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The Wind Load Provisions of ASCE 7: From 2005 to 2010

Gary Chock, P.E.


Member, ASCE 7 Wind Load Subcommittee Member, International Code Council Structural Committee Structural Engineers Association of Hawaii Member of the State Building Code Council

Upcoming Major Changes to the ASCE 7 Wind Design Provisions


REORGANIZATIONOFTHEWINDLOADCHAPTER SIMPLIFIEDMETHODFORENCLOSEDSIMPLEDIAPHRAGMBUILDINGS160FT. NEWWINDMAPSwithLRFDBasis EXPOSUREDinHURRICANEPRONEREGIONS WINDBORNEDEBRISCRITERIA Figure61HawaiidesignationasaSpecialWindRegion

Other New Provisions listed per the present Chapter 6 organization (not discussed here)
6.2Definitions Definitionofmeanroofheight Definitionofsimplediaphragmbuilding Figure62revisionpertainingtotheEnclosedLowRiseSimpleDiaphragmBuilding Method Figure610revisionandrewordingpertainingtotheLowRiseBuildingMethod 6.5.6.3DownwindTransitionfromExposureD 6.5.9.3Roofaggregate 6.5.11.4Overhangs Table64Freestandingwallsandsigns

Upcoming Changes to the ASCE 7 Wind Design Commentary listed per the present Chapter 6 organization (not discussed here)
C6.5.4SaffirSimpsonCategory C6.5.6reference C6.5.6.6Multipleroughnessregimes TableC68z0forExposureB C6.5.6z0andalpha Exampleofroughnesstransitioncalculations C6.6WindTunneldatabase

Re-organization of Chapter 6 Wind Load into Multiple Chapters in ASCE 7-2010

Clarifying the Basis of the Different Methods


DIRECTIONALPROCEDURE:
Aprocedurefordeterminingwindloads onbuildingsandotherstructuresfor specificwinddirections,inwhichthe externalpressurecoefficientsutilizedare basedonpastwindtunneltestingof prototypicalbuildingmodelsforthe correspondingdirectionofwind.

ENVELOPEPROCEDURE:
Aprocedurefordeterminingwindload casesonbuildings,inwhichpseudo externalpressurecoefficientsarederived frompastwindtunneltestingof prototypicalbuildingmodelssucessively rotatedthrough360degrees,suchthat thepseudopressurecasesproducekey structuralactions(uplift,horizontalshear, bendingmoments,etc.)thatenvelope theirmaximumvaluesamongallpossible winddirections. FormerlyreferredtoasMethod1Enclosed SimpleDiaphragmLowRiseandMethod2 AnalyticalProcedureLowRise,butnot explainedasaseparatemethodology

FormerlyreferredtoasMethod2 AnalyticalProcedure,AllHeights

Method 2 Analytical All Heights Figure 6-6

Example of Method2AnalyticalProcedure LowRise(EnvelopeProcedure)Figure610

Clarifying the Different Methods


WINDTUNNELPROCEDURE: Aprocedurefordeterminingwindloadsonbuildingsandother structures,inwhichpressuresand/orforcesandmomentsare determinedforeachwinddirectionconsidered,fromamodelofthe buildingorotherstructureanditssurroundings,inaccordancewith Chapter31.

FormerlyreferredtoasMethod3

Chapter 26 General Requirements


26.1Procedures 26.2Definitions 26.3SymbolsandNotation 26.4General 26.5WindHazardMap 26.6WindDirectionality 26.7Exposure 26.8TopographicEffects 26.9GustEffectFactor 26.10EnclosureClassifications 26.11InternalPressureCoefficient

General Requirements Velocity Pressure


The ASCE/SEI Standard 7-05 utilizes the following equation for velocity pressure: q = 0.00256 Kz Kzt Kd V2 I where: Kz is the velocity pressure exposure coefficient that is defined according to system or component design cases and terrain category, Kzt is the topographic speed-up factor, Kd is the wind directionality factor which accounts for the fact that the probability that the maximum wind may not impact the structural component or system in its weakest orientation, V is the peak gust windspeed associated with a 700-year return period, divided by 1.6, and I is the Importance Factor of the building or structure, based on its occupancy type. (ASCE 7-10 will revise how V is defined and will eliminate I)

