SPECIAL MEETING OF TOWNSHIP COUNCIL

Monday, October 5, 2009 at 3:00 p.m. Fraser River Presentation Theatre 4th Floor, 20338 – 65 Avenue, Langley, BC

AGENDA
Page

A.
1-6

ADOPTION OF MINUTES 1. Special Council Meeting – September 21, 2009 Recommendation that Council adopt the Minutes of the Special Council meeting held September 21, 2009.

B.

APPROVAL OF DELEGATION REQUESTS TO APPEAR AT THE 4:00 P.M. SPECIAL MEETING 1. Deirdre Goudriaan File 0550-07 Request by Deirdre Goudriaan, to appear before Council to discuss healthy eating and active living for youth.

7-8

B.

APPROVAL OF DELEGATION REQUESTS TO APPEAR AT THE 7:00 P.M. REGULAR MEETING 2. Johnson A. Reddy File 0550-07 Request by Johnson A. Reddy, to appear before Council to discuss unauthorized suite enforcement and regulated compliance of the bylaw.

9

11

3.

Gurdip Buttar File 0550-07 Request by Gurdip Buttar, to appear before Council to discuss driveway fees at 25075 40 Avenue.

October 5, 2009 Special Council Meeting Agenda
Page

-2-

B.

APPROVAL OF DELEGATION REQUESTS TO APPEAR AT THE 7:00 P.M. REGULAR MEETING 4. A. Sivia Sivia Construction File 0550-07 Request by A. Sivia, Sivia Construction, to appear before Council to discuss Section 104.4 (9) of the Township Zoning bylaw relating to stairwells and wet bar regulations.

13-14

MOTION TO RESOLVE INTO SPECIAL CLOSED MEETING Recommendation that Council now resolve into a Special Closed Meeting according to Section 90 of the Community Charter for discussion of the following items identified under Section 90: Item D.1 - Section 90(1) (e) Property; (k) Negotiations; Item E.1 - Section 90(1) (a) Personal; Item E.2 - Section 90(1) (e) Property; (g) Litigation; Item G.1 - Section 90(1) (e) Property; (k) Negotiations; and Item G.2 - Section 90(1) (e) Property.

C.

PRESENTATIONS 1. Aldergrove Core Planning Program – Concept Options Summary Report Presentation by staff, J. Karakas of HB Lanarc and representatives of the Aldergrove Planning Committee regarding the Aldergrove Core Planning Program – Concept Options Summary Report. 2. Fraser Valley Rail Presentation Mayor Green to provide an update regarding the Fraser Valley Rail project.

October 5, 2009 Special Council Meeting Agenda
Page

-3-

D.
15-44

REPORTS TO COUNCIL 1. Aldergrove Core Planning Program Report 09-122 File CD 6540-20 Recommendation that Council receive the report entitled “Aldergrove Core Planning Program”, for information; and further That Council authorize staff to proceed with a Public Open House to obtain community feedback on the preliminary design concepts for downtown Aldergrove.

45-55

2.

Master Transportation Plan – Road Network Plan and Classifications Report 09-126 File ENG 5260-23/3 Recommendation that Council receive the Master Transportation Plan report; and That Council endorse the Road Classifications Maps 6.2A (Attachment C) and 6.2B (Attachment D) to replace the existing Highway Classification Map P-1 (Attachment A) and the Master Transportation Plan – Road Cross-Sections Map (Attachment E and F).

57-61

3.

Fraser Highway/248 Street Traffic Signal Report 09-127 File ENG 5330-23 Recommendation that Council receive the Fraser Highway/248 Street Traffic Signal report for information.

E.

CORRESPONDENCE Proclamations: In an effort to make the community aware, the following proclamations have been requested:

63

1.

Crohn’s and Colitis Awareness Month File 0630-01 Letter received from Ive Balins, Strategic Objectives, Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of Canada, requesting the month of November be proclaimed as Crohn’s and Colitis Awareness Month.
Clerk’s Note: Policy No. 01-024 Approved by Council, September 18, 2000: No vote or action to be taken on proclamation requests.

October 5, 2009 Special Council Meeting Agenda
Page

-4-

E.
65-66

CORRESPONDENCE 2. Foster Family Month File 0630-01 Letter received from Mary Polak, Ministry of Children and Family Development and Minister Responsible for Child Care advising the month of October has been proclaimed as Foster Family Month in British Columbia.
Clerk’s Note: Policy No. 01-024 Approved by Council, September 18, 2000: No vote or action to be taken on proclamation requests.

Correspondence:
67

3.

Heart Month File 0320-01 Letter received from Lisa Catallo, Community Campaigns Coordinator, Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC & Yukon requesting permission to hold annual canvassing campaign in February 2010.
Clerk’s Note: Request Council approve annual canvassing campaign in February 2010.

69

4.

Poppy and Wreath Sales File 0320-01 Letter received from Wilma McEwen, Poppy Chairperson, Royal Canadian Legion, Langley Branch 21, requesting permission to hold annual poppy and wreath sales within the Township of Langley from October 19 to November 10, 2009.
Clerk’s Note: Request Council approve annual poppy and wreath sales from October 19 to November 10, 2009.

F.
71-79

MINUTES OF COMMITTEES 1. Heritage Advisory Committee – September 8, 2009 File 0540-20 Recommendation that Council receive the Minutes from the Heritage Advisory Committee meeting held September 8, 2009. COUNCIL Recommendation that Council authorize placing the Willoughby Methodist (later United) Church, the Tom and Dorothy Campbell Residence and the David Jones Residence on the Township’s Community Heritage Register as requested by the owners.

October 5, 2009 Special Council Meeting Agenda
Page

-5-

F.

MINUTES OF COMMITTEES COUNCIL Recommendation that Council approve a $5,000 grant for repair and restoration of the Coronation Block located on Glover Road in Fort Langley.

81-89

2.

Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee – September 9, 2009 File 0540-20 Recommendation that Council receive the Minutes from the Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee meeting held September 9, 2009.

91-97

3.

Aldergrove Planning Committee – September 17, 2009 File 0540-20 Recommendation that Council receive the Minutes from the Aldergrove Planning Committee meeting held September 17, 2009. COUNCIL

That the Aldergrove Planning Committee recommends that Council: 1. Receive the draft Aldergrove Planning Program - Concept Options Summary Report for information; and 2. That Council authorize staff to schedule a public open house to obtain community input in October.
COUNCIL

That Council authorize staff to send a letter to the Boys and Girls Club recommending them to initiate a discussion with Aldergrove Neighbourhood Services regarding service programming in the area.
99-103

4.

Community Safety Advisory Committee – September 24, 2009 File 0540-20 Recommendation that Council receive the Minutes from the Community Safety Advisory Committee meeting held September 24, 2009. COUNCIL Recommendation that Council endorse the top five 2009 Work Plan initiatives of the Community Safety Advisory Committee (Annexure 1).

October 5, 2009 Special Council Meeting Agenda
Page

-6-

G. ASSOCIATIONS AND OTHER GOVERNMENT AGENCIES

H.

INFORMATION ITEMS FROM SPECIAL CLOSED MEETINGS

I.

ITEMS FOR INFORMATION

J.

ITEMS FROM PRIOR MEETINGS

K.

STAFF ITEMS FOR DISCUSSION WITH COUNCIL

L.

ITEMS FOR DISCUSSION BY COUNCIL MEMBERS

M. OTHER BUSINESS

N.

TERMINATE

- 359 -

A.1

SPECIAL MEETING OF TOWNSHIP COUNCIL
Monday, September 21, 2009 at 3:00 p.m. Fraser River Presentation Theatre 4th Floor, 20338 – 65 Avenue, Langley, BC

MINUTES Present: Mayor Green Councillors J. Bateman, B. Dornan, S. Ferguson, C. Fox, M. Kositsky, K. Richter and G. Ward P. Catlin, D. Leavers, C. Roberts, R. Seifi, H. Tsikayi and J. Winslade K. Larsen and S. Palmer

The Mayor noted that the agenda order would be varied. A. ADOPTION OF MINUTES 1. Special Council Meeting – September 14, 2009 Moved by Councillor Bateman, Seconded by Councillor Fox, That Council adopt the Minutes of the Special Council meeting held September 14, 2009. CARRIED B. APPROVAL OF DELEGATION REQUESTS TO APPEAR AT THE 4:00 P.M. SPECIAL MEETING

B.

APPROVAL OF DELEGATION REQUESTS TO APPEAR AT THE 7:00 P.M. REGULAR MEETING

C.

PRESENTATIONS

Page 1 of 103

A.1
September 21, 2009 Special Council Meeting Minutes D. REPORTS TO COUNCIL - 360 -

E.

CORRESPONDENCE Moved by Councillor Bateman, Seconded by Councillor Ferguson, That Council receive for information the items under “Correspondence” as presented. CARRIED 1. Ride-Share Week 2009 File 0630-01 Letter received from Crystal Wilkes, Ride-Share Week Coordinator Assistant, Jack Bell Foundation, requesting the week of October 5-9, 2009 be proclaimed as Ride-Share Week. 2. Township Representation to the South Fraser Child and Youth Council File 0230-20 Moved by Councillor Bateman, Seconded by Councillor Ferguson, That Council appoint Councillor Kositsky as the Township of Langley’s representative to the South Fraser Child and Youth Council and advise Karen Edwards, Chair, accordingly. CARRIED

F.

MINUTES OF COMMITTEES 1. Economic Development Advisory Committee – September 2, 2009 File 0540-20 Moved by Councillor Ferguson, Seconded by Councillor Fox, That Council receive the Minutes from the Economic Development Advisory Committee meeting held September 2, 2009. AMENDMENT Moved by Councillor Ferguson, Seconded by Councillor Ward, That any Advisory Committee members seeking reappointment for the upcoming appointment process must submit an application and participate in an interview process. CARRIED

Page 2 of 103

A.1
September 21, 2009 Special Council Meeting Minutes F. MINUTES OF COMMITTEES AMENDMENT Moved by Councillor Bateman, Seconded by Councillor Fox, That Council authorize funding from Council Contingency for up to four members of the Economic Development Advisory Committee to attend the Surrey Regional Economic Summit. CARRIED Councillor Ferguson opposed MAIN MOTION, AS AMENDED The question was called on the Main Motion, as Amended, and it was CARRIED 2. Council Priorities Committee – September 9, 2009 File 0540-20 Moved by Councillor Fox, Seconded by Councillor Ward, That Council adopt the Minutes from the Council Priorities Committee meeting held September 9, 2009. CARRIED MOTION Moved by Councillor Richter, Seconded by Councillor Ward, That Council endorse the following recommendations from the Council Priorities Committee meeting held September 9, 2009: 1.a) That Council endorse Recommendation 1.a): Place peak flow restrictions on specified new or altered water supply wells. That Council endorse Recommendation 2.e): Encourage industryendorsed green building rating systems to promote development standards to better meet water management plan goals. That Council endorse Recommendation 2.f) Require certified irrigation plans when new Development, or upgraded or replacement of in-ground irrigation systems, are planned for systems on municipal land or for large water users. That Council endorse Recommendation 3.a) Approve a limit on the amount of water extracted by municipal supply wells, within ranges consistent with protecting the aquifers for long term use. That Council endorse Recommendation 4. Mandate summertime lawn sprinkling restrictions for private well owners. - 361 -

2.e)

2.f)

3.a)

4.

Page 3 of 103

A.1
September 21, 2009 Special Council Meeting Minutes F. MINUTES OF COMMITTEES 8. That Council endorse Recommendation 8. Mandate the prohibition of new groundwater bottling operations through legislation. That Council endorse Recommendation 11. Adopt a series of locally enforceable agricultural practices in the Township of Langley as set out by the Ministry of Agriculture. That Council endorse Recommendation 12. Initiate a pilot Nutrient Management Plan (NMP) project in the Hopington area. That Council endorse Recommendation 21. Coordinate abandoned well closure through a mandatory registry program. That Council endorse Recommendation 24. Fund and implement a comprehensive monitoring and study program to provide information to assist in future groundwater decisions as it relates to assessing residential metering of the municipal water supply system. That Council endorse Recommendation 29. Establish a local (environmental) protection officer and that the matter be referred to the budget deliberations. - 362 -

11.

12.

21.

24.

29.

That Council endorse Recommendation 31. Instigate more rigorous Inspection and enforcement of existing regulations affecting groundwater quality and quantity. CARRIED 31. Councillor Kositsky opposed MOTION Moved by Councillor Fox, Seconded by Councillor Ward, That Council endorse the foregoing recommendations for inclusion in the draft final Water Management Plan; and further That Council direct staff to submit the draft final Water Management Plan, as amended, as the Final Water Management Plan to the Minister of Environment for approval. CARRIED Councillor Kositsky opposed G. ASSOCIATIONS AND OTHER GOVERNMENT AGENCIES

H.

INFORMATION ITEMS FROM SPECIAL CLOSED MEETINGS

Page 4 of 103

A.1
September 21, 2009 Special Council Meeting Minutes - 363 -

I.

ITEMS FOR INFORMATION

J.

ITEMS FROM PRIOR MEETINGS

K.

STAFF ITEMS FOR DISCUSSION WITH COUNCIL

L.

