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Teacher eachers Guide

Dear Educator,

Bicycles
P AGES

et ready to take a spin with KIDS DISCOVER to find out more about bicyclesfrom training and touring to safety and specialty bikes! While reading Bicycles, your young cyclists will learn about the fascinating topics at right. This Teachers uide is filled with acti!ity ideas and blackline masters to help your students en"oy and learn more from Bicycles. #elect or adapt the acti!ities that suit your students needs best. Thank you for making KIDS DISCOVER a part of your classroom. #incerely,

W H A T S I N BICYCLES
!o"#hee$ed #o%der

23 A

&acing, off-road, hybrid, specialty, and touring bicycles

&' (o! )ic*c$es #ork


' diagram of parts of a bicycleplus, how the gear system works!

+, Rei%ve%ti%- the #hee$


' time line of how bikes ha!e changed throughout history and ha!e changed history itself!

./ 0ast

imes

&oad, track, and B() racing

1211 S3i%%i%- #hee$s


$hotos of interesting !ariations of bikes through the years

1213 4ro 5ear a%d (i-h" ech )ikes


&acing gear and bikes designed for safety and speed

1&1'

he Ride o6 7our 8i6e


Bicycling safety, healthy riding tips, rules of the road, and turn signals

1+1, )ikes o% a Ro$$


*ommuting on bikes, bicycle messengers, bicycle police, and concerns about cars

KIDS DISCOVER
$.#. We would lo!e to hear from you! %-mail your comments and ideas to teachers@kidsdiscover.com

1.1/ Stude%t Activities


' match-up, word search, and resources

IN THIS TEACHERS GUIDE


2 Prereading Activities

Meeting the Standards

$hysical #cience National Science Education Standards +isit !!!.kidsdiscover.com9sta%dards to find out more about how KIDS DISCOVER meets state and national standards.

3 Get Set t Read !Antici"ati n Guide# & Discussi n and Writing $uesti ns '+ Its in the Reading !Reading C %"rehensi n# , Ever&thing 'isua( !Gra"hic S)i((s# . Cr ss*Curricu(ar E+tensi ns /12 Ans,er -e&s t .(ac)(ine Masters

!!!.kidsdiscover.com KIDS DISCOVER , -./ 0ifth '!enue, -1th 0loor , 2ew 3ork, 23 -44-4 , T5 1-167886..98 , 05 1-16:9:6;4:4
: KIDS DISCOVER )IC7C8ES 1

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PREREADING
e/ r e nts distri0utin g -I DIS C1 'E B i c yc le , rea act iv atg e s tude "ri r )n ,D (eS dg e an d se tR a "ur" se /s r din ,i t h t hes e ac tivitie s 2 Discussi n
o get students thinking about how this topic relates to their interests and li!es, ask5

.
T

!Antici"ati n Guide# Get Set t Read


opy and distribute the Get Set t Read blackline master >page : of this Teachers uide?. %<plain to students that this Antici"ati n Guide will help them find out what they know and what misconceptions they ha!e about the topic. Get Set t Read is a list of statementssome true, some false. 'sk students to write whether they think each statement is true or false in the .e/ re Reading column. Be sure to tell students that it is not a test and they will not be graded on their . The acti!ity can be completed in a !arianswers. ety of ways for differentiated instruction5

Do you like to ride bicycles? Why or why not? What do you want to learn about bicycles? What are some different types of bicycles?

C nce"t %a"
<plain to students that they will be reading Bicycles What are some words that are related to bicycles? =ist students responses on the board. >#ee bo< below for some words they may suggest.? 'fter creating a list, ask students to group the words into categories, such as T&"es or Parts2 *reate a concept map by writing Bicycles on the board and circling it. Write the categories around the circle and draw lines between the ideas to show connections. Then print the words from the list around the appropriate categories. %ncourage students to add more words to the concept map as they read Bicycles.

Have students work on their own or in small groups to complete the entire page. Assign "airs of students to focus on two statements and to become @e<pertsA on these topics. As) students to complete the .e/ re Reading column on their own, and then tabulate the classs answers on the chalkboard, on an o!erhead transparency, or on your classroom computer. Revie, the state%ents orally with the entire class. Bf you predict that students will need assistance finding the answers, complete the Page Nu%0er column before copying Get Set t Read2

.M3 //*r ad h&0rid tande% unic&c(e racing

sadd(e "eda( c g gear derai((eur tread

Previe,

istribute Bicycles and model how to pre!iew it. %<amine tit(es4 headings4 , rds in 0 (d/ace t&"e4 "ictures4 charts4 and ca"ti ns2 Then ha!e students add new information to the C nce"t Ma". Bf stu- dents will only be reading a few pages at one sit- ting, pre!iew only the selected pages.

