalues. eigenvectors. 2006.Theory Courses 81 AC Models . Voltage amplifiers – voltage gain. Microprocessor architecture. and applications with 8085. L. Floyd and R. Class C amplifiers. positive and negative feedback-advantages of negative feedback-input and output resistances-voltage series and current series feedback-frequency response of amplifiers with and without feedback. phase shift oscillator. T.). Electronic principles. frequency response of RC coupled amplifiers. PHY 314 Q UANTUM M ECHANICS . Pearson Education. resonant circuit oscillators. comparison of amplifier configurations. 2008. Darlington pair. 2008. A basis labeled by a . T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Operators. Morris Mano and M.). J. 2002. Dirac Bra and Ket notation. Rays and vectors in Hilbert space. the uncertainty principle. simplified h-model. Quantum amplitudes. Oscillators. Jit. crystal oscillator. S. C. Ciletty. square wave and triangle wave generators. S. Electronic devices and circuits. 2007. Push pull amplifiers. Non commutating operators and observables. Schmitt trigger. M. Power amplifiers — Class A. Gaonkar. cascading CE & CC amplifiers. Transistor hybrid model — determination of h-parameters from characteristics. probabilities and the Born rule. 6. transformer coupled amplifiers.). Semiconductor Devices. 2005. ac-equivalent circuits — T. Digital Design (4th Ed. Malvino and D. RC. Jain. P.1 [3003] Quantum kinematics: The state vector. Bates.model. Physics and Technology (2nd Ed. R. M. Halkias and S. 2. the Stern-Gerlach experiment. DC. Colpitts oscillator. Class B. 3. Millman. analysis of a transistor amplifier using h-parameters. observables and expectation values (a bit of linear algebra). programming. Wiley India. Digital Fundamentals (8th Ed. A. multivibrators. Wien bridge oscillator. the principle of superposition. Π -model. C. Tata Macgraw Hill. 5. J.ac resistance of the emitter diode. ac input impedance. Hilbert space and some general properties of linear vector spaces. Prentice Hall. Pearson Education. D. ac load-line. Basis vectors. Sze. Mcgraw-hill.

Function spaces. 4. Modern quantum mechanics. Dover Publications (2003) PHY 321 S TATISTICAL M ECHANICS [3003] Review of thermodynamics and Probability theory: The Laws of Thermodynamics. The Feynman lectures on physics Vol 3. Principles of quantum mechanics. J. finite time evolution and unitary transformations. Marvin Chester. Wave functions. properties of unitary transformations. The probability current and the continuity equation. Separation of variables. quantum tunneling. Charged Particle in a Magnetic Field: Oscillator algebra. R. Townsend. Plenum Publishers. The Schr¨ odinger equation in three dimensions: The Schr¨ odinger equation in spherical coordinates. Spin. Fourier transforms. Feynman. Dynamics in Phase space. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. 1994. Examples: particle in an infinite square well and particle in a finite square well. Narosa (2007) 5. Sakurai. The uncertainty principle revisited. time evolution of expectation values. The time independent Schr¨ odinger equation.82 School of Physics continuous parameter and the wave function. Addison-Wesley. Particle interchange – chemical potential. Statistical Picture of Mechanics: Statistical description of a classical particle. Primer of Quantum Mechanics. 1994. Random variable. Energy spectrum and Eigenstates. Volume change – Pressure. The Hydrogen atom. P. Commutation relations. Ergodicity. Interactions – The Conditions for Equilibrium. The position and momentum bases. S. The radial equation and energy quantization. Quantum Dynamics: The Schr¨ odinger equation. Stationary states and Liouville theorem. The Heisenberg picture. Shankar. . Stationary states. Landau levels. Delta function normalization. University Science Books (2000) 2. R. J. Central limit theorem. The Hamiltonian and the idea of generators. 3. Stationary states. J. the angular equation. spherical harmonics and introduction to quantized angular momentum. A modern approach to quantum mechanics. Thermal Interaction – Temperature. Distribution function. Microcanonical and Canonical states. scattering off a potential barrier. the quantum harmonic oscillator.