ITEMS FOR DISCUSSION BY COUNCIL MEMBERS

M. OTHER BUSINESS 1. Translink Report – Update 2010 10 Year Plan Moved by Councillor Fox, Seconded by Councillor Dornan, That Council receive the memorandum from Mayor Green regarding the Translink Report – Update 2010 – 10 Year Plan. CARRIED 2. West Latimer Neighbourhood Plan Initiation File 6410-01 REFERRAL Moved by Councillor Bateman, Seconded by Councillor Fox, That the correspondence dated September 17, 2009 from Maxine Charlton regarding the West Latimer Neighbourhood Plan be referred to staff. CARRIED 4. Councillor Richter presented the following Notice of Motion for consideration at the next Regular Council meeting: Mufford Glover Overpass Whereas Sonya Paterson made a delegation to Council on September 14, 2009 regarding a letter sent by six members of Council to the Agricultural Land Commission claiming that “tens of thousands” of Township residents support the proposed Mufford Glover Overpass; and Whereas no response has yet been sent to Ms. Paterson;

Page 5 of 103

A.1
September 21, 2009 Special Council Meeting Minutes M. OTHER BUSINESS Therefore be it resolved that Council respond to Ms. Paterson’s delegation and subsequent letter to Council by justifying and explaining the source of the “tens of thousands” number used in the Agricultural Land Commission letter. The original agenda order resumed. MOTION TO RESOLVE INTO SPECIAL CLOSED MEETING Moved by Councillor Ferguson, Seconded by Councillor Bateman, That Council now resolve into a Special Closed Meeting according to Section 90 of the Community Charter for discussion of the following items identified under Section 90: Item E.1 – Section 90(1) (a) Personal; and Item E.2 – Section 90(1) (a) Personal. CARRIED MEETING RECESSED The meeting recessed at 4:12 p.m. MEETING RECONVENED The meeting reconvened at 4:17 p.m. - 364 -

N.

TERMINATE Moved by Councillor Bateman, Seconded by Councillor Ward, That the meeting terminate at 4:17 p.m. CARRIED CERTIFIED CORRECT:

Mayor

Deputy Township Clerk

Page 6 of 103

B.1

Page 7 of 103

B.1

Page 8 of 103

B.2

Page 9 of 103

Page 10 of 103

B.3

Page 11 of 103

Page 12 of 103

B.4

Page 13 of 103

B.4

Page 14 of 103

D.1

REPORT TO MAYOR AND COUNCIL

PRESENTED: FROM: SUBJECT:

OCTOBER 5, 2009 - SPECIAL MEETING COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION ALDERGROVE CORE PLANNING PROGRAM

REPORT: FILE:

09-122 6540 - 20

RECOMMENDATION(S):

That Council receive the report entitled “Aldergrove Core Planning Program”, for information; and further That Council authorize staff to proceed with a Public Open House to obtain community feedback on the preliminary design concepts for downtown Aldergrove.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

The Aldergrove Core Planning Program is proceeding as previously outlined in Report No. 09-30 dated March 9, 2009. An Aldergrove Core Design Charrette was held in June, with over 40 people attending the day-long event. The Charrette produced two preliminary design options or long-term visions. A copy of the concept options report presented to the Aldergrove Planning Committee (APC) at its meeting of September 17, 2009 is included as Attachment A to this report. The (APC) has recommended a public open house to obtain community input on the two preliminary design options.
PURPOSE:

This report provides an update to the Aldergrove Core Planning Program and seeks Council’s permission to host a Public Open House to obtain community feedback on the draft concept options for downtown Aldergrove.

Page 15 of 103

ALDERGROVE CORE PLANNING PROGRAM Page 2 . . .

D.1

BACKGROUND/HISTORY:

On March 9, 2009, Council received Report # 09-30 and authorized staff to proceed with an Aldergrove Core Planning Program (including a design charrette) as part of the Aldergrove Community Plan Update. Subsequently, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was issued for the Aldergrove Core Planning Program. HB Lanarc was selected as the lead consultant for the project.
DISCUSSION/ANALYSIS:

On June 6, 2009, an Aldergrove Core Design Charrette was held with over 40 local residents, business owners and community stakeholders attended the day-long event. The participants produced two preliminary design concepts for the downtown core area. Subsequently, the Aldergrove Planning Committee (APC) and Township staff reviewed the preliminary concepts and provided additional feedback to the consultants. The consultants incorporated the feedback into the two preliminary concepts which were presented to the APC. On September 17, 2009, the APC passed the following motion: “That the Aldergrove Planning Committee: • • • Receive the draft Aldergrove Planning Program - Concept Options Summary Report, Recommend that the plan draft report be presented to Council for information purposes, and Recommend that Council approve the scheduling of a public open house to obtain community input in October.”

The attached “Aldergrove Core Planning Program – Concept Options Summary Report, Draft September 10, 2009” documents the two preliminary design concepts. Based on the Charrette Directives (see Page 5 of the Concept Options Summary Report), the preliminary design concepts represent different approaches to key urban design and functional considerations for the downtown area, including: • • • • • • • treatment and vehicle capacity of Fraser Highway, mobility network within the study area, street orientation of new developments, built form and density, civic and cultural uses, development adjacent to Bertrand Creek, and the Aldergrove Mall site.

The key differences of the two preliminary design concepts are summarized on page 8 of the Concept Options Summary Report. As part of the Aldergrove Core Planning Program, a study exploring economic implications and development opportunities for the downtown area was undertaken by G.P. Rollo and Associates (land economists). The study indicated that downtown Aldergrove has excellent long term potential for redevelopment. The two preliminary design options are anticipated to take place over the next 30 years, characterized by continuing population and employment growth in the Fraser Valley, both of which will fuel the demand for residential and commercial uses in downtown Aldergrove.

Page 16 of 103

ALDERGROVE CORE PLANNING PROGRAM Page 3 . . .

D.1

Next Steps The APC has recommended a Public Open House to obtain feedback from the community. The tentative date for the Open House is October 29. Based on community feedback, a preferred option would be selected (or a new one developed with elements from the two preliminary options) by the end of 2009. The preferred option would be presented to the APC early in 2010. The APC would then recommend the Preferred Concept (complete with detailed drawings and design guidelines) to Council in February-March 2010. Respectfully submitted,

Jason Chu STRATEGIC PLANNER for COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION

ATTACHMENT A

Aldergrove Core Planning Program – Concept Options Summary Report Draft September 10, 2009

Page 17 of 103

Aldergrove Core Planning Program Concept Options Summary Report
Draft - September 10, 2009

Attachment A

Page 18 of 103

D.1

Content
1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background, Purpose and Overview 1.2 The Aldergrove Core Planning Process 1.3 Area and Context Overview 1.4 The Charrette 1.5 Charrette Process and Method TWO ALTERNATIVE CONCEPTS 2.1 Overview: key similarities and differences 2.2 Concept A: “Quartiers” 2.3 Concept B: “Great Streets” CONCLUSIONS and NEXT STEPS 1 1 2 4 5 6 7 7 9 17 25

2.0

3.0

Page 19 of 103

D.1

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background, Purpose & Overview

The Township of Langley is undertaking the Aldergrove Core Planning (ACP) Program. This process will lead to the formulation of a conceptual development plan for downtown Aldergrove and inform a review and update of the Aldergrove Community Plan currently under way. This planning process seeks to establish a common vision through community consultation that defines land uses, sets an urban design vision, considers possible densities, and sets policies to guide growth and development in downtown Aldergrove. This will include detailing the type and location of housing and commercial buildings permitted in the downtown, and outlining pedestrian, cycling and transit integration measures. The plan will also identify natural areas, key public spaces, recreation locations, and community facilities.

The Township of Langley has retained a consulting team led by HB Lanarc Consultants to conduct urban design and planning work as a key component of the ACP process. The ACP process is structured around a comprehensive public and stakeholder consultation program. The consultants assisting in this process are working closely and collaboratively with Township Staff (transportation, engineering, planning and other technical staff) which together make up the ACP Project Team. Guiding and overseeing the process is the Aldergrove Planning Committee which is comprised of Aldergrove business owners, property owners, resident and stakeholder representatives and Township Councillors and established by Council to provide input, liaison and guidance throughout the process.

Public and stakeholder events form the backbone of the ACP process, which includes meetings, workshops and public open houses at critical stages. A public design charrette held June 6th was the key public event in the overall the ACP Program, resulting in two alternative options for the downtown. Comments and feedback collected at an APC workshop and a technical working group workshop held subsequent to the charrette, formed the basis for further revision and refinement of the two options.

The Concept Options Report is a key deliverable in the ACP program, presenting the results of the process to date including detailed descriptions of the two alternative concepts developed at the charrette. Community and Council feedback, along with a technical evaluation by the Project Team of the two concepts presented in this report, will lead to the identification of a preferred concept option and form the basis for more detailed plan development including a land use plan, policy recommendations and a set of design guidelines to implement the urban design vision established through this process.

Page 20 of 103
Aldergrove Core Planning Program - Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

D.1
1

1.2 The Aldergrove Core Planning Process
The ACP process is structured around APC and Project Team workshops and public open houses occurring at key stages of the process. The consulting team includes expertise in sustainability planning, urban design, landscape architecture, ecology, and land economics. The process began in May 2009 and is expected to be completed by March, 2010. To date the process has included the following key tasks and events: • Project Team kick-off meeting (April 27): key project tasks, events, deliverables and outcomes were confirmed with Township Staff; • Background/technical review and synthesis including the relevant policy framework and an overview of development trends and opportunities; • APC workshop # 1 (May 28): identified key issues and opportunities facing downtown Aldergrove, provided an overview of best practices in creating sustainable and livable communities and neighbourhoods, and established a vision and set of planning and design principles to guide the development and refinement of alternative concepts; • Preparation of the Design Brief which contained the necessary background information and instructions to guide the development of alternative concepts at the Charrette. The instructions included a set of design principles and objectives that were crafted in response to input provided by the public, stakeholders and the APC to-date, and the relevant policies contained in the Official Community Plan and the Draft Regional Growth Strategy. The design instructions also include key facts about the site along with a set of assumptions regarding projected population and employment projections to 2031. • The Charrette (June 6): a multidisciplinary public design workshop with over 50 participants that included members of the APC, Township staff and the consulting team. Participants formed two charrette teams which resulted in the two alternative concept options presented in this report. • Refinement of concept options: The consulting team refined the two concept options based on the broad directions identified at the charrette. • APC workshop #2 (June 23): Refined concept options were reviewed by APC to confirm key elements and details, and identify further information needed for presentation to public and council. • Project Team workshop #2 (July 24): Technical issues and constraints presented by each option were identified and discussed at a workshop attended by the consultants and Township staff. • Preparation of Concept Option Report: summarizing process results to date including the two concept options was developed, forming the basis for public/stakeholder evaluation, feedback and the selection of a preferred option. The preferred option will be based on feedback gathered at an upcoming public open house, council workshop and APC and Project Team meetings. The preferred concept will define the location, type and intensity of land uses, open space and mobility networks, urban form and massing, and form the basis for the development of detailed policies and design guidelines for both public and private realms.

Page 21 of 103

D.1

2

Aldergrove Core Planning Program Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

Downtown Aldergrove Study Area

Page 22 of 103
Aldergrove Core Planning Program - Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

D.1
3

Existing Land Uses in the Downtown

1.3 Area and Context Overview
The downtown Aldergrove study area is approximately 80 acres in size. It is centred on the intersection of Fraser Highway and 272 Street, and bounded by Bertrand Creek to the north and east, 29 Avenue to the south and 270 Street to the weStreet Aldergrove has its roots in farming and agriculture. Downtown Aldergrove is the traditional commercial and service centre for what used to be a predominantly farming community, but which has over the years transformed into a predominantly residential supported by a range of primarily local serving commercial uses and with some industrial and agricultural/ rural uses. Today, the downtown continues to have a wide variety of commercial and service uses supporting a range of surrounding residential uses including single family homes, duplexes, townhouses and apartments. The majority of residential lands within the study area are large lot single family homes ranging in age from 30 - 60 years old, with some townhouses and apartments including two fairly recent four-plexes located on 30th Avenue west of 272 Street Aldergrove’s small town heritage is reflected in some of the built form and design elements of the downtown, including the location of buildings at the sidewalk edge, the heritage facade treatments of some buildings, and the pedestrian orientation and amenity of some of the buildings and public open spaces. Commercial uses are concentrated along Fraser Highway and 272 Street, and range in use from small local serving ‘mum and pop’ businesses, to larger commercial businesses and buildings including Fields and the Aldergrove Mall. Currently, there are approximately 120 active businesses and roughly 338,000 sq. ft. of commercial space within the study area. Due to the proliferation of new commercial/retail service centres outside of the downtown over the past several decades, the commercial vitality of the downtown is not what it once was as evidenced by a number of vacant store fronts and the existence of some marginal businesses. The large volumes of vehicular and commercial traffic at peak periods along the Fraser Highway impact the quality of fronting businesses and the adjacent pedestrian environment, despite the attractive and substantial street-scape enhancements that took place in the late ‘90s. The street system includes a limited network of lanes and is laid out in a modified grid pattern with an east - west orientation. The figure ground diagram below shows how the large blocks within the study area create gaps in the transportation network and reduce the overall connectivity of the network.

Commercial Residential Civic/Institutional Utility

Figure Ground Diagram showing block structure and street network

Fraser Highway. & 272

Page 23 of 103

(Please refer to the Downtown Aldergrove Charrette Design Brief for more background information on the study area).

