Seattle’s Convention

and Visitors Bureau
one convention place,
701 pike street, suite 800,
seattle,washington 98101
t (206) 461-5800; f (206) 461-5855;
visitseattle.org
S
Marketing Plan
DeSti nati On
MARKETING PLAN
Seattle’s Convention and Visitors Bureau
2007
Dedication
We dedicate this publication in
loving memory of our friend and
colleague, Amy Wilkerson. Amy’s
guiding spirit is felt throughout
Seattle’s hospitality community
every day. We are affrmed by her
strength and inspired by her kind-
ness, wisdom and humor.
Vision
Seattle is a state of mind, a way of
living and a portal to the future. Our
rich history has shaped technology,
culture, taste and travel. Our guests
delight in our breathtaking beauty,
abundant recreation, thriving
metropolis and welcoming spirit.
Inspiration awaits.
Mission
Seattle’s Convention and Visitors
Bureau is a non-proft economic
development agency responsible
for competitively marketing the
Seattle area as a destination for
conventions, tour groups and indi-
vidual travelers. The goal of these
marketing efforts is to enhance the
employment opportunities and eco-
nomic prosperity of the region. Our
members beneft from the bureau’s
marketing programs and gain direct
access to the visitor market.
Cover by: Michael Craft for Seattle’s Convention and Visitors Bureau
1
Marketing Plan
table of contents
1 table of Contents
3 letter from SCVB Chair and President
4 2006 Highlights
6 On the Horizon
8 Facts, Figures and Data
12 Membership Opportunities
14 Convention Sales and Services
25 international tourism
29 north american tourism Development
32 Public relations
35 Citywide Concierge and Visitor Center
36 Cultural tourism
38 Marketing Services
40 Seattle Super Saver
42 Seattle Sports Commission
46 SCVB Staff list
48 SCVB Board of Directors
49 notes, ideas, Brilliant thoughts
Produced by:
Seattle’s Convention and Visitors Bureau
One Convention Place, 701 Pike Street, Suite 800
Seattle, Wa 98101
(206) 461-5800; fax (206) 461-5855
www.visitseattle.org
Published by:
tiger Oak Publishing
1505 Western avenue, Ste. 500
Seattle, Wa 98101
(206) 284-1750; fax (206) 284-2550
www.tigeroak.com
President & CEO
Don Welsh
Senior Vice President,
Sales & Marketing
tom norwalk
Editors
David Blandford
Heather Bryant
Matt Wakefeld
Cover by: Michael Craft for Seattle’s Convention and Visitors Bureau
2
[Photo opposite presidential letter – Metronatural ad, bleeds
into presidential letter ]
8
Marketing Plan
dear member,
Momentum is a word that often describes positive progress in regard to business, sports
and our personal lives. Tere is no doubt that 2006 was a year of great momentum for
Seattle and the region.
In 2006, Seattle and King County experienced a record 9.1 million overnight visitors
who generated more than $4.3 billion in revenues and we expect this positive trend to
continue through 2007.
Seattle’s hotel occupancy, rate and RevPAR growth performed in the upper fve percent of
all major cities this past year. We welcomed the Hotel 1000 and the Pan Pacifc Seattle to
our hospitality community and their levels of service, product and technological innova-
tion have been well-received by travelers from around the world.
Te Washington State Convention & Trade Center hosted nearly 50 major conventions
which brought almost 150,000 delegates from around the world to our city and region.
Tese conventions alone accounted for nearly 330,000 room nights and an economic im-
pact of $252 million. In conjunction with hotel-booked meetings and a vibrant business
travel market, many restaurants and retailers realized the fnancial beneft that meetings
and conventions provide.
Leisure travel to Seattle and the region continues to grow into a year-around business
rather than the seasonal market of the past. Tis is a result of the extensive oferings in
the arts, culture, festivals, and sports and recreational events that the area provides. Add
to this an array of eclectic restaurants, award-winning Washington State wines and abun-
dant shopping opportunities, and Seattle is an undeniable draw throughout the year.
A record 200 sailings from Seattle to Alaska occurred this past year, delivering nearly
400,000 passengers to our city. Recent data projects that between 30 and 35 percent of
these Alaska-bound passengers also booked a Seattle area hotel stay prior to or after their
cruise. Tis positive trend will also carry into 2007 and beyond.
Air travel volume also added to the momentum. Seattle-Tacoma International Airport
experienced a record 30 million passengers. Airlines increased fights, including British
Airways, which added a second non-stop between London and Seattle in summer 2006 in
order to accommodate the growing demand from Europe.
To further support our growing tourism industry and more clearly communicate the
uniqueness of our destination to meeting planners, tour operators and leisure travel
customers from around the world, we launched a new destination brand in October 2006.
Since its launch, metronatural has generated more than 170 million impressions and an
equivalent advertising value of more than $15 million.
In closing, we would like to take this opportunity to thank our more than 1,000 members
for their commitment in working together to welcome all of our guests in a courteous,
professional and gracious manner. Tese are the hallmarks of a great city and just a few of
the wonderful things guests can expect when visiting Seattle and the region.
Best wishes for a happy and successful 2007.
Sincerely,
Jeff Wright, Chair
Don Welsh, President & CEO
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Tourism in the News
Troughout 2006, SCVB promoted the
importance of Seattle’s tourism industry to
Seattleites. Stories in the local and national
media featured record summer tourism,
increased convention business and another
all-time-high cruise season.
Metronatural Launch
October 20, 2006: Metronatural was unveiled to the world in high style.
Te new Seattle destination brand debuted atop the Space Needle in 18-
foot-tall letters. An unveiling ceremony and press conference was held on
the Observation Deck with more than 200 members of Seattle’s tourism
industry, civic leaders, elected ofcials and news media in attendance. Te
brand launch garnered worldwide publicity with a combined circulation of
more than 170 million and an equivalent advertising value of more than
$15 million, including coverage in USA Today, CNN, CBS News, Te London Daily Mirror, MSNBC, Chicago
Tribune, Los Angeles Times and hundreds of other news media.
Metronatural was developed through a broad-based, grassroots process led by SCVB and creative partner EX-
CLAIM, working hand-in-hand with a steering committee comprising representatives from the City of Seattle,
Port of Seattle, local hotels, airlines, attractions, restaurants, the arts and many travel industry stakeholders.
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2006
highlights
Taxi Appreciation Day
Coinciding with National Tourism Week in May, SCVB ral-
lied the support of Seattle’s tourism community to thank more
than 700 taxi drivers for their year-around service as tourism
ambassadors and to further educate them about the regional
tourism industry. Te frst-ever Seattle Taxi Appreciation Day
was co-hosted by partner organizations that included the Port
of Seattle, Washington State Convention & Trade Center,
Holland America Line, Aramark, Qwest Field, Seattle South-
side Visitor Services, Seattle Hotel Association and others.
Seattle’s hospitality team passed out box breakfasts and gift
bags to taxi drivers and thanked them for their crucial, though
often overlooked, role as frontline greeters of Seattle’s nine
million annual visitors.
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Seattle’s new tourism
slogan is “welcome to
metronatural” which
replaces their old slogan
- “Drummer Wanted”
Saturday Night Live,
Oct. 28, 2006

Marketing Plan
Seattle Sets Record-High
Cruise Business in 2006
Last year, cruise business at the Seattle Homeport
doubled over the previous three years. Te 2006
cruise season achieved a record number of sail-
ings and passenger volume, according to the Port
of Seattle. Nearly 400,000 passengers embarked
on approximately 200 sailings ofered by fve
major cruise lines including Holland America
Line, Princess Cruises, Norwegian Cruise Line,
Celebrity Cruise Line and Royal Caribbean Line.
Hot Hotel Market Gets Hotter
Seattle and Vancouver Work Locally to Promote Globally
Te boards of directors of Seattle’s Convention and Visitors Bureau and Tourism Vancouver
met in Vancouver in October 2006 to discuss ways of cooperatively promoting the two cities
and the Cascadia region. Te boards of each CVB voted unanimously to create a study group
to examine the viability of jointly bidding on major international sporting and cultural events,
including the 2018 World Cup of soccer, 2020 World’s Fair and 2028 Summer Olympics.
Further discussions are scheduled in 2007.
Robust Convention Business
Meetings and conventions were the founda-
tion of Seattle’s strong tourism business in
2006. Seattle hosted more than 10 groups
of 5,000 or more attendees, many of which
experienced record attendance. Groups in-
cluded national associations such as the In-
ternational Society for Magnetic Resonance
in Medicine, American Spine Society and
American Society for Mass Spectrometry.
Regional corporate groups, such as Micro-
soft, convened in Seattle multiple times.
Hotel 1000
MTM Luxury Lodging opened its newest property in the
heart of downtown Seattle in June.
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Pan Pacifc
Seattle Hotel
Pan Pacifc Hotels &
Resorts opened its
ffth North American
property in Seattle’s
South Lake Union
neighborhood in
November.
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Photo by: tim thompson
S
2006 HigHligHtS Marketing Plan
Photo courtesy of Hotel 100

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arts and Culture
Olympic Sculpture Park
Te Seattle Art Museum (SAM) opens the
nine-acre, $85 million Olympic Sculpture
Park in January 2007. Designed by Weiss/
Manfredi Architects, the park seamlessly
connects city and waterfront via an iconic
z-shaped traverse from Western Avenue
to Elliott Bay, providing a continuous
landscape of native plantings and a diverse
setting for a wide range of sculptures. Te
park features internationally-recognized
artists, including Alexander Calder, Louise
Bourgeois, Roy McMakin, Richard Serra,
Beverly Pepper, Mark Dion, Teresita Fernandez and Tony Smith. Panoramic
views of the Olympic Mountains, Elliott Bay and Puget Sound add to the ex-
perience. A glass and steel pavilion ofers event space and an outdoor amphithe-
ater provides a unique setting for outdoor flms and performances.
Seattle Art Museum Re-Opening
SAM’s newly expanded downtown building is scheduled to open May 5,
2007. Te expansion of the museum will accommodate rapidly growing col-
lections, programs and audiences. Tis frst phase of Allied Works Architec-
ture’s dynamic design will inaugurate 118,000 square feet, including two
foors of free public space and 70 percent more gallery space for the museum’s
permanent collections and special exhibition programs. SAM will also fea-
ture interactive and engaging art installations and artist-created experiences.
on the horizon
Hotels in
Development
Sheraton Seattle
Hotel & Towers
(second tower addition)
Location: Downtown Seattle
Guestrooms: 415
Open: Spring 2007
Four Seasons Hotel
Seattle
Location: Downtown Seattle
Guestrooms: 150
Opening: Spring 2008
Silver Cloud
Hotel - Stadium
Location: Qwest and Safeco Fields
Guestrooms: 210
Opening: Early 2007
Distant Horizon
“We are extremely
excited by the opportunity
to open the Hyatt at Olive
8, our second Seattle ho-
tel. the long-term outlook
for the city’s hospitality
industry, from corporate
business, conventions
and tourism, is very
strong. there is a tremen-
dous sense of positive
energy in Seattle and we
look forward to expanding
our presence here.”
Mark Stiebeling
general Manager
grand Hyatt Seattle
“Seattle is recognized as one
of the nation’s leading cultural
cities. We should all be proud
of our vibrant arts community,
from visual art to theater to
opera, music, flm and dance.
as our cultural infrastructure
grows, Seattle is also known
as a premier cultural destina-
tion, welcoming visitors from
around the country and around
the world.”
Hyatt at Olive 8
Location: Downtown Seattle
Guestrooms: 350
Opening: Summer 2008
Hyatt Place
Location: South Lake Union
Guestrooms: 158
Opening: Second Quarter 2008
Hotel “1”
Starwood Capital group
Location: Downtown Seattle
Guestrooms: 110
Opening: Late 2008
Arctic Club Hotel
arctic Club llC/Hotel group
Location: Downtown Seattle
Guestrooms: 91
Opening: Fall 2007
Hyatt Regency
Bellevue
(addition to existing property)
Location: Downtown Bellevue
Guestrooms: 350
Opening: Late 2008
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“The Valley Precinct” of the
Olympic Sculpture Park with
Richard Serra’s WAKE, 2004
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Mimi Gardner Gates
the illsley Ball nordstrom Director
Seattle art Museum
7
Marketing Plan On tHe HOrizOn
In 1907, Seattle doubled in size and
gave birth to the Pike Place Market,
the Moore Theatre, Children’s Hospital
and United Parcel Service—ushering in
the age of innovation and creativity for
which we are known worldwide today.
In 2007, Seattle is America’s most liter-
ate and educated city, with the highest
number of arts and arts-related busi-
nesses per capita. No wonder visitors
choose Seattle: it is truly civilization as
nature intended.”

Greg Nickels
Mayor of Seattle
Pike Place Market Centennial
On August 17, 2007, the Pike Place Market will celebrate its 100th birthday. Often re-
ferred to as “the soul of Seattle,” the market will mark its centennial with events through-
out the spring and summer of 2007, culminating in Centennial Week Celebration festivi-
ties August 10-17. One of the state’s most popular attractions, eight to 10 million visitors
walk through Pike Place Market annually.
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Sports and
entertainment
Qwest Field fulflled its promise as an
entertainment epicenter in 2006, hosting
mega concerts by the Rolling Stones and
Kenny Chesney and drawing fans from
throughout the Pacifc Northwest and
Western Canada. Te debut of WaMu
Teatre at Quest Field Events Center
ofered a more intimate, state-of-the-art
music and live entertainment venue with
seating capacity between 3,300 and 7,000.
Te new theater, a partnership between
Seattle-based First & Goal and AEG Live,
showcases state-of-the-art sound, lighting
and technological features.
Photo by Seattle times
2005 King County Overnight Visitors
Source: CIC Research Inc.
8,000,000
8,500,000
9,000,000
2000
8.64M
2001
8.45M
2002
8.50M
2003
8.73M
2004 2005
9.10M
8.80M
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facts, fgures and data
B

Washington has breathtak-
ing natural scