Emco Unimat Mk.

2b
Photographic Essay

Unimat Mk. 2B: although the major components continued unchanged this version it was the first to incorporate a means of aligning the headstock with the bed bars. Upon first assembly the base casting and headstock were jigged and a small vertical slot cut across the junction of their front faces. When the faces were correctly aligned (by using the tailstock method previously outlined) it was possible to insert into the slot a small "setting piece" - a disc washer given by the handbook as being 0.748" in diameter. However, one measured has been discovered to have an OD 0.734", and ID 0.333" and a thickness of 0.1577". Whilst the OD and ID are plain machined the flats were ground). Mk. 2B …. The handbook instructions differed edition to edition, but the following is probably the clearest given: "...two corresponding grooves have been milled in the bed and the headstock housing. If, with the tension screw (No. 4 Fig. 1) slackened, you insert the accompanying setting piece (no. 55) (disc washer 0.748" in diameter) in the milled grove and tighten the tension screw again, the headstock and tailstock will be lined up. The setting piece may be removed again after the headstock has been clamped in position." Removing the setting piece would, of course, have guaranteed its immediate loss. The motor was the now-familiar (and larger) plain-bearing Dutch unit with the centre portion painted ether black, in a colour to match the rest of the machine or silver. Several styles of handwheel were used, all turned from steel and plated silver or black. Towards the end of the Mk. 2B production run it is believed that the first of the new (and cheaper to produce) die-cast handwheels with the delightful "wasp-tail" handles was introduced. Some versions of this lathe have been found with two locking screws on the cross slide, one in the normal position nearer the front and the other in line with it further back. Realising that one 6 mm screw clamping the casting to the slide bar was entirely adequate, Emco did not persist with this modification. Unimats of this age were also given a more robust carriage assembly with the whole of the casting, including the front and back walls through which the way-bars passed, noticeably thickened. Colours, as ever, pose a problem and instead of a single, standard finish crackle-black (see lower down this page) examples have been found in a light plain (flat) grey and others in either silver-blue or silver grey - with the latter two in a "hammer-effect" paint.

This version was the first to incorporate a means of aligning the headstock with the bed bars. Upon first assembly the base casting and headstock were jigged and a small vertical slot cut across the junction of their front faces. When the faces were correctly aligned it was possible to insert into the slot a small "setting piece" - a disc washer given by the handbook as being 0.748" in diameter.

Unimats of this age were given a more robust carriage assembly with the whole of the casting, including the front and back walls through which the way bars passed, noticeably thickened.

Note the repair to the tailstock - a weak point on these lathes where the to lock the spindle a slit in the casting is closed down by a set-screw

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