D.1

4

Aldergrove Core Planning Program Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

1.4 The Charrette

The Downtown Aldergrove charrette was held June 6th from 9:00 to 4:00 at the Rotary Field House in Aldergrove. A Design Brief was provided to all charrette participants to inform and guide the development of alternative concepts. The Design Brief contains a summary of relevant policy, technical and land economics information to provide the necessary background information. It also contains a set of instructions and directives, the key component of which are the Design Objectives. These were compiled from the 2004 Aldergrove Community Visioning Program, and revised and confirmed by the Aldergrove Planning Committee prior to the charrette.

Charrette Directives: Design Objectives

1. Reinforce downtown as the social, cultural and commercial heart of the community.

2. Increase housing choice and density in the downtown while ensuring a high degree of livability.

3. Incorporate mixed-use developments in the downtown including housing located above commercial uses.

4. Focus (and potentially reduce) the extent of commercial uses to create a vibrant commercial core.

5. Consider re-orienting commercial development in a north/south alignment; reduce linear development along the Fraser Highway.

6. Incorporate built form, layout and open space design that supports transit-use and cycling for everyday travel needs.

7. Prioritize pedestrian activity in the core area to create a truly walkable downtown.

8. Create options for vehicles and goods movement traveling through the downtown core to minimize vehicle impacts on the traditional commercial high street along the Fraser Highway.

9. Create an attractive and distinct public realm and interconnected open space network that emphasizes pedestrian comfort and safety and reinforces the small town/rural identity of the community.

10. Create a greener downtown that provides parks, street trees and protects and enhances Bertrand Creek as a focal point.

11. Incorporate built forms, open space treatments and innovative infrastructure that reduces overall environmental impacts.

12. Develop alternative concepts that establish a long term urban design vision for the downtown that is innovative, visionary and bold in achieving true community wide sustainability and livability to 2041 and beyond.

Page 24 of 103
Aldergrove Core Planning Program - Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

D.1
5

Methods for Generating and Discussing Ideas

1.5 Charrette Structure & Process
The charrette included two design sessions interspersed with presentations and plenary reports. The charrette began with a presentation by the consultants and Township staff to provide the key background information and establish the context and key design instructions for charrette participants. Charrette participants then broke out into two teams and the design work began. Each team had two urban designers (project consultants) with technical and design support from the charrette facilitator and Township staff. The morning and afternoon design sessions were structured around three general themes:

• • •

Street Network, Land Use and Context Built Form and Building Types Public Realm: Streets, Squares and Open Spaces

Design around each theme occurred concurrently throughout the day. The charrette included a number of plenary sessions where smaller groups reported back to their respective charrette teams. Methods for generating and discussing ideas included context and “special places” mapping, conceptual land use development, block modeling, visual preference mapping, and general discussion which was documented through diagramming, drawing and writing. At the end of the day, the design teams produced illustrated concept plans of the entire study area to varying degrees of completion, concept design drawings of special study areas, cross sections, conceptual land use plans and some perspective sketches. In addition, policy and implementation strategies were documented for each concept. The charrette concluded with an “end-of-day pin-up” where team members presented key elements from each concept and answered questions. Some participants posted comments on individual drawings. Following the charrette, the urban design consultants refined the preliminary concepts produced at the charrette to provide more detail and information on the two concepts developed. The refined concepts were then presented to the APC and township staff at two separate post charrette workshops.

Page 25 of 103

D.1

6

Aldergrove Core Planning Program Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

2.0

TWO ALTERNATIVE CONCEPTS

2.1 Overview

The downtown Aldergrove charrette and subsequent design work resulted in two alternative concepts: Concept A: “Quartiers” and Concept B: “Great Streets”. These concepts show different approaches to the location, intensity and type of land uses and built form, the mobility and open space network, the treatment of the public realm and street-scapes, and the treatment and vehicle capacity along the Fraser Highway. The two concept options also showed a number of similarities and consensus points. Following is a summary of these key similarities and differences.

Summary of Key Similarities and Consensus Points

Both concepts propose:

• Significant changes in land use and increase in density within the downtown;

• The introduction of a range of mixed use building types ranging in height from 3 to 16 storeys;

• An expansion of the extent of residential uses within the downtown, with a focus on low - medium density attached ground oriented housing forms with some taller residential buildings up to 16 storeys;

Concept A: “Quartiers”

• A slight reduction in the extent of commercial uses (while maintaining or slightly increasing capacity for commercial floor area);

• Transportation network expansion to increase pedestrian connectivity (particularly north-south connectivity) within the downtown and along the Fraser Highway;

• Street-scape enhancements and enhanced pedestrian orientation throughout the downtown;

• An enhanced arts/cultural/civic focus for the downtown;

• Emphasizing Bertrand Creek as a major green space, pedestrian corridor and focal point for activity, including incorporation of strategic bridge crossings and restoration and “day-lighting” of the creek as part of future public and private realm improvements;

• The introduction of a number of small urban public parks/plazas, and

• Public open space provision and design to accommodate a public farmers market within the downtown.

Page 26 of 103

Concept B: “Great Streets”

D.1
7

Aldergrove Core Planning Program - Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

Summary of Key Differences

Fraser Highway

Concept A: “Quartiers”

Concept A: “Quartiers” Expands vehicle capacity at peak periods by removing on street parking, reinforcing the role of the Fraser Highway as a vehicle and goods movement corridor through Aldergrove and the downtown, and orienting new pedestrian oriented uses and activities off of the Fraser Highway. Mobility Proposes new network connections (primarily north-south) network/ structure in the form of new public streets that accommodate vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists. Orientation Encourages development oriented of develaway from the Fraser Highway opment and inwards within the surrounding neighbourhoods and Aldergrove Mall site. Built form Lower Density: Proposes primarily 4 and storey apartments and 2 – 3 storey density townhouses, with four 16 storey towers located along Bertrand Creek and primarily within the Aldergrove Mall site. Up to 4 storey mixed use along Fraser Highway and 272 Street Civic/ Proposes an arts/culture/precinct cultural at the Aldergrove Elementary uses School site. Proposes an outdoor events/performance venue small stage/amphitheatre at Rotary Park

Concept B: “Great Streets” Maintains existing capacity and onstreet parking, and proposes new pedestrian crossings through the downtown along the Fraser Highway. This diverts through traffic and reestablish the pedestrian orientation of this section of the Fraser Highway and its status as Downtown Aldergrove’s “main street”. Proposes new network extensions (primarily north-south) principally in the form of publicly accessible pedestrian and cyclist “green-ways” that would exclude vehicular traffic. Encourages development oriented towards Fraser Highway and 272 street, embracing them as pedestrian oriented, traditional main streets with a retail focus. Higher Density: Proposes primarily 6 storey apartments with some 2 – 3 storey townhouses, with five 16 storey towers located along Bertrand Creek within the Aldergrove Mall site, and south of the Fraser Highway on either side of 272 Street.

Page 27 of 103

Concept B: “Great Streets”

Proposes re-locating the arena and locating new pool to the Aldergrove Elementary School site, financed by redevelopment of the current arena site for medium to high density residential uses. DevelProposes residential development Proposes a public roadway in the opment backing on to Bertrand Creek form of a lane and small local street adjacent which is buffered by a green open located adjacent to Bertrand Creek to Bertrand space corridor and trail system. through study area, with residential Creek frontage along it. Aldergrove Proposes a new retail street internal Proposes primarily residential uses Mall Site to the mall site with residential uses internal to the site with retail frontage located above shops and services. along Fraser Highway and 272 Street. Includes a Woonerf (shared streets - see pp 22) and an enhanced pedestrian oriented lane north of Fraser Highway.

D.1

8

Aldergrove Core Planning Program Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

2.2 Concept A: “Quartiers”

Page 28 of 103
Aldergrove Core Planning Program - Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

D.1
9

“Quartiers” - Overview

st.

2-3 storey buildings along retail high streets

Page 29 of 103

D.1

10

Aldergrove Core Planning Program Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

“Quartiers” - Land Use, Density & Mix

Page 30 of 103
Aldergrove Core Planning Program - Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

D.1
11

Quartiers - Built Form
4 storey (mixed use)

retail

office retail

~16 storeys residential/ mixed-use

Insert heights map and location of tall build3-4 storey

Building forms to encourage passive energy (natural lighting and ventilation) and create opportunities for roof top gardens

Insert elevations/cross sections/massing diagrams

4 storey

2-3 storeys

Page 31 of 103

D.1

12

Aldergrove Core Planning Program Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

“Quartiers” - Mobility Network

Page 32 of 103
Aldergrove Core Planning Program - Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

D.1
13

“Quartiers” - Street Types and Open Spaces

Retail street with 4 storey street wall

Fraser Boulevard: 2 travel lanes during/ in direction of peak period traffic (onstreet parking in peak period directions removed)

272 Street: 1 travel lane in each direction, on street parking and a 4 storey street wall.

Local neighbourhood street with Apartment frontage

Lane with townhouse frontage Active lanes Local neighbourhood street with townhouse/apartment frontage Housing fronting onto pedestrian mews

Page 33 of 103

D.1

14

Aldergrove Core Planning Program Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

“Quartiers” - Aldergrove Mall Site

Mid-sized grocery store wrapped with small shops fronting onto 272 Street and the new internal street, and with flats located above

Tall residential and mixed-use buildings fronting onto new retail street and backing onto Bertrand Creek

Small “paseos” or “pass-throughs” create pedestrian connections and opportunities for sidewalk cafes

New retail street with residential uses located above shops.

Page 34 of 103

Frontage onto lane

D.1
15

Aldergrove Core Planning Program - Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

“Quartiers” - Summary Concept Diagram

Page 35 of 103

D.1

16

Aldergrove Core Planning Program Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

2.3 Concept B: “Great Streets”

Page 36 of 103
Aldergrove Core Planning Program - Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

D.1
17

“Great Streets” - Overview

4-5 storey buildings along retail high streets

st.

Page 37 of 103

D.1

18

Aldergrove Core Planning Program Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

Great Streets: Land Use, Density & Mix

Page 38 of 103
Aldergrove Core Planning Program - Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

D.1
19

“Great Streets”: Built Form

6 6 6

4-5 storeys

6 6

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 3 storeys

3 storeys

6

6

Page 39 of 103

12-16 storeys

D.1

20

Aldergrove Core Planning Program Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

“Great Streets” - Mobility Network

Page 40 of 103
Aldergrove Core Planning Program - Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

D.1
21

Quartiers: Streets and Open Spaces

Residential uses front onto narrow local serving neighbourhood street with pedestrian pathways on either side.

A “woonerf”: a small, neighbourhood serving street with traffic calming measures and special design treatments and where road space is shared by pedestrians, cyclists and slow moving vehicles, is proposed in a number of downtown locations.

Fraser Highway is a bustling street with one travel lane in each direction and on-street parking to serve fronting businesses.

A local shared street and adjacent trail establish a public use focus for the Bertrand Creek green space corridor.

Pedestrian oriented neighbourhood street.

Page 41 of 103

272 Street: a mixed-use retail street with one travel lane in each direction and on-street parking.

Aldergrove Square: a public gathering space framed by residential buildings and incorporating public art features expressing the Township’s agricultural roots.

A narrow “mews” framed by affordable, ground oriented townhouses.

D.1

22

Aldergrove Core Planning Program Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

“Great Streets”: Aldergrove Mall Site

A mixed-use building with a mid-sized retailer

“Great Streets” proposes small scale “woonerfs” in several locations within the downtown. This includes a Woonerf with residential frontage adjacent to, set back and buffered from Bertrand Creek by landscaping and trails north of Fraser Highway and a “woonerf” with retail frontage for a half block on either side of the Fraser Highway south of the Aldergrove Mall site.

Page 42 of 103

D.1

Mid-rise residential buildings front onto small public street.
Aldergrove Core Planning Program - Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

23

“Great Streets”: Summary Concept Diagram

Page 43 of 103

D.1

24

Aldergrove Core Planning Program Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

3.0

Conclusions and Next Steps

The two alternative concepts developed at the charrette represent different approaches and design choices for achieving the overall project goals and objectives. Preliminary evaluation of the two options by Township staff, the consultants, the Aldergrove Planning Committee and the public will identify preferred elements and approaches from each of the preferred concepts to incorporate into a preferred hybrid concept plan to carry forward with more detailed planning and design.

Acknowledging that the two alternative concepts were produced and refined very quickly at the charrette and post-charrette workshops, there are likely to be some technical challenges with some elements in each of the plans, which will be identified and addressed as part of the technical analysis and critical evaluation that is the next step in this process. However, overall the charrette was a very productive, creative and collaborative event that identified a wide range of approaches for managing future growth and change in Downtown Aldergrove and setting the foundation for further collaboration moving forward to a preferred concept and supporting set of polices and guidelines.

Next Steps

Following the presentation and approval of this report at the September 17 Aldergrove Core Planning Committee meeting, this report will be presented to Council for information and approval to proceed to a Public Open House tentatively scheduled for October 29. These two concept options will be displayed at the open house for public comment and feedback. Township staff will report to Council on the results of the public review, the professional technical review and the evaluation process following the Open House.

The Downtown Aldergrove Charrette team

The resulting final design concept, which incorporates the most desirable elements from each of the two concepts, will form the foundation for the development of policy recommendations and urban design guidelines which together, will become a key element of the Updated Aldergrove Community Plan.

Page 44 of 103
Aldergrove Core Planning Program - Concept Options Report - Draft Sept. 10/09.