Chapter 27 WIND LOADS (MWFRS) DIRECTIONAL PROCEDURE FOR ENCLOSED, 4 PARTIALLY ENCLOSED, AND OPEN BUILDINGS OF ALL HEIGHTS 27.1Scope PARTIEnclosedandPartiallyEnclosedBuildingsofAllHeights
27.2GeneralRequirements 27.3VelocityPressure 27.4WindLoads

PARTIIEnclosedSimpleDiaphragmBuildingswithh160Feet
27.5GeneralRequirements 27.6WindLoads PARTIIhasbeenaddedtoASCE710tocoverthecommonpracticalcasesof enclosedsimplediaphragmbuildingsuptoheighth=160ft.Designwindpressures aretabulateddirectlyusingtheDirectionalApproachofPARTI

Frequency calculation to determine whether a building is flexible, (listed per the present Chapter 6 organization)
6.5.8 GustEffectFactor. 6.5.8.1FrequencyDetermination.Todeterminewhetherabuildingor structureisrigidorflexibleasdefinedinSection6.2,thefundamental frequencyofthestructure,n1,inthedirectionunderconsiderationshallbe establishedforbuildingsgreaterthan60feetinheight,usingthestructural propertiesanddeformationalcharacteristicsoftheresistingelementsina properlysubstantiatedanalysis.Asanalternativetoperformingananalysisto determinethefrequencyofthestructure,n1,itispermittedtousethe approximatebuildingfrequency,na,forsteel,concrete,ormasonrybuildings lessthanorequalto300feetinheight,directlycalculatedinaccordancewith Section6.5.8.2.Buildingsupto60feetinheightarepermittedtobe consideredrigid. Note, per 6.2 Definitions, RIGID BUILDINGS AND OTHER STRUCTURES: The defining criteria for rigid, in comparison to flexible, is that the natural frequency is greater than or equal to 1 Hz

Approximate Fundamental Frequency (lower-bound)


6.5.8.2ApproximateFundamentalFrequency.Theapproximatelowerbound fundamentalfrequency(na),inHertz,ispermittedtobedeterminedfromoneofthe followingequations:
Forsteelmomentresistingframebuildings: na =22.2/ H0.8 (64) Forconcretemomentresistingframebuildings: na =43.5/ H0.9 (65) Forsteelandconcretebuildingswithotherlateralforceresistingsystems: na =75/ H (66) Forconcreteormasonryshearwallbuildings,itisalsopermittedtouse:

n1 =385(Cw)0.5/H
100 n H cw = h AB i =1 i Ai hi 1 + 0.83 D i
2


AB = base area of the structure (ft2) Ai = area of shear wall i (ft2) Di = length of shear wall i(ft) hi = height of shear wall i (ft)

n1 = building natural frequency (hertz) H = building height (ft) n = # of shear walls in building effective in resisting lateral forces in direction under consideration

What is an Enclosed Simple Diaphragm Building?


BUILDING,SIMPLEDIAPHRAGM: Abuildinginwhichbothwindwardandleeward windloadsaretransmittedbyverticallyspanningwallelementsonlythroughthe floorandroofdiaphragmstothesameverticalelementsoftheMWFRS. NewPARTIIEnclosedSimpleDiaphragmBuildingswithh160Feetprovides tablesofdesignpressurebasedoncalculationsthatassumelowerbound frequencies(75/H)andaccountfornonrigidbuildingsupto160ft.tall. Thisnewsimplifiedmethodalsoassumesthatthebuildingisenclosed,sothatthe internalpressurizationeffectGCpiisreduced.Accordingly,thiswouldrequire impactprotectivesystemsonglazinginwindbornedebrisregionslikeHawaii

Chapter 28 WIND LOADS (MWFRS) - ENVELOPE PROCEDURE FOR ENCLOSED AND PARTIALLY ENCLOSED LOW-RISE BUILDINGS 28.1Scope PARTIEnclosedandPartiallyEnclosedLowRiseBuildings
28.2Scope 28.3VelocityPressure 28.4WindLoads MainWindForceResistingSystem

PARTIIEnclosedSimpleDiaphragmLowRiseBuildings
28.5GeneralRequirements 28.6WindLoads MainWindForceResistingSystem

Chapter 29 WIND LOADS (MWFRS) BUILDING APPURTENANCES AND OTHER STRUCTURES 29.1Scope 29.2GeneralRequirements 29.3VelocityPressure 29.4DesignWindLoads SolidFreestandingWallsandSolid FreestandingSigns 29.5DesignWindLoads OtherStructures 29.6RooftopStructuresandEquipmentforBuildingswithh60ft. 29.7Parapets ThisisaDirectionalProcedure

