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SICKLE CELL ANEMIA

ANDREW BUNKER EDU 214 PROF. LARA

OVERVIEW
Sickle Cell Anemia is the most common form of sickle cell disease (SCD). It gets its name from the fact that it causes the body to make sickle (or crescent) shaped red blood cells. Sickle cells have abnormal hemoglobin, caused by a gene mutation, which causes the sickle cells to increase their viscosity and lose the pliability necessary to pass through the capillaries. This reduced blood flow to the organs and limbs can bring about a great deal of pain, dehydration and organ damage with an increased risk of infections for sickle cell patients. Additionally, sickle cells die after only 1020 days and so the body is unable to replace the dying cells with new ones. Patients often require continual longterm care and have significantly reduced life expectancies.

CRESCENT-SHAPED RED BLOOD CELLS

COMPLICATIONS
Secondary consequences can include: infections fever pain leg ulcers stroke

acute chest syndrome pulmonary hypertension

SYMPTOMS & DIAGNOSIS


Symptoms include: fatigue dizziness shortness of breath jaundice coldness in the hands and feet. Sudden pain, known as Sickle Cell Crises, can often occur in the bones, lungs, abdomen and joints. Diagnosis is easily carried out via a blood test.

spleen malfunction

TREATMENTS
While there is no known cure, treatments can include blood and marrow transplants, antibiotics for infections, pain medicines, a healthy diet to include hydration, transfusions, and hydroxyurea (making the body generate fetal hemoglobin).

GLOBAL SICKLE CELL DISEASE NETWORK, 555 UNIVERSITY AVE, TORONTO, CANADA

SICKLE CELL ANEMIA

ANDREW BUNKER EDU 214 PROF. LARA

GENETIC CAUSE
Sickle Cell Anemia is an inherited disease. Patients who have the disease have inherited one recessive gene from each parent. People who have just one sickle gene are known as having the Sickle Cell Trait. These individuals usually do not have any symptoms and lead normal lives. Children of parents who both carry the sickle hemoglobin gene have a 25% of being born with the disease.

FAMILY REFERENCES
Childrens Cancer & Blood Disorder Center 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 1-855-430-2701 www.danafarberbostonchildrens.org University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) 225 Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 1-800-492-5538 www.umm.edu/patients/resource-center University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) 5115 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 412-692-4724 www.upmc.com/services/sickle-cell
CAPTION YOUR PHOTO HERE GENETIC CAUSES OF SICKLE CELL ANEMIA

REFERENCES
Lanzkron, Sophie et al. Systematic Review: Hydroxyurea for the Treatment of Adults with Sickle Cell Anemia. Annals of Internal Medicine. 6/17/2008. Vol. 148, Issue 12, p939-W205. Nelson, Jemima. Sickle Cell Disease in the Workplace. Occupational Health. Aug 2011, Vol 63, Issue 8, p26-29. Sheth, Sujit. Sickle Cell Anemia: Time for a Closer Look at Treatment Options? British Journal of Haemotology. Aug 2013, Vol.162, Issue 4, p453-464.

INFECTION AND FEVER

GLOBAL SICKLE CELL DISEASE NETWORK, 555 UNIVERSITY AVE, TORONTO, CANADA