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ORIGO Stepping Stones is a world class core math program

written and developed for elementary schools implementing


the Common Core State Standards.*
This revolutionary online program integrates print and
digital technology to give educators what they have been
requesting for years.

STUDENT JOURNAL

ORIGO Stepping Stones is an innovative online program that

Honestly addresses both the content and the intent of the CCSS.

Fosters students thinking and reasoning skills.

Delivers multiple ways to differentiate classroom instruction.

Provides a valuable source of professional learning for the teacher.

Offers methods to assess deep understanding and skills.

Is rich in online and print resources that engage all students.

Its simply a smarter approach!

THIS BOOK BELONGS TO

*or the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) or the Common
Core State Standards for Mathematics with California Additions.

Product Code: SSJ 226 2

STUDENT JOURNAL

PL
E
M

SA
SENIOR AUTHORS

PROGRAM CONSULTANTS

James Burnett

Diana Lambdin

Calvin Irons

Frank Lester, Jr.


Kit Norris

contributing authors

PROGRAM EDITORS

Peter Stowasser

James Burnett

Allan Turton

Beth Lewis
Donna Richards
Kevin Young

STUDENT JOURNAL

1.9
1.10
1.11
1.12

20
22

2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12

Working with Addition


Using the Commutative Property of Addition
with Count-On Facts
Relating Addition and Subtraction Facts
(Count-On Facts)
Working with Count-On Fact Families
Extending the Count-On Addition Strategy to
Two-Digit Numbers
Using Place Value (Hundred Chart)
to Add Two-Digit Numbers
Using Place Value (Number Line)
to Add Two-Digit Numbers
Reading and Writing Time on the Hour
and Half Past the Hour
Working with Duration (Hours)
Identifying Five-Minute Intervals
Working with Five-Minute Intervals
Working with Duration (Hours and Minutes)

MODULE 3
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.12

Working with Hundreds


Writing Three-Digit Numbers
Reading and Representing
Three-Digit Numbers
Writing Three-Digit Number Names
Writing Three-Digit Numerals
Identifying Three-Digit Numbers
on a Number Line
Measuring Length with Uniform
Non-Standard Units
Introducing the Inch
Working with Inches
Introducing Feet
Working with Feet and Inches
Introducing Yards

4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8

24
26
28
30

4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12

MODULE 5

MODULE 2
2.1
2.2

4.3

5.1
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
54

5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.9
5.10
5.11
5.12

56
58
60
62
64
66
68
70
72
74
76
78

6.1
6.2
6.3

6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7

6.8
6.9
6.10
6.11
6.12

7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8

82
84
86
88
90

7.9
7.10
7.11
7.12

92
94
96
98

Skip Counting by 2 or 5
Adding Jumps of 2 or 5
Describing Equal Groups
Adding Equal Groups
Describing Arrays
Adding Equal Rows
Using the Turnaround Idea with Arrays
Identifying and Comparing Amounts
of Money
Relating Amounts of Money
Working with Cents
Working with Dollars
Working with Dollars and Cents

Using the Make-Ten Addition Strategy


Working with Make-Ten Fact Families
Extending the Make-Ten Addition Strategy
Beyond the Facts
Analyzing Addition Patterns (with Bridging)
Extending the Doubles Addition Strategy
Using Place Value to Add Two-Digit Numbers
Using Place Value to Add Two-Digit Numbers
(with Bridging)
Introducing Centimeters
Working with Centimeters
Introducing Meters
Working with Meters
Using Line Plots to Record Length

8.1

100
102

8.2

104

8.4

106

8.5

108

8.6

110

8.7

112
114
116
118
120
122
124
126

8.8
8.9
8.10
8.11
8.12

152
154
156
158
160
162
164
166
168
170
172
174

Composing and Decomposing Two-Digit


Numbers
Subtracting One-Digit Numbers from
Two-Digit Numbers
Calculating Difference Between Two-Digit
Numbers
Consolidating Subtraction with Two-Digit
Numbers
Relating Addition and Subtraction Beyond
the Facts
Using the Unknown Addend Strategy
to Subtract Two-Digit Numbers
Using Place Value (Number Line) to Solve
Subtraction Problems
Introducing the Pound
Working with Pounds
Introducing the Kilogram
Working with Kilograms
Comparing Customary and Metric Units

176
178
180
182
184
186
188
190
192
194
196
198

MODULE 9
9.1

128
130

9.2
9.3

132

9.4

134
136
138

9.5
9.6
9.7

140
142
144
146
148
150

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2

MODULE 10

MODULE 8

8.3

Representing Three-Digit Numbers


(with Zeros)
Representing Three-Digit Numbers
(with Teens and Zeros)
Writing Three-Digit Numbers in Numerals
and Words
Working with Three-Digit Numbers
to One Thousand
Comparing Three-Digit Numbers
Ordering Three-Digit Numbers
Marking the Direction of Turn
Describing Amounts of Turn
Identifying Polygons
Identifying Quadrilaterals
Working with Polygons
Drawing 2D Shapes

MODULE 6

80

9.8
9.9
9.10
9.11
9.12

Exploring the Relative Position


of Three-Digit Numbers
Estimating Answers (Adding within 100)
Estimating Answers (Subtracting
within 100)
Using the Associative Property of Addition
with Three One- and Two-Digit Numbers
Using the Associative Property of Addition
with Four One- and Two-Digit Numbers
Solving Word Problems
Identifying One-Half, One-Fourth,
and One-Third of a Collection
Identifying One-Half, One-Fourth,
and One-Third of a Region
Exploring Fractions
Analyzing Fractions
Working with Parts of a Whole (Equal Size)
Exploring Area

200
202
204
206
208

10.1
10.2
10.3
10.4
10.5
10.6
10.7
10.8
10.9
10.10
10.11
10.12

224
226
228
230
232
234
236
238
240
242
244
246

MODULE 11
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
11.5
11.6
11.7
11.8
11.9
11.10
11.11
11.12

Extending the Count-Back Strategy


to Three-Digit Numbers
Using Place Value to Subtract Two-Digit
Numbers from Three-Digit Numbers
Using Place Value to Subtract Three-Digit
Numbers
Consolidating Subtraction of Two- and
Three-Digit Numbers
Using a Place-Value Strategy to Subtract
Three-Digit Numbers
Using a Place-Value Strategy to Solve
Subtraction Problems
Introducing the Multiplication Symbol ()
Using Multiplication (Equal Groups)
Using Division Language (Sharing)
Relating Multiplication and Division (Sharing)
Using Division Language (Grouping)
Relating Multiplication and Division (Grouping)

248
250
252
254
256
258
260
262
264
266
268
270

MODULE 12
12.1
12.2
12.3

210
212

12.4

214

12.5

216
218
220
222

12.6
12.7
12.8
12.9
12.10
12.11
12.12

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2

Extending the Count-On Strategy


to Three-Digit Numbers
Using Place Value to Add Two- and
Three-Digit Numbers
Using Place Value to Add Three-Digit
Numbers
Composing Three-Digit Numbers
Using the Make-Ten Strategy to Add Oneand Three-Digit Numbers (with Bridging)
Using Place Value to Add Two- and
Three-Digit Numbers (with Bridging)
Using Place Value to Add Three-Digit
Numbers (with Bridging)
Consolidating Addition with Three-Digit
Numbers
Identifying Polyhedrons
Identifying Pyramids
Investigating 3D Objects
Drawing 3D Objects

Decomposing Three-Digit Numbers


Subtracting One-Digit Numbers from
Three-Digit Numbers (with Bridging)
Consolidating Subtraction of One-Digit
Numbers (with Bridging)
Using Place Value to Subtract Two-Digit
Numbers from Three-Digit Numbers
(with Bridging)
Consolidating Subtraction of Two-Digit
Numbers (with Bridging)
Using Place Value to Subtract Three-Digit
Numbers (with Bridging)
Consolidating Subtraction of Three-Digit
Numbers (with Bridging)
Consolidating Subtraction of Two- and
Three-Digit Numbers (with Bridging)
Introducing Cups, Pints, and Quarts
Working with Cups, Pints, and Quarts
Introducing Liters
Working with a Liter

272
274
276
278

280
282
284
286
288
290
292
294

CONTENTS

1.8

18

4.2

MODULE 7

Exploring the Comparison Model


of Subtraction
Extending the Count-Back Strategy
to Two-Digit Numbers
Using Place Value (Hundred Chart)
to Subtract Two-Digit Numbers
Using Place Value (Number Line)
to Subtract Two-Digit Numbers
Working with the Doubles Addition Strategy
Relating Addition and Subtraction
(Doubles Facts)
Working with Doubles Fact Families
Extending the Doubles Addition Strategy
Beyond the Facts
Working with Time Quarter Past the Hour
Identifying and Recording Time Using
a.m. and p.m.
Working with Timetables and Duration
Working with the Calendar

PL
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1.7

16

4.1

ORIGO Education.

1.6

8
10
12
14

1.5

Writing Tens and Ones, and Number Names


Writing Two-Digit Numbers
Reading and Writing Two-Digit Numbers
Exploring the Relative Position of
Two-Digit Numbers on a Number Track
Exploring the Relative Position of
Two-Digit Numbers on a Number Line
Working with Two-Digit Numbers
on a Number Line
Comparing Two-Digit Numbers
on a Number Line
Comparing and Ordering
Two-Digit Numbers
Exploring the Properties of Odd
and Even Numbers
Solving Number Puzzles on
a Hundred Chart
Sorting Data in Different Ways
Interpreting and Constructing One-to-One
Picture Graphs

ORIGO Education.