T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. primitive cells. Reif. K.).Phenomenology: Phase diagrams. B. Broken symmetry. Strongly interacting systems: Phase transitions — Introduction to the Ising model. R. Scaling theory and scaling of free energy. Statistical Physics (2nd Ed.). Generalised Expression for Entropy Gibbs entropy. Tata Mcgrawhill. Wiley. space group and point groups. 2011. 2. Weakly interacting Systems: Cluster Expansion. The Classical Limit The Maxwell Distribution. Conserved and non-conserved order parameters. two and three dimensional lattices. Examples: Black-body radiation. Particle in a 1D and 3D box. Free Energy and Thermodynamic Variables. Thermodynamics and an Introduction To Thermostatistics. Landau theory. F. Virial theorem. H. lattice gas and phase separation in alloys and Bragg-Williams approximation. Discussion of ferroelectrics. classification of . Grand Potential and Thermodynamic variables. 3. Symmetry breaking. symmetry. scattering. Transfer matrix method in 1D. 2006. Quantum Distributions: Bosons and Fermions. Callen. Critical exponents. Order of phase transitions and Order parameter. Equipartition theorem. 5. soft modes. Ideal Paramagnet (negative temperature).Theory Courses 83 Methadology of Statistical Mechanics: Definition of counting and partition function – Density of states. John Wiley & Sons. Examples – Two level system. Harmonic oscillator. Ornstein Zernike. PHY 322 C ONDENSED M ATTER P HYSICS . The Grand Partition Function . F. Statistical Physics: Berkeley Physics Course Vol. Distinction between second order and first order transitions. 4. Pathria. The Fermi and Bose Distribution. Classical Partition function. fluctuations. Thermodynamic Averages: The Partition Function. 1991. Symmetry. 2002. Bose Einsten Condensation and Fermi gas at low temperatures. Phase transitions . Mandl. Grand Potential for Identical Particles. Magnetic case. Goldstone bosons. Van der Waal’s gases. Examples of non-interacting systems – Einstein and Debye model. Statistical Mechanics (2nd Ed.1 [3003] Crystal structure: Bravais lattice. Elsevier.

2000. interaction of X-rays with matter. Operational amplifiers — actual circuits of operational amplifiers. noninteracting electrons in an electric field. Simplification of Boolean expressions. David Mermin. 3.Wannier functions. Brillouin zones. free electron model. Solid state physics. N. semiclassical electron dynamics. hexadecimal and Octal numbers. . Ashcroft. Electron transport: Drude theory. John Wiley. rotating crystal method. comparators. Kronig-Penny model. 4. encoders multiplexers. Mechanical properties: elasticity. rotational symmetry and group representations. inelastic scattering from phonons. W. The Schr¨ odinger equation and symmetry: Blochs theorem. De Morgans theorem. Laws of Boolean algebra. HartreeFock equations. 7th edition. density functional theory. Marder. liquid crystals. common source and common drain amplifiers. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. electron-electron interactions. Laue method. deriving the truth table. van Hove singularities. Electronic structure: The single electron model. deciphering the structure. characteristics and applications. look-ahead-carry implementation. density of levels. Logic gates. tightly bound electrons. waveform generators. specific heat of noninteracting electrons. SCS. small signal model. phonons. John Wiley. PHY 323 E LECTRONICS 2 [3003] FETS. Karnaugh Map. Macmillan India . BCD. uses as amplifiers. Introduction to solid state physics. integration and differential circuits. 2. demultiplexers. N. characteristics. designing combinational logic from truth table. Solid state physics. 1976. J. Fermi surface. 2005. 2004. Diac. Triac. Zener tunneling. Magnitude comparators. logarithmic generators. Boolean algebra. Einstein and Debye models. biasing. A. ASCII code. band structure. Harcourt. Digital Electronics: Binary number systems. NAND and NOR gates. Half adder. binary-decimal conversions. Gray code. Condensed matter physics. analog circuits adding. MOSFET. C. powder method. Kittel. full adder. decoders. Dekker.84 School of Physics lattices by symmetry. tight binding model. Michael P. Silicon controlled rectifiers. Models: Nearly free electrons. Experimental determination of crystal structure: Scattering from crystals. combinational logic circuits.

