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GoPro and Hero3

Carl Michael Haeussler (chaeussl) (Jan 29, 2014 1:09 PM) - Read by: 5

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Filming technology has developed drastically throughout the last 20 years. Cameras are so compact now they can be found on virtually any mobile device used by todays consumers. The evolution of digital imaging in mobile devices has allowed people to capture every special moment and share it with their friends through social media networking. The GoPro is a product that has been derived from this type of social media trend and has revolutionized camera technology. The GoPro is a versatile camera that can be secured to wherever the person filming sees fit, i.e.; their helmet, a car dashboard, etc. This dynamic of the camera has made it perfect for filming extreme sports such as snowboarding, dirt biking, etc. Having the flexibility of being placed anywhere to record is an advantage that allows the consumer who watches the video to take it in from a very unique perspective that normal cameras are incapable of. This has allowed the GoPro to evolve even further with social media technology. The GoPro is loaded with software that interacts with social media networks like Facebook and Instagram so you can upload footage from the GoPro to the network. The software is known now as Hero3, obviously being the third generation of this application. This Bluetooth application has created an easy way for professional athletes and other media figures to share their livelihood easily on the social media networks. This type of social media development has been specifically changed by the GoPro and its capability to capture and share. The usability of the GoPro has created an entirely new dynamic to filming and connecting with the media. This type of camera technology has been evolved to be flexible, versatile, compact, and user friendly through the development of digital imaging and camera manufacturing.
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Ralph Buchal (rbuchal) (Jan 29, 2014 2:29 PM) - Read by: 4

It is interesting how old terminology persists even after the original meaning is lost. The process of recording "moving pictures" was called filming when film was the medium. The introduction of videotape lead to the term taping, or videotaping. Now that it is entirely digital, we don't have a good name, and keep calling it filming or taping. There are many examples of this. Digital cameras have a "bulb" shutter speed, shortened to B. In the 1800s, cameras used a pneumatic bulb and hose to hold the camera shutter open as long as the bulb was being squeezed. Those cameras also had inserts with different aperture sizes that could be inserted into a slot on the lens. These were called "waterhouse stops", and these aperture sizes came to be known as f-stops.
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Yevgeny Vanditch (yvanditc) (Jan 29, 2014 3:49 PM) - Read by: 2

In addition to you said, Google, the "amazing innovators" is releasing Google glass which also lets you record footage and more. I also read something about a company called Oakley that created snow goggles calledAirwave HYPERLINK "http://ca.oakley.com/airwave" HYPERLINK "http://ca.oakley.com/airwave" HYPERLINK "http://ca.oakley.com/airwave" that have on screen display inside of them for stats such as temperature, speed, directions and even your music, and texts. Being GoPro, a camera for extreme sports, I feel as if they will some how combine those two ideas I mentions above.

I think that Gopro definetly changed the market of cameras because it proportionates new functionalities to the cameras. The old cameras can be used to film, but GoPro can be used to take filmages from other views and this is a big deal for people that practice sports. Another really good point is that even though it is a very small camera, it can film in high resoltions like 1080p. This cameras can film in 4K too, but the quality is not good because their fps is very low. One thing that I think that they must improve is the battery life. That characteristic can restrict you to film what you want..

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Instant Replay In Sports


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Scott Beaton (sbeaton5) (Jan 29, 2014 3:04 PM) - Read by: 5

The debate of whether or not there should be video replay in sports has been a long lasting one. There have been divided opinions on the matter for many years now, some arguing it would change the sport too much. Others believing that by incorporating more technologies into the sport such as high quality video replay would advance the game and allow for mistakes to be eliminated. Most professional sports, ranging from hockey to speed walking, have adopted the use of instant replay or using different types of technology in attempt to improve the sport for the consumers, the fans. Whether video replay is good or not, the use of technology has drastically improved and changed the way replays are used in sports.
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Blair Simpson (bsimps4) (Jan 29, 2014 5:02 PM) - Read by: 2

