3 3333 O

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REFERENCE

K,<H<ens

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uiiiniiiiiiniiif
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KITTENS AND CATS
JFtrst

Beater

EULALIE OSGOOD GROVER
AUTHOR OF "THE SUNBONNET BABIES' PRIMER," "THE OVERALL BOYS," ETC.

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HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY
BOSTON NEW YORK CHICAGO DALLAS SAN FRANCISCO
QTbe ftibeuffte Press Cambridge

COPYRIGHT,

1911

BT EULALIE OSGOOD GROVER
PICTURES COPYRIGHTED BY THE ROTOGRAPH CO.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO REPRODUCE THIS BOOK OR PARTS THEREOF IN ANT FORM

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CAMBRIDGE MASSACHUSETTS PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.
.

TO FRITZ
WHO
LOVES KITTENS

AND

CATS AS MUCH AS

.

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CONTENTS
THE QUEEN
2

GRANNY GRAY
GETTING EEADY
I
-

4
6
7
.
.

WONDER
. .
.

READY FOR THE PARTY

8

A

FULL CART

9

TIME TO START
Is

10
. . .
.

MY HAT ON STRAIGHT

12

HIDING

14 15

AN

INVITATION

No PARTY FOR ME

.16
18

FM OFF
BEING WEIGHED

20
22

THE PARTY

vi

CONTENTS

THE COMMANDING OFFICER
THE LATEST NEWS

.....
....
. .

.

.

.

.23
24 25

WHAT

is

IT?

I'LL SING

YOU A SONG

.

.

26
28

A
A

TALE OF A MOUSE

WE

ARE THE CATS

NURSE'S TALE

..... ......
.
.

29 30
32

A FAMOUS MOUSER
A LONG TIME AGO
DUNCE'S TALE

.34
36
.

TALE OF THREE KITTENS

.38
41

THE KITTENS THREE

A A

EAINY-DAY TALE

TALE OF LONDON TOWN
I

....

42

44
46

A TALE

KNOW

CONTENTS
A
A A
TALE OF
ST. IVES
.

yii

48
.
.

LITTLE FAIRY'S TALE

.

.50
52

SECRET

WHO WAS HE

........

54
55
56

A
A

STRANGER
SAD TALE

MY OWN TALE
THREE TALES

58 60
61

A A

SIGHT TO SEE

TRAID-CAT'S TALE

62

FROM THE NORTH POLE
THE TWINS

64
66
67

Do WE LOOK ALIKE

WHAT

SHALL

WE

SING

68
69

WAITING

viii

CONTENTS

DING, DONG, BELL

THE DINING-ROOM
I

......
. .

70
72

AM

so

HUNGRY

.

...
,

74
,

THE QUEEN'S TEA-TABLE
SEVEN LITTLE PUSSY-CATS
.

.

v
-

<
;

75

.

.

.

76 78

MANY THANKS
GOOD NIGHT
. .

.

.

.

.

79

THE LAST TALE

80

KITTENS AND CATS

KITTENS AND CATS

THE QUEEN
I

I

am am

the Queen of
the Queen
all
!

all

the Kittens.
!

the Queen

Come,

you kittens and Hear what I have to say.
To-morrow
I give a

cats.

grand party.

The party will be in my palace. You are all invited from the biggest
the
est,

to

littlest,

from the oldest to the young-

from the blackest to the whitest.
fur.

So wash your paws and shine your

Forget your naughty tricks and do not one of you dare be late to your Queen's
party.

To-morrow at one

o'clock.

UHMIIIIIIIUI
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IT IS
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MY PARTY
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KITTENS AND CATS

GRANNY GKAY
I
I

am Granny Gray. am very, very old, but
am grandmother
any
of

I

am

going to

the Queen's party.
I

to a great

many
their

kittens.

When
When

them

are

naughty

mothers always send for me.

any

of

them

are sick I always
.

know what to do. I teach them how
I teach
I teach I

to sing. to scratch.
to catch mice.

them how

them how

am

very, very old.
call

They

me Granny

Gray.

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^MnMiiiNimrn

riu

imnn mmnnnrni n rm n iinTTrnrm niJJicr I AM GRANNY GRAY
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6

KITTENS AND CATS
^-^=-^1^.

GETTING KEADY
Hark, hark what
!

is

that noise ?

No, I cannot play with you now.
I I

must take

my

bath.

I

must get ready for the party. have a new jacket and a new hat to

wear.

My pants were new last week, but they
are not
I tore

new now.
two holes in them when I climbed

the apple tree in the back yard.