). Halkias and S. PHY 324 E LECTRODYNAMICS AND SPECIAL THEORY OF RELATIVITY [3003] Review of Maxwell’s equations and basic electrodynamics. and applications with 8085.). 2. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. PMOS and NMOS. Electromagnetic field equations: The action function of the electromag- . Lorentz transformation of the field. M. shift register applications. 2006. Memories – ROM. Experimental evidence. Charges in electromagnetic fields: Elementary particles in special theory of relativity. microcontrollers. Bates.Principle of least action. Invariance of the interval. Space-time diagrams. Coordinates used by another observer. Millman. Electronic principles. RAM. Shift registers. Energy and momentum. Transformation of distribution functions. 7. 2002. Invariant hyperbolae. M. Mcgraw-hill. Synchronous and asynchronous counters. PROM and EPROM.Theory Courses 85 Flip-flops — RS. Pearson Education. counter applications. programming. Digital Fundamentals (8th Ed. 2008. multivibrators. Integrated circuits. 2007. C. D. Jain. C. Invariants of the field. Electronic devices and circuits. Postulates of the special theory of relativity. Floyd and R. Wiley India. 3. Microprocessors architecture. 5. S. Gaonkar. Malvino and D. C. The Lorentz transformation. P. Millman. Prentice Hall. R.). 2005. Jit. D/A and A/D conversions. Elastic collisions. S. 8086 microprocessors. L. and C. J. Gauge invariance. Electromagnetic field tensor. Four vectors: four velocity and four momentum. Tata Macgraw Hill. Physics and Technology (2nd Ed. The velocity composition law. Microprocessor architecture. Ciletty. CMOS. An inertial observer. Angular momentum. J. 2008. J. four potential of a field. Digital Design (4th Ed. Tata Macgraw Hill. Sze. JK flip-flops. 6. Semiconductor Devices. 4. 2008. T. Halkias. special memories and applications. 8085. different types. Integrated electronics. addressing modes. D. Morris Mano and M. Pearson Education. peripheral devices. A.

86 School of Physics netic field and the first pair of Maxwell’s equations. Partially polarized light. D. Various pumping methods (rotary/diffusion/turbo molecular/ion/cryo pump) and their area of application. Motion in the coulomb field. Pergamon. John Wiley. Lifshitz. Lienard-Wiechert potentials. AC measurement techniques. 2000. leakage current. AC + DC mixing and application in directly obtaining various harmonics of the primary signal. Voltage and current sourcing techniques. John David Jackson. Griffiths. Cambridge. Vol-2 of course of theoretical physics. Bernard F. AC/DC techniques range of application. Retarded and advanced potentials. A first course in General Relativity. Prentice Hall. pumping impedance and pumping speed. Electrostatic energy of charges. Four dimensional current vector. L. Vacuum Techniques: Introduction to the concept of low pressure with examples and measurement scales. Constant electromagnetic fields: Coulombs law. Fourier resolution of the electrostatic field. Classical Electrodynamics. lock-in amplifiers — operating principle (phase locking). Spectral resolution. System of charges in an electric field. David J. obtaining best fit. Schutz. Low current measurement. source-meter and sample impedance matching. Comparison of different gauges used in measurement (pirani/penning/ion/capacitance) . Energy density and energy flux. Landau and E. M. Continuity equation. Application of above in designing and measuring the R vs T or constant current V vs T curve of a diode. Fitting the bare data by linearization technique. the energy-momentum tensor of the electromagnetic field. Plane waves. Introduce calibration curve of a sensor and its predictive value. The dipole and multipole moments. The field of a uniformly moving charge. Electromagnetic waves: The wave equation. 1999. Introduction to Electrodynamics. Production and measurement of high and ultra high vacuum. van der pauw). The second pair of Maxwells equations. Classical Theory of Fields. Design of a vacuum chamber. PHY 411 E XPERIMENTAL M ETHODS [3003] Electrical characterization techniques: Resistance measurement. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. 2009. Magnetic field and moments. 1998. 3. various configurations (2/4 probe. 4. Larmors theorem. 2.