ou ha!e e<clusi!e access to additional resources including $ower +ocabulary blackline masters for e!ery a!ailable CBD# DB#*E+%& title! These acti!ities introduce students to -9 specialiFed and general-use !ocabulary words from each CBD# DB#*E+%& title. Working with both types of words helps students de!elop !ocabulary, impro!e comprehension, and read fluently. 0ollow the links from your Teachers Toolbo< *D-&E( and find your title to access these !aluable resources5

)E #ORD #ISE #I ( 4O#ER VOCA);8AR7< +ocabulary cards


*rossword puFFle Word find (atching *loFe sentences Dictionary list

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Name

Date

Get Set to Read


What do you know about bicycles? In Before Reading, write true if you think the statement is true Write false if you think the statement is not true !hen read "IDS DIS#$%&R Bicycles #heck back to find out if you were correct Write the correct answer and the 'age number where you found it #()**&NG&+ Rewrite each false sentence in a way that makes it true Before Reading )fter Reading ,age Number

se the / (( ,ing 5uesti ns as ra( discussi n starters r / r 6 u r na(ing2 7 r additi na( in*c(ass discussi n and ,riting 5uesti ns4 ada"t the 5uesti ns n the reading c %"rehensi n 0(ac)(ine %asters n "ages 8 and 92
A(( "ages Before students read the issue on bicycles, ask5 When did you learn to ride a bicycle? Who tau ht you? Was it hard for you to learn? What was the e!perience like? C ver Ga!e students look at the co!er lines. 'sk5 Did you e"er hear of a bicycle in a battle? #f so$ what do you know about it? What do you think a arden hose mi ht ha"e to do with a bicycle? What do you think bloomers are? What mi ht they ha"e to do with bicycles? Pages ?;@ #f you could own one type of bicycle shown on pa es %-&$ what type would you like to ha"e? Why? Pages A;8 #f you ha"e a bicycle$ how is your bike similar to the bike pictured on pa es '-(? )ow is it different? What types of handlebars and tire tread does your bike ha"e? Pages 9;B Would you like to ride any of the bikes pictured on pa es *-+? Which one? Why? Which fact about the history of bicycles surprised you most? Why did it surprise you?

DISCUSSI1N

WRITING

Pages :;< There are Elympic e!ents in which riders race against each other, on an o!al track and crosscoun- try. 'sk5 What skills do you think a person needs in order to be a competiti"e bike rider? Do you think you would like to compete in bike races? Why or why not? Pages =>;== Ga!e students look at the photographs on the center spread. 'sk5 Which of the bicycles shown here would you most like to ride? Which would be your least fa"orite bike to ride? E!plain your answer.
E%coura-e

6ami$* readi%- =*
se%di%- home co3ies o6 KIDS DISCOVER i% -a$$o%"si>e resea$a=$e =a-s 6or 3rotectio%.

Why do you think people like to create "ariations of bicycles? Pages =?;=@ When you ride a bike$ do you wear any of the ear pictured on pa e ,%? Which thin s do you wear? Do you think they help you ride? )ow? Pages =A;=8 )ow often do you ride a bike? What safety rules do you follow? What safe ridin tips can you add to the ones shown here? Pages =9;=B En page -8, there is a list of the top -- bicyclefriendly places. 'sk5 Do you think our area is a bike-friendly? What kinds of chan es do you think would make our community friendlier to bicyclists? Why do you think it-s important to ha"e a bike-friendly area? A(( "ages 'fter students read the issue, ask5 What is the most interestin fact you learned about bicycles? What .uestions do you ha"e about bicycles that were not answered in the issue?

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Name

Date

It-s in the Reading


)fter reading "IDS DIS#$%&R Bicycles, choose the best answer for each .uestion /ill in the circle

/ind your answers on the pa es shown in the book icon ne!t to each .uestion.

!he best bike for riding across bum'y, sandy terrain would be a

) B # D

hybrid bike touring bike recumbent bike B() bike

1 2

) bicycle used by a racer would 'robably ha3e

) thin tires and straight handlebars B thin tires and drop handlebars # wide tires and straight handlebars D wide tires and drop handlebars

4 5

Susan B )nthony said that bicycles hel'ed emanci'ate women because ) bicycles enabled women to take long trips B bicycles pro!ided transportation so they could !ote # women began dressing differently to ride bikes D women became more athletic after taking up biking !he first ste' in creating the bicycle was

6 7

creating spoked wheels ) B in!enting a wheeled !ehicle # making a !ehicle with pedals D in!enting pneumatic tires

6 7

In 089:, )merica-s most 'o'ular s'ort was

) baseball B football # hockey D bicycle racing

8 9

!he first )merican to win the !our de /rance was

) =ance 'rmstrong B reg =e(ond # (arshall Taylor D &ebecca Twigg

8 9

)IC7C8ES

It-s in the Reading


7

;continued<

=udging from the 'hotos on 'ages 0: and 00 of bicycles 'eo'le ha3e in3ented, 'eo'le-s attitude toward bicycles is that ) bicycles are fun. B bicycles are more useful than cars. # bicycles are only for practical purposes.