D.1
25

D.2

REPORT TO MAYOR AND COUNCIL

PRESENTED: FROM: SUBJECT:

OCTOBER 5, 2009 - SPECIAL MEETING REPORT: ENGINEERING DIVISION FILE: MASTER TRANSPORTATION PLAN – ROAD NETWORK PLAN AND CLASSIFICATIONS

09-126 5260-23/3

RECOMMENDATION(S):

That Council receive the Master Transportation Plan report; and That Council endorse the Road Classifications Maps 6.2A (Attachment C) and 6.2B (Attachment D) to replace the existing Highway Classification Map P-1 (Attachment A) and the Master Transportation Plan – Road Cross-Sections Map (Attachment E and F).
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

The Township Engineering Division has been leading an update of the Master Transportation Plan for the past several years. The plan update included a review of the transportation vision and goals, examining existing conditions, identifying problems, transportation modeling, identifying improvements, development of a plan, and public consultation throughout the process. The latest version of the plan was presented to the public in the spring of 2007. The plan incorporates changes resulting from revisions to Neighbourhood and Community Plans as well as major regional projects, plans, and initiatives such as the Golden Ears Bridge, the Provincial Transit Plan, the South of Fraser Transit Plan, the Roberts Bank Rail Corridor Study and the Provincial Gateway Program. The Township is also undertaking a review of its cycling routes. The changes resulting from the draft bike route map have been incorporated into the transportation plan. The Township is also undertaking a review of its subdivision and development control bylaw which includes modification to road cross sections. As a result of these plans and initiatives, new road classification maps have been developed to replace the existing Highway Classification P-1 Map. The new maps include a road classification map for the entire Township that identify major and minor arterial and collector roads, a similar classification map for the Willoughby area and a new Road Classification Map that identifies road cross sections for every arterial and collector road within the Township. The Engineering Division will recommend future updates to Council for changes to these maps necessitated through changes in neighbourhood or community plans or provincial and regional plans and initiatives. The Master Transportation Plan also reflects the goals and objectives of the Township’s Sustainability Charter, adopted by Council in June 2008; in particular with respect to: • Integration of transportation in community planning; • Conserving and enhancing our environment; and • Reducing energy consumption.
PURPOSE:

To seek Council endorsement of the Road Network Classification Maps component of the Master Transportation Plan.

Page 45 of 103

MASTER TRANSPORTATION PLAN – ROAD NETWORK PLAN AND CLASSIFICATIONS

D.2

Page 2 . . .
BACKGROUND/HISTORY:

The Township of Langley is responsible for an extensive transportation system that provides for the safe and efficient mobility of people and goods. The Township guides the development of its transportation system through its Master Transportation Plan (MTP) primarily using the Highway Classification P-1 Map (see Attachment A – Road Network and Classification). The P-1 Map was last updated in 2004 to incorporate major changes as a result of neighbourhood and community plans, as well as major regional road network changes such as the Golden Ears Bridge. The Master Transportation Plan was last updated in 1988. The current update of the Master Transportation Plan was undertaken by Ward Consulting. A copy of the full report is available for viewing with the Township Clerk.
DISCUSSION/ANALYSIS:

The goal is to prepare a future Transportation Plan that will “guide the orderly long term development of the Township’s transportation system in an effective and economical manner”. The plan focuses on the development on an updated road network and classification map as the basis for the transportation system. The information will be used to assist in updating future transit and cycling routes and facilities within the Township. The major steps undertaken as part of the Master Transportation Plan included: • • • • • • Examining existing transportation conditions Identifying problems Transportation modeling Identifying road network improvement options Developing a road network plan Public Consultation throughout the planning process

The project was initiated in 2003 with a review of the Township transportation vision and goals. Public consultation and feedback was obtained throughout the planning process including newspaper ads, public open houses, visioning workshops, and household surveys, with the most recent meetings occurring in the spring of 2007. The plan has been revised to incorporate the latest changes approved through neighbourhood and community plans amendments. The draft plan has been revised to be consistent with other regional and provincial plans such as: • • • • • The Golden Ears Bridge and related road network revisions The Provincial Transit Plan The South of Fraser Transit Plan The Roberts Bank Rail Corridor Study The Provincial Gateway Program

One of the major goals of the plan is to meet the needs of a growing community in a sustainable manner while minimizing the negative impact such as the impact to the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR). Towards this end, the Township is also currently working on an amendment to its subdivision and development control bylaw; part of that bylaw includes updated road standards for arterial, collector and local roads. The road cross sections generally require narrower vehicle travel lanes and the incorporation of cycling lanes. The transportation plan also includes a road classification map that identifies road cross sections for each arterial and collector road within the Township.

Page 46 of 103

MASTER TRANSPORTATION PLAN – ROAD NETWORK PLAN AND CLASSIFICATIONS

D.2

Page 3 . . . The Township of Langley is updating its cycling routes. The draft bike route plans (see Attachment B) has been incorporated into the proposed road network classification maps and the updated road standards in the subdivision and development control bylaw. The Engineering Division plans to undertake a public consultation process on the draft bike route plans. Revisions to the Transportation Plan will be required once the bike route plan is adopted. Similarly, future revisions to neighbourhood and community plans will require revisions to the road network classification plans. The existing Highway Classification P-1 Map designates arterial and collector roads within the Township. The P-1 Map also includes varying right of way widths that correspond to road cross-sections within the previous subdivision and development control bylaw. The new Road Classification Maps have incorporated the road network changes from regional, provincial, and Township plans as well as subdividing the road system into major arterial, minor arterial, major collector and minor collector roads. The intent of the new classification system is to more accurately reflect the role and function of a road and to assist in operational decisions such as the application of traffic calming measures. The Road Classifications Map 6.2A (see Attachment C) provides the road classifications for the entire Township. Due to the detail contained within the Willoughby area, a separate Road Classification Map 6.2B (see Attachment D) has been created. The proposed road cross sections are shown on Attachments E and F. The major highlights of the plan are: North East Langley/Glen Valley: The road network remains unchanged with the exception of defining of some routes as major arterial, minor arterial, major collector, or minor collector. These definitions were based upon issues such as connectivity, traffic volumes, truck routes and the adjacent land usage. The major change was the incorporation of a rail overpass on 232 Street as per the Roberts Bank Rail Corridor Study. Gloucester The road network was modified to become consistent with the Gloucester Neighbourhood Plan. This included the removal of a proposed overpass on 56 Avenue across Highway 1 and confirming the future need for an overpass of Highway 1 at 272 Street. Aldergrove The road network was modified to reflect the findings of the traffic study undertaken by Ward Consulting as part of the initial review of the Aldergrove Neighbourhood Plan study currently underway. The plan proposes a collector ring road system around Aldergrove and four lanes on Fraser Highway in the future. As part of the Aldergrove visioning and planning process, it is anticipated that the road network plan in Aldergrove will undergo revisions. Following that process, the Road Classification Maps included in the Master Transportation Plan may need to be revised. South Langley The road network in south Langley has seen some changes resulting from subdividing road arterials and collectors into major and minor categories. The major change is the removal of the 24 Avenue and 32 Avenue connections through the Agricultural Land Reserve. The classification of 16 Avenue remains unchanged as a major arterial route. The classification of Zero Avenue is a minor collector to reflect its role and function.

Page 47 of 103

MASTER TRANSPORTATION PLAN – ROAD NETWORK PLAN AND CLASSIFICATIONS

D.2

Page 4 . . . Brookswood The Brookswood Neighbourhood Plan is in need of a major update and revision. Due to the lack of information in Brookswood, the road network plan is unchanged with the exception of subdividing arterial and collector roads into major and minor categories. Murrayville The road network in Murrayville is substantially unchanged with the exception of subdividing arterial and collector roads into major and minor categories. Fort Langley The road network in Fort Langley has seen some changes as a result of the closure of the Albion Ferry. The network has been subdivided into major and minor categories with the general trend of roads being classified into lower categories. Milner The Milner area includes the 64 Avenue rail overpass at Highway 10 and extension. This is consistent with the previous road network map from 2004 and the Roberts Bank Rail Corridor Study. The construction of the overpass project is subject to the approval of the Agricultural Land Commission. Northwest Langley/Walnut Grove The road network in Northwest Langley and Walnut Grove has undergone substantial changes as result of the Golden Ears Bridge, particularly with 200 Street, 199A Street, and 201 Street now being classified as major arterial routes. Some of the routes under and north of the structure have been classified into lower categories of roads. The plan shows the future 216 Interchange and the widening of the 208 Street overpass, which is unchanged from previous plans. The plan now incorporates a proposed transit/HOV tunnel at 202 Street which is consistent with the Provincial Gateway Program. Willowbrook The Willowbrook area has seen little change in the road network classification of the existing routes. The major change in the incorporation of the overpass structures is included in the Roberts Bank Rail Corridor Study such as the 204 Street, 196 Street, 192 Street, and 53 Avenue overpass structures. A new road link connecting 203 Street to the Langley Bypass has been included in the plan. Willoughby The Willoughby plan has undergone substantial changes as a result of new Neighbourhood plans being developed in the past several years. The road network and classification maps have been modified to be consistent with those plans. In areas where neighbourhood plans have not been completed, gaps between neighbourhoods have been filled in. The changes include the connector road to the 216 Interchange, the widening of 208 Street, and the extension of 202 Street to Highway 1. In addition, 200 Street has been identified as a future rapid transit corridor.

Page 48 of 103

MASTER TRANSPORTATION PLAN – ROAD NETWORK PLAN AND CLASSIFICATIONS

D.2

Page 5 . . . The draft plan has undergone significant changes over the past several years since its inception in 2003. Following the public open house held in 2007, there have been minor revisions resulting from public input and ongoing changes from Neighbourhood plans. The Engineering Division recommends that Council endorse the Road Classification Maps 6.2A and 6.2B and the Master Transportation Plan – Road Classifications Map. If adopted, it is the intention of the Engineering Division to continue updating the maps as needed following any changes resulting from ongoing neighbourhood and community plans updates as well as any changes resulting from Provincial or Regional Plans. Respectfully submitted,

Paul Cordeiro MANAGER, TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING for ENGINEERING DIVISION ATTACHMENT A: ATTACHMENT B ATTACHMENT C: ATTACHMENT D: ATTACHMENT E: ATTACHMENT F EXISTING ROAD NETWORK AND CLASSIFICATION MAP DRAFT BIKE ROUTE MAP ROAD CLASSIFICATION MAP OVERALL ROAD CLASSIFICATION MAP WILLOUGHBY ROAD CROSS-SECTIONS OVERALL ROAD CROSS-SECTIONS WILLOUGHBY

This report has been prepared in consultation with the following listed departments.
CONCURRENCES Division / Department COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Name R. SEIFI

Page 49 of 103

MASTER TRANSPORTATION PLAN – ROAD NETWORK PLAN AND CLASSIFICATIONS

D.2

Page 6 . . .

ATTACHMENT A
EXISTING ROAD NETWORK AND CLASSIFICATION MAP

Page 50 of 103

MASTER TRANSPORTATION PLAN – ROAD NETWORK PLAN AND CLASSIFICATIONS

D.2

Page 7 . . .

ATTACHMENT B
DRAFT BIKE ROUTE MAP

DBB

Page 51 of 103

MASTER TRANSPORTATION PLAN – ROAD NETWORK PLAN AND CLASSIFICATIONS

D.2

Page 8 . . .

ATTACHMENT C
ROAD CLASSIFICATION MAP - OVERALL

Page 52 of 103

MASTER TRANSPORTATION PLAN – ROAD NETWORK PLAN AND CLASSIFICATIONS

D.2

Page 9 . . .

ATTACHMENT D
ROAD CLASSIFICATION MAP – WILLOUGHBY

Page 53 of 103

ATTACHMENT E

D.2
R LA AL S RE DC
Legend
Road Cross Section
6 Lane Divided + Bike Lanes <=60 6 Lane Divided + Bike Lanes > 60 4 Lane Divided + Bike Lane <= 60 4 Lane Divided + Bike Lane > 60 Bridge Local Municipal Roads Provincial Highways

104 Ave

Golden Ears Bridge
102B AVE
Mc NO K IN

4 Lane Divided <= 60 4 Lane Divided > 60 4 Lane Divided Wide Curb <= 60 2 Lane Divided <= 60 Major Collector Residential Major Collector Industrial/Commercial Minor Collector Residential Rural 4 Lane (TWLTL) 2 Lane <= 60

(

Future Interchange

199A ST

201 ST

203 ST

98 AVE 97 B
206 ST

96 Ave

204 ST

213 ST

WRI GHT ST TRATT LE ST

200 St Interchange 88 Ave
88 AVE
86 AVE

Future Bridge

GL OV E

R

Future Bridge

93 AVE

RD

Intersection Re-alignment

AV E
96 AVE

NC

96 AVE

RE S

204 ST

216 ST

84 AVE
Future Bridge

211 ST

Future Bridge

82 AVE
197 ST

209 ST

80 Ave

80 AVE
204 ST

80 AVE

216 ST

78 AVE

200 ST 201 ST 202A ST 202B ST

Future Bridge

76 AVE

Glover Rd Overpass

198B ST

208 ST

197 ST

204 ST

196 ST 197 ST 198 ST

62 AVE

CR ES

264 ST

268 ST

Future 196 St RBRC Overpass 56 Ave Future 192 St Overpass
48 Ave
44 AVE
42 AVE 204 ST

204 St Overpass Future 53 Ave Overpass

Future 64 Ave RBRC Overpass
224 ST

248 St Overpass

60 AVE
58
56 AVE

272 ST
CR E

Fraser Hwy Future Bus RapidTransit On Fraser Hwy

68 AVE

201 ST

203 ST

FF OR D

64 AVE

64 AVE

256 ST

66 AVE MU

248 ST

Future Pedestrian Overpass

206 ST

72 Ave

73A AVE 72 AVE

CR US H

CR ES

232 St Interchange

240 ST

74B AVE

Future 232 St RBRC Overpass
72 AVE

232 ST

256 ST

83 AVE

83 AVE

Future 216 St Interchange

RAWLISON CR ES

84 AVE

64 AVE

264 ST

221A ST

52 AVE

50 AVE
219 ST

222 ST

228 ST

48 AVE

48 AVE

240 ST

Future Pedestrian Overpass

44 AVE

44 AVE

FR AS ER H

WY OLD

212 ST

YAL E

S ROBERTSON CRE

Future 272 St Overpass

RD

40 Ave

40 AVE

38 AVE

36 AVE
262 ST
Future Bridge

216 ST

260 ST 260 ST

268 ST

210 ST

29 AVE

200 ST

240 ST

28 AVE

28 AVE

210 ST

196 ST

204 ST

26 AVE
24 AVE
24 AVE

26 AVE

24 Ave

24 AVE

24 AVE

24 AVE

204A ST

20 AVE

20 AVE
208 ST

256 ST

Proposed Road

216 ST

224 ST

240 ST

16 Ave

16 AVE

8 Ave

8 AVE

8 AVE

256 ST

0 Ave

0 AVE

200 St

208 St

216 St

224 St

232 St

240 St

248 St

256 St

264 St

264 ST

Master Transportation Plan - Road Cross-Sections
version date: 09/2009
Disclaimer: The data provided had been compiled from various sources and is not warrented as to its accuracy or sufficiency by the Township of Langley. The user of this information is responsible for confirming its accuracy and sufficiency.