Mother patched them, but someway the
patches show more than the holes did.

Perhaps
patches. I

my new jacket will

cover the
dressed.

hope I shall look well

i

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I

AM TAKING MY BATH

iffiilliilllltllllllllllllllllltlltllMllllltlllllllllllllllllflfllllfllllllBlllirillllillfllllllf

I

WONDER

I

wonder

if

those horrid patches
trousers white
as

Upon my
Would show
As black

much

if

they were not

as black as night ?

8

KITTENS AND CATS

EEADY FOR THE PARTY
Mew mew mew mew
!

!

!

!

Come, mother, come quickly We are all ready and waiting to
!

start.

Yes,

we

are all here.
us.

There are one, two, three, four of

The
think

carriage
all

is

pretty small, but
in.

we

we can

get

We

will be

good this time and not
out.

push each other

But please do come
It is

quickly, mother.

hard to
!
!

sit

so
!

still.
!

Mew mew mew mew

WE ARE ALL HERE
HUll
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in rf

A FULL CAUT

We
The

are three little cats in a cart

And one underneath on
cart
is

the

floor,

so full

we

hardly see

how

There '11 be any room for more.

10

KITTENS AND CATS

TIME TO START
Dear me!
hurry
!

my

kittens are in such a

They give me no time to dress.
very long time to shine

It takes a

my

fur

and

to fix

my
I

bonnet.
first

It is a I

new bonnet. This is the
it.

time

have worn
I

hope

it

looks all right,

must practice

sitting

up straight and
I

proper just for a minute.

want the

Queen
I

to

know

that I

am

a fine lady.

hope

my
If

kittens will not rough

up

their fur.

they do I shall have to

shine

it all

over again.

Now we
Where
is

must

start.
?

their father

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nnmf mi in n in MUIIIIIII 11111 MI n I HAVE A NEW BONNET
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iiiiiimiiiimmimiiMiiiiimimmiimiiiimiimr

12

KITTENS AND CATS
IS

MY HAT ON STRAIGHT
I

Here

am. Yes, I

am

the father of

those four fine kittens.

They

are such beautiful kittens their
tie

mother does not eyen
their necks.
I

ribbons around

am

glad of that, for I do not like

ribbons.
I

must go now and take them
I

all to

the Queen's palace.

am

sure they will

be the handsomest kittens there.
I suppose I shall
carriage.

have to push their
us be

Come, mother,
whiskers
stiff ? Is

let

off.

Are

my
?

my

hat on straight

ill"""""

i

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n. n n WAITING FOR THE CHILDREN

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miiiiinmiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimuilllliniiMllllI

KITTENS AND CATS

HIDING
Don't
I

am

anybody where I am. hiding away from mother.
tell

She wants

me

to

go to the Queens

party and I don't want to go.
I don't like the

Queen, she

is

so

grand

and

dignified.

She frightens me. I would rather hide in this pitcher day than go to the Queen's palace.
Please don't
tell

all

where
you ?

I

am.

You

will not, will

DON T TELL ANYBODY
nil

iiiinimiiini niiini

AN INVITATION
I've had an invitation

To go
But
I

to see the Queen,

'm a bashful kitten
I 'd rather not

And

be seen.

16

KITTENS AND CATS

NO PAETY FOE ME
How strange it is that some of us want
to

go to the party, and some do wo want to go. Some of us can go, and some cannot go.
I

am
who

one

who wants

to go,

and

I

am

one
I
I

cannot go.
It aches.

have a sick head.

Perhaps

caught too

many mice

last night.

The

doctor has been here.

He told me
!

to take this medicine every half-hour.

go to the party They surely will have something good to eat there, but I must stay at home and
I

How

wish

I could

take

my

medicine.

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18

KITTENS AND CATS
I'M
I

OFF
country

'm
?

off for

the Queen's palace.

I na the only cat in our

who

has an automobile.

But

I

suppose

all

the fine cats will be

having them soon.
It is really great

fun to ride faster

than any cat or kitten can run.
I

would invite you
is

to ride too. but
*

there
So,

room

for only one.
!

good-bye
off for

I

'm

the Queen's party.

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iiimiiiiimmiimmiminm IN MY AUTOMOBILE
iiiiiiiiiinnnniiminiiiiiiiMimmiinnTcm

20

KITTENS AND CATS

BEING WEIGHED
Yes, I

am

being weighed.

It frightens
this.

me to hang

in the air like

What
tied
I

if

I should fall,

with

my
!

feet

up in

this

bag

!

am

sure I should be killed
I

Can you see how much Nearly two pounds ?

weigh?