Glass. hole. electron beam. Temperature scales vs energy scales in physical systems. profilometer etc. Vapour pressure and choice of materials in a vacuum system. thermocouple).Characterization techniques: Principle of pulse NMR. Al. Springer. (Electrical and thermal properties of common materials at low T. Measurement of heat capacities. < 1. 4. effective mass. Working principle of a residual gas analyser. cernox. Room temperature – mK range (300 – 77K.1 Semiconductors: intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors. Relevant temperature ranges vis--vis practical applications (examples from real systems). Experimental Pulse NMR: A Nuts And Bolts Approach.6K ). capacitance. Production and Measurement: Introduction to cryogens (liquid nitrogen. 77 – 4. laws of mass action. principle of Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) and SQUID magnetometer. diode. Sample deposition Techniques: Thermal. Principles of Magnetic Resonance. 2. Magnetic measurement. spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and spin-spin relaxation time (T2). negative feedback and zeroing of a PID controller. Paper via a comparison chart or graph will be helpful). Thickness monitor. 1989. PHY 412 C ONDENSED M ATTER P HYSICS . carbon. pumping on cryogens. Westview Press. Introduction to attaining high magnetic field in lab. PHY 322: Condensed Matter Physics . Slichter. PTFE. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Pt.6K > 5T ). Types of thermometers comparative study and application ranges and conditions (Pt100. impurity band . measurements of NMR spectra. helium). Si. Carbon.6K. Temperature control. Cu. Rubber. Knudsen Cell.2 – 1.Theory Courses 87 operating principles and ranges of application. E. Cryogenics: Introduction to low and high temperature applications and its importance. Silicone. 1993. Sapphire. Fukushima. T measurement in high magnetic field and low temperatures (< 1. Charles P. Piecewise curve fitting for a cernox thermometer. Macor.2 [3003] P REREQUISITE 1. Basic principles of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and its application. electron and hole mobilities. RF/DC sputtering – applications and limitations.2K.

DC and AC Josephson effects. 3. Ginzburg-Landau theory. Superconducting tunneling. Heisenberg model. Landau theory of the phase transition. Shottky barrier .2 [3003] P REREQUISITES 1.and ferrimagnetism. Frenkel excitons. . David Mermin. High-T superconductivity: structure and transport properties. Introduction to solid state physics. PHY 413 Q UANTUM M ECHANICS . Hunds rule. Ferroelectric domains. spin wave. Electronic interband transitions. PHY 314: Quantum Mechanics .1 2. A. Optical Processes: Optical reflectance. Kittel. PHY 312: Classical Mechanics Angular Momentum: Angular Momentum algebra. Marder. John Wiley.88 School of Physics conduction . Classical and quantum theories. Mott-Wannier excitons. Piezoelectricity. para-magnetism. John Wiley. Magnetic resonance. Eigenvalues and Eigenstates of Angular Momentum. quantum Hall effect . Michael P. Dielectric and Ferroelectrics: General concept. 2000. Resolution of a plane wave. Meissner effect. Magnetism: dia-. Thermodynamics of superconductors. SU(2) Representations. N. Superconductivity: Experimental survey. W. Harcourt. 2. Solid state physics. F-center etc. 2004. anti. Ashcroft. Addition of Angular Momentum. Displacive transitions: Soft phonon modes. Motion in Central Potential. Crystal defects: Schottky vacancies. Frenkel defects. mean field theory. Type-I and Type-II superconductors. Condensed matter physics. Ferroelectric crystals. Accidental degeneracy. BCS theory. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. Schwinger’s Oscillator Model of angular momentum. 2005. Kramers-Kronig relations. 1976. J. Curie-Weiss law. Londons equation. SQUIDs. C. N. 7th edition. Coulomb potential. and Ferroelasticity. Dekker. first and second order phase transitions. p-n junction . 4. Spherical waves. Exchange interaction. Raman effect in crystals etc. Asymptotic properties of Radial wave-functions. ferro-. flux quantization. Solid state physics. Macmillan India. coherence length. dielectric constant and polarizability. Van-Vleck and Pauli paramagnetism. Structural phase transitions.