1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4

MODULE 4

SA

CONTENTS

MODULE 1

ORIGO Stepping Stones is an innovative online program that

Honestly addresses both the content and the intent of the CCSS.

Fosters students thinking and reasoning skills.

Delivers multiple ways to differentiate classroom instruction.

Provides a valuable source of professional learning for the teacher.

Offers methods to assess deep understanding and skills.

Is rich in online and print resources that engage all students.

Its simply a smarter approach!

Product Code: SSP 332 2

PRACTICE BOOK

STUDENT JouRNAL

NOTES FOR HOME

Engaging student pages accompany each lesson within ORIGO Stepping Stones. In the
Student Journals for Grades 15, there are two pages for each lesson. Following are the
features of the Grade 2 Student Journal as a part of the whole program.

Each book is one component of a comprehensive teaching program. Together they are a collection
of consolidation and practice pages from lessons in the ORIGO Stepping Stones program.

PL
E

STEP 1
Step 1 provides guided discussion of enquiry. This
often sets the scene for the lesson. Teachers can
project this piece of the lesson and step through
each question or point one at a time.

STEP 2
Step 2 provides individual work based
on the discussion above.

Additional Resources Print

a.

9 dots in total

b.

13 dots in total

c.

11 dots in total

How could you figure out the number of cows in the barn?

d.

e.

14 dots in total

f.

16 dots in total

Write a number fact to match each story.

The total is

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.6

Grade

Module

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

60

hundreds

tens

ones

Lesson

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2

10

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

50

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

59

60

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

70

71

Professional
learning sessions

Interactive
whiteboard tools

Interactive games

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

80

82

83

84

85

86

87

88

89

90

91

Fundamentals
Game Boards

72

81

Flare

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2

12

21

51

91

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.6

100

11

ORIGO MathEd

STEP 3
Step 3 puts a little twist on each lesson
to develop higher-order thinking skills.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.6

10

These are some of the innovative teaching channels integrated into the teachers
online program.

ORIGO Education.

d. Luis and Tien have read


12 books in total. Tien has
read 6 books. How many books
has Luis read?

Additional Resources (ONLINE CHANNELS)

ORIGO Education.

The other part is

b. Donna and Keisha have 12 berries


together. Keisha has 5 berries.
How many berries does
Donna have?

c. Maria bought 16 stickers.


There are 7 red stickers and the
rest are blue. How many stickers
are blue?

The Number Case provides


teachers with ready-made
resources that are designed to
develop students understanding
of number.

SA

ORIGO Education.

One part is

ORIGO Education.

The total is

ORIGO Education.

The total is

a. Tyler put 6 cookies on a plate.


The plate can hold 14 cookies.
How many more cookies can
Tyler fit on the plate?

The other part is

Step Ahead

b.

17 dots in total

1. Write the two parts and the total for each picture.

One part is

I could start with 15 and take away 7,


or I could think 7 plus "something" is 15.

The other part is

One part is

ORIGO Big Books build on


young students natural love for
stories to help introduce key
mathematical concepts. There
are 12 Big Books at this grade.

2. Figure out how many dots are covered. Then write the matching equations.

There are 15 cows on this farm. Some of the cows are in the barn.

a.

*or the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) or the Common
Core State Standards for Mathematics with California Additions.

Class teachers will decide which pages suit individual needs. So students might not complete
every page in these books. For more information about the program, visit
www.origoeducation.com/steppingstones.

Relating Addition and Subtraction (Doubles Facts)

Step Up

INTRODUCTION

PRACTICE BOOK

INTRODUCTION

This revolutionary online program integrates print and


digital technology to give educators what they have been
requesting for years.

THIS BOOK BELONGS TO

each picture.

90

ORIGO Stepping Stones is a world class core math program


written and developed for elementary schools implementing
the Common Core State Standards.*

Regular and meaningful practice is a hallmark of ORIGO Stepping


Stones. Each module in this book has perforated pages that
practice content previously learned to maintain concepts and
skills, and pages that practice computation to promote fluency.

The ORIGO Stepping Stones program has been created to provide a smarter way to
teach and learn mathematics. It has been developed by a team of experts to provide a
world-class math program that honestly addresses the content and intent of the Common
Core State Standards.

e away 7,
hing" is 15.

4.6

PRACTICE BOOK

STEPPING STONES RESOURCES PRINT

92

93

94

95

96

97

98

99

100

A three-dimensional (3D) object shows length,


width, and height. A 3D object can be solid like
a brick, hollow like a football, or skeletal like a
house frame. For example:

LITER

An addition fact family includes an addition


fact, its turnaround fact and the two related
subtraction facts. For example:

4 + 2 = 6
2 + 4 = 6
6 4 = 2
6 2 = 4

A liter is a metric unit of capacity.

A polygon is any closed 2D shape that has


three or more straight sides. For example:

METER

addition fact with


its turnaround fact

POLYGON

the two related


subtraction facts

A meter is a metric unit of length that is longer


than one yard. One hundred centimeters is the
same length as one meter.

A triangle is a polygon
that has three sides.

A quadrilateral is any
polygon with four sides.

A pentagon is a polygon
that has five sides.

A hexagon is a polygon
that has six sides.

MULTIPLICATION
Fractions describe parts of one whole, when
those parts are of equal size. For example, when
one whole is split into two groups or two parts of
equal size, the fraction one-half describes one
of those groups or parts. When one whole is split
into four groups or four parts of equal size, the
fraction one-fourth (one-quarter) describes one
of those groups or parts.

Mental computation strategies

CAPACITY
Capacity is the amount something can hold.
CENTIMETER
A centimeter is a metric unit of length that
is shorter than one inch.
COMPARING

When read from left to right, the symbol > means


is greater than. The symbol < means is less than.
For example:

2 < 6 means 2 is less than 6

EVEN NUMBER
An even number is any whole number that has
a 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8 in the ones place.

For example:

U
 se a known sum (use doubles)
See 7 + 7 think double 7
See 25 + 26 think double 25 plus 1 more
See 35 + 37 think double 35 plus 2 more

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2

15

Addition facts are all the addition sentences


that show two one-digit numbers being added.
Addition facts can be written with the total or
sum at the start or at the end.

Make ten
See 9 + 4 think 9 + 1 + 3
See 38 + 14 think 38 + 2 + 12

Count back
See 9 2 think 9 1 1
See 26 20 think 26 10 10

NUMBER FACTS

2 + 3 = 5 or 9 = 4 + 5

Subtraction facts are all the subtraction


sentences that are related to the addition facts.
For example:

Subtraction
Think addition
See 17 9 think 9 + 8 = 17 so 17 9 = 8

A pyramid is a polyhedron that has any


polygon for a base. All the other faces joined
to the base are triangles that meet at a point.

QUART

Addition
Count on
See 3 + 8 think 8 + 1 + 1 + 1
See 58+24 think 58+10+10+4

A polyhedron is any closed 3D object


that has four or more flat faces.

three groups of two is six

These are strategies you can use to figure


out a problem in your head.

2+3=5

1 row

equal groups

For example:

array

A kilogram is a metric unit of weight.

Addition is used to find the total or sum of two


or more numbers of objects. This is recorded
in an addition sentence that uses words or
symbols. Addition is shown by the + symbol.

POLYHEDRON

For example:

three rows of five is fifteen

KILOGRAM
ADDITION

Multiplication is used to find the total number


of objects in an array or in a number of equal
groups. This is recorded in a multiplication
sentence that uses words or symbols.
Multiplication is shown by the symbol.

PL
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A sphere is a ball-shaped
3D object made with one
curved surface.

FRACTION

5 2 = 3 or 9 4 = 5

ODD NUMBER
An odd number is any whole number that
has a 1, 3, 5, 7, or 9 in the ones place.
ORIGO Education.

A cube is a box-shaped
3D object made with
six flat surfaces that are
the same size.

A cylinder is a 3D object
made with two flat surfaces
and one curved surface.

ORIGO Education.

A cone is a 3D object
made with one flat surface
and one curved surface.

PINT
A pint is a unit of capacity.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2

A quart is a unit of capacity. One quart is the


same as two pints.
SUBTRACTION
Subtraction involves taking one number away
from another. Subtraction may be used to find
an unknown addend or to find the difference
between two numbers. This is recorded in
a subtraction sentence that uses words or
symbols. Subtraction is shown by the symbol.
For example:

52=3

TURNAROUND FACT
Each addition fact has a related
turnaround fact.
For example:

 +2=6
4
2+4=6

GLOSSARY

FACT FAMILY

SA

GLOSSARY

3D OBJECT

Writing Tens and Ones, and Number Names

1.1

2. 
Write the number of tens and ones on the expander.
Then write the number name.
a.
a.
a.

Look at this picture.


What number does it show?

How could you use tens and ones blocks


to show the same number?

PL
E

a.
b.

How would you show the number on this expander?


How do you know?
How would you write the number name?

a.

twenty-six

seventy-three

1. 
Write the number of tens and ones on the expander.
Then complete the number name.

d.

SA

Step Up

fifty-one

c.
a.

What do you know about


these numbers?

fifty three

b.

Step Ahead

Two people show 17 with


their hands like this.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.1

ORIGO Education.

t wenty nine

ORIGO Education.