0

0.5

1

2

3

4

5 Kilometers

\\whistler\geo\Maps\Custom Maps\Transportation\Trn_20090003_TOL_RoadClassification\Trn_RoadsClassification09.mxd

Page 54 of 103

272 St

272 ST

276 ST

32 Ave

32 AVE

32 AVE

232 ST

32 AVE

275 ST

202 ST

T 212 S

91 AVE

Future 202 St Tunnel

RIVER RD
88 AVE

B 214 ST

88 AVE

88 AVE

208 St Overpass

56 AVE

S

264 St Interchange

52 AVE

ATTACHMENT F

D.2
98 AVE
199A ST

201 ST

205A ST

H

206 ST

TR A

IL

203 ST

TE L

EG RA P

97 B

AV E

Intersection Re-alignment
198 ST

96 AVE

96 AVE

204 ST

A 93

E AV

92A AVE 91A AVE
202 ST

Future Bridge

93 AVE
92 AVE

213 ST

88 AVE

206 ST

Future 202 St Tunnel
201 ST
198A ST

WALNUT GROVE DR

88 AVE

86A

86 AVE

204 ST

85 AVE
84 AVE

208 St Overpass
84 AVE

CR E

S

216 ST
TEL E

87 AVE

214 B

ST

200 St Interchange

212 ST

210 ST

Future Bridge

GRA P

HT

RAI L

83 AVE
82 AVE
198A ST
81A AVE

Future Bridge

Future Bridge

211 ST

83 AVE

Future 216 St Interchange

209A ST

80 AVE

199 ST

Glover Rd Overpass
209 ST

197 ST

204 ST

212 ST

76 AVE

200 ST

202A ST

206 ST

77A AVE

76 AVE

74B AVE
206A ST

198B ST

73A AVE

197 ST

72 AVE
196B ST

T

200A ST

208 ST

198A S

CR

201 ST

202B ST

204 ST

206 ST

70 AVE
69 AV E

US H

70 AVE

CR

ES

68 AVE

Future Pedestrian Overpass
L IE EF AK W

201 ST

196 ST

66 AVE

197 ST

203 ST

W IL

LO

W

65 AVE
64 AVE

BR O

O K

CO NN

216 ST

Future Bridge

78 AVE

78 AVE

64 AVE
FF OR D

202 ST

20 4

ST

MU

WILLOWBROOK DR

Fraser Hwy Future Bus RapidTransit On Fraser Hwy Future 196 St RBRC Overpass

CR E

S

62 AVE

Future 64 Ave RBRC Overpass

Legend
Road Cross Section
6 Lane Divided + Bike Lanes <=60 6 Lane Divided + Bike Lanes > 60 4 Lane Divided + Bike Lane <= 60 Local Municipal Roads Provincial Highways

216 ST

204 St Overpass

4 Lane Divided + Bike Lane > 60 4 Lane Divided <= 60 4 Lane Divided > 60 4 Lane Divided Wide Curb <= 60 2 Lane Divided <= 60 Major Collector Residential Major Collector Industrial/Commercial Minor Collector Residential Rural 4 Lane (TWLTL) 2 Lane <= 60

Bridge

(

Future Interchange

56 AVE

Master Transportation Plan - Road Cross-Sections - Willoughby Area
version date: 09/2009
Disclaimer: The data provided had been compiled from various sources and is not warrented as to its accuracy or sufficiency by the Township of Langley. The user of this information is responsible for confirming its accuracy and sufficiency.

0

0.25

0.5

1

1.5

2 Kilometers

\\whistler\geo\Maps\Custom Maps\Transportation\Trn_20090003_TOL_RoadClassification\Trn_RoadsClassified09_Willoughby11x17.mxd

Page 55 of 103

GL OV ER

RD

D DR

224 ST

Page 56 of 103

D.3

REPORT TO MAYOR AND COUNCIL

PRESENTED: FROM: SUBJECT:

OCTOBER 5, 2009 - SPECIAL MEETING ENGINEERING DIVISION FRASER HIGHWAY/248 STREET TRAFFIC SIGNAL

REPORT: FILE:

09-127 5330-23

RECOMMENDATION(S):

That Council receive the Fraser Highway/248 Street Traffic Signal report for information.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

At their regular meeting of June 15, 2009, Council requested that staff provide a report on how the intersection at 248 Street and Fraser Highway can be improved and the timeline for such improvements. A number of options were reviewed and considered including: 1. the addition of northbound and southbound left phases only, is the least expensive option but will actually reduce the overall capacity and performance of the intersection; significant delays are expected if this option is pursued alone. 2. the construction of northbound and southbound left turn bays would provide an improvement to the overall capacity of the intersection over the existing condition; however, this option will have impacts to the surrounding properties and will require significant capital funds allocated to this intersection. 3. the construction of northbound and southbound left turn bays and the installation of left turn phases are more costly than option 2 and actually decrease the performance of the intersection as compared to option 2. 4. the widening of Fraser Highway to four lanes will also improve the intersection performance. While the existing configuration has delays to the northbound and southbound traffic in the peak hour, priority is given to Fraser Highway, thereby minimizing overall delay at the intersection. The cost of Option 2 is $430,000 plus property and business impact costs: all costs must be funded from general revenue sources. There are several other locations within the Township with similar or worse traffic conditions and as a result, the expenditure of these funds should be considered in the overall context of Township needs and priorities.
PURPOSE:

This report responds to the request for further information and options for improvement for the traffic signal at Fraser Highway and 248 Street.

Page 57 of 103

FRASER HIGHWAY/248 STREET TRAFFIC SIGNAL

D.3

Page 2 . . .
BACKGROUND/HISTORY:

Fraser Highway is a major East/West arterial road in the Township of Langley with an average daily vehicle volume of approximately 25,000 vehicles per day (248 Street carries about 5000 vehicles per day). In situations where the volume on the major road is significantly larger than the minor road, priority is given to the major road resulting in larger delays to the minor road. At signalized intersections where a high number of left turning vehicles are present, a left turn bay may be installed to separate this traffic from the other streams. This allows other movements to proceed unhindered by waiting left turning vehicles. If the conflicting vehicle volumes are high enough, a left turn phase may also be installed. Left turn phases are only installed where the conflicting vehicle volume is high enough as the installation of additional phases decreases the overall capacity of the intersection. The Township installed left turn phases in the eastbound and westbound directions on Fraser Highway at 248 Street. Following this installation, Council has requested staff to look into further improvements particularly in the northbound and southbound directions.
DISCUSSION/ANALYSIS:

A number of options were reviewed and considered including: 1. the addition northbound and southbound left phases only 2. the construction of northbound and southbound left turn bays 3. the construction of northbound and southbound left turn bays and the installation of left turn phases. The table below provides a summary of the options reviewed in terms of the anticipated construction costs and performance. The construction costs do not include any land acquisition or compensation to property owners impacted by options 2 and 3. Also, as the majority of the construction activity is on the cross street (248 Street), the project would not be eligible for funding from the TransLink Major Road Network Minor Capital fund or from the Road DCC fund. As a result, the funding would be required from General Revenue sources. Option Estimated Cost Intersection LOS D E Intersection Signal Delay (s/veh) 38.6 60.0 Average NB Queue length (m) 73 104

Existing 1. Installation of NB/SB LT phases only 2. Installation NB/SB LT bays only 3. Installation of NB and SB LT bays and phases

0 $30,000

$400,000

C

23.9

25

$430,000

C

31.1

44

Page 58 of 103

FRASER HIGHWAY/248 STREET TRAFFIC SIGNAL

D.3

Page 3 . . . The installation of northbound and southbound left turn phases only (i.e. a dedicated left turn arrow) without constructing left turn bays will have significant negative impacts to the overall intersection performance and will not improve the capacity or operations of this intersection. The provision of northbound and southbound left turn bays would be quite beneficial (either with or without left turn phases) and improve the overall performance of the intersection, reduce vehicle delays, and provide separation between left turning and through moving vehicles. Options 2, the addition of northbound and southbound left turn lanes without left turn phases would be the most efficient option. The construction of left turn bays in the northbound and southbound directions would have impacts on the surrounding properties. A concept drawing is provided as Attachment A showing the existing configuration and Attachment B showing the addition of northbound and southbound left turn bays. In order to accommodate the required turning movements, additional widening on the northwest and southeast corners is likely required with the construction of retaining walls due to the grades in the area. The large shoulder area on the southwest corner would be significantly reduced with little to no parking remaining in this area impacting primarily the business on this corner. Not shown on the above table is the long term solution of widening Fraser Highway to 4 lanes. While this would provide a significant benefit to traffic operations in this location for all directions, this widening will not take place for some time with other portions of Fraser Highway being widened prior to this location. The estimated cost of Option 2 ($430,000 of general revenue funding) does not include land and property impacts. As a result, this significant investment should be considered in the context of the overall needs and priorities of the Township. There are numerous other locations within the Township that are also experiencing similar or worse traffic delays including several intersections along the 200 Street corridor, the 208 Street corridor, 56 Avenue/232 Street and other intersections along the Fraser Highway corridor. For these reasons, the Township Transportation Department does not recommend undertaking any further improvements at this time. Alternatively, the performance of the intersection will continue to be monitored by staff and potential upgrades may be brought forward by staff for the consideration of Council in future years. Respectfully submitted,

Richard Welfing PROJECT ENGINEER for ENGINEERING DIVISION ATTACHMENT A ATTACHMENT B AERIAL VIEW OF EXISTING CONFIGURATION AT FRASER HIGHWAY AND 248 STREET AERIAL VIEW OF IMPACTS OF NB AND SB LT BAYS AT FRASER HIGHWAY AND 248 STREET

Page 59 of 103

D.3

ATTACHMENT A

Page 60 of 103

D.3

ATTACHMENT B

Page 61 of 103

Page 62 of 103

E.1

Page 63 of 103

Page 64 of 103

E.2

Page 65 of 103

E.2

Page 66 of 103

E.3

Page 67 of 103

Page 68 of 103

E.4

Page 69 of 103

Page 70 of 103

F.1
HERITAGE ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Tuesday,September 8, 2009 commencing at 7:30 p.m. Salmon River Committee Room th 4 Floor, 20338 – 65 Avenue, Langley, BC

MINUTES Present: Chair, I. Mugridge T. Annandale, M. Camparamo, A. Johnson, J. Megahy, G. Muller, F Pepin, B. Sommer and M. Sparrow Council Representative Councillor Fox Staff: E. Horricks, J. Robertson and S. Carneiro

APPROVAL OF AGENDA 1. Heritage Advisory Committee - September 8, 2009 Moved by A. Johnson, Seconded by G. Muller, That the Heritage Advisory Committee adopt the Agenda of the September 8, 2009 meeting. CARRIED

A. 1.

APPROVAL OF MINUTES Heritage Advisory Committee - June 2, 2009 Moved by T. Annandale, Seconded by G. Muller, That the Heritage Advisory Committee adopt the Minutes of the June 2, 2009 meeting as amended. CARRIED

B.