You

don't
I

mean

it!

Then
party
that I

am

big enough to go to the

all alone,

though

I

am

not sure

want

to go.

I think I

had rather stay at home and

play.

limimiiUJim

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HOW MUCH DO I WEIGH ?
iiiimiiiiMiiimimiiiiNiiiiiiiimim

Minium

22

KITTENS AND CATS

THE PAKTY
Attention, kittens and cats
strikes one.
I
!

The clock

The Queen's party has begun.

am

palace.

Commanding Officer of the Attention to what I have to say
the

!

Our Queen bids you welcome. She waits for you in her throne room.

As you each
tale, or

pass in you

must
tale,

salute

her and recite for her a cat

a rat

some other tale, long or

short, true

or not.

But no

fears or tears, for our

Queen

has a fine dinner in her grand dining-room
for all

brave kittens and

cats.

Now who

has the best tale ?

rm

niiiiiiiiiiit
,

mi II

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mm mum
nmiiiiiiiiLMiiinriH

I

VE A FEATHER IN MY CAP

THE COMMANDING OFFICER
I

'm an
1
5

officer of

the Queen

;

m proud as proud
I 've a feather in
see.

can be,

For

my

cap,

As any one can

24

KITTENS AND CATS

THE LATEST NEWS

We
Queen

are here to bring great news,
!

O

We

are here to bring great
!

news

!

Do you know Do you know Do you know

!

a balloon
!

Has gone up to the moon The moon has been found
'

By a great, big balloon. Up in a balloon, boys,
Just think of that
!

Sailing round the moon, boys.'

Hurrah

for the balloon

!

Hurrah

for the big

moon

!

BREAKING THE NEWS

WHAT
Good neighbor,

IS IT
of the day,

What's the news
I

pray ?

They say

a balloon
to the

Has gone up

moon.

26

KITTENS AND CATS
I'LL SING
I

YOU A SONG
among
kittens

am

a famous singer

and

cats. I

sing in the kitten choir and

in big concerts.
I

wear a French bonnet when
voice
is

I sing.

My
I

very soft and very sweet.

have come here to-day to sing for

my

Queen.
Purr-r, purr-r, purr-r
!

I

'11

sing you a song.
long,

Though not very
Yet
I

think

it is

as pretty as any.
in your purse.

Put your hand

You'll never be worse,

And

give the sweet singer a penny.

mi

nMnniHiMMMiniMniniinimi
THE SWEET SINGER mimiiiiMimiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiinimuimmTmm

28

KITTENS AND CATS

A TALE OF A MOUSE
Listen, O Queen, to this tale of a
'

mouse

!

Hickory, dickory, dock,

.

The mouse ran up the clock; The clock struck one,

And down he And we gobbled him
So, dear

run,
5

Hickory, dickory, dock.
up.

Queen, no mouse shall trouble

your party while
here.

we two brave

cats are

u
Hf

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iinriiiiTTiirniT. ...........

TWO BRAVE CATS

"S

UllllllllTTTrniimiimmMnillllllllllllllllllllllHllllimplllIlT

WE ARE THE
Oh! we are the
mouse.

CATS

cats that caught the

That ran up the clock so

fast.

The

clock struck one, and

down he
last.

run,

And we

gobbled him up at

30

KITTENS AND CATS

A NURSE'S TALE
who takes care of kittens and cats when they are sick. Sometimes they eat too much and have
I

'm the nurse

the stomach-ache.

Sometimes they

fall

down

stairs

and

bump

their heads.
tails bitten

Sometimes they get their by bad dogs.

Then
I

their mothers send for

me and

I

take care of

them

until they are well.

always wear a white dress and a

white bonnet.
If

you ever get sick just send
I will take care of you.

for

me

and

IIIMHIMIll

II

I

M

Illllf Illllllllllll

MUM 111

A LITTLE NURSE
.

32

KITTENS AND CATS

A FAMOUS MOUSER
I

am

a famous mouser. I have caught
cat.

more mice than any other I can see them afar off
.

I I

can hear them afar

off.
off.

can scent them afar

They They

are all afraid of me.

scurry

away whenever they
on the bottom of

see

me
I

coming.

wear

soft pads

my

feet so they cannot hear me.

I

keep

my

teeth white and sharp.