Shankar.List of Electives in Physics 89 Approximation methods: Time-independent Perturbation Theory (nondegenerate case. 1994. L. Application to spin in a time-varying Magnetic Field. Method of Partial Waves. R. Applications to Interactions with the Classical Radiation Field. Identical particles. 2. Quantum Mechanics (2 volumes). Energy Shift and Decay Width. Symmetry considerations in Scattering. Principles of quantum mechanics. Sakurai. Free-Particle states (plane waves. including Yukawa and Coulomb. Transition rates. relativistic and spin-orbital effects. Optical theorem. Resonance Scattering. Identical Particles and Scattering. Permutation symmetry and Young Tableau. Transition Probabilities. Inelastic Electron-Atom Scattering. Liftshitz. Berry’s phase. Low-Energy Scattering and Bound States. spherical waves). 2000. Quantum Mechanics Vol-3 of course of theoretical physics. D. Semi-classical (WKB) Approximation and Applications (Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule. 4. Time-dependent formulation of Scattering. Butterworth-Heinmann. Cohen-Tannoudji and Diu-Lalo¨ e. Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Two electron system. Atomic and Molecular Physics . Tunneling. Addison-Wesley. J. Lippmann-Schwinger Equation. High Energy Physics 2. Eikonal approximation. Born Approximation and application to scattering from various spherically symmetric potentials. The Adiabatic Approximation and Geometrical Phase: Adiabatic theorem. Fermi’s Golden rule. degenerate case). Stark effect. Time-dependent Potentials and the Interaction Picture: Time-dependent Perturbation Theory. Zeeman effect. M. Wiley. Scattering theory: Scattering cross-section. Permutation Symmetry. Plenum Publishers. and Applications (Fine structure of hydrogen. 2000. T EXTBOOKS /R EFERENCES 1. J. Van der Waals interaction). The Helium Atom. List of Electives in Physics 1. Spontaneous emission. Bound-state energies etc). 3. Symmetrization Postulate. 1994. Variational Methods and Applications (Ground and Excited states of Helium). Landau and E. Modern quantum mechanics.

Owen . 13. 10. 6. DeSauty. Torsion Pendulum Rigidity modulus of material of wire Young’s Modulus: Cornu’s Method (Elliptical & Hyperbolic Fringes) Spectrometer: i − i curve Spectrometer Hartmann’s formula (Find unknown wavelength) Youngs modulus Optic Lever Mehtod Surface Tension Capillary Rise (Water) Method. 5. 11. 13. 15.Oscillating Disc Method Viscosity of Liquid Variable or Constant Pressure Head. 6. 16. 12. 8. 8. Viscosity of a Liquid . 12. 4. 2. 3. 9. Computational Techniques and Programming Languages Fluid dynamics Nonlinear dynamics Advanced quantum mechanics: many body theory Statistical field theory Non-equilibrium statistical mechanics Advanced mathematical methods Early universe Astrophysics Quantum information theory Physics at the nano scale Quantum theory of fields General theory of relativity and cosmology String theory Laboratory Courses PHY 315 A DVANCED P HYSICS E XPERIMENTS I [0093] 1. Maxwell. 7. 15. 9.90 School of Physics 3. 14. 16. Capillary Dip (Mercury) Method and Quincke’s Method (Mercury) Beam Profile of Laser Divergance of Laser Beam Diffraction by ultrasonic waves Velocity of Sound in Liquid e/m . 10. 14. 5. 11.Thomsons Method Dipole Moment of Organic Molecule Fabrey-Perot Interferometer Michelson’s Interferometer LCR circuit (Series and Parallel) Frequency Response and Value of Unknown L AC Bridges Anderson. 4. 7.