DELEGATIONS

Page 71 of 103

F.1
September 8, 2009 Heritage Advisory Committee Minutes C. PRESENTATIONS -2-

D. 1.

REPORTS (VERBAL) Chairman’s Report I. Mugridge reported that J. Watt has resigned from the Committee due to changes in her work schedule and family commitments; however she has indicated that she would be willing to assist with any short term task force work that arises in future. Lance Talbott 2. Heritage Planner’s Report E. Horricks reported the following: Historic Places Initiative Funding In late June, 2009 the Township received a Historic Places Initiative grant of $3,000 dollars from Heritage BC to complete four Statements of Significance. The deadline for completion of these statements is December 31, 2009. Four sites have been identified for which historic documentation would be timely including, the Porter’s General Store in Murrayville and the Willoughby Methodist (later United) Church, Tom and Dorothy Campbell Residence and David Jones Residence located in Willoughby. Properties to be added to the Community Heritage Register The Township has received requests from the owners of the Willoughby Methodist (later United) Church, the Tom and Dorothy Campbell Residence and the owner of the David Jones Residence that their properties be added to the Township’s Community Heritage Register. All three buildings are earmarked for retention and restoration as part of a Quadra Homes Townhouse Development proposal for 208 Street in Willoughby. Adding these properties to the Community Heritage Register in advance of a Heritage Revitalization Agreement, will allow the Township to take advantage of the historic places initiative funding by preparing Statements of Significance for each of the sites by the grant deadline of December 31, 2009. COUNCIL Moved by A. Johnson, Seconded by F. Pepin, Recommendation that Council authorize placing the Willoughby Methodist (later United) Church, the Tom and Dorothy Campbell Residence and the David Jones Residence on the Township’s Community Heritage Register as requested by the owners. CARRIED

Page 72 of 103

F.1
September 8, 2009 Heritage Advisory Committee Minutes D. REPORTS (VERBAL) Heritage Incentive Program The next deadline for applications to the Heritage Building Incentive Program is October 9, 2009. The advertisement for the Heritage Building Incentive program will run in the local newspapers from September 3 to September 18, 2009. Coronation Block Grant In May 2008, a $5,000 Heritage Building Incentive Program grant was approved for the Coronation Block (b.1911) pending Council approval, for the rot repair and restoration of the north-west corner of the building fronting Glover Road and the demolition and replication of the original Juliet balcony adjoining the residential unit on the upper east side of the building. Although the Community Charter makes provisions for providing financial support to commercial properties with respect to heritage conservation, funding for properties with a commercial component must be approved by Council. COUNCIL Moved by G. Muller, Seconded by A. Johnson, Recommendation that Council approve a $5,000 grant for repair and restoration of the Coronation Block located on Glover Road in Fort Langley. CARRIED Volunteer Insurance Coverage E. Horricks provided a brief overview on the scope of volunteer insurance coverage for the Committee membership. 3. Museum Manager’s Report J. Robertson reported the following: • • • • • • • Visitation statistics were down in the summer months possibly due to the closure of the Albion Ferry on July 31, 2009. The Museum hosted a number of special events throughout the summer months, including Diversity Day and Canada Day. The current exhibition entitled “100-Mile Harvest” opened in August and addresses the agricultural diversity and sustainability in the Fraser Valley. Three grants were acquired this year to subsidise summer staff, two from Young Canada Works and one from Service Canada. The museum has applied for a grant to upgrade the fire suppression equipment to current standards. Two rotating exhibits have been established; one at the entrance to the history gallery and the other in the foyer of the museum. Works by Kwantlen artist Phyllis Atkins are now on display. The Museum Advisory Group met on June 8, 2009; minutes were circulated to the Committee membership for their information. -3-

Page 73 of 103

F.1
September 8, 2009 Heritage Advisory Committee Minutes E. 1. REPORTS (WRITTEN) Land Use & Planning Committee Report File 0540-20 Meeting notes for the Land Use & Planning Committee meeting dated July 17, 2009 were included in the agenda package. T. Annandale gave an update on the Land Use & Planning Committee’s activities, as follows: • A final review of the development permit drawings for three Willoughby heritage structures proposed for revitalization was reviewed in July. He reported that the developer, Quadra Homes, has been very responsive in implementing the Committee’s suggestions and the Committee is very pleased with their plans to revitalize the Willoughby Methodist (later United) Church, the Tom and Dorothy Campbell Residence and the David Jones Residence as part of a proposed townhouse development for 208 Street. The details of this proposal will be contained in a Heritage Revitalization Agreement planned to go forward to Council with the development application. A site review of the David Jones Residence was also completed in July. The Committee received an application in June for the Heritage Building Incentive program for the Murrayville Community Hall (b.1928) for the replacement of three existing exit doors with three five-panel cedar doors, which will restore the original appearance of the Hall’s exterior doors and bring them up to current building code standards. An award of $5750 has been granted to the Murrayville Community Memorial Hall Association, pending final completion and inspection of the work. -4-

• •

2.

Douglas Day Planning Committee Report File 0540-20 The minutes of the Douglas Day Planning Committee meeting were distributed with the agenda for the Heritage Advisory Committee’s information. A. Johnson provided a verbal update on the organization of Douglas Day celebrations. She reported that Mayor Green and F. Pepin attended the meeting on June 17, 2009. She also noted that the focus of the event this year will be on the Langley Heritage Society, who is celebrating their thirtieth anniversary.

Page 74 of 103

F.1
September 8, 2009 Heritage Advisory Committee Minutes F. 1. CORRESPONDENCE Exempting Heritage Property from the HPA File 0540-20 Memo from E. Horricks regarding exemption of heritage property from the HPA. E. Horricks provided a summary of the memo addressed to the Committee. Discussion ensued and it was recommended that the memo be distributed to Council for their information in advance of the 2009 UBCM Convention scheduled for the last week in September, where a motion on this matter is scheduled. -5-

G. 1.

2009 WORK PROGRAM Captain Jackson Commemoration E. Horricks reported that the following tasks have been completed with regards to the Captain Jackson Commemoration: • • • The memorial stone has been restored and design for the mount completed. The mount for the stone and plaque (displayed at the meeting) is currently being constructed by the Langley Heritage Society. The Township arborist has advised that some gravel will be removed from the boulevard to provide adequate soil for the maple tree. A hole for the ceremonial planting will be prepared in advance of the ceremony in order to provide an opportunity for those attending the ceremony to participate in the planting. The selected date for the ceremony is October 15, 2009; final details will be resolved by a Commemoration Task Force. Andrew Jackson has conveyed that a donation of up to $500 has been provided by the Aldergrove Credit Union to assist with the cost of the commemoration event.

• •

J. Megahy and M. Sparrow offered to serve on the Task Force to plan the final details of the commemoration ceremony. 2. Proposed Changes to the Township of Langley Heritage Inventory At the June meeting the Committee membership received a document containing proposed changes to the Township’s Heritage Inventory to review over the summer months. E. Horricks reported that the museum staff has now reviewed the document and has no further revisions. She also reported that she has visited the sites and, at the request of the Committee, will provide a highlighted list of a few sites that require further consideration for addition to the Inventory given their current condition. Details on these sites will be sent to Committee members prior to the next meeting, in order to garner final feedback during October.

Page 75 of 103

F.1
September 8, 2009 Heritage Advisory Committee Minutes G. 3. 2009 WORK PROGRAM Murrayville Conservation Area Strategy A draft of the proposed Murrayville Conservation Area Strategy prepared by Donald Luxton and Associates is currently being reviewed by staff and will be circulated to the Committee membership in advance of October’s meeting for comment. Donald Luxton is scheduled to attend the October 6, 2009 meeting to provide an overview of the proposed strategy. 4. Heritage Week 2010 I. Mugridge conveyed the contents of a memo from J. Watt, dated August 21, 2009 proposing that the Committee explore the potential of holding a round table discussion on heritage in conjunction with Heritage Week 2010. Discussion identified a number of concerns including the short timeline remaining to plan such an event. J. Megahy volunteered to research the idea further and report back to the membership at the October meeting. -6-

H.

COUNCIL RESOLUTIONS AND REFERRALS

H.

TASK FORCE UPDATES 1. Terms of Reference Task Force Report File 0540-20 B. Sommer presented the preliminary draft of the Terms of Reference. She noted that the task force met three times over the summer months to prepare the draft. The Committee reviewed each section of the proposed draft to clarify its content and resolve the final wording. Section 8.5 Staff Support was revised to read as follows: “Appropriate staff, members of Council and a Committee clerk will be assigned to support the work of the Committee. The Heritage Planner, or designate shall attend and support Committee meetings. The Museum Services Manager, or designate shall attend Committee meetings to provide historical information, archival documentation and notice of program services that support the work of the Committee.” Moved by B. Sommer, Seconded by G. Muller, Recommendation that Council endorse the terms of reference of the Heritage Advisory Committee as revised and presented as Attachment A. CARRIED
Clerk’s Note: Terms of Reference (Attachment A) is not included with the minutes. This item will be included at a later date. Refer to Annexure 1.

Page 76 of 103

F.1
September 8, 2009 Heritage Advisory Committee Minutes I. 1. ITEMS FOR INFORMATION Memorial Cottage Grand Opening Celebration – September 2009 E. Horricks indicated that she received notification from Capital Planning at the Fraser Health Authority that an invitation to attend the opening of this facility will be sent out shortly to the Committee members who have played a role in this project in the past. 2. Advisory Committee Members Term E. Horricks requested that all Advisory Committee members whose membership term expires on December 31, 2009 are requested to submit their application for reappointment by the Friday, October 16, 2009 deadline. She noted that if the membership knows of anyone in the community who may be interested in serving on the Heritage Advisory Committee, they should direct their inquiries regarding application to the Deputy Township Clerk. Councillor Fox noted that current members who re-apply will not have to go through the interview process. -7-

J.

OTHER BUSINESS

K. 1.

ROUND TABLE J. Megahy inquired about whether being a member of the Heritage Advisory Committee provides the necessary eligibility to attend the upcoming annual Museum Conference. J. Robertson will explore the delegate criteria and let J. Megahy know who is eligible. 2. Further to the Committee’s previous discussions on Old Yale Road, T. Annandale inquired as to whether it would be possible to have further information on the costs of upgrading Old Yale Road by the next meeting. E. Horricks will follow up with staff to see whether this is possible for the October meeting. 3. F. Pepin announced that the Heritage Society approved funding of $1000 each for three schools, including the Nicomekl Community School, Douglas Park Community School and Langley Meadows Community School, to attend the Langley Heritage Society Museum Program. He also reported that work on the Dixon House is now complete.

Page 77 of 103

F.1
September 8, 2009 Heritage Advisory Committee Minutes L. NEXT MEETING Date: October 6, 2009 Location: Salmon River Committee Room 4th Floor, 20338 – 65 Avenue Time: 7:30 p.m. M. TERMINATE Moved by T. Annandale, Seconded by G. Muller, That the meeting terminate at 9:40 p.m. CARRIED CERTIFIED CORRECT: -8-

________________ Chair, Ian Mugridge

Page 78 of 103

F.1 ANNEXURE - 1

Page 79 of 103

Page 80 of 103

F.2
RECREATION, CULTURE, and PARKS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Wednesday, September 9, 2009 commencing at 7:00 p.m. Salmon River Committee Room th 4 Floor, 20338 – 65 Avenue, Langley, BC

MINUTES Present: Chair, Jamey Paterson Remi Camparmo, Kristen Charlesworth, Suzan Guest, Hattie Hogeterp, James Michael Jack and Dan Sheel Municipal Representative: Councillor Grant Ward School Board Representative: Wendy Johnson Staff: David Leavers, Tab Buckner, Bev Herman, Al Neufeld and Sylvia Carneiro

A. 1.

APPROVAL OF AGENDA Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee - September 9, 2009 Moved by D. Sheel, Seconded by J. Jack, That the Recreation, Culture and Parks Advisory Committee approve the Agenda of September 9, 2009 meeting. CARRIED

B. 1.

ADOPTION OF MINUTES Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee - June 10, 2009 Moved by H. Hogeterp, Seconded by D. Sheel, That the Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee adopt the Minutes of the June 10, 2009 meeting. CARRIED

Page 81 of 103

F.2
September 9, 2009 Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee Minutes B. 2. ADOPTION OF MINUTES Joint Meeting of Township of Langley Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee and City of Langley Parks, Environment, Recreation & Culture Committee - June 24, 2009 Moved by D. Sheel, Seconded by R. Camparamo, That the Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee adopt the Minutes of the Joint Meeting dated June 24, 2009. CARRIED -2-

C.

DELEGATIONS

D.

PRESENTATIONS

E. 1.

REPORTS (VERBAL) Chairman’s Report J. Paterson reported that all the Directors and Chair positions for the 2010 Summer Games have been filled. The first official Board meeting will be held on September 22, 2009. 2. Director, Recreation, Culture, and Parks Report D. Leavers reported that in the coming month the Langley Events Centre will play host to the opening game of the Langley Chiefs Junior ‘A’ Hockey Club and Paul Brandt in concert. He also reported that it has been an extremely successful year for sports tourism in the Township of Langley. Sport Langley is encouraged regarding the following events that have been held or have been awarded to the Township. Langley has hosted the following events in 2009: 1. BC Pee Wee / Bantam Baseball Championships at Aldergrove Athletic Park 2. Canadian Senior Little League Championships at McLeod Athletic Park and City Park 3. Provincial Gymnastics and Tumbling Championships at Langley Events Centre 4. Little League Zone Finals – Walnut Grove Community Park 5. American Bike Association – National BMX Race – Langley BMX Track in Brookswood 6. BC Summer Swim Association – Provincial Championships – Walnut Grove

Page 82 of 103

F.2
September 9, 2009 Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee Minutes E. REPORTS (VERBAL) Community Centre 7. Fraser Valley Diving – Provincial Championships – Walnut Grove Community Centre Langley has been awarded the following events Fall 2009 and 2010: 1. Western Canadian University Rowing Championships – Nov. 2009 – Fort Langley 2. CIS Men’s Soccer National Championships – Nov. 2009 – Trinity Western University 3. Provincial High School Football Championships – Nov. 2009 – McLeod Athletic Park 4. Provincial Boys ‘A’ High School Basketball Championships – March 2010 – Langley Events Centre 5. BC Racquetball Championships – Newlands Golf and Country Club 6. BC Summer Games – July 22-25, 2010 In addition, Langley has been awarded the following events for 2011 and 2012: 1. 2011 CIS Men’s Volleyball Nationals – Trinity Western University at the Langley Events Centre 2. 2012 CIS Women’s Volleyball Nationals - Trinity Western University at the Langley Events Centre In addition, Go Row BC have applied to host: 1. 2010 Commonwealth Rowing Championships in Fort Langley -3-

E.