My
But

friends call
I
>

me

*

the Mouse Trap.'
is

know a Kitty who
tell

not a good
her.

mouser. I will

you about

iimiiiiiiinminMimuiimmm 'THE MOUSE TRAP'

34

KITTENS AKD CATS
This
is

my

story:

A LONG TIME AGO
Once there was a
little

Kitty,

White

as the

snow;
frolic,

In the barn she used to

Long time
In the barn a

ago.

little

Mousie.

Ran

to

and

fro;

For she heard the Kitty coming, Long time ago.

Nine pearl teeth had
All in a row;

little

Kitty,

A BOOK OF TALES
And they
bit the little Mousie,

35

Long time

ago.

When

the teeth bit
cried,

little

Mousie,

Mousie

Oh!

But she got away from Kitty,

Long time

ago.

No mouse
paws
I

ever slipped through

my

like that, I

am

glad to say.

am

a great mouser.

Yes, I

am

a famous mouser,

O

Queen!

36

KITTENS AND CATS

A DUNCE'S TALE
The other day
in school I couldn't do

my

sums.

I could n't tell

how many two and two

make.
I could n't

read

I couldn't
I could n't

my lesson. say my A B C's. sing my song.
me
stand on a
this cap
it

So the teacher made
stool.

Then she put
to

on

my head.

I

have had

wear

ever since.

After this I

am

going to study hard.

I don't like to

be called a dunce.

I don't like to sit

on a

stool.

Would you?

muimim

MimilllimmilHimMHinimmillillim YES, I AM A DUNCE
niiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimnimTi

iiiiimiiu

38

KITTENS AND OATS

A TALE OF THREE KITTENS We will tell you a tale of ourselves, dear Queen. A tale of three little kittens.
'

Three

little

Kittens lost their mittens,
to cry,

And they began
"

O

mother

dear,

We very

much

fear

That we have
"

lost

our mittens."

'

Lost your mittens

!

You naughty Kittens Then you shall have no
"

!

pie."

"Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow!"
No, you shall have no
pie."

"Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow!"

UM minium

Illlllllll

II

HI

1

I

III!

11

THE KITTENS THAT LOST THEIR MITTENS

iimiiimmiTTrtf

^

40

KITTENS AND OATS
little

;

The three
mittens,

Kittens found their

And they began
"

to cry,

O

mother

dear,

See here, see here,
See!
4

we have found

our mittens/'

"

Put on your mittens,

You silly Kittens, And you may have some
"

pie."

Purr-r, purr-r, purr-r,
!

Oh, let us have the pie

Purr-r, purr-r, purr-r."'

II

Mil

1

I

I

Mllllimilll.llllllllHIII Illllll

111

I

Illllllllllll

IMIHUI IIIIMIII llllUIHM/mi IHIMIIIIimi

MEE-OW, MEE-OW

HIM

I

It II II III

Hfl

II II

I

I

THE KITTENS THREE
Did you ever see the kittens three

That

lost their

mittens so red ?
in

They hopped
about,

chairs

and looked

And mee-ow and
' '

<

mee-ow,' they said.

42

KITTENS AKD CATS

A RAINY-DAY TALE
One day
it

rained and

we

could not

go out of doors. So my brothers and

sisters
attic.

and I played

Hide and Seek in the

All of a sudden one of
said,
'

my
's

brothers
'
!

I

'11

tell

you what
all

let

do

'What's that?' we
6

asked together.

Let

's

dress up! It's lots of fun.'

So

we

ran to the closet where father

and mother keep their Sunday clothes. I put on father's trousers, and now

I

wear them every day. My brothers and sisters laugh at me. But I think I look fine, don't you
!

"Jin " '"

nimnnn

11

n Mini nimiimii
I1HHI
III

MUM in
I

HIS FATHER S TROUSERS
Illl Ill
I

111 III

I

III III

44

KITTENS AND CATS

A TALE OF LONDON TOWN
If

you should say
<

:

Pussy-cat, pussy-cat,

Where have you been ?
I should
'

'

say

:

1

9

ve been to London
at the Queen.'
:

To look
If

you should say
'

Pussy-cat, pussy-cat,

What
Then
'

did

you there
:

?

'

I

should say

I frightened a little

mouse

From under her

chair.'

And

she gave

me

these fine clothes.

in"""""

iimiiiiiiiiiiniimmnHTm

THE HERO
iiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiniiimmiiiicmmi

46

KITTENS AND CATS

A TALE

I

KNOW

Hey! diddle, diddle, The cat and the fiddle.

The cow jumped over the moon; The little dog laughed
*

To

see such sport,
after the spoon.
fiddle.