Loop the numbers that three people could show.


thirty-eight

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.1

twenty-one

fifty-three

thirty

1.2

Writing Two-Digit Numbers

2. Complete these mix-and-match puzzles.


a.

Look at the number on this expander.


How do you read and say the number?

b.
a.

How could you show the number


using tens and ones blocks?
How many people would be needed to show
the number with their fingers?
How do you know?
How would you write the numeral without using an expander?
How would you write the number name?

a.

b.

d.

45

SA

forty

a.
c.

87

Step Up

1. 
Write the number of tens and ones on the expander.
Then write the numeral and number name.

PL
E

a.

twenty

Step Ahead

Count the number of tens and ones blocks.

c.
a. Write the numeral.

10

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.2

ORIGO Education.

ORIGO Education.

b. Write the number name.



ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.2

11

1.3

Reading and Writing Two-Digit Numbers

2. Write the numeral with and without the expander.


a.

fifty-two

fifteen

seventy-one

b.

seventeen

c.

seventy-four

d.

Look at these number names.

forty-one

e.

forty

f.

fourteen

h.

sixty

i.

sixty-seven

fifty

What do you notice when you read and say these numbers?
Do you always say the number of tens first?
What are some other numbers where you say the number of ones first?

a.

d.

sixty-three

fifty-six

b.

e.

eighty-four

c.

ninety-two

twenty-eight

f.

Step Ahead

I am greater than sixty and less than seventy.


The digit in my tens place is less than
the digit in my ones place.

thirty-two

ORIGO Education.

ORIGO Education.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.3

Read the clues. Write the numeral on the expander to match.

a.

b.

12

sixteen

1. 
Read the number name.
Write the numeral with and without the expander.

SA

Step Up

g.

What are some other numbers where you say the number of tens first?

PL
E

How would you show the numbers on these expanders?

I am less than forty and greater than thirty.


The digit in my ones place is less than
the digit in my tens place.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.3

13

Exploring the Relative Position of Two-Digit Numbers


on a Number Track

1.4

2. Write the numerals that should be shown in these positions.


a.

Look at this piece of number track.

30

40
50

What numeral would you write in the position shown by the red arrow?
How do you know?

42
Step Up

37

1. 
Draw a line to show where each numeral and number name
is located on the track.
10

20

90

c.

fourteen

twenty-one

23

30

SA

18

29

80

12

31

29

b.

PL
E

How can you figure out where each of these is located on the number track?

60

40

thirty-two

30

Step Ahead

Look at this piece of number track.

thirty-nine

40

40 50

38

forty-seven

14

forty-four

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.4

ORIGO Education.

46

ORIGO Education.

Loop the numerals that you could show on this piece of number track.
40

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.4

44

42

55

49

52

15

1.5

Exploring the Relative Position of Two-Digit Numbers


on a Number Line

2. Draw a line from each numeral to its position on the number line.
a.

Look at the number track.

42

58

50

60

53

55

69

74

51

47

79

85

93

70

80

90

100

71

What numeral would you write in the position that is yellow?


How do you know?

82

89

96

20

PL
E

40

20
Look at this number line above.
How is it the same as the number track? How is it different?
What numeral should we write at the start of the number line?

Which mark on the number line shows the same number


that is shaded on the number track? How do you know?

What is a quick way to find 17 on the number line?

Step Up

10

20

11

15

22

28

Step Ahead

30

27

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.5

Draw arrows from each numeral to its position on the number line.
Think carefully before you draw.
30

ORIGO Education.

19

ORIGO Education.

12

SA

1. Draw a line from each numeral to its position on the number line.

70

b.

What do you notice about the marks along the number line?
What do the marks of different length show? How do you know?

16

64

20
ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.5

25

35

40
17

Working with Two-Digit Numbers on a Number Line

1.6

2. 
Write the numerals that should be in the boxes above each number line. Then
draw a line from each box below the number lines to show that numerals position.

Look at this number line.

a.

10

20

30

10

What other numerals are you able to find on this number line?

15

15 is halfway between 10 and 20.

PL
E

How do you know?

30
35

50
45

b.

Mark 15 and 25 on the number line.


How could you find 19? What numeral would it be near?

20

How could you find 12?


What numerals are closer to 10 than 20? How do you know?
1. 
Write the numeral that should be in each box.
Think carefully before you write.

a.

b.
0

20

40

35

60
55

c.

40

10

SA

Step Up

25

40

50
25

60

90
75

80

Step Ahead

Divide the number line into smaller parts that are the same length.
Then find and mark 16 and 47.

c.
100

18

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.6

ORIGO Education.

50

ORIGO Education.

10

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.6

30

50

19

Comparing Two-Digit Numbers on a Number Line

1.7

2. Write the numeral that you think should be in each position.

Look at the this number line.

10

15

20
80

90

100

Which numeral is the greater distance from zero?


Which numeral is greater?

PL
E

What numeral should be marked at the position of each arrow? How do you know?

3. Write < or > to complete these. Use the number line from Question 2 to help.

What numerals are greater than 13 but less than 17? How do you know?

a.

Which symbols do we write for greater than and less than? How do you know?

1. 
Draw a line to join each numeral to its position on the number line.
Then write < or > in each circle to describe each pair of numerals.

a.
36

38

40

b.

50
20

49

54

62

60

69

89

Step Ahead

50

58

80

81

90

96

e.

h.

82

90

93

84

99

83

c.

f.

i.

92

95

87

95

88

98

47

a.

66

c.

70

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.7

ORIGO Education.

30

51

42

g.

SA

33

ORIGO Education.

Step Up

d.

88

b.

Write two-digit numerals and < or > to complete true


comparison sentences.

26
91

e.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.7

b.

d.

70
54

f.

21

Comparing and Ordering Two-Digit Numbers

1.8

This table shows amounts raised by Grades 3 and 4.


Use the table to answer Questions 3 and 4.
One

Two

Week
Three

$63

$58

$39

$45

$53

$59

$65

$40

$57

$38

Grade

Look at the amounts in these purses.

$51

Which purse has more money?


How do you know?

$26

Did you compare the digits in the tens


place or the ones place first? Why?

Four

Five

3. a. Write the amounts that are less than $50.

Which of these amounts are greater than $26 but less than $51?

PL
E

b. Write the amounts raised by Grade 3 in order from greatest to least.

$44

$14

$41

$34

Look at all the purses above.

4. Complete these sentences.

How would you figure out the order from least to greatest amount?

1. 
This table shows amounts raised by Grades 1 and 2 for a school
fundraiser. For each week, color the box that shows the greater
amount raised.

Grade

One

Two

$64

$48

$57

$62

Week
Three

Four
$55

$58

$35

Step Ahead

and Week

or

Grade 1 Week 5

b.

Grade 2 Week 1

or

c.

Grade 1 Week 3

or

Grade 2 Week 5

Total Money Raised


Grade 2
Grade 3

Grade 2 Week 4

Grade 1

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.8

ORIGO Education.

Grade 1 Week 1

ORIGO Education.

a.

Look at the tables on page 22 and at the top of this page.

a. Use a calculator to figure out how much money each grade raised in total.

2. 
Loop the week in which less money was raised.

22

b. Grade 4 raised less than Grade 3 in Week

$61

$50

raised more in Week 3 than Grade

Five

$39

a. Grade

SA

Step Up

c. Write the amounts raised by Grade 4 in order from least to greatest.

Grade 4

b. Which grade raised the greatest amount of money?


ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.8

23

Exploring Properties of Odd and Even Numbers

1.9

2. Look at this chart.

10

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

b. Write about a pattern you see.

PL
E

How would you describe the sorting?

a. Color the odd numbers blue.

These number mats have been sorted into two groups.

11

3. Write all the even numbers between 21 and 40.

What types of numbers are in each group?

What are some other numbers you could show in each group? How do you know?

4. Write all the odd numbers between 28 and 45.

Even numbers can be shown with a groups of two


arrangement where every part has a partner.
For odd numbers, there is always one left over.

5. Write the next two even numbers.


10

a.

b.

18

b.

25

c.

44

c.

33

SA

a.

1. a. 
Look at the chart below. Color the even numbers red.
Look at the number mats above to help.

Step Up

d.

50

d.

49

b. Write about a pattern you see.


1

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.9

ORIGO Education.

20

Step Ahead
ORIGO Education.

19

24

6. Write the next two odd numbers.

Write the numbers that you say when you start at 5 and count in
steps of 5. Then color the numbers that are even.

5 10 15
ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.9

25

1.10

Solving Number Puzzles


on a Hundred Chart

c.

d.

I am an even number.
I am between 60 and 80.
I am less than 64.

I am between 80 and 100.


The difference between my
digits is 9. I am an even number.

Where do you see or


hear two-digit numbers?
1
11

Find 28 on this hundred chart.


What does the 2 tell you?

e.

10

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

I am between 30 and 60. The


difference between my digits is 0.
I am an even number.

PL
E

31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

What are some things you know


about this two-digit number?

41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

g.

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
Read this number puzzle.

61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100

SA

63

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.10

b.
45

62

20
8

The total of the tens


digit and the ones
digit is always

c.

53

97
The difference between
the tens digit and the
ones digit is always

ORIGO Education.

The total of the tens


digit and the ones
digit is always
ORIGO Education.

26

81

27

I am between 60 and 70.


The difference between my digits
is 2. I am greater than 65.

31

44

53

a.

Figure out these number puzzles.


b.

For each flower, write what you notice about the digits
in each petal.