0: 00

D bicycles are not stylish !ehicles.

Which does N$! hel' a bike racer go faster? ) skintight clothing B an aerodynamic seat tube # a steel frame

01 02

D a carbon f iber frame

)ccording to statistics, the most likely misfortune for bike riders is ) a deadly accident B a !isit to the emergency room # a ticket for unsafe riding

04 05

D a stolen bicycle

0:

) ma>or ad3antage of bicycling is that

) bikes ne!er need maintenance B it is perfectly safe # it is not influenced by the weather D it is good e<ercise

04 05

00

!he area where bicycles are most a 'art of 'eo'le-s lifestyles is

) the Hnited #tates B 2ew 3ork *ity # 'sia D 0rance

06 07

01

Do you think *ance )rmstrong has had a ma>or influence on the 'o'ularity of bike riding? &?'lain why or why not

Name

Date

&3erything %isual
) bar gra'h hel's you com'are facts Study the bar gra'h called @Bicycling 3s $ther S'ortsA on 'age 04 !hen answer the .uestions

Which s'ort has the greatest number of in>uries 'er thousand 'artici'ants? (ow many does it ha3e?

Which s'ort has the least number of in>uries 'er thousand 'artici'ants? (ow many does it ha3e?

Describe the number of in>uries bicycling has com'ared to basketball

Which s'ort has about the same number of in>uries as bicycling? (ow many does it ha3e?

(ow would you res'ond to the comment @/ootball is much safer than basketballA?

(ow im'ortant would the facts shown on the gra'h be to a 'erson choosing a s'ort to 'artici'ate in? &?'lain

CR1SS*CURRICUCAR E3TENSI1NS
ave students tr& these activities t interest in 0ic&c(es2 Math4 Ge gra"h&
The Tour de 0rance, as described on page ; of the issue, co!ers about 1,944 miles. 'sk students, @What towns or locations do you think are 1,944 miles from our townIA Then gi!e students a map with a scale, such as a map of the Hnited #tates or of 2orth and #outh 'merica. #how students how to use the scale and a piece of string to determine the distance between two points. Hsing your town as the center of the circle and the string length repre- senting 1,944 miles as the radius of the circle, draw a circle on the map to show the towns that are 1,944 miles away from your town.

e+"and their )n ,(edge and S c i e n c e 4 S ci a ( S t u d i e s 4 A r t

Canguage Arts

Ga!e students write a poem about a bicycle or one particular part Stude%ts !i$$ $ove of a bicycle. The poems readi%- KIDS can be based on e!ents DISCOVER from the students own duri%- si$e%t li!es, or they can be readi%- time. pure fiction. %ncourage students to display their writing as a shape poem. They can either write it inside a bicycle picture or write the words into the shape, such as the wheels, handlebars, and saddle! Display students poems on a bulletin board.

Ga!e students create a list of different modes of transportation, such as bicycles, skis, feet, roller skates, airplanes, scooters, cars, and helicopters. Write each mode of transportation on a sticky note. Then guide the class to create a dichotomous key for the modes, where each step in the key gi!es you two choices on how to sort the modes. 0or e<ample, the first Juestion may be, @Does it ha!e wheelsIA 'll the modes with wheels would be under the @yesA option and the ones without wheels would be under the @noA option. #how students a dichotomous key, such as one used for tree identification, as a sample. 0inally, students can work together and create a mural that includes a !ariety of modes of transportation, as well as se!eral e<amples of different kinds of bicycles.

Art4 Canguage Arts


Ga!e students work in groups to create their own co!er with co!er lines for an issue on bicycles. #tudents should find a suitable picture in a magaFine or draw their own and come up with four or fi!e co!er lines of their own about bicycles. #tudents should @mock upA a magaFine co!er by placing their picture on a piece of cardboard. They should write or type their co!er lines and include illustrations to go along with them. 'll the co!ers can be displayed in the room, and the class can discuss what they like about each co!er.

Math4 Hist r&

Ga!e students use the dates and information about the e!ents in the history of bicycles on pages 7 and 8 to create their own math word problems. 0or e<ample, they may ask, @Gow many years are there between when =eonardo da +inci was born and when Kames #tarley created the cog-and-chain systemIA or @Gow many years before $ierre (ichau< attached pedals and a crank to the front wheel did Baron Carl !on Drais create the LhobbyhorseIA Bn addition to writing the word problem, students should write an e<planation of how to sol!e the problem. %ncourage students to e<change word problems with a partner and sol!e them.