While the dish ran
I
[
[

know, for I was the cat with the

saw the cow jump over the moon.
heard the

[

dog laugh. saw the dish run away with the spoon.

little

Poor spoon!
I

saw the whole

of the fun.

Hey! diddle, diddle, The cat and the fiddle!

iiiuiiiiiiimjiiiiimniiiiiiimui

HEY! DIDDLE, DIDDLE

48

KITTENS AND CATS

A TALE OF
Listen,
tale.
'

ST.

IVES
wonderful

O

Queen! to

my

As

I

was going

to St. Ives,

I

met a man with seven wives
sacks,
cats,

Every wife had seven Every sack had seven

Every cat had seven kits: Kits, cats, sacks, and wives, How many were there going to
Ives ?
I
'

St.

have thought and counted, and counted and thought, but I cannot tell

how many were going

to St. Ives.

Can you help me, wise Queen?

I

II

1

1

1

1

ON THE WAY TO
n mini iniiiinii
i

ST.
i
i

IVES
n n
i
i

ii

i

ii

i

i

i

i

i

in

i

M

in

i

i

i

i

i

i

i

50

KITTENS AND CATS

A LITTLE
I

FAIRY'S

TALE
am
only a

am

called Little Fairy.

Would you know
kitten, dear

that I

Queen? Even the mice do not know

it,

for
fine

they play with
frolics together.

me and we have
mouse
told

One day a
where to
If

little

me

just

find his house.
I

he had known that

was a

real,

live kitten, I

am

sure he never

would

have told me.

Would you
little

like to
?

know where
friend

the

mouse

lives

A

was with
!

me and

she will

tell

you. Listen

INN
ii

in miiiiiiini

i

mi
i

1

1

THEY CALL ME LITTLE FAIRY
I

Mil

ii

linn

ii

i

ii

i

ii

i

linn

i

ii

i

in

i

i

ii

1111

in

mi in

i

52

KITTENS AND CATS

A SECKET
Yes, listen to
I
6

my

wonderful secret!

asked the mouse,
'

Where is your house ? The mouse then said to me,
Tell not the cat
I
'11

'

And

tell thee.

Up

stairs

and down

stairs,

Then

straight ahead;
right, to the left,

To the

Then bend down your head;
For there
is

my

house

With the

door so small,

That even a mouse
Can't go in
if

he

's tall.'

mi

iiiiiiui

i
k.

'

?

miiiiiiiumiiiiinuiHiiininmmiHiiliniD I KNOW A SECRET

54

KITTENS AND CATS

WHO WAS HE
I

have a strange

tale,

O

Queen.

The other day I found a round glass. An old man was looking into the glass,
so I looked in,
I

and guess what

I saw.

saw a cat looking straight at me. His face was white just like mine.
His eyes had black spots in them just
like mine,

and his whiskers were long

just like mine.

When When
paw.

I said I

Mew he said Mew moved my paw, he moved his
'

'

'

'

!

!

When
I

I

ran away, he ran

away

too, so

never have found out

who he

was.

BEHIND THE LOOKING-GLASS
.11

HI I. Ill

1.1 II

HI

.

111! .[.......

A STRANGER
I 've

met the

cat that lives behind
glass,

The looking

you

see.

He's very handsome, and he looks

For

all

the world like me.

56

KITTENS AND CATS

A SAD TALE
Ding, dong, bell
!

My

pretty pussy

is

drowned, is drowned
!

!

Ding, dong, bell

Pussy

's

in the well.

Who
Little

put her in ?

Tommy

Lin.

Who pulled
What
a naughty boy

her out ?

Great Johnny Stout.

was

that.

To drown the

poor, poor pussy-cat,

Who never
But

did

him any harm,
mice in his
!
i

killed the

father's barn.

Ding, dong, bell
I

am

sad, so sad, dear

Queen!

10.IIIM1M

II II

I

MMMII MM M M M
1

1

MY PUSSY
ii
i

S IN
i i

MM MM IMMI Ml THE WELL
11111
ii
i

II

MM

I

M

in in in
i

mini

i

ii

i

ii ii

M in

ii ii

mi in

i

iiini

58

KITTENS AND CATS

MY OWN TALE
Pussy-cat

Mew

jumped over a

coal,

And

in her best petticoat burnt a great
hole.

Poor Pussy's weeping, she'll have no

more milk
Until her best petticoat
silk.
's

mended with

Mew! mew! mew! I am Pussy-cat Mew.

1
.