REPORTS (WRITTEN)

F. 1.

CORRESPONDENCE Langley Olympians Swim Club File 0540 Letter from B. Metcalfe, Director of Swimming/Head Coach, and Langley Olympians Swim Club informing us that the Langley Olympians Swim Club members had done very well at various championships meets.

Page 83 of 103

F.2
September 9, 2009 Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee Minutes F. 2. CORRESPONDENCE Olympic Torch Relay File 0540 An email invitation from Councillor Bateman regarding the Olympic Torch Relay that will come through Langley on February 8, 2010. A workshop will be held on October 6, 2009 from 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Events Centre Banquet Hall regarding planning a community celebration. If any of the members would like to be involved email Councillor Bateman jordan@jordanbateman.com or D. Leavers. -4-

G. 1.

2009 WORK PROGRAM Capital Projects Updates – McLeod Athletic Park / Willoughby Community Park The Willoughby Community Park water park and playground area deficiencies have been repaired and the landscaping work will be completed shortly. The sand, soccer and baseball fields have been assumed by Parks Operations and the pedestrian lighting will be completed this fall. A number of improvement contracts are underway at McLeod Athletic Park. The track resurfacing work was completed over summer and most of the line painting has been completed. The track has re-opened to the public. A new pole vault facility has been constructed. A contract has been entered into for the installation of a six feet high chain link perimeter fence that will surround the stadium. Bleacher seating will be installed this fall at the Grandstand facility and it is expected to be completed in time for the November high school football championships. Both an electronic score board and sound system have been installed. 2. Advertising in Municipal Parks and Facilities B. Herman introduced the 2009 fall work plan initiative to develop an advertising policy for municipal parks and facilities Staff led a philosophical discussion amongst Advisory Committee members to gain insight into the relative comfort levels of our members regarding the potential for the presence of advertising in Township parks and recreation facilities. Staff are looking for recommendations from members of the committee to enable them to put together a policy that will be sent to Council for their consideration. Discussion ensued whether the goal of such advertising is to generate revenue for the Township or to provide voluntary community organizations with an additional method to raise funds to offset participant costs.

Page 84 of 103

F.2
September 9, 2009 Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee Minutes G. 2009 WORK PROGRAM The following were the suggestions put forward by the committee: • Support for Local Community Organizations The Township advertisement policy should provide voluntary organizations opportunities to sell advertising and retain at least a portion of the revenues. Setting Parameters for Advertising In the current economic times it is difficult to get corporate sponsors, however, the Township should set very clear parameters so that the voluntary organizations and advertisers do not dictate terms. Family Oriented Advertisement Members were in agreement that advertising should be family oriented and the Township should have control over it. Review Period The Advertising Policy should be reviewed every two years. Revenues The policy should include different levels of advertising and the surplus amount from advertising in municipal parks and facilities should be retained by the Recreation, Culture, and Parks Division and be used to offset operational costs of maintaining parks and facilities. Naming Rights If a corporation donates money towards capital infrastructure (e.g. scoreboard, etc.) they should be allowed advertising rights up to five years to recognize their contributions by agreement. -5-

• •

Members would like to know if there are stats available from other municipalities regarding advertising. If Committee members have any more suggestions regarding advertising in municipal parks and facilities, they should email it to B. Herman bherman@tol.bc.ca. . B. Herman will put together a draft policy later this year or early next year. 3. Community Storage in Municipal Parks and Facilities D. Leavers reported that when parks are designed there is some consideration for storage for community groups. However, in recent years the demand for storage at the parks has exceeded the infrastructure provided. Committee would like to see a uniform approach In our parks and facilities regarding the provision of storage for community groups. For example, the increased use of cargo containers in parks was cited as less than ideal approach to meeting this need.

Page 85 of 103

F.2
September 9, 2009 Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee Minutes G. 2009 WORK PROGRAM The members suggested the following: Storage containers should be consistent in building type and appearance. The design of the containers should be appealing Liability should be clarified Containers should be leased or purchased from a recommended supplier Containers should be installed on a concrete slab and should be made of metal so that the chances of vandalism is minimised. • The cost, if any, for storage should be spelled out and included in the Fees and Charges bylaw. 4. Langley Centennial Museum D. Leavers reported that on October 1, 2008 the Langley Centennial Museum was transferred under the umbrella of the Recreation, Culture, and Parks Division. The Museum Manager and Curator retired soon after and, therefore, the focus since has been on museum operations. The Museum Advisory Group is currently working on developing their Terms of Reference. The Langley Centennial Museum hosted four major exhibits this year; the Lantern Festival, Soft Pastels with Barbara Boldt, Fort Winery and the 100-Mile Harvest. The museum acquired three grants to subsidise summer staff this year, two from Young Canada Works and one from Service Canada. The museum has applied for a grant to upgrade the fire suppression equipment to current standards. • • • • • -6-

H.

COUNCIL RESOLUTIONS AND REFERRALS The following resolution was adopted at the August 31, 2009 Special Council meeting: 1. Aldergrove Athletic Park That Council receive the report entitled “Aldergrove Athletic Park Concept Plan” and the results of the public input, for information; That Council endorse the Aldergrove Athletic Park Concept Plan to guide future development of the park; and further That Council authorize staff to proceed with site preparation as a first phase of developing the new proposed facilities in the park. AMENDMENT That staff provide a report on cost of moving forward for the 2010 budget process.

Page 86 of 103

F.2
September 9, 2009 Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee Minutes H. COUNCIL RESOLUTIONS AND REFERRALS CARRIED . The question was called on the main motion and it was CARRIED I. 1. COMMUNITY LIAISON/TASK FORCE UPDATES Seniors / Older Adults Councillor Ward and J. Jack would like some direction to enable them to report more effectively. 2. Therapeutic Recreation No report 3. Recreation and Fitness No report 4. Equestrian S. Guest noted that there are at least six different kinds of equestrian organizations in Langley. She had talks with the BC Horse Council and they would like to know what kind of information the Committee is looking at. She noted that the BC Horse Council has a lot of statistics that they can share with the Township. She was informed that currently the members would like to know who they are, how can the community, especially the economically disadvantaged kids, get involved and their upcoming events. She could inform them of the grant opportunities available with the Township. 5. Libraries / Museum Councillor Ward reported that currently the libraries are dealing with the issue of Provincial cuts. 6. Early Childhood / Preschool / Family Programming Child and Youth Committee (CYC) H. Hogeterp reported that Langley has three committees for early childhood and youth. She would like clarity on her role. She informed the members that the Aldergrove Youth Committee are working on a grant since the school budget is very tight and they may not have a drop in program for the youth there. -7-

Page 87 of 103

F.2
September 9, 2009 Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee Minutes H. COUNCIL RESOLUTIONS AND REFERRALS She reported that she will be attending the Langley School District Literacy Program meeting on September 29, 2009. She will also be contacting Joy Wilson regarding representation on their committee. -8-

J.

ITEMS FOR INFORMATION

K. 1.

ITEMS FROM PRIOR MEETINGS Langley Walk At the Joint Meeting with the City of Langley and the Township of Langley it was agreed that a facilitator be hired to help to channel new ideas for promoting the Langley Walk with a goal to encourage mass participation. D. Sheel, K. Charlesworth, S. Guest, H. Hogeterp, J. Paterson, G. Aitken and Councillor Ward agreed to participate in the session. The date will be confirmed.

L. 1.

OTHER BUSINESS Confirmation of November Meeting Date Members were agreeable that the date of the November meeting be moved to Thursday, November 12, 2009 in lieu of Wednesday, November 11, 2009 (Remembrance Day).

M. 1.

ROUND TABLE H. Hogeterp reported that the Aldergrove Planning Committee met in June and will be meeting again in October and she is very pleased with the progress the committee is making towards improving Aldergrove. W. Johnson reported that the provincial foot ball championships will be held in Langley and if it goes well, teams will continue to use the facilities at McLeod Athletic Park. S. Guest reported that as a result of the Joint Meeting with the City of Langley, she and Nathan have organized a Bike Coalition and the first meeting will take place at the Langley Events Centre on September 17, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. The goal of the Bike Coalition is to promote safe biking. J. Marvel reported that the Walnut Grove pool has been closed for 3 weeks for its annual shut downas some of the equipment is being replaced both in the weight room and the pool.

2.

3.

4.

Page 88 of 103

F.2
September 9, 2009 Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee Minutes M. ROUND TABLE A small fitness centre will be opened at the Aldergrove Kinsmen Centre by the end of October by transforming a small meeting room to meet this emerging need. 5. T. Buckner reported that the two tennis courts at Walnut Grove have been closed as a risk management precaution because there has been some lifting and cracking on the court surfaces. The situation is being monitored and paving work may have to be done before the winter. -9-

N. 1.

NEXT MEETINGS Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 Location: Salmon River Committee Room 4th Floor, 20338 – 65 Avenue Time: 7:00 p.m. 2. Joint Meeting of Township of Langley and Ridge Meadows Date: Thursday, October 22, 2009 Location: Willoughby Community Centre (Langley Events Centre) Time: 7:00 p.m.

O.

TERMINATE Moved by D. Sheel That the meeting terminated at 9:15 p.m. CARRIED CERTIFIED CORRECT:

________________________ Chair, Jamey Paterson

Page 89 of 103

Page 90 of 103

F.3
ALDERGROVE PLANNING COMMITTEE
Thursday, September 17, 2009, at 7:01 p.m. Aldergrove Kinsmen Community Centre 26770 – 29 Avenue, Aldergrove, BC

MINUTES PRESENT: M. Robinson, Chair B. Bailey, D. Bloomfield, R. Daems, L. Hollaar, H. Hogeterp, S. Janda, S. Kumhyr, A. McDougall, CJ Phan, A. Robinson and B. Thomasson COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES: Mayor Green and Councillor C. Fox STAFF REPRESENTATIVES: J. Chu, P. Crawford, J. Marvel and S. Palmer OTHERS PRESENT: J. Karakas, HB Lanarc (Consultant) A. 1. ADOPTION OF AGENDA Aldergrove Planning Committee September 17, 2009 Moved by B. Thomasson, Seconded by R. Daems, That the Aldergrove Planning Committee approve the Agenda of the September 17, 2009 meeting. CARRIED B. 1. ADOPTION OF MINUTES Aldergrove Planning Committee June 25, 2009 Moved by A. McDougall, Seconded by D. Bloomfield, That the Aldergrove Planning Committee adopt the minutes of the June 25, 2009 meeting. CARRIED

Page 91 of 103

F.3
September 17, 2009 Aldergrove Planning Committee Minutes C. 1. PRESENTATIONS Preliminary Design Concepts, Aldergrove Core Planning Program Joaquin Karakas of HB Lanarc, provided an update on the Aldergrove Core Planning Program. Copies of the draft Concept Options Summary Report dated September 10, 2009 were distributed on table. He outlined key differences between the two concepts as outlined on page 8 of the report. J. Chu noted that comments were received from committee members since the previous committee meeting and forwarded to J. Karakas for incorporation into the report. Discussion ensued and comments provided as follows: • Section 2, page 7 – a set of guiding objectives for this process were identified, premised on focusing on downtown Aldergrove as the heart of the greater Aldergrove community, creating more walkability, enhancing overall sustainability of not only the downtown area but the community as a whole. The focus is placed on new residential and commercial growth in the core to further a number of Township sustainability initiatives and provide for more efficient land use. Mixed use development was introduced and expansion of residential use featuring low and medium density townhouses, stacked townhouses and apartments. Slight reduction in extent of commercial use (amount of land area dedicated to commercial). Both concepts propose enhancements to streetscapes and pedestrian routes through the downtown area. Enhanced arts, culture and civic uses in the downtown area are proposed. Both concepts emphasize greenspace as a focal point for these activities. Act on ecological restoration of Bertrand Creek into smaller parks and plazas at key locations; emphasize Aldergrove’s roots and history in agricultural farming. Dedicate public space for farmers market, community gardens and other ways to celebrate Aldergrove’s agricultural history. An objective is to slow down and discourage traffic coming through the downtown area along Fraser Highway. If an east-west alignment of 16 Avenue is possible when Abbotsford has resolved land issues, pressure may be relieved on Fraser Highway (one example in diverting interregional traffic). Streets can be more pedestrian-friendly if treated correctly as illustrated in the example of “shared” streets like those found on Granville Island. Explore opportunities to focus new growth; one key aspect is that amenities would be leveraged against new development. Examples of “woonerf” – small neighbourhood serving street with traffic calming measures and special design treatments for road space shared by pedestrians, cyclists and slow moving vehicles were discussed (page 22). An example of this concept is Selkirk Village in Victoria. -2-