Step Ahead

What is the greatest possible number? How do you know?

I am between 30 and 40.


I am greater than 35, but less
than 39. I am an odd number.

I am greater than 60 and less


than 90. The difference between
my digits is 3. I am an even number.

81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90

Color the hundred chart to show all the possible answers. What do you notice?

a.

h.

I am between 40 and 60.


When you add my digits, the
total is 11. I am an odd number.

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80

I am a two-digit number.
When you add my tens and
ones digits, the total is 7.
What numbers could I be?

Step Up

I am an odd number.
When you add my 2 digits,
the total is 6. I am less than 20.

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

What does the 8 tell you?

What is the least possible number?

f.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.10

27

1.11

Sorting Data in Different Ways

b. Write about your sorting on page 28.

How could you sort these bow ties and neckties?

2. a. Sort the same hats another way. Then complete this graph to show your sort.

PL
E

Type of hat

Clown Hat Graph

4
5
6
Number of hats

10

b. Write about your sorting above.

How could you show your sorting?

Step Up

3. Describe another way you could sort the hats.

SA

What type of graph would you use? Why?

1. a. Your teacher will give you a sheet of pictures.



Sort the hats then complete this graph to show your sort.

Type of hat

Clown Hat Graph

Look at your graph in Question 2.


Complete these sentences to describe the data.

4
5
6
Number of hats

10

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.11

ORIGO Education.

ORIGO Education.

a. There are
0

28

Step Ahead

more

b. There are

less

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.11

hats than
hats than

hats.
hats.
29

1.12

Interpreting and Constructing One-to-One Picture Graphs

2. a. Draw

Type of movie

Comedy
means 1 vote

Comedy

Cartoon
Action
Scary
Number of votes

Cartoon
b. What is the most popular type of movie?

PL
E

Action

c.
What is the least popular type of movie?

Scary
Number of votes

d.

How many students voted for each type of movie?


How do you know?
How many more students voted for Action than Cartoon?

Step Up

Step Ahead

Comedy

1. 
Ask each student in your class to vote for their favorite type
of movie. Record the results in this tally chart.
Type of movie
Comedy

Tally

a. Complete this bar graph to show the data from your tally chart.
Favorite Movies

SA

How many students voted in total?


How do you know?

What types of movies are more popular than Scary?

students in total voted for Comedy and Scary.

e.
What is the difference in the number of votes for Action and Cartoon?

Type of movie

Type of movie

means 1 vote

Favorite Movies

Lily asked some students to vote for their favorite type of movie.
She showed the results with this picture graph.
Favorite Movies

to create a picture graph that shows your results.

Total

Cartoon
Action
Scary
0

Cartoon

5
6
7
8
Number of votes

10

11

12

13

b. Which type of graph do you like best? Explain your thinking.

Scary

30

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.12

ORIGO Education.

ORIGO Education.

Action

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 1.12

31

2.1

Working with Addition

2. Add the groups. Then write an addition fact to match.


a.

Which numbers are parts of the total? How do you know?


What equation could you write to match your story?

1. Write numbers to match each picture. Then write the addition fact.

a.
eggs in the basket.

There are

eggs out of the basket.

There are

eggs in total.

red apples.

Mano has eaten 7 olives and has


2 more to eat. How many olives
did he have in total?

There are

apples in total.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.1

Write numerals to complete different number facts.


Make each total less than 10.

ORIGO Education.

There are

Step Ahead

green apples.

b.

Kimie has 6 raspberries and


2 strawberries. How many
berries does she have in total?

There are

32

a.

SA
+

b.

3. Read the story. Then write an addition fact to match.

There are

ORIGO Education.

Step Up

d.

PL
E

Which number is the total in your story? How do you know?

b.

c.

What addition story could you say about this picture?

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.1

33

2.2

Using the Commutative Property of Addition


with Count-On Facts

2. 
Draw lines to join matching turnaround facts.
Cross out the facts that do not have a match.

Look at these pictures. What do you notice?

8 + 3 = 11
1+6=7

4+1=5

0+8=8

3 + 8 = 11

PL
E

7+2=9

2+7=9
What addition facts could you write to match the pictures?

3+2=5

What do you call a pair of facts like this?

2+3=5
8+1=9

These are called turnaround facts. Turnaround facts


have the same parts and the same total.

1+8=9
8+0=8

3. Write true or false.

a.

b.

+
+

2
4

=
=

c.

+
+

b.

d.

4+1=5
is the turnaround for

3 + 9 = 12
is the turnaround for

c.

12 + 9 = 3

e.

2 + 8 = 10
is the turnaround for

6+2=8
is the turnaround for
4+4=8

f.

0+3=3
is the turnaround for

1+4=5

4 + 6 = 10

3+3=0

d.

a.

Step Ahead

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.2

ORIGO Education.

34

5+0=5
is the turnaround for
0+5=5

ORIGO Education.

4
2

1. Write two addition facts to match each picture.

SA

Step Up

a.

Write the turnaround sentences to match.

14 + 2 = 16

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.2

b.

3 + 12 = 15

c.

17 + 0 = 17

=
35

2.3

Relating Addition and Subtraction (Count-On Facts)

2. 
Look at each sheet of stickers. Complete the sentences to match.
a.

Kristina bought a sheet of 12 stickers.


She put 3 stickers on a card she was making.

b.
=6

4+

=4

6
What subtraction story could you say
about what happened?
+ 9 = 12

Which number is the total in your story?


Which numbers are parts of the total?

PL
E

c.

What addition story could you say about the 12 stickers?


Which number is the total in your story?
Which numbers are parts of the total?

d.
10

a.

SA

b.

The total is
36

.
.

One part is
The other part is
The total is

=8

11 dots in total

b.

7 dots in total

c.

9 dots in total

Step Ahead

.
.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.3

ORIGO Education.

The other part is

+8=9

ORIGO Education.

One part is

=8

3. 
Figure out how many dots are covered.
Then write the matching number sentences.

1. Write the number of stickers on each card and the total.

a.

= 10

8+

What do you notice about the parts and total in the addition and subtraction stories?

Step Up

=9

12

a.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.3

Write numerals to make each sentence true.

b.

c.

+
37

Working with Count-On Fact Families

2.4

2. For each number fact, color the total red. Then color the two parts blue.
a.

Look at this picture.


What addition story could you say?

b.

What are the parts and total for your story?

d.

What two addition facts could you write to match?

e.

What two subtraction facts could you write to match?

c.

10

10

f.

PL
E

3. 
Use the same color to show the number facts that belong in the same
fact family. The first one has been done for you.
2+1=3

a.

b.

38

9
9

=
ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.4

11 2 = 9

6+1=7

1+2=3

93=6

43=1

71=6

9 + 2 = 11

6+3=9

3+6=9

1+6=7

11 9 = 2

a.

76=1

32=1

Write the other number sentences that complete these families.

1 1 + 2 = 13

b.

3 + 15 = 18

c.

1 4 + 1 = 15

ORIGO Education.

9
9

31=2

Step Ahead

ORIGO Education.

c.

SA

Step Up

2 + 9 = 11

3 + 8 = 11

1. 
Write two addition facts to match each picture.
Then write two subtraction facts to match.

96=3

3+1=4

What other fact families do you know?

11 3 = 8

41=3

These two addition facts and two


subtraction facts make a fact family.

1+3=4

11 8 = 3

What are these four facts called?

8 + 3 = 11

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.4

39

2.5

Extending the Count-On Strategy to Two-Digit Numbers

3. Count on 10 or 20 and write the total. You can use the chart to help.

Look at this chart. Loop a number between 13 and 18.


2

c. 53 + 20 =

e. 68 + 20 =

f. 10 + 74 =

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

41

43

46

47

48

52 53 54 55 56

57

58 59 60

61

62 63 64 65 66

67

68 69

70

71

72

76

77

78

80

81

82 83 84 85 86

87

88 89 90

PL
E

42

51

Think about the number of tens and ones in your number.


What happens to the tens when you move right on the chart?
What happens to the ones?
What happens to the tens and ones when you move down on the chart?
1. 
Count on 1, 2, or 3 and write the total.
You can use the chart above to help.

Step Up

b. 57 + 20 =

d. 10 + 67 =

a. 43 + 10 =

73

d. 23 + 1 =

c. 18 + 2 =

e. 2 + 27 =

75

49

79

50

b.

c.
20 + 59 =

82 + 10 =

f. 25 + 3 =

h. 34 + 3 =

i.

5. Count on to figure out these totals. Use turnarounds to help you.

1 + 33 =

SA

g. 3 + 32 =

74

46 + 30 =

b. 3 + 16 =

45

4. Count on to figure out the total. Then write the turnaround.


a.

a. 11 + 2 =

44

a. 30 + 45 =

b. 2 + 86 =

d. 20 + 33 =

e.

c.

3 + 17 =

2. Write the total. Then write the turnaround.


b.

c.

14 + 3 =

d.

+
e.

Step Ahead

f.

3 + 24 =

40

29 + 1 =

f. 30 + 68 =

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.5

Use the chart above to help you.

Anna has 4 dimes and 6 pennies. Noah has 23 pennies and 2 dimes.
Amos has 1 dime and 38 pennies.

3 + 33 =
ORIGO Education.

1 + 97 =

38 + 1 =

2 + 26 =

ORIGO Education.

a.

Who has the most money?


ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.5

41

Using Place Value (Hundred Chart) to Add


Two-Digit Numbers

2.6

What is the total cost of these clothes?