Interesting Topic Scott! Instant replay is both a good and bad thing. As you said it, eliminates mistakes , but it also slows the pace of the game. When playing hockey myself, there are plenty of times ive seen the puck bounce in and out of the net and the ref miss, and wish there was instant replay. I believe the NHL has the right idea with thier policy on instant replay. They review goals, and only goals (during the game) and only slow the pace of the game in case thier is a conflict with a goal otherwise the play resumes like normal. On the other hand, the NFL does too much instant replay. One of the cons of the sport is the pace and it doesn't help with all the instant replay taking place. Interesting Rule in the NHL official rules is that every goal is judged by a video goal judge and only stops the play if their is a conflict . http://www.nhl.com/ice/page.htm?id=26326
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Ralph Buchal (rbuchal) (Jan 29, 2014 5:24 PM) - Read by: 2

This is a good application for small cameras like the GoPro discussed in the other thread. A lot of innovation comes from matching a technology to a need. Ubiquitous high quality video is also having a big impact on coaching, particularly the amateur level. A tablet with a big screen allows coaches to review a performance with athletes immediately.
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Emily Germann (egermann) (Jan 29, 2014 7:03 PM) - Read by: 2

Unfortunately, I feel that the debate of to what extent this technology is used will never end. I appreciate the fairness that video review brings to professional sports, but agree that often times it can slow the game down at important moments. Human error may never completely be removed from judging sports, but I think that in many events and leagues it is being used properly at this time. In particular, I appreciate the fairness that video review has brought to the Olympic games. Although it sometimes results in disqualifications (which we never love to see), it is a great tool when it comes down to a close race. It will be interesting to see which professional sports leagues start learning from each other. For example, should the coaches challenge be implemented into the NHL (alike the NFL)?

Undoubtedly the cameras used to capture moments and replay them changed a lot. If you went to a soccer game in Brazil twenty years ago, you would hear a lot of complaints about cameras being moved around the field to film the game - the cameras were positioned between the field

and the fans. Today we have a lot of cameras positioned in a lot of places that do not affect the fans to see the game. Furthermore, it proportionated a lot of information for people that are watching the game on television. In my opinion, the instant replay could bring only benefits considering soccer, even though it is still not used in the games. If it was used, a lot of mistakes could be avoided. Other benefit in this sport is that we could use it to improve the tatics of the teams and to make the game more interesting to the fans.

The history of printing as a mean of duplicating text and images can be dated back to 200CE when th people started to use woodblock printing. For a long time till late 20 century, printing technique served as only an industrial need rather than individual. It was not until 1973, computer-based printing technology appeared to enable desktop publishing to make people started use individual printers to do slow and low-volume printing jobs. The ongoing rapid advancement in information and mechatronic technology are helping reducing the size and weight of the

personal printers at the same time improving functions and even roles of them. I recently bought a HP printer, its set up is incredibly easy with multifunction such as scanning, copying, faxing, and printing. WiFi allows the printer located anywhere in my room and ePrint function which I am still not familiar with. Furthermore, 3D printer has newly entered the market and there is a huge passion to make them affordable and attractive to individuals. Same with the concept of computer-based printing which transform electronic documents to physical form. 3D printers are designed to do such operations on almost every objects. This may generates personal manufacturing that heavily impacts traditional manufacturing in the future.
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Ralph Buchal (rbuchal) (Jan 21, 2014 9:52 AM) - Read by: 6

Good example. Computers were supposed to lead to a "paperless" office, eliminating the need for printed documents. Is it still necessary to print on paper?

I think that printers that have the characteristics of scaninning, copying, and printing are amazing because it save a lot of our money and time. In other words, we would not need to be dependent of some business places to do the tasks. The 3D printers have negative and positive sides. The positive is that it could help the manufacturing industry to reduce costs. However, I think that it should be restricted to the indivuals because they would do any type of objects with these printers - guns, for example.