Chapter 30 WIND LOADS COMPONENTS AND CLADDING


1) Part1appliestoenclosedandpartiallyenclosedlowrisebuildings,buildings withh60ft,andbuildingswith60ft<h90fthavingflatroofs,gableroofs, multispangableroofs,hiproofs,monoslope roofs,steppedroofsandsaw toothroofs.Windpressuresarecalculatedfromawindpressureequation. (Thisisanenvelopeprocedure) 2) Part2appliestoenclosedlow risebuildingsandbuildingswithh60ft havingflatroofs,gableroofsandhiproofs.Windpressuresaredetermined directlyfromatable.(Thisisanenvelopeprocedure) 3) Part3appliestoenclosedandpartiallyenclosedbuildingswithameanroof heighth>60feethavingflatroofs,pitchedroofs,gableroofs,hiproofs, mansardroofs,archedroofsanddomeroofs.Windpressuresarecalculated fromawindpressureequation.(Thisisadirectionalprocedure) 4) Part4appliestoenclosedbuildingshavingameanroofheighth160feet havingflatroofs,gableroofs,hiproofs,monoslope roofsandmansardroofs. Windpressuresaredetermineddirectlyfromatable.(Thisisanewdirectional procedure)

Chapter 30 WIND LOADS COMPONENTS AND CLADDING


5) Part5 appliestoopenbuildingsofallheightshavingpitchedfreeroofs, monoslopefreeroofsandtroughfreeroofs.(Thisisadirectionalprocedure) 6) Part6appliestobuildingappurtenancessuchasroofoverhangsandparapets. (Thisisadirectionalprocedure)

Chapter 30 WIND LOADS COMPONENTS AND CLADDING 30.1Scope 30.2GeneralRequirements 30.3VelocityPressure PARTIEnclosedandPartiallyEnclosedLowRiseBuildings
30.4DesignWindPressuresforEnclosedandPartiallyEnclosedLowRise Buildingswithh60ft. 30.5DesignWindPressuresforEnclosedandPartiallyEnclosedLowRise Buildingswith60ft.<h<90ft.

PARTIIEnclosedLowRiseBuildings
30.6Conditions 30.7DesignWindPressuresforEnclosedLowRiseBuildingsh60ft.

Chapter 30 WIND LOADS COMPONENTS AND CLADDING PARTIIIEnclosedandPartiallyEnclosedBuildingswithh>60ft.


30.8DesignWindPressuresforEnclosedandPartiallyEnclosedBuildingswith h>60ft.

PARTIVEnclosedSimpleDiaphragmBuildingswithh160ft.
30.9GeneralRequirements 30.10WindLoads ComponentsandCladding
ThissectionhasbeenaddedtoASCE710tocoverthecommonpracticalcaseof enclosedbuildingsuptoheighth=160ft.Table30.91includeswallandroof pressuresforflatroofs(<10deg),gableroofs,hiproofs,monosloperoofsand mansardroofs.PressuresarederivedfromFig.30.81(flatroofs),Fig.30.41B,Cand D(gableandhiproofs)andFig.30.42(monosloperoofs)ofPart3.TheGCpvalues fromthesefigureswerecombinedwithaninternalpressurecoefficient(+or 0.18) toobtainanetcoefficientfromwhichpressureswerecalculated.

Chapter 30 WIND LOADS COMPONENTS AND CLADDING

PARTVOpenBuildingsofAllHeightswithMonoslope,Pitchedor TroughFreeRoofs
30.11DesignWindPressuresforOpenBuildingsofAllHeightswith Monoslope,PitchedorTroughFeeRoofs

PARTVIBuildingAppurtenances(RoofOverhangsandParapets)
30.12RoofParapets 30.13RoofOverhangs

Chapter 31 Wind Tunnel Procedure

31.1Scope 31.2TestConditions 31.3DynamicResponse 31.4LimitationsonWindSpeeds 31.5WindBorneDebris

C6.5.2 Limitations of Analytical Procedure


Theprovisionsgivenunder6.5.2applytothemajorityofsite locationsandbuildingsandstructures,butforsomeprojects theseprovisionsmaybeinadequate.Examplesofsitelocations andbuildingsandstructures(orportionsthereof)thatmay requirespecialstudies,eitherusingapplicable recognized literaturepertainingtowindeffects,orusing thewindtunnel procedureof6.6include: 1.
2. Sitelocationswhichhavechannelingeffectsorwakesfromupwindobstructions. Buildingswithunusualorirregulargeometricshape,includingbarrelvaults,andother buildingswhoseshape(inplanorverticalcrosssection)differssignificantlyfromthe shapesinFigures63through68.

C6.5.2 Limitations of Analytical Procedure


2. Buildingswithresponsecharacteristicsthatresultinsubstantialvortex inducedand/ortorsional dynamiceffects,ordynamiceffectsresulting fromaeroelastic instabilitiessuchasflutterorgalloping.Suchdynamic effectsaredifficulttoanticipate,beingdependentonmanyfactors,but arelikelytobeimportantwhenanyofthefollowingapply.
i. ii. iii. iv. Theheightofthebuildingisover400ft. Theheightofthebuildingisgreaterthan4timesitsminimumeffectivewidth as definedbelow. Thelowestnaturalfrequencyofthebuildingislessthan0.25Hz.
Vz > 5 where z = 0 .6 h and V z isthemeanhourlyvelocity Thereducedvelocity n1 B min
atheight z .
Bmin isdefinedastheminimumvalueof

v. Theminimumeffectivewidth
i i i

h B / h consideringallpossiblewinddirections.Thesummationsareoverthe
heightofthebuildingforeachwinddirection,hiistheheightabovegradeofleveli ,and Bi isthewidthatlevelinormaltothewinddirection.

C6.5.2 Limitations of Analytical Procedure


4.Slenderbridges,cranes,electricaltransmissionlines,guyed masts,telecommunicationtowersandflagpoles. Whenundertakingdetailedstudiesofthedynamicresponseto windforces,thefundamentalfrequenciesofthestructureineach directionofconsiderationshouldbeestablishedusingthe structuralpropertiesanddeformationalcharacteristicsofthe resistingelementsinaproperlysubstantiatedanalysis,andnot utilizingapproximateequationsbasedonheight.

ASCE 7 2010 Determination of Design Wind Speeds


Incorporatesanewprobabilisticanalysiswithanimproved windfield modelforthecontinentalU.S.andaseparateanalysis forHawaii(ARA,2001) Loadcalculationatstrengthdesignpoint
LRFDdesign Windmapsat3001700yearrecurrence LoadFactor=1.0(versus1.6today) OtherWindmapsprovidedat50,10etc.yearsforserviceabilityanddrift AllowableStressavailablebyusing0.8factor

Designwindspeedreturnperiodisbasedonoccupancy,andthe ImportanceFactoristhuseliminated

Reasons (per ASCE)


NewdataandresearchindicatesthatthecurrenthurricanewindspeedsgiveninASCE 7wereconservativeinthecontinentalUSAandneededtobeadjusteddownward. Astrengthdesignwindspeedmapismorealignedwithseismicdesigninthattheyboth usealoadfactorof1.0forstrengthdesign. Multiplemapseliminatetheproblemofhavingimportancefactorsthatvarywith occupancycategoryandhurricaneproneandnonhurricaneproneregions. Theuseofmultiplemapseliminatestheconfusionofengineersnotunderstandingthat thepresentmapisnota50yearreturnperiodmap. Engineershavenotunderstoodthattheirdesign,aftermultiplicationbythe1.6load factor,wasaroughly700yeareventwithwindspeeds1.6timesthatshownonthe map. Buildingownershavenotunderstoodthattheirbuildingswouldnotfailforwind speedssomewhatabovethepresentmapvalue.Therevisedmapsgivetheownera betterideaofthewindspeedsforwhichnodamageorminimaldamageisexpectedin anengineeredstructure.

Basic Wind Speed, V


Occupancy Category I (ASCE 7 -10) II (ASCE 7 -10) III and IV (ASCE 7 -10) Description Agricultural, Temporary, and Minor Storage Normal Occupancies High Hazard Occupancies (such as assembly, school buildings with > 250 occupants, Power, Telecom, Hazmat, Explosives,) Essential Facilities Return Period 300 700 1700 Map Value for Hawaii 113 129 143

I (ASCE 7- 05)

105 * 1.6 * 0.77 gives the LRFD equivalent of 105 * 1.6 gives the LRFD equivalent of 105 * 1.6 * 1.15 gives the LRFD equivalent of