'

'

'

I

1

1

I

I

I

1

I

I

I

1

V

IJ

I

1

1

I

I

I

1

(

I

II

I

I

1111 1111

HIM

I

III

1

11

PUSSY-CAT

MEW

iimiiiiiiiiimmmiiiiiiiiiilMMmmilllimiMlimi

60

KITTENS AND CATS

THREE TALES
I

am

the cat, that caught the

rat.

That ate the malt, That lay in the house that Jack
I

built.

am

the dog, that worried the

cat,

That caught the rat, That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack
I
built.

am

the kitten

all forlorn,

That scratched the dog, That worried the cat,
That caught the rat, That ate the malt,

That lay in the house that Jack

built.

11 1111 1!

I

Mil

.1 I.I

..III I.. I..... ..........

I

..............

1.

.

PRIZE-WINNERS
[Jimuii

mi nun

mifttiiiim

A SIGHT TO SEE
The
cat and the dog arid the kitten
as brave as brave could be,
to visit the Queen^
!

Were

But when they came

Why, they were

a sight to see

62

KITTENS AND CATS

A
Once
I

'FRAID-CAT'S
was a
'fraid-cat,

TALE
dear Queen.

All the kittens and cats laughed at

me and

sang this song about me.

C was

a cat

who

ran after a
fail

rat,

But her courage did

When

he seized on her

tail.

Now what

do you think that cat did do?
cried,

She jumped in a chair and

Mew! mew!
I was the
But
cat

who

ran after the

rat.

my courage did fail When he seized on my tail.
Mew! mew!

MY COURAGE

DID FAIL

64:

KITTENS AND CATS

FROM THE NORTH POLE
I

came from the land

of

the snow,

from the land of the Eskimo, where the

summer
night.

is all

day and the winter
there.

is all

We
It
's

dress in fur coats
cold, so cold

up

one can hardly wink.

But

I

am
is

proud of
there.

my
it.

land, for the

North Pole

The dogs have seen
so.

They

tell

us

And what
know.

the dogs say

is true,

you

Ill

1IIIMIM

H IN

III

I

III)

I

lllllll

11

I

TTn

A LITTLE ESKIMO
'I

"1""1

HI llllllll

II

II

I

II

lllllll

I

I

1

I

II

I

I

66

KITTENS AND CATS

THE TWINS

We
alike.

are twin kittens.
us,

There are two of

and we look

just

Our brothers and
apart.

sisters

cannot

tell

us

Even our mother cannot

tell

us apart.

When
other says

one of us says

"Mew!"

the

"Mew!"
is

When
hungry.

one

hungry, the other

is

When one is sleepy, the other is sleepy.

We

are afraid, dear Queen, that

we

are

beginning to be sleepy right now.

We

have had such fun at your party!

I.

**.......

I

II

TWO SLEEPY KITTENS
iiiiiiniiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiniiiiiii

iiiiiiiLiiiniH|tmnii

DO
We
And

WE LOOK

ALIKE

look alike and dress alike.
act alike, they say.
is

And

that

why we 're
old

called the

Twins

By good

Granny Gray.

68

KITTENS AND CATS
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
t

_^
just
tale.

WHAT SHALL WE
We
look alike.

SING
we

are twins too, and they say

We are
cannot

so

hungry

now we simply
if

tell

you a

But we

will sing

you a song,

we

can think of one.

Hey ding a ding, what shall we sing ? How many holes in a skimmer ?
Four and twenty,
we're feeling quite

empty

;

Dear Queen, give us some dinner.

Hey

ding a ding, what shall

we

sing?

Dear Queen, give us some dinner.

.......... ..............

11

WE RE FEELING
ii

QUITE EMPTY
11.
ii
i

ii

i

mini M linn in in
i

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11

i

ii

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in

i

in

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1.

1

in

ii i

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in iim

!

i

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ii iiii 11

nil

WAITING

We Ve washed our paws and noses red We think we look quite neat; We 've donned our bibs, and now we beg
;

For something good 731
*l

to eat.

70

KITTENS AND CATS
DING, DONG, BELL
Ding, doiig, bell
!

We

have something to tell! All you kittens and cats who have
tales of rats, or of mice, or of cats,

told

and

have made our Queen laugh,

listen!

you come to the grand dining-room. There a dinner she spreads which may quite turn your heads.
bids

The Queen

Heed what we say and we '11 show you
the way.

Ding, dong, bell!

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

n tun miiiiii

1

1

mM
Nil

1

1

DING, DONG, BELL Illl II II HIM Ml

1

111 111

1

ill

72

KITTENS AND CATS

THE DINING-ROOM
Oh my What how many tables
!

a fine dining-room, and
there are
!