How did you figure it out?

2. 
Start with the greater number. Write addition sentences to show how
you add the tens, then the ones. Then write the total.
a.

$21

How could you use a hundred chart


to show how you add the two numbers?
12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

50

51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

59

60

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

70

30
4

74 + 15 =

92

+
+

=
d.

16 + 83 =

=
=

46 + 32 =

3. 
Start with the greater number. Write addition sentences to show how
you add the ones, then the tens. Then write the total.

SA

c.

f. 41 + 21 =

g. 13 + 11 =

h. 37 + 31 =

i. 21 + 13 =

57

+
+

=
d.

=
=

35 + 54 =

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.6

Step Ahead
ORIGO Education.

e. 35 + 21 =

c. 49 + 11 =

d. 28 + 12 =

1
20

66 + 13 =

ORIGO Education.

b. 43 + 23 =

16 + 72 =

1. 
Draw arrows on the chart above to show how you add each
of these. Then write the totals.

a. 15 + 12 =

b.

56 + 21 =

56
57

I would start with 48 and work with the


ones first. 48 plus 1 is 49. 49 plus 20 is 69.

42

I would start with 48 and add the tens


first. 48 plus 20 is 68. Then 1 more is 69.

Step Up

62
92

c.

a.

Which method do you like best? Why?

62 + 34 =

PL
E

11

$ 48

b.

15

Write the missing numbers along this trail.


+13

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.6

+21

+11

+22

43

Using Place Value (Number Line) to Add


Two-Digit Numbers

2.7

2. 
Draw jumps to show how you could count on to figure out each of these.
Then write the totals.
a.

How can you figure out the total cost


of the guitar and book?

$73

How could you use this number line


to show how you added?

46 + 12 =

$14

40

50

60

70

30

40

50

60

60

70

80

90

50

60

70

80

30

40

50

60

b.
80

35 + 21 =

90

PL
E

70

c.

I started at 73 and added the tens then the ones of 14.


I can draw jumps like this to show how I added.

62 + 27 =

Step Up

50

73

80

83

d.

87

90

55 + 24 =

1. a. 
Draw jumps on this number line to show how you would
add 56 and 13.

SA

70

+4

+10

60

e.
33 + 16 =

70

b. Draw jumps on this number line to show another way you could add 56 and 13.

44

70
ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.7

ORIGO Education.

60

ORIGO Education.

50

Step Ahead

13

Write the missing numbers on this trail.

+21

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.7

+40

+14

+11

45

2.8

Reading and Writing Time on the Hour


and Half Past the Hour

2. Write each time in words.


a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

f.

Look at this analog clock.


What does the long hand tell you?
What does the short hand tell you?
What time is shown on the clock?

2:00

PL
E

Look at this digital clock.


What do the numbers on the left side of the colon tell you?
What do the numbers on the right side of the colon tell you?
What time is shown on the clock?
How many minutes are in one hour?
How many minutes are in half an hour? How do you know?

g.

4:30

What times are they showing?


How do you know?

4:00

i.

12:00

SA

1. 
Loop in red the clocks that show a time on the hour.
Loop in blue the clocks that show a time half past the hour.

Step Ahead

Loop the clocks that show a time after 11 oclock in the morning
and before half past 4 in the afternoon.

1:30

8:03

7:30

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.8

1 1:30

ORIGO Education.

3:00

ORIGO Education.

5:30

46

6:30

h.

Look at these two clocks.

Step Up

12:30

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.8

12:00

1:00

47

2.9

Working with Duration (Hours)

3. Write the hours that have passed.


a.

What time is shown on this clock?


How do you know?

start

Where will the clock hands be pointing one hour later?


How do you know?
What time is one hour later than 8 oclock?
c.

PL
E

How long is the movie? How do you know?


How will the clock hands move during that time? How do you know?

48

start

finish

9:30

5:00

1 1:30

hour

8 oclock

d.

half past 9

12:30

c.

3:00

:
ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.9

ORIGO Education.

b.

Step Ahead

ORIGO Education.

d.

hours

b.

1 1 oclock

c.

:
e.

1 oclock

half past 5

:
f.

half past 12

start

finish

oclock

2. Write the times that are 3 hours later.

9:00

c.

hours

finish

SA

oclock

a.

a.

1. Write the time that is 2 hours later than the time on each clock.
half past

finish

4. Read each time. Then write the time that was 2 hours before.

The minute hand will make 2 full turns around


the clock and at the same time the hour hand
will move forward 2 numbers to show 2 hours.

b.

start

4:00

Imagine the clock on the left shows the start


time for a movie and the clock on the right
shows the finish time.

a.

start

hours

Look at these two clocks.

Step Up

b.

finish

Draw the missing clock


hands to show a start and
finish time for an activity
that lasts 5 hours.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.9

49

2.10

Identifying Five-Minute Intervals

2. Write numbers to show each time.

a.

b.

Count in steps of five around this clock.


Write the numbers you say.
What happens when you reach 12 on the clock?

minutes past

How many minutes past the hour


is a half-past time? How do you know?

d.

PL
E

c.

How many minutes past the hour is this clock showing?


Which hour is it?
What time is the clock showing?

minutes past

e.

What is another way you could read this time?

b.

minutes past 8
50

a.

c.

minutes past 9

minutes past 4
ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.10

start

ORIGO Education.

a.

Step Ahead

ORIGO Education.

1. Write each time.

minutes past
f.

minutes past

SA

What time is showing on this clock?


How do you know?

Step Up

minutes past

Count in steps of five to figure out how many minutes have passed.
finish

minutes

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.10

minutes past

b.

start

finish

minutes

51

2.11

Working with Five-Minute Intervals

2. 
Draw lines to connect clocks to times.
Cross out the two clocks that do not have a match.

What time is showing on this digital clock?

9:35

How would you show the same time on an analog clock?


How do you know?

2: 45

ten past six

fifteen past five

Look at this clock.


Why is there a zero just before the five?

9:05

What different ways could you say


the time shown on this clock?

9:20

Twenty past nine.

52

5: 15

twenty-five past twelve

two forty-five

three thirty

twenty past eight

12: 25

1: 00

1. Draw lines to connect the matching times.

7:20

10: 15

7: 10
ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.11

In each pattern, the next clock shows five minutes more.


Complete the missing times.

a.

ORIGO Education.

3:45

Step Ahead

ORIGO Education.

2:35

five past eleven

6: 20

SA

Nine twenty.

Step Up

PL
E

How would you show the same time on an analog clock?


How do you know?

one forty

3: 30

b.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.11

3: 05

3: 10

:
53

2.12

Working with Duration (Hours and Minutes)

3. Write how many minutes have passed.


a.

What time is shown on this clock? How do you know?

start

finish

b.

start

finish

Where will the clock hands be pointing one hour later?


How do you know?
minutes

Where will the clock hands be pointing five minutes later?


Where will the clock hands be pointing ten minutes later?

c.

3: 15

I would count on 15 minutes in steps


of five 3:15, 3:20, 3:25, 3:30.

b.

minutes past

c.

minutes past

Step Ahead

54

c.

minutes

b. At what time did the cake


come out of the baking pan?

:
ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.12

Read the story. Then answer the questions.

a. Daniel started reading at 4:40.


He read for half an hour.
When did he finish reading?

1:40

ORIGO Education.

1 1:20

4:55

minutes past

ORIGO Education.

8: 10

b.

4:20

2. Write the times that are 15 minutes later.


a.

finish

minutes

a. At what time did the mixture


go into the oven?

SA

a.

1:40

start

Juan and Sam started making a cake at 9:10.


It took 5 minutes to find all the things they needed.
It took another 10 minutes to prepare and mix all the ingredients.
Then the mixture was placed in the oven and cooked for an hour.
When the cake was cooked, they let it cool for 5 minutes before
taking the cake out of the baking pan.

1. Write the times that are 5 minutes later.

1: 10

d.

4. Read the story. Then write the times.

What time is five minutes later than 2:55? How do you know?

Step Up

finish

PL
E

What time is showing on this clock?


How could you figure out the time that is 15 minutes later?

start

minutes

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 2.12

b. Donna left her friends house at


2:50. She arrived home at 3:15.
How long did it take to get home?
minutes

55

3.1

Working with Hundreds

2. oop groups of 10 tens blocks to make one hundred.


L
Then write the number of hundreds, tens, and ones.

Where have you seen or heard one hundred?

a.

My great-grandmother is 100 years old.


There are 100 cents in one dollar.

hundreds

tens

ones

hundreds

tens

ones

tens

ones

c.

What different ways could you show 125 using blocks?

125 ones.

12 tens and
5 ones, or

d.

hundred

SA

1. 
Loop groups of 10 tens blocks to make one hundred.
Write the number of hundreds. Then write the number of tens
and ones left over.

a.

tens

Step Ahead

ones

a.

b.

tens

ones

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.1

ORIGO Education.

hundred

ORIGO Education.

b.

56

hundreds

hundreds

PL
E

How could you show one hundred using blocks like these?
How many tens blocks would you need?
How many ones blocks would you need?
What other block could you use?

Step Up

ones

b.

What are some different ways you could show one hundred?

1 hundreds block,
2 tens, and 5 ones, or

tens

c.

Write the missing numbers.

1 hundred 4 tens 7 ones

is the same as

tens

ones

3 hundreds 4 tens 5 ones

is the same as

tens

ones

3 hundreds 4 tens 0 ones

is the same as

tens

ones

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.1

57

3.2

Writing Three-Digit Numbers

2. Write the matching number on the expanders.


a.