117

II (ASCE 7-05) III and IV (ASCE 7-05)

133 142

Table C6-ZZc 1.6 * Bas ic Wind Spe e d Saffir /Sim ps on Hur r icane Cate gor y Cate gor y 1 Bar Harbor, Maine Hampton Beach, New Hampshire Boston, Massachusetts Hyannis, Massachusetts New port, Rhode Island New Haven, Connecticut Southampton, New York Brooklyn, New York Atlantic City, New Jersey Bow ers Beach, Delaw are Ocean City, Maryland V irginia Beach, Virginia Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina Folley Beach, South Carolina Sea Island, Georgia Jacksonville Beach, Florida Melbourne, Florida Miami Beach, Florida Key West, Florida Clearw ater, Florida P anama City, Florida Gulf Shores, Alabama Biloxi, Mississippi Slidell, Louisiana Cameron, Louisiana Galveston, Texas P ort Aransas, Texas Haw aii P uerto Rico Virgin Islands 82 (36.7) 108 (48.3) 156 (69. 7) Wind Spe e d, m ph (m /s ) 130 (58.1) 191 (85. 4) Cate gor y 2 Cate gor y 3 Cate gor y 4 Cate gor y 5

Hurricane Prone Regions


HURRICANEPRONEREGIONS: Areasvulnerabletohurricanes;inthe UnitedStatesanditsterritoriesdefinedas 1. TheU.S.AtlanticOceanandGulfofMexicocoastswherethebasic windspeedforCategoryIIbuildingsisgreaterthan90 114 mi/h, and 2. Hawaii,PuertoRico,Guam,VirginIslands,andAmericanSamoa. Reasoning:Adjustthewindspeedcriteriaby1.6totheLRFD levelwithaLFof1.0

Relation between Saffir - Simpson Hurricane Scale Winds to Peak Gust Speeds Over Open Terrain
SaffirSimpson category sustained (1-minute) wind speed over open water (mph) 74-94 95-110 111-130 131-155 >155 3-second Peak Gust over open terrain (mph) ASCE 7-05 [Vickery, 2000] 82-108 109-130 131-156 157-191 >191 Updated 3-second Peak Gust over open terrain (mph) ASCE 7-10 [Simiu, Vickery, Kareem, 2007] 81-105 106-121 122-143 144-171 >171

1 2 3 4 5

Exposure D will be back in Hurricane Prone Regions


Researchsince2004hasshowedthatthedragcoefficientoverthe oceaninhighwindsinhurricanesdidnotcontinuetoincrease withincreasingwindspeedaspreviouslybelieved.Thestudies showedthattheseasurfacedragcoefficient,andhencethe aerodynamicroughnessoftheocean,reachedamaximumat meanwindspeedsofabout30m/sec(~70mphpeakgust).There issomeevidencethatthedragcoefficientactuallydecreases(i.e. theseasurfacebecomesaerodynamicallysmoother)asthewind speedincreasefurther,orasthehurricaneradiusdecreases.The consequencesofthesestudiesarethatthesurfaceroughness overtheoceaninahurricaneisconsistentwiththatofexposureD ratherthanexposureC.Consequently,theuseofexposureD alongthehurricanecoastlineisnowrequired.

Windborne Debris
WINDBORNEDEBRISREGIONS:Areaswithinhurricaneprone regionslocated: 1. Within1mileofthecoastalmeanhighwaterlinewherethe basicwindspeed,forthebuildingcategoryunderconsideration, is equaltoorgreaterthan130110 mi/handinHawaii or 2. Inareaswherethebasicwindspeed,forthebuildingcategory underconsideration, isequaltoorgreaterthan140120 mi/h. Reasoning:adjustthewindspeed totheLRFDdesignlevelwithaLFof 1.0insteadof1.6,andreferencethenewstrengthlevelwindmaps ofreturnperiodsthatareoccupancycategorydependent

Differences between Content in the Standard and Local Codes, per ASCE and NCSEA
Materialthatisleftinthebuildingcode conformstooneofthefollowingcriteria: Relatestolocalclimatic,terrain,orotherenvironmental conditions,whichmanybuildingofficialswillwishtospecifywhen adoptingthemodelcodebylocalordinance.Thisincludes specificationofbasicwindspeeds,terrain,exposureandsimilar provisions. Relatestoenforcementoftypesofconstructionwhichisoften setbyconditionsolocalpractice,materialsavailabilityand constructionindustrycapabilities Isnotpresentlycoveredinanadequatemannerbyanational consensusstandard.Thisincludestomaterialcoveringroofing materials,hurricaneprotectionofopenings,etc.

February,2005

Jim Rossberg, Structural Engineering Institute of ASCE, representing NCSEA Code Advisory Committee and ASCE/SEI

Hawaii Special Wind Region in ASCE 7-10


C6.5.4.1 SpecialWindRegions.Althoughthewindspeedmapof Fig.61isvalidformostregionsofthecountry,therearespecial regionsinwhichwindspeedanomaliesareknowntoexist.Some ofthesespecialregionsarenotedinFig.61.Windsblowingover mountainrangesorthroughgorgesorrivervalleysinthese specialregionscandevelopspeedsthataresubstantiallyhigher thanthevaluesindicatedonthemap.Whenselectingbasicwind speedsinthesespecialregions,useofregionalclimaticdataand consultationwithawindengineerormeteorologistisadvised.

Hawaii Special Wind Region in ASCE 7-10


C6.5.4.1 Itisalsopossiblethatanomaliesinwindspeedsexistona micrometeorologicalscale.Forexample,windspeedupoverhillsand escarpmentsisaddressedinSection6.5.7.Windspeedsovercomplex terrainmaybebetterdeterminedbywindtunnelstudiesasdescribed inSection6.6.Adjustmentsofwindspeedsshouldbemadeatthe micrometeorologicalscaleonthebasisofwindengineeringor meteorologicaladviceandusedinaccordancewiththeprovisionsof Section6.5.4.2whensuchadjustmentsarewarranted.Duetothe complexityofmountainousterrainandvalleygorgesinHawaii,there aretopographicwindspeedupeffectsthatcannotbeaddressedsolely byFigure64.IntheHawaiiSpecialWindRegion,therearespecialKzt topographiceffectadjustmentstotheBasicWindSpeedestablishedby theauthoritieshavingjurisdiction.

Hawaii Design Maps


ExposurebasedonLandcoverdatadevelopedbytheNOAACoastal ServicesCenterfromLandsat EnhancedThematicMapper satellite imagerybeginningintheyear2000toprovidelandcoverdataforthe coastalregionsoftheNationalLandCoverDatabase(NLCD).
(SubjecttoupdatefortheExposureDrevisioninASCE710whichbecomeseffective locallybyadoptionofthe2012IBC)

TopographicFactorgivingthemaximumtopographiceffect TablesofDirectionalityFactorthattakeintoaccountsitedirectional probabilitiesoftheoccurrenceofthemaximumeffect EffectiveWindSpeedforCladdingandComponentsbasedon105mph basicwindspeed


(subjecttorevisionbeforeLRFDwindspeedmapsofASCE710becomeseffective locallybyadoptionofthe2012IBC)

Therefore,themapsaregoodforthe2003 2009IBCperiodof adoptions

Exposure Category - Oahu

Exposure Category - Hawaii

Exposure Category - Maui

Exposure Category - Molokai and Lanai

Exposure Category - Kauai

Maximum Topographic Factor - Oahu

Maximum Topographic Factor - Hawaii

Maximum Topographic Factor - Maui

Maximum Topographic Factor - Molokai

Maximum Topographic Factor - Lanai

Maximum Topographic Factor - Kauai

Effective Wind Speed Maps


Algebraically-normalized maps of Veffective, i.e., V multiplied by ( Kzt x Kd / 0.85 ) allow implicit consideration of topographic effects for Cladding and Component design. The Veffective values can be used for performance-specified building components and cladding, as well as when using prescriptive design tables and existing reference standards and simplified methods based on wind speed tables.

Effective Wind Speed based on 105 mph Basis for C&C

Effective Wind Speed based on 105 mph Basis for C&C

Effective Wind Speed based on 105 mph Basis for C&C

Effective Wind Speed based on 105 mph Basis for C&C

Effective Wind Speed based on 105 mph Basis for C&C

Effective Wind Speed based on 105 mph Basis for C&C

ASCE 7 Wind Provisions Update Status


Currentlycompletingremainingfinalballotitemsbeforetheseare forwardedtotheASCE7MainCommitteeinAugust Updateshavemovedtoa5yearrevisioncycle ASCE710willbereferencedinthe2012 IBC,thenpresumably adoptedby2014intheStateofHawaii,andthenbythecountiesby 2016.