Each

cat has a table all to himself. I

wonder why. There is the Queen
of the room.

sitting at the

end

She

is

looking straight at me.

Oh

dear!

What

if

I

should

spill

my
!

milk on this white cloth!

What would the Queen say I am almost afraid to drink
It is so

to
it.

me

hard to drink out of china cups.
try.

But

I

must

Ill

1

1

I

I

I

I

I

I

1

I

H

1

1

1

M

I

1

1

I

I

I

1

M H
I

I

1

I

1

1

I

1

I

I

1

)

I

1

I

I

M

1

I

1

I

TTP

(VTV
I

THE QUEEN
II
I
1 I I I

IS

LOOKING STRAIGHT AT ME
1 1 I I
I

-\
1

I

1

I

II

I

111

..........i.iiiiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinri II II III 111 U Mil II 1 II
1
I I
I

I

i

I

I

I

I

I

1

1

1

I

1

I

I

1

74

KITTENS AKD CATS
I
I

AM

SO

HUNGEY

wish some one would hurry and bring
milk.

me some
Mine
I

is all

gone and so
this is all

is

my

mouse.

wonder
eat.

if

we

are going to

have to
I

am so hungry I
rat.
is

shall

have to go home

and catch a

The Queen

asking some one to

tell

a story. I believe she

means me.

Yes, dear Queen, I will tell

about seven

little

you a story pussy-cats who were
are.

not so polite as

we

But

first

may

I

please have a little

more milk

to drink ?

(My

tale is coming.)

. t..>IMIt IK... ..._

HiilllllililIIIHilllllHIIIIIMIIIl"lilttlll I"""

!

"

A HUNGRY CAT
iiifiiiniiif

THE QUEEN'S TEA-TABLE
The Queen has had the
As
fine as fine
I

table set,

can

be,
niilk

And now

wish she 'd send some
like

For a hungry cat

me.

76

KITTENS AND CATS

SEVEN LITTLE PUSSY-CATS
Seven little pussy-cats, invited out to
Cried: 'Mother, let us go.
tea,

Oh, do! for

good we '11 surely be. We '11 wear our bibs and hold our things as you have shown us how:
Spoons in right paws, cups in left, and make a pretty bow.

We
<

'11

always say, Yes, if you and Only half of that."
'

"

please,"

Then

go,

my

darling children,' said the
Cat.

happy Mother

The seven

little

pussy-cats

went out that

night to tea. Their heads were smooth and glossy, their
tails

were swinging

free

;

A BOOK OF TALES
They held
their

77

things
tried to

as

they had
;

be polite With snowy bibs beneath their chins they were a pretty sight.
learned,

and

But, alas for manners beautiful, and coats
as soft as silk!

The moment

that the

little kits

were

asked to take some milk,

They dropped
bow, and

their
oh,

spoons,

forgot to

what do you think ?
and
all

They put

their noses in the cups

began to drink!
Yes, every naughty little kit set up a

Mee-ow

for more,

Then knocked the

tea-cup

over,

and

scampered through the door.

78

KITTENS AND CATS

MANY THANKS
Sing, sing,

what
to

shall I sing?

Many thanks
I will sing,

my

Queen,

I will sing.

Do, do, what shall I do ?
I will

run away home,
to
to

And go And go

bed bed

too, too.

I

M GOING HOME
n"i mi
i

"llLLL'i'""^

""""""""""" """""
IIIIIIHIIIIIUI nilllll

nil mill mi|ii

GOOD NIGHT
Yes, I

have put

my

jacket on,
said,

And my Good Night have

And now I'm going home And then

again,

straightway to bed.

nun
i

iiiiimiiiiiiniii

nnmmim 1111 inn mi iMiiiiinniiiiniii in/i iuiiinni|fi ""in
i

minim SH-H-H
1

1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

I 1 1 1

I

I 1 1 1 I I I I 1

1

II

I

I

I

I

I

1

1

II

1 1

1

1 1

ITT

THE LAST TALE
The book
Don't
is

done, the tales are told;
noise.

wake me with your
tired,

For

I

'm as

as tired, I guess,

As many

girls

and boys.
:

CENTRAL CIRCULA7
CHILDREN'S fiOOM

A WORD TO THE TEACHER
WHEN
a

new

school Reader comes to the hands of the primary
'
:

teacher, she naturally asks

Will this book give to

my

class of

healthy stimulus of thought and pleasure? Will they receive through it valuable instruction and assistance in the
girls a

boys and

mechanics of reading? Is the book sufficiently literary in style and artistic in form to command the respect and love of the children
suggestive, dramatic, and ethically healthful? In a word, worth the precious time of the schoolroom ? "
Is
it

:

is it

To
is

the inquiring teacher

who may examine
and fancies

this little book,

which

devoted entirely to the

frolics

of kittens

and

cats, the

following remarks

may

reveal a definite educational purpose and

value in

it.