What number is shown by these blocks?


How do you know?

How could you show the same number


on these expanders?
How do you know where to write
the digits?
Look at the picture of blocks above.
Look at these expanders.
What blocks must be added to those
above to create this number?

b.

c.

1. 
Look at the blocks. Write the matching number on the expander.

a.

Step Ahead

SA

Step Up

PL
E

b.

Color blocks to show a number that uses more tens blocks


than ones blocks. Then write the number on the expanders.

58

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.2

ORIGO Education.

ORIGO Education.

c.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.2

59

3.3

Reading and Representing Three-Digit Numbers

2. Color blocks to show the number on the expander.


a.

What number is shown by these blocks?

b.

d.

a.

1. Look at the blocks. Write the matching number on the expander.

e.

SA

Step Up

c.

How would you read and say these numbers?

PL
E

How do you read the number?


What parts of the number do you say together?

b.

How could you show the same number


on this expander?

How do you know?

Step Ahead

Color more blocks to match the number on the expander.

c.

60

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.3

ORIGO Education.

ORIGO Education.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.3

61

3.4

Writing Three-Digit Number Names

What number is shown on this expander?


How do you know?

2. 
Look at the blocks. Write the number on the expander.
Then complete the number name.

a.

How do you read the number?


What do you notice?

hundred
b.

ten
forty

twenty
fifty

thirty

one

two

three

sixty

four

five

six

seventy eighty ninety

hundred

b.

1. 
Look at the blocks. Write the matching number on the expander.

hundred

d.

a.

hundred

c.

hundred

SA

Step Up

seven eight nine

PL
E

Which of these number words would you use to complete the number name to match?

Step Ahead

Look at these two pictures of blocks. Figure out the total


of the two numbers they show. Then write the total in words.

62

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.4

ORIGO Education.

ORIGO Education.

c.

hundred
ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.4

63

3.5

Writing Three-Digit Numerals

2. Write the matching number on the expander, then write the numeral.
a.

How could you figure out the number


shown in this picture of blocks?

I add the places in


my head like this:
400 + 20 + 5 = 425
How could you show the same number
on these expanders?

c.

How would you write the numeral without an expander?

64

d.

1. Look at the blocks. Write the matching number on the expanders.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.5

Look at these pictures of blocks.


Figure out and write the total of the two numbers they show.

ORIGO Education.

Step Ahead

ORIGO Education.

b.

SA

a.

Look at the picture of blocks above.


How many of each type of block must be added
to create this number? How do you know?

Step Up

PL
E

b.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.5

65

Identifying Three-Digit Numbers on a Number Line

3.6

Write the numeral for each arrow. Think carefully before you write.
3.

Look at this number line. What do you notice?

What numeral would you write in the position shown by the arrow? How do you know?

You could split the part between 0 and


100 into 10 smaller parts that are the
same length. The first part would be 10.

b.

c.

2.
200

400
b.

c.

500

a.

b.

c.

d.

900

800
f.

g.

h.

b.

c.

d.

200
f.

d.

600
d.

Step Ahead

700

e.

a.

800
e.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.6

ORIGO Education.

a.

300

ORIGO Education.

100

66

h.

a.

500

g.

h.

Write the numeral that should be in the position shown by each arrow.

1.

a.

g.

100
e.

SA

Step Up

4.

5.

Could you draw more marks to find the number 1? Explain your thinking.

d.

f.

700
e.

Where would you draw more marks to find 10?

c.

400

PL
E

How could you draw marks to show steps of 50 from 0?


What numerals would you label at these marks?

b.

300
e.

400

What other numerals could you label on the number line?

a.

600
e.

620

Natalie has made some mistakes on her number line.


Find each mistake and write the correct numeral.
b.

c.

660

720

d.

790

700
630

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.6

f.

670

800
g.

730

h.

760

67

3.7

Measuring Length with Uniform Non-Standard Units

2. Measure the length of each worm using cubes.

Jess found this worm in her garden.


She used cubes to measure its length.

Is her measurement accurate? How do you know?


How would you use the cubes to measure the worm?
I would join the cubes together so that
there were no gaps and no overlaps.

1.  ake a cube train with five cubes. Color the worms


M
that are close to the length of your train.

Use cubes to help you draw a worm that is between


5 and 7 cubes in length.

ORIGO Education.

Step Ahead

ORIGO Education.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.7

cubes

cubes

SA
68

cubes

cubes

Is the worm longer or shorter than 5 cubes? How do you know?

Step Up

PL
E

cubes

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.7

69

3.8

Introducing the Inch

2. Use your inch ruler to measure the length of each tool picture.

What do you know about one inch?


My dad said his shoe is about 10 inches long.

The store sells 6-inch subs.


inches

PL
E

What are some things that you think measure one inch?

Some books are


about one inch thick.

Use a pattern block to find some things


that measure one inch in the classroom.

inches

1. Use your inch ruler to measure the length of each picture.

SA

Step Up

This pattern block is one inch long and one inch wide.

inches

Step Ahead

Nails come in many shapes and sizes.


Draw a nail that is between 3 and 4 inches long.

inches

70

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.8

ORIGO Education.

inches

ORIGO Education.

inches

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.8

71

3.9

Working with Inches

2. 
This table shows the measurement of other
televisions. Complete each sentence.

In some countries, the word for inch is


the same as the word for thumb.

b.

inch

Look at your thumb.

Kaitlyn

has the smallest television.

c. Kaitlyns television is

40
60

Morgan

has the largest television.

46

Stevie

a.

Television Size
(inches)

Elijah

The inch is a length measurement that was once used


to describe the width of a mans thumb at the base
of the nail.

Student

52

inches smaller than Elijahs.

How does your inch compare to that of other students?

Measurements for televisions and whiteboards


are taken from opposite corners like this.

d. Morgans television is

86 inches

c. Cole or Sumi
d. Carson
or Sean

M
Sumi

32

Carson

50

Work with a teacher to measure the size of a school whiteboard.


Write the size below.

42

Sean

37

Cole

Television Size
(inches)

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.9

inches

ORIGO Education.

b. Carson
or Cole

72

Step Ahead

ORIGO Education.

a. Sumi or Sean

inches.

3. 
Look at the table of television sizes from Question 1 and Question 2.
Write the measurements in order from least to greatest.

1. This table shows the measurement of some students televisions.

Student

s .

s television is 6 inches larger than Elijahs television.

g.

SA

What measuring tool


would you use to
measure a whiteboard?

In each pair, loop the student who


has the larger television.

s television is 20 inches larger than

e.

T
f.  he difference between the size of Morgans
television and the size of Kaitlyns television is

This is a picture of a 86-inch whiteboard.

Step Up

inches smaller than Stevies.

PL
E

Today, the inch is standard and is still used as a length measurement.


The inch is also used to describe the lengths seen in different objects such
as the width of a frying pan, the length of a nail, or the height of a door.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.9

73

3.10

Introducing Feet

2. Find and write objects in the classroom to match each length.


Less than 2 feet

What do you know about the measure called a foot?

About 2 feet

More than 2 feet

How long do you think it is?


The foot was once used to describe the length
of a mans foot.
Imagine you measured the length
of the classroom using your feet.

PL
E

Would you get the same answer as your teacher? Explain your thinking.
Use orange pattern blocks to measure the length of your ruler.
What do you notice?
What could you write to describe one foot?
One foot is the same as 12 inches.

3. 
Your teacher will give you some grid paper and explain how to make
a tape measure. Use the tape to measure the width of each object.

Step Up

A big book could


be 1 foot wide.

Desk

about

Some mattresses are


about 1 foot thick.

SA

A wooden spoon is
about 1 foot long.

a.

What are some things at home that measure about one foot long,
one foot wide, or one foot thick?

Step Ahead

1. 
Look around the classroom.
Then write some objects that you would measure in feet.

feet

b.

c.

Whiteboard
about

feet

Door
about

feet

Complete the table. Then write how you found


the missing numbers.

Feet

Inches

12

24

36

74

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.10

ORIGO Education.

ORIGO Education.

4
5

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.10

75

Working with Feet and Inches

2. Color the bar graph to show the height of each plant in Question 1.

How many inches equal two feet?


How do you know?

a. The marigold
and the violet

What is the height of this plant?


How could you say the height a different way?
How much taller than one foot is the plant?

15 inches

What are some other lengths that are between


one foot and two feet long?

inches

PL
E

b.  he daffodil and
T
the marigold

inches

c. 
The violet and
the daisy

1. This table show the height of four plants.

Daffodil

17 inches

Violet

8 inches

Daisy

15 inches

Marigold

19 inches

a. The daffodil is
b. The daisy is
c. The marigold is
d. The violet is
76

foot and
foot and
foot and

d. 
The marigold and
the daisy
inches

Step Ahead

inches high.

Daffodil

Violet

inches high.

.
foot and

inches.

c.  foot and 4 inches is the same as


1

inches less than one foot.


ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.11

Marigold

Write these lengths another way.

b.  inches is the same as


16

inches more.

Daisy

Type of flower

a.  inches is the same as


12

ORIGO Education.

Complete these sentences.

Height

SA

Plant

inches

ORIGO Education.

Step Up

more than 1 foot

W
3.  rite the differences
in height between
these plants.

Plant Heights

20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0

less than 1 foot

How many inches equal one foot?