........................... !!!.kidsdiscover.com ...........................

KIDS DISCOVER , -./ 0ifth '!enue, -1th 0loor , 2ew 3ork, 23 -44-4 , T5 1-167886..98 , 05 1-16:9:6;4:4

Name

)NSW&R "&B

Get Set to Read

Date

What do you know about bicycles? In Before Reading, write true if you think the statement is true Write false if you think the statement is not true !hen read "IDS DIS#$%&R Bicycles #heck back to find out if you were correct Write the correct answer and the 'age number where you found it #()**&NG&+ Rewrite each false sentence in a way that makes it true Before Reading )fter Reading ,age Number

It-s in the Reading


)fter reading "IDS DIS#$%&R Bicycles, choose the best answer for each .uestion /ill in the circle

/ind your answers on the pa es shown in the book icon ne!t to each .uestion.

!he best bike for riding across bum'y, sandy terrain would be a

) B # D

hybrid bike touring bike recumbent bike B() bike (classification)

1 2

) bicycle used by a racer would 'robably ha3e

) thin tires and straight handlebars B thin tires and drop handlebars (draw conclusions) # wide tires and straight handlebars D wide tires and drop handlebars

4 5

Susan B )nthony said that bicycles hel'ed emanci'ate women because ) bicycles enabled women to take long trips B bicycles pro!ided transportation so they could !ote # women began dressing differently to ride bikes (cause and effect) D women became more athletic after taking up biking !he first ste' in creating the bicycle was

6 7

) creating spoked wheels B in!enting a wheeled !ehicle (sequence) # making a !ehicle with pedals D in!enting pneumatic tires

6 7

In 089:, )merica-s most 'o'ular s'ort was

) baseball B football # hockey D bicycle racing (details)

8 9

!he first )merican to win the !our de /rance was

) =ance 'rmstrong B reg =e(ond (details) # (arshall Taylor D &ebecca Twigg

8 9

It-s in the Reading


7

;continued<

=udging from the 'hotos on 'ages 0: and 00 of bicycles 'eo'le ha3e in3ented, 'eo'le-s attitude toward bicycles is that ) bicycles are fun. (draw conclusions) B bicycles are more useful than cars. # bicycles are only for practical purposes.

0: 00

D bicycles are not stylish !ehicles.

Which does N$! hel' a bike racer go faster? ) skintight clothing B an aerodynamic seat tube # a steel frame (cause and effect)

01 02

D a carbon f iber frame

)ccording to statistics, the most likely misfortune for bike riders is ) a deadly accident B a !isit to the emergency room # a ticket for unsafe riding

04 05

D a stolen bicycle (draw conclusions)

0:

) ma>or ad3antage of bicycling is that ) bikes ne!er need maintenance B it is perfectly safe # it is not influenced by the weather

04 05

D it is good e<ercise (synthesize)

00

!he area where bicycles are most a 'art of 'eo'le-s lifestyles is ) the Hnited #tates B 2ew 3ork *ity # 'sia (draw conclusions)

06 07

D 0rance

01

Do you think *ance )rmstrong has had a ma>or influence on the 'o'ularity of bike riding? &?'lain why or why not Answers will vary. Students might say yes because his feat is spectacular and has called attention to the sport of cycling, or no because cycling has always been popular.

Name

)NSW&R "&B

Date

&3erything %isual
) bar gra'h hel's you com'are facts Study the bar gra'h called @Bicycling 3s $ther S'ortsA on 'age 04 !hen answer the .uestions

Which s'ort has the greatest number of in>uries 'er thousand 'artici'ants? (ow many does it ha3e? bas etball! "#." per #,$$$ participants

Which s'ort has the least number of in>uries 'er thousand 'artici'ants? (ow many does it ha3e? in%line s ating! &.' per #,$$$ participants

Describe the number of in>uries bicycling has com'ared to basketball Bicycling has almost ($) fewer in*uries per #,$$$ participants than bas etball does.

Which s'ort has about the same number of in>uries as bicycling? (ow many does it ha3e? Snowboarding has about the same number of in*uries per #,$$$ as bicycling, ##.".

(ow would you res'ond to the comment @/ootball is much safer than basketballA? Statistically, football is only slightly less dangerous than bas etball.

(ow im'ortant would the facts shown on the gra'h be to a 'erson choosing a s'ort to 'artici'ate in? &?'lain Answers may vary. Students may say that a careful person would choose a sport partly based on its safety, or that the statistical differences in safety among the sports is too small to ma e a big difference.