Following the example of Mother Goose, the wise and classic rhymester of the nursery, we have taken a subject dear to the heart
of childhood

and have given

it life

and personality

in the simple

and

unsophisticated manner of the child.

Many

of the happiest playtime experiences of children are asso-

They delight to dress the frolicsome yet gowns and jackets, and give them long rides in doll carriages, and make them sit at tiny tables and share in tea parties, then put them to bed and perhaps give them water medicine for an imaginary ill. Can there be a more normal and healthy
ciated with their kittens.
docile little creatures in doll

pastime for a

little

child than this

?

In one respect kittens take precedence over

dolls.

They

are alive.

82

A WOED TO THE TEACHEK
treated kindly.

They must be
lect

They

will not bear the

abuse and negattention and

given to

many

beautiful dolls.

They demand

companionship, and they return a real devotion for kindness and care. Therefore we love them, and especially do our children love

them and
Those

delight in stories or pictures of them.

of us

who have had

glimpses of the child heart and mind

know

that stories of kittens and queens and parties yield
fiction, as

much

the

same delight to the little reader of juvenile and romance to the grown-up reader.

do adventure

This simple story about the Queen of the Kitten Country and the
party which she gives in her palace, ought, therefore, to meet one of
the most important requirements for a higher
first

grade school

Reader, that of a strong appeal to the child in subject matter and
illustration.

With

the interest keenly aroused the difficulties in

learning to read are mastered quickly and with pleasure.

However,

the following brief suggestions are given to assist any teacher

who

may need them
for her class.

in

making use

of the

book to the greatest advantage

SUGGESTIONS
Before the reading of the book
or
is

begun there might well be one
possible,

two

story- telling periods.

Each

child should be encouraged to tell
if

a story, from his

own

experience

about a kitten, or a

party, or to give his idea of a queen.

The

children should be assisted in recalling and in learning Mother

Goose rhymes and other verses about cats. Give them several blackboard drawing lessons showing cats in different positions and costumes.

A

frieze of kittens

may

be started at the top of the black-

A WORD TO THE TEACHER
''

83

board, adding each new kitten character to the row as the story progresses. This frieze will furnish material for several varieties of

busy work."

A valuable exercise
is

to stimulate thought

and

facility of

expression

to assign a short page for a child to read silently, which he later

gives aloud in his

own words

before the teacher and class.

Interesting and

profitable reviews

may

signing a cat character to each child, having
text devoted to their special character.

be frequently had by asthem read in order the
first

The

review of this kind

may

well occur at the end of page twenty, where the preparations

for the party are completed.

may

When the party is over a final review be given in dramatic form. The children should impersonate
amuse the Queen, who sits This final dramatic review would naturally begin the Commanding Officer on page twenty-two. Each
tell their tales

the different cats and

to

on her throne.
with the
call of

child should

memorize

his part

sion

and

action. Slight

and give it with spontaneous exprescostuming may be prepared if desired, or the
furnish the cat pictures, while the children

blackboard frieze
give
life

may

and

action to them.

Other special and valuable reviews
large

may

be developed from the

amount

of verse in the book, each child choosing a favorite

verse to read or recite or to illustrate on the blackboard.

The

child-

ren should be encouraged to
lists of their

make rhyming

sentences and word

own, using the fundamental thought or words in the

day's lesson as a basis.

From such rhymes and

lists of

rhyming

words, phonic work may " There are about six hundred words in the vocabulary of Kittens it has not been mechanically graded, it should and and
Cats,"

be developed as the teacher chooses.

though

84

A WOKD TO THE TEACHER
first

be within easy grasp of upper

grade pupils, after the usual

Primer work

is

done.

Each page

of the

book

is

a complete brief
stories are

story well suited to the daily lesson period.
so related, however, as to

These short

make one continuous long

story, thus keep-

ing the interest of the children keen throughout the book.

Books

of

this nature have proved a great stimulus to thoughtful and fluent

reading, which, after

all, is

the high aim in primary work.

CENTRAL CIRCULATION
CHILDREN'S BOOM