Velocity of light Foucolt’s Method 2. Voltage Controlled Oscillator (Transistor): Variation in frequency with control voltage 21. Coefficient of Resistance of Copper 10. Arc Spectrum Iron or Brass 5. Triac. Transistor Characteristics (CE) 19. Thermal Relaxation of Bulb 8. Op-Amp Inverting and Non-inverting amplifiers (Frequency Response) 13. Absorption Spectrum KM nO4 or Iodine 6. Frequency responses (Common and Diff. SCR. Transistor as a Switch and Amplifier 20. Bi-stable Multivibrator (Transistor) PHY 325 A DVANCED P HYSICS E XPERIMENTS II [0093] 1. Mono-stable Multivibrator (Transistor) 25. Square. Photo-diode Characteristics (Intensity vs. dark resistance of photo diode) 18. Modes) . Calibration of Secondary Thermometers 7. X-ray spectrum analysis 9. Diac Characteristics 12. Differentiation) 14. Phase-shift & Wein-bridge Oscillators (Transistor) 24. Low-pass Signal Filter (First and Second Order) Frequency Response 16. Resistivity (4 probe Method) & Temp. Voltage Controlled Oscillator (555 timer): Variation in frequency with control voltage 22. Op-Amp Mathematical Tools (Addition. Photo current. Triangular & Saw-tooth wave generators using Op-amp 15. Band Pass and Band Reject Filters Frequency Response 18. Differential Amplifier using transistor CMRR. Photo-electric Effect Characteristics of photoelectric emission (I-V for different wave lengths and different frequencies). FET Characteristics and Amplifier using FET 11. Colpit & Hartley Oscillators (Transistor) 23. Integration. Plancks Constant from Voltage-frequency curve 3. High-pass Signal Filter (First and Second Order) Frequency Response 17. Thermal diffusivity of brass 4.Laboratory Courses 91 17.

Microprocessor programming Multiplication / Bubble sorting 24. ESR spectrometer: g -factor of a sample 6. Noise fundamentals 10. Magnetic susceptibility . GM Counter 14. Amplitude modulation Modulation index for different amplitudes of audio signal. 3.Quincke’s Method 8. Decade Counters with seven segment Display 22. Microprocessor programming . 20. Damped-Driven Pendulum 13. Optical Pumping 11. D/A Converter 23.one photon at a time 12. SR & JK Flip-flops 21. Design new experiments (micro projects) . Two slit Interference . Super Conductivity 16.A/D Converter 25. Curie-Wiess Law of Dielectric Material 2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 4. B − H Curve (Ferromagnet) 9.92 School of Physics 19. Microprocessor programming . Zeeman Effect To verify the ratio of 0 /hc using Zeeman splitting in 6 3 P2 and 7 3 S1 states of mercury. Band gap of a semiconductor 7. Hall Effect 5.Stepper Motor PHY 415 A DVANCED P HYSICS E XPERIMENTS III [0093] 1. Fiber Optics 15.

Srinivasa Associate Professor Natesh. M. NCBS 1 Research interests Biochemistry Mammalian Cell Biology Immunology Cancer Biology Molecular StructuralBiology Meiotic recombination Genome stability Plant molecular genetics & patterning Cellular asymmetry Cell division in bacteria Insect navigation Sensory ecology Bio statistics Contact details1 tmanna@ 0471-259-9425 sms@ 0471-2590-406 natesh@ 0471-259-9403 nishantkt@ 0471 259-0677 kalika@ 0471-259-9404 sunish@ 0471-259-9401 hsomanathan@ 0471-259-9424 madhavbk@gmail. K Visiting Faculty. M.in to the email address 93 .res. K. Sunish Assistant Professor Somanathan.in Please suffix iisertvm. Pune Univ. Assistant Professor Prasad. Tapas Assistant Professor Murty Srinivasula. B Visiting Faculty. T. Kalika Assistant Professor Radhakrishnan. Ramanathan Assistant Professor Nishant.com Neurobiology Ion channels mathew@ncbs. Hema Assistant Professor Kulkarni.Faculty School of Biology Faculty members Manna.ac. Mathew.