Height in inches

3.11

inches.

d.  foot and 7 inches is the same as


1

inches.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.11

77

Introducing Yards

2. Write one object that you think could match each length.

How could you measure things like a sports track


or a building?

How many feet equal one yard?


How can you figure out the number of inches
that equal one yard?
What are some things that are about one yard long,
one yard wide, or one yard thick?

a. 2 yards
b. 5 yards
c. 10 yards

PL
E

How long is one yard?

10 20 30 4 0 50 4 0 30 20 10

Look at the classroom yardstick.


What do you notice?

TOUCHDOWN
10 20 30 4 0 50 4 0 30 20 10

3.12

d. 50 yards

3. 
Use your tape measure to measure each length.
a.

The classroom is about

TOUCHDOWN

A big tree could


be 1 yard thick.

yards long.

Step Ahead

SA

Step Up

A door is about
1 yard wide.

1. Write inches, feet, or yards to show how you would measure


each of these.

a. television

The library is about

The library is about


yards wide.

Feet
3

e. building

f. adults height

g. library book

h. handspan
ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.12

ORIGO Education.

d. cell phone

ORIGO Education.

c. whiteboard

78

d.

Complete the table.


Then write how you found the missing numbers.

Yards
1

b. sports track

The classroom is about


yards wide.

yards long.

c.

A baseball bat is
nearly 1 yard long.

b.

10

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 3.12

79

4.1

Exploring the Comparison Model of Subtraction

2.  raw jumps to figure out the difference for each pair of shaded numbers.
D
Then complete the sentences.

Look at these cubes.


How many green cubes are there?
How many orange cubes are there?

a.

b.
1

How many more orange cubes


are there than green cubes?
How could you figure it out?

so

The difference is

The difference is

so

PL
E

How could you show your thinking on a number track?

c.

b.

The difference is
so 7 5 =
c.

10

so

11

12 13 14 15

so

The difference is

10

11

12 13 14

e.
1

The difference is

The difference is

so 9 6 =

10
so

11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

Alisha found a worm that was 16 inches long.


Miguel found a worm that was 11 inches long,
and Alexa found a worm that was 4 inches long.

Step Ahead

Loop the two students who found worms that had the greatest difference in length.

so 16 9 =

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.1

ORIGO Education.

ORIGO Education.

The difference is

80

d.

1.  igure out the difference between each pair of cube trains.


F
Then complete the sentence.

a.

The difference is

SA

Step Up

I can count on or count


back. The difference
between the numbers
is always three jumps.

Alisha

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.1

Miguel

Alexa

81

4.2

Extending the Count-Back Strategy to Two-Digit Numbers

Dana has saved $9.


If she buys this ball, how much money will she have left?

2. Write the differences. You can use the chart to help.


a.

10

11

12

13

14

c.

What is another way you could figure out the difference?

86

76

66

56

f.

60 2 =

56

57

58

59

60

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

70

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

80

82

83

84

85

86

87

88

89

90

92

93

94

95

96

97

98

99

100

d.

63 10 =

What will be the next three numbers in this number pattern? How do you know?

55

91

90 20 =

15

PL
E

54

81

b.

53

61

80 1 =

52

71

$2

Draw jumps on the number track to show your thinking.

51

e.
79 20 =

75 3 =
g.

h.

96 20 =

62 10 =

58

56

54

What will be the next three numbers in this number pattern? How do you know?

3. Figure out and write the differences.

52

a.

What do you think these patterns would look like on a hundred chart?

f. 15 3 =

g. 10 1 =

h. 8 3 =

i. 7 2 =

25 10 =

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.2

Step Ahead
ORIGO Education.

e. 10 0 =

f.
42 01 =

c. 11 2 =

d. 14 2 =

47 2 =

e.
36 1 =

ORIGO Education.

b. 9 3 =

c.

68 30 =

d.

1.  rite the differences. You can use the number track


W
above to help you.

a. 5 2 =

82

53 10 =

SA

Step Up

b.

89

Write the missing numbers along this trail.


2

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.2

30

20
83

4.3

Using Place Value (Hundred Chart) to Subtract


Two-Digit Numbers

2.  rite subtraction sentences to show how you count back the tens,
W
then the ones. Then write the difference.

How much money will be left in the wallet after buying the ball?

a.

How did you figure it out?

$21

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

50

51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

59

60

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

70

c.

d.

=
=
96 13 =

3.  rite subtraction sentences to show how you count back the ones,
W
then the tens. Then write the difference.
a.

SA

I would subtract the ones then the tens of the price.


67 take away 1 is 66. Then 66 take away 20 is 46.

c.

76 21 =

f. 45 32 =

g. 65 11 =

h. 60 21 =

i. 69 12 =

=
87 22 =

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.3

Step Ahead
ORIGO Education.

e. 27 11 =

d.

c. 29 11 =

d. 48 13 =

ORIGO Education.

b. 53 12 =

92 31 =

78 3 = 75
75 20 =

1.  raw arrows on the chart above to show how you figure out each
D
of these. Then write the differences.

a. 32 21 =

b.

78 23 =

I would start with 67 and subtract the tens and the ones
of the price. 67 take away 20 is 47. Then 1 less is 46.

84

89 32 =

PL
E

13

12

82 21 =

75 20 = 55
55 2 =

$67

11

Step Up

75 22 =

How could you use this chart to show


how to subtract the price?

b.

98

12

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.3

Write the missing numbers along this trail.


21

23

11

85

Using Place Value (Number Line) to Subtract


Two-Digit Numbers

4.4

2.  rite the difference. Then draw jumps on the number line to show your thinking.
W
a.

How much will be left in the wallet after buying the cap?

66 13 =

How do you know?


$57

How could you use this number line to show


how you figured it out?

$13
40

50

60

70

40

50

60

b.
57 15 =
50

60

PL
E

40

30

c.

85 21 =

I started at 57 and counted back the tens then the ones of


the price. I can draw jumps like this to show how I subtracted.

40

44

10
47

50

57

86

90

40

50

60

70

60

30

70

80

90

e.

SA

88 26 =

50

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.4

ORIGO Education.

70
70

Step Ahead

ORIGO Education.

60
60

80

60

50
60
70
50
60
70
Draw jumps on this number line to show another way you could figure out 68 12.
b. Draw jumps to show another way you could figure out 68 12.

50
50

70

67 23 =

Draw jumps on this number line on show how you would figure out 68 12.
1. a.  raw jumps to this number line to show how you would
D
figure out 68 12.

Step Up

60

d.

50

52 +

Draw a number line to help you figure out the missing number.

= 79

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.4

87

4.5

Working with the Doubles Addition Strategy

2. Write the doubles fact that helps. Then complete each double-plus-2 fact.
a.

What doubles fact does this domino show?


What number sentence can you write
to show this double?

I can use double

5+7=

I can use double

3+5=

I can use double

7+9=

How can you use that doubles fact to figure out


the total number of dots on this domino?

c.

What number sentence can you write to match?

Step Up

3. Write the total. Then write the turnaround.

6+7=

8+6=

d.

I can use double

+
f.

8 + 10 =

6+5=

=
10 + 9 =

3+4=

Step Ahead

7+8=

a.  rite a doubles equation that


W
has a sum greater than 20.

b.  hen use this known sum to write four near-doubles equations.


T

c.
8+9=

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.5

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.5

ORIGO Education.

ORIGO Education.

+
I can use double

88

e.

c.

4+6=

8+7=

SA

I can use double

b.

4+5=

1.  rite the doubles fact you would use to figure out each
W
double-plus-1 fact. Then complete the fact.

a.

b.

a.

What doubles fact would you use


to figure out each of these?

PL
E

b.

=
89

4.6

Relating Addition and Subtraction (Doubles Facts)

2.  igure out how many dots are covered. Then write the matching equations.
F
a.

There are 15 cows on this farm. Some of the cows are in the barn.

9 dots in total

b.

13 dots in total

c.

11 dots in total

How could you figure out the number of cows in the barn?

d.

The other part is

The total is

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.6

e.

14 dots in total

f.

16 dots in total

+
=

Write a number fact to match each story.


b. Donna and Keisha have 12 berries
together. Keisha has 5 berries.
How many berries does
Donna have?

c. Maria bought 16 stickers.


There are 7 red stickers and the
rest are blue. How many stickers
are blue?

The total is

a. Tyler put 6 cookies on a plate.


The plate can hold 14 cookies.
How many more cookies can
Tyler fit on the plate?

d. Luis and Tien have read


12 books in total. Tien has
read 6 books. How many books
has Luis read?

ORIGO Education.

One part is

The other part is

90

ORIGO Education.

One part is

Step Ahead

SA

b.

17 dots in total

1. Write the two parts and the total for each picture.

a.

I could start with 15 and take away 7,


or I could think 7 plus "something" is 15.

Step Up

PL
E

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.6

91

4.7

Working with Doubles Fact Families

2.  he circle shows the total. The squares show the parts.


T
Write the missing numbers, then complete the fact family.

Look at these facts.

4 + 6 = 10

a.

10 4 = 6

6 + 4 = 10

b.

17

10 6 = 4

9
Use red to loop each total.
Use blue to loop the parts in each fact.

c.

15

PL
E

What do you notice about the parts and total in the facts?

What do you call these four related facts?

What is the fact family for each of these dominos?

3.  se the same color to show the facts that belong in the same fact family.
U

Step Up

1. Write the fact family for each domino.


b.

c.

95=4

6 + 8 = 14

5+4=9

73=4

11 6 = 5

94=5

14 = 8 + 6

7=4+3

14 8 = 6

Step Ahead

=
=

Write numbers to complete these doubles and near-doubles facts.

a.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.7

+
ORIGO Education.

11 5 = 6

11 = 6 + 5

ORIGO Education.

74=3

4+5=9

92

5 + 6 = 11

14 6 = 8

SA

a.

3+4=7

What do you notice?

d.

19

b.

11

c.

e.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.7

f.

14

+
93

4.8

Extending the Doubles Addition Strategy


Beyond the Facts

2. Double the tens, then double the ones. Write the total.
a.

12 + 12

10
2
20 + 4

Double

How could you figure it out?

$20

c.

is

20
4

31 + 31
Double

30

is

Double

is

=
d.

24 + 24

PL
E

20 is the same as 2 tens. Double 2 is 4 so double


2 tens is 4 tens. The total is 40.

is

Double

Look at this shirt.


What will be the total cost of two shirts?

b.

45 + 45

is

Double

is

Double

How could you figure out the total cost


of two pairs of shorts?

Double

is

Double

is

$23

3. Write the totals.

I could double the tens first. Double 20 is 40.


Then I would double the ones. Double 3 is 6.
So 40 plus 6 is 46.

a.

b. 21 + 21 =

c. 44 + 44 =

d. 35 + 35 =

SA

Step Up

a. 14 + 14 =

e. 43 + 43 =

f. 13 + 13 =

1. Write the missing numbers.


b.

80 + 80
is the same as
tens +

c.

70 + 70

is the same as
tens

tens +

Step Ahead

90 + 90

Choose one of the equations from Question 3.


Write a doubles story to match.

is the same as

tens

tens +

tens

94

b. 30 + 30 =

c. 50 + 50 =

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.8

ORIGO Education.

a. 40 + 40 =

ORIGO Education.

2. Write the totals.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.8

95

4.9

Working with Time Quarter Past the Hour

2. Draw hands on the analog clock to show the matching time.


a.

Look at this analog clock.

b.

2: 15

Where will the hands be pointing when the time


is 11 oclock? How do you know?

c.

9: 15

d.

8: 15

7:30

Where will the hands be pointing when the time is half past 11?
How do you know?

PL
E

How many minutes has the minute hand


moved past the hour on this clock?

3. Write each time two different ways.

What are the different ways you could read


or say the time shown on the clock?

a.

b.

quarter past

nine fifteen, or

How could you show the same time on this digital clock?

Step Up

c.

d.

:
ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.9

minutes past

Complete the clocks to keep each pattern going.

a.

ORIGO Education.

:
96

Step Ahead

half past

minutes past

ORIGO Education.

b.

d.

quarter past

1. Write the matching time on the digital clock.

a.

minutes past

c.

SA

How do you know?

minutes past

a quarter past nine.

Fifteen minutes
past nine,

half past

b.

10:30

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.9

1 1:30

12:30

:
97

4.10

Identifying and Recording Time Using a.m. and p.m.

2. Write each of these as digital times. Loop a.m. or p.m.


a.

At what time does a day begin? What time does it end?


How do you know?
What time is exactly in the middle of the day?

twenty-five minutes past ten


in the morning

What do you know about this time of the day?


c.

How could you show the difference between 6 oclock


in the morning and 6 oclock in the afternoon?

We write p.m. to describe times between noon and midnight.

e.

a.m. is short for ante meridiem which means before midday.


p.m. is short for post meridiem which means after midday.

:
c.

prepare for
dinner

98

a.m.

h.

p.m.

p.m.

a.m.

p.m.

four fifty
in the afternoon

p.m.

a.m.

ten minutes past eleven


at night

f.

ten thirty
at night

walk home
from school

a.m.

p.m.

eight fifteen
at night

a.m.

p.m.

d.

Step Ahead

Chang and Emma live in different towns.


Their families are driving to the same campsite for a vacation.

Changs family will leave at 9 p.m. on Friday. Their journey will take 10 hours.
Emmas family will leave at 3 a.m. on Saturday. Their journey will take 5 hours.

pack lunch

a. Whose family will reach the campsite first?


ORIGO Education.

b.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.10

ORIGO Education.

eat breakfast

a.

g.

a.m.

d.

p.m.

quarter past eleven


in the morning

SA

Step Up

1.  rite the digital time for each event.


W
Then write a.m. or p.m. to match the event.

a.m.

seven forty-five
at night

p.m.

fifteen minutes past three


in the afternoon

PL
E

We write a.m. to describe times between midnight and noon.

a.m.

b.

b. At what time of day will they arrive?

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.10

99

4.11

Working with Timetables and Duration


a. Which event can you watch at 11:30 a.m.?
Our school day

What do you think happens at 9 oclock?


Which activity is before the morning recess?
How long is the morning recess?
What time does lunch start?
What time does it finish?

9: 1 0
10 : 4 5
1 1 : 00
12 : 1 5
12 : 4 5
1:15
1 :45
2: 1 5
2:25
3 : 00

a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.

c. Which event takes exactly 2 hours?


d. How many events take exactly one hour?
e. How many events take exactly half an hour?
f. f you arrive at 2:30 p.m., how long
I
will you wait to see the Demolition Derby?
g. f you arrive at 3:00 p.m., how many events
I
can you see before the fair closes?

What time does math start?

h. Which event takes the most time?

How long is it from the start of school to the end of the first recess?
Which activities last for more than one hour?
Which activities are exactly half an hour long? How do you know?
Which activity lasts the longest time?

i. Which event is repeated?

Use this show program to answer questions on page 101.

Step Ahead

SA

Step Up

b. How long do the fireworks last?

reading
recess
math
lunch
writing
science
social studies
recess
music
school ends

PL
E

This timetable shows


what I do on Wednesday
at my school.

100

Motocross
Marching Band
Dog Show
Skydiving Marvels
Fashion Parade
Hot Dog Eating Contest
Folk Dancing
Community Band
Demolitian Derby
Skydiving Marvels
Golden Guitar Band
Fireworks
Close

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.11

Time

Activity

ORIGO Education.

a.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.

ORIGO Education.

Gates open
at 7:30 a.m.

8: 00
11 :30
12 : 3 0
1 : 00
1 :30
2:30
3 : 00
3:30
5:30
7 : 00
7:30
8: 00
8:30

Make a timetable to show five events that happen today.

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.11

101

Working with the Calendar

4.12

Step Up

Look at this calendar. What year is it for?

1. a. How many months have exactly 30 days?

2021
JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL

S M T W T F S

S M T W T F S

S M T W T F S

S M T W T F S

1 2
7 8 9
14 15 16
21 22 23
28

7
14
21
28

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
13
20
27

7
14
21
28

1
8
15
22
29

2
9
16
23
30

3
10
17
24

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
13
20
27

1
8
15
22
29

2
9
16
23
30

3
10
17
24
31

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
13
20
27

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

S M T W T F S

1
8
15
22
29

2
9
16
23
30

3
10
17
24

c. many months start on a Wednesday?


How

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
13
20
27

7
14
21
28

1
8
15
22
29

S M T W T F S
6
13
20
27

7
14
21
28

1
8
15
22
29

2
9
16
23
30

3
10
17
24

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

S M T W T F S
4
11
18
25

6
13
20
27

7
14
21
28

1
8
15
22
29

2
9
16
23
30

3
10
17
24
31

1
8
15
22
29

2
9
16
23
30

3
10
17
24
31

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
13
20
27

7
14
21
28

a.
Memorial Day May 31
b.
Independence Day July 4

NOVEMBER

S M T W T F S
6
13
20
27

5
12
19
26

2. oop these special dates on the calendar. Then write the day for each celebration.
L

S M T W T F S

7
14
21
28

1
8
15
22
29

2
9
16
23
30

3
10
17
24

4
11
18
25

S M T W T F S
3
10
17
24
31

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
13
20
27

7
14
21
28

1
8
15
22
29

2
9
16
23
30

S M T W T F S
7
14
21
28

1
8
15
22
29

2
9
16
23
30

3
10
17
24

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
13
20
27

c.
Veterans Day November 11

S M T W T F S
1
8
15
22
29

2
9
16
23
30

3
10
17
24
31

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
13
20
27

7
14
21
28

3.  rite the dates for these celebrations.


W
a.  artin Luther King Day
M
3rd Monday in January
b.  ashingtons Birthday
W
3rd Monday in February

SA

What do the red letters mean?


Write the names of the months that are missing.
Which day of the week has been circled?

DECEMBER

3
10
17
24
31

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

5
12
19
26

7
14
21
28

d.
Which months start on a weekend day?

JUNE

2
9
16
23
30

6
13
20
27

b. many months have exactly 31 days?


How

PL
E

3
10
17
24
31

Use the calendar on page 102 to complete these questions.

c. hanksgiving Day
T
4th Thursday in November

A date tells you the number of the month and the day. What date has been circled?
Some celebrations happen on the same date each year.
Imagine today was Hooray for Math Day.

Step Ahead

Think about two other celebrations that are special in your school,
home, or community. Write when they happen in the year.

Write todays date.

102

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.12

ORIGO Education.

Some celebrations happen on a certain day of the week during the month. Mothers
Day is celebrated on the second Sunday in May. What will that date be in 2021?

ORIGO Education.

Which day of the week is it this year? Which day of the week will it be in 2021?

ORIGO Stepping Stones 2 4.12

103