• • • • • • • • •

Page 92 of 103

F.3
September 17, 2009 Aldergrove Planning Committee Minutes C. PRESENTATIONS • Scale and treatment of streets is achievable through land use designations and design guidelines. White Rock has some good examples of successful street wall development (mid-rise six to eight storey mixed use buildings off of Johnson and Oxford Streets). -3-

Discussion took place regarding commercial space in the downtown area. It was noted that currently Aldergrove has about 340,000 sq.ft. of commercial space. One of the design objectives is to reduce the size of the commercial footprint to provide focus for more viable businesses and to render a smaller, urban look to the downtown area. Concept A would reduce the total commercial space by approximately 100,000 sq.ft. to 217,000 sq.ft. as opposed to Concept B that proposes commercial space of 275,000 sq.ft. J. Karakas responded that the key issues were addressed by placing emphasis on residential development in the downtown core to attract people to live in the community; both concepts take the approach of reducing commercial space, but not removing it altogether. He added that people are less likely to buy a condominium when they have to get in their vehicles to pick up milk, etc. The comment was made that unless upzoning, improved densities and property values occur in Aldergrove, there will not be an improvement in commercial viability. It is time to plan and look to the future now during the economic downturn and develop in a phased approach to improve values and returns. Exploring other methods to encourage development has been discussed such as creating economic zones. J. Karakas echoed these comments saying that a long-term vision is required so that development happening in the short term does not preclude long term development. The concern was raised of providing enough affordable housing for young families and first time home buyers. J. Karakas noted that both concepts try to address this issue, but particularly Concept A does both in terms of offering a mix of affordable townhouses to apartment towers. He commented that there is no evidence to date that indicates that six-storey wood buildings are feasible and more cost-effective than concrete. He added that the ideal would be to allow and create a land use designation allowing six storey wood buildings to ensure flexibility. He added that supportive or social housing are not under consideration at this time, but that the Committee could make a policy recommendation in the final report. B. Bailey commented that Abbotsford had a unique approach in that every tenth lot had to be an AHOP (Affordable Homeownership Opportunity Program) style building to provide a mixed blend for different economic stratas. J. Karakas responded that there are inclusionary mechanisms available to ensure a percentage of affordable housing. He added that Langford is opting for every tenth unit being developed to be at an affordability rate based on a complex formula. The suggestion was made to include the desire for a mixed approach to housing ( i.e. provide for affordable housing) as a policy recommendation based on the preferred concept.

Page 93 of 103

F.3
September 17, 2009 Aldergrove Planning Committee Minutes C. PRESENTATIONS A. Robinson referenced a documentary illustrating His Royal Majesty Prince Charles’s marketing concept promoting development of mixed-use housing. Examples of the “Quartiers” concept may be found in the Bosa development of Newport Village in Port Moody which features mixed-use townhouses, four storey apartment buildings, and internal retail streets oriented away from main roads. S. Janda commented that his preference was Concept A – the “Quartiers”, as the Aldergrove Mall in the north-eastern section of the core area would see more exposure and traffic. COUNCIL Moved by B. Bailey, Seconded by A. McDougall, That the Aldergrove Planning Committee recommends that Council: 1. Receive the draft Aldergrove Planning Program - Concept Options Summary Report for information; and 2. That Council authorize staff to schedule a public open house to obtain community input in October. CARRIED Action Item: J. Chu to email APC members and J. Karakas regarding the date of the Special Meeting of Council once confirmed. It was noted that the date of the Public Open House is tentatively set for October 29, 2009. 2. Aldergrove Athletic Park Concept Plan J. Marvel, Manager of Recreation Facilities and Services, was in attendance and provided a brief history of the Aldergrove Athletic Park which was built in 1985. He continued to describe the new Aldergrove Athletic Park Concept Plan which was endorsed by Council on June 22, 2009 and identifies new facilities such as a mountain bike park, batting cage, picnic shelter, relocation of children’s play areas, and additional parking. He continued that funding has been applied for through the Federal government. He also noted that clearing of wooded area will commence shortly and that Douglas Fir Trees may be retained. Funding for clearing the wooded area has been provided by the Rotary Club and the Township. Mr. Marvel commented that a new fitness area will be developed in the Kinsmen Aldergrove Community Centre. Councillor Fox noted that this project is unique in that it is community-driven and added that the Rotary and Elks clubs are heavily involved in terms of providing financial support as well as in-kind donations of time, effort and machinery. -4-

Page 94 of 103

F.3
September 17, 2009 Aldergrove Planning Committee Minutes C. PRESENTATIONS MOTION Moved by H. Hogeterp, Seconded by L. Hollaar, That the Aldergrove Planning Committee receive the presentation relative to the Aldergrove Athletic Park Concept Plan. CARRIED D. 1. OTHER BUSINESS Establishment of a Boys and Girls Club in Aldergrove File 0230-01 At the July 6, 2009 Special Council meeting, Council resolved: “That the letters received from Gord Stewart, Principal and Jessica Bullock, Career & Personal Counsellor, Aldergrove Community Secondary School, Cheryle Beaumont, Superintendent, Langley School District 35 and response letter from Mayor Rick Green in support of establishing a Boys and Girls Club in Aldergove, BC be referred to the Aldergrove Planning Committee for review.” COUNCIL Moved by L. Hollaar Seconded by A. McDougall, That the Aldergrove Planning Committee receive the information; and Recommend that Council authorize staff to send a letter to the Boys and Girls Club recommending them to initiate a discussion with Aldergrove Neighbourhood Services regarding service programming in the area. CARRIED 2. Appointment of Sitting Member – Aldergrove Planning Committee At the July 6, 2009 Special Meeting, Council resolved: “That Council approve inviting a member of the Board of School Trustees for School District No. 35 to be a sitting, voting member on the Aldergrove Planning Committee and that the Terms of Reference be amended accordingly.” The Chair noted that Trustee Wendy Johnson has been appointed to the APC. -5-

Page 95 of 103

F.3
September 17, 2009 Aldergrove Planning Committee Minutes D. 3. OTHER BUSINESS Aldergrove Planning Committee – Terms of Reference, as amended The Aldergrove Planning Committee is requested to adopt the following amendment to its Terms of Reference to include the following resolution adopted by Council: (a) July 6, 2009 Special Meeting of Council: “That Council approve inviting a member of the Board of School Trustees for School District No. 35 to be a sitting, voting member on the Aldergrove Planning Committee and that the Terms of Reference be amended accordingly”. MOTION Moved by B. Thomasson, Seconded by S. Janda, That the Aldergrove Planning Committee adopt the Terms of Reference, as amended. CARRIED 4. Urban Design Bus Tour B. Bailey discussed the possibility of scheduling an urban design bus tour for Committee members to view examples of similar developments As proposed in the concept plans. MOTION Moved by B. Bailey, Seconded by B. Thomasson, That staff be requested to investigate the feasibility of organizing a study tour of selected sites in Metro Vancouver for the members of the Aldergrove Committee to view examples of best practices in downtown redevelopment and urban design CARRIED Action Item: J. Chu to email Committee members with information on proposed bus tour as well as confirmation of date of next Public Open House (October 29, 2009). E. NEXT MEETING Date: Thursday, October 22, 2009 Location: Aldergrove Kinsmen Community Centre 26770 – 29 Avenue, Aldergrove, BC Time: 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. -6-

Page 96 of 103

F.3
September 17, 2009 Aldergrove Planning Committee Minutes F. TERMINATE Moved by B. Thomasson, Seconded by A. McDougall, That the meeting terminate at 8.59 p.m. CARRIED CERTIFIED CORRECT: -7-

Chair, M. Robinson Aldergrove Planning Committee

Page 97 of 103

Page 98 of 103

F.4
COMMUNITY SAFETY ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Thursday, September 24, 2009 commencing at 7:00 p.m. Salmon River Committee Room th 4 Floor, 20338 – 65 Avenue, Langley, BC

MINUTES

Present: G. Zacher, Chair S. Anderson, M. Camparmo, B. Gaudette, A. Holley, D. Preddy, R. Proulx and T. Williams Municipal Representative: Councillor Kositsky Staff: R. Konarski, D. Wade and S. Carneiro

APPROVAL OF AGENDA 1. Community Safety Advisory Committee – September 24, 2009 Moved by R. Proulx, Seconded by B. Gaudette, That the Community Safety Advisory Committee approve the Agenda of the September 24, 2009 meeting. CARRIED

A. 1.

ADOPTION OF MINUTES Community Safety Commission – May 20, 2009 Moved by T. Williams, Seconded by R. Proulx, That the Community Safety Commission adopt the minutes of the May 20, 2009 meeting. CARRIED

B.

DELEGATIONS

Page 99 of 103

F.4
September 24, 2009 Community Safety Commission Minutes C. 1. PRESENTATIONS Community Policing Lorraine Grennan provided a presentation regarding the Langley Community Policing Services. She reported that the RCMP strategic priorities are: • • • • • Drugs Road Safety Property Crime Youth Communication -2-

Langley RCMP has the support of volunteers and program coordinators who provide remarkable support to the reduction and prevention of crime in our community. This support forms a huge part quality policing service. Some of the programs of the Community Policing Services are the auxiliary constable program, the block watch, realty watch, speed watch, crime free multi housing, citizen’s crime watch, business watch and crime prevention and the foot and bike patrols.

D.

REPORTS (VERBAL)

D. 1.

REPORTS (WRITTEN) Golden Ears Crossing Response Protocols – Report File 0540-20 The document contains a protocol agreement for emergency responses to the Golden Ears Crossing between the Fire Departments of the Township of Langley, Maple Ridge, Pitt Meadows and Surrey.

E.

CORRESPONDENCE

F. 1.

ITEMS FROM PRIOR MEETINGS Hiring a Crime Reduction Strategy Manager There was a discussion regarding the Township hiring a Crime Reduction Strategy Manager to support its commitment to safer communities. The committee suggested inviting Lance Talbott, Crime Reduction Strategy Manager, City of Surrey, to give a talk to the members regarding his role.

Page 100 of 103

F.4
September 24, 2009 Community Safety Commission Minutes -3-

G. 1.

2009 WORK PROGRAM 2009 Work Plan – Draft The 2009 Draft Work Plan with the ranking was circulated to the members of the Advisory Committee. COUNCIL Moved by A. Holley, Seconded by R. Proulx, Recommendation that Council endorse the top five 2009 Work Plan initiatives of the Community Safety Advisory Committee (Annexure 1). CARRIED The next three meetings will be devoted to “Traffic Safety” that is the No. 1 priority of the 2009 Work Plan. Leanne Cassap, ICBC, will be invited to speak on traffic safety issues, the top ten accident locations and the 200 Street corridor, on October 21, 2009.

H.

COUNCIL RESOLUTIONS AND REFERRALS

I.

TASK FORCE UPDATE

J. 1. 2.

ITEMS FOR INFORMATION Langley RCMP Detachment Weekly Report – September 7 - 13, 2009 Langley RCMP Detachment Weekly Report – August 24 – 30, 2009

K.

OTHER BUSINESS

L. 1.

ROUND TABLE T. Williams suggested that with increase in mail box thefts, Credit Cards should be collected from the financial institutions and not sent by mail.

Page 101 of 103

F.4
September 24, 2009 Community Safety Commission Minutes -4-

M.

NEXT MEETING Date: Wednesday, October 21, 2009, Location: Salmon River Committees & Commissions Room 4th Floor, 20338 – 65 Avenue Time: 7:00 p.m.

N.

TERMINATE Moved by R. Proulx, Seconded by B. Gaudette, That the meeting terminate at 8:50 p.m. CARRIED

CERTIFIED CORRECT:

__________________ Chair, Gordon Zacher

Page 102 of 103

F.4
ANNEXURE - 1 TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION - 2009 WORK PLAN

Topic 200 Street Corridor (identify the major issues and look at some viable solutions to combat the identified issues in both the short and long term) Golden Ears Bridge Issues – Crime & Traffic Gateway Project (explore the possible impact of the project on the Township of Langley) Traffic Safety Bicycle Safety Gangs & Guns Drug Grow Operations and Drug Labs (identify community safety concerns regarding the presence of these establishments in the Township of Langley and explore possible measures to minimize their frequency and impact) A school program to instill a sense of safety in our youth (rather than trying to change the ways of the youth later on in life, an early start to this approach will make safety an easier concept to instill. Have a youth component in the safety committee other than just a youth representative). Availability of Services for Youth in the Township (look at initiating programs that are designed to identify troubled youth early and prevent them from becoming at risk. Explore improving the availability of services for those youth who are at risk in the Township of Langley [possible development of youth drop in centers in the Township of Langley]) Fire Department Ambulance Service Response (look into concerns surrounding ambulance response times and availability of ALS ambulances in the Township. Explore pressuring BCAS to require that the TOLFD is sent to a wider range of medical aid calls to ensure that TOL residents that require medical attention will receive it in a timely fashion. Explore pressuring the BCAS to allow TOLFD firefighters to be trained to a higher level of medical certification to help buffer the gaps between the response capabilities BCAA and TOLFD) Emergency Preparedness Fire Sprinkler Bylaw (look at upgrading the Bylaw to include fire sprinkler requirements for all newly constructed or renovated single family and double family occupancies in the Township as a possible measure to combat the response time challenges of the TOLFD when responding to the remote and rural properties) Community Policing Umbrella (Inspector Richard Konarski)

Rank

1

2

3

4

5
Community Policing

Page 103 of 103