M Visiting Faculty 1 Research interests Computational Chemistry Theoretical Sciences Quantum Chemistry Non-linear dynamics Physical organic chemistry Biophysical chemistry Theoretical Chemistry Computational Chemistry Medicinal chemistry Chemical Biology Theoretical chemistry Contact details1 ayan@ 0471-259-9417 gopi@ 0471-259-7428 mahesh@ 0471-259-9413 jemmis@ 0471-259-7421 kms@ 0471-259-9412 swathi@ 0471-259-9404 kgt@ 0471-259-7425 reji@ 0471-259-9427 ajay@ 0471 259-0677 vinesh@ Photochemistry Hybrid nanomaterials Supramolecular chemistry Functional DNA Inorganic Chemistry Organometallic NMR Spectroscopy padmanabhan@ 0471-259-7437 Please suffix iisertvm. Assistant Professor Thomas.ac. Assistant Professor Swathi. K M. Mahesh Assistant Professor Jemmis. Ayan Assistant Professor Gopinathan. Professor Hariharan. Vinesh Assistant Professor Padmanabhan. Professor and Director Sureshan. R S. M.in to the email address . D. George K. Reji Assistant Professor Venugopal. Professor and Dean Varghese. Ajay Assistant Professor Vijayan.94 Faculty School of Chemistry Faculty members Datta. E. S.

P Visiting Faculty Nanda. Sachindranath Assistant Professor Manna.School of Mathematics 95 School of Mathematics Faculty members Dharmatti. Tara R. S Visiting Faculty Research interests Partial differential equations Control theory Linear Algebra Contact details1 sheetal@ 0471-259-9401 sachindranathj@ 0471-259-0487 manna.in to the email address .utpal@ 0471-259-9414 rajanmp@ 0471-259-9411 sujith@ Stochastic Processes Partial differential equations Functional Analysis Mathematical Finance Combinotorial number theory Ramsey theory on integers Commutative Algebra Algebraic geometry Functional Analysis Probability Theory Statistics 1 Please suffix iisertvm. Visiting Faculty Unnithan. Utpal Assistant Professor Rajan. Sujith Assistant Professor Jyothilingam. P Associate Professor Vijay. Sheetal Assistant Professor Jayaraman. M.ac.

Joy Assistant Professor Pai.in to the email address . Ramesh Chandra Assistant Professor Mitra.ac. Manoj Assistant Professor Nath. Rajeev N C Assistant Professor Namboothiry. M M Assistant Professor Shaji. Sreedhar B Assistant Professor Jaiswal-Nagar. Madhu Assistant Professor 1 Research interests Nonequillibrium physics Quantum statistical field theories Strongly correlated electron systems and Superconductivity Teraherz spectroscopy & imaging Contact details1 sbdutta@ 0471-259-9421 deepshikha@ rajeevkini@ 0471-259-9402 manoj@ 0471-259-9426 rnath@ 0471-259-9427 j. Archana Assistant Professor Shaijumon.mitra@ 0471-259-9403 archana@ 0471-259-9423 shaiju@ 0471-259-9402 shaji@ 0471-259-9422 shanki@ 0471-259-9415 madhu@ Organic optoelectronics Spintronics Magnetism Superconductivity Scanning probe microscopy tunnelling induced luminiscence Gravitational wave physics Signal processing Nanomaterials Energy Storage Quantum information theory Open quantum systems Cosmology Classical and quantum gravity Electron transport in Mesoscopic systems Please suffix iisertvm. S Assistant Professor Thalakulam. Anil Assistant Professor Shankaranarayanan. Deepshikha Assistant Professor Kini.96 Faculty School of Physics Faculty members Dutta.

Ganga Devi. Unnikrishnan V Visiting Faculty Shenoy. Subodh Visiting Faculty Research interests Laser Spectroscopy Contact details1 nayarvu@ 0471-2599-416 subodhshenoy@ Condensed matter physics Laboratory Coordinators 1.Laboratory Coordinators 97 Faculty members Nayar. T School of Biology gangadevi@ 0471-2597-437 othomas@ 2.in to the email address . Thomas.ac. O School of Chemistry 1 Please suffix iisertvm.

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