Cheng Chen Belch: 4th Hour AP World History 22nd of October of 2007 Inner and East Asia (600

-1200) The Early Tang Empire (618-755)
• • • • •

China reunified during the Sui dynasty. It collapsed in 34 years. Li Shimin = first Tang emperor. Build upon ruins of Sui. Avoided over centralizing The confucian style of official examination continued.

Buddhism and the Tang Empire
• • •

Used Buddhism for a political tool. Created the Mahayana network to help others achieve enlightenment. The Chinese language spread with Buddhism.

To Chang'an by Land and Sea
• • • • • • • • •

The capitol of Tang was passed from the Sui at Chang'an. Many trade came into Guang Zhou. The sui built the Grand Canal to link Huang He and Yang Zi. Chang'an became the capitol of the tributary system. Foreigners, Merchants, Students, etc lived in specific compounds and entrepots. Population grew up to 100,000. The walled cities had lock downs during night to prevent crime. As the Tang spread to Guang Zhou and the south, so did Judaism and Islam. In the early 600s, the Justinian Plague (Bubonic Plague) occurred.

Trade and Cultural Exchange
• • • •

Women (court women) played polo in their past time. People and noblewomen tended to follow and assimilate to Chinese tradition by eating stricktly Chinese diets. China's export also was constantly growing due to its high interest in trade. China was a main source of silk.

Rivals for Power in Inner Asia and China (600-907)
• • •

Western Tang empire ended at the Tibetan empire at the Tarim basin. Like normal, the Tang empire eventually grew too big to support itself. by 800, Tang power had long but diminished.

The Uighur and Tibetan Empires
• • • • •

Turkic people settle at the Tarim basing after the fall of Han. They became the Uighurs. Cities in areas developed by the Uighurs propelled themselves in trade. It was a center to Art, Language, and trade. After the Uighur empire collapsed, Tibet was left as a rival of the Tang dynasty. Trade was still very common: Tibetan royals preferred medicine transmitted through Iran from

• •

Greek cultures. A Tang princess brought the Mahayana Buddhism to Tibet in 634 when she politically married a Tibetan king. Tibet also excelled in warfare.

Upheavals and Repressions (750-879)
• • • • • • • •

Buddhism was attacked by elites in Tang China. Some believed that Buddhism neglects/negates Confucianism. Buddhism was also attacked for encouraging women into a patriarchal political society. Prominent women were used and seen as scapegoats many times. Wu Zhao was a powerful women who took control of the imperial family in 690. The empire turned turmoil in its attempt to gain control. Tang China destroyed up to 4600 Buddhist temples. This was a significant loss to Chinese culture.

The End of the Tang Empire (879-907)
• •

The complex tax system and various military campaigns sapped the Empire's resources. in 755, a general (An Lushan) let 200,000 troops in a rebellion against the emperor.

Cheng Chen Belch: 4th Hour AP World History 22nd of October of 2007 Inner and East Asia (600-1200) The Early Tang Empire (618-755)
• • • • •

China reunified during the Sui dynasty. It collapsed in 34 years. Li Shimin = first Tang emperor. Build upon ruins of Sui. Avoided over centralizing The confucian style of official examination continued.

Buddhism and the Tang Empire
• • •

Used Buddhism for a political tool. Created the Mahayana network to help others achieve enlightenment. The Chinese language spread with Buddhism.

To Chang'an by Land and Sea
• • • • • • • • •

The capitol of Tang was passed from the Sui at Chang'an. Many trade came into Guang Zhou. The sui built the Grand Canal to link Huang He and Yang Zi. Chang'an became the capitol of the tributary system. Foreigners, Merchants, Students, etc lived in specific compounds and entrepots. Population grew up to 100,000. The walled cities had lock downs during night to prevent crime. As the Tang spread to Guang Zhou and the south, so did Judaism and Islam. In the early 600s, the Justinian Plague (Bubonic Plague) occurred.

Trade and Cultural Exchange
• • • •

Women (court women) played polo in their past time. People and noblewomen tended to follow and assimilate to Chinese tradition by eating stricktly Chinese diets. China's export also was constantly growing due to its high interest in trade. China was a main source of silk.

Rivals for Power in Inner Asia and China (600-907)
• • •

Western Tang empire ended at the Tibetan empire at the Tarim basin. Like normal, the Tang empire eventually grew too big to support itself. by 800, Tang power had long but diminished.

The Uighur and Tibetan Empires
• • • • • • •

Turkic people settle at the Tarim basing after the fall of Han. They became the Uighurs. Cities in areas developed by the Uighurs propelled themselves in trade. It was a center to Art, Language, and trade. After the Uighur empire collapsed, Tibet was left as a rival of the Tang dynasty. Trade was still very common: Tibetan royals preferred medicine transmitted through Iran from Greek cultures. A Tang princess brought the Mahayana Buddhism to Tibet in 634 when she politically married a Tibetan king. Tibet also excelled in warfare.

Upheavals and Repressions (750-879)
• • • • • • • •

Buddhism was attacked by elites in Tang China. Some believed that Buddhism neglects/negates Confucianism. Buddhism was also attacked for encouraging women into a patriarchal political society. Prominent women were used and seen as scapegoats many times. Wu Zhao was a powerful women who took control of the imperial family in 690. The empire turned turmoil in its attempt to gain control. Tang China destroyed up to 4600 Buddhist temples. This was a significant loss to Chinese culture.

The End of the Tang Empire (879-907)
• •

The complex tax system and various military campaigns sapped the Empire's resources. in 755, a general (An Lushan) let 200,000 troops in a rebellion against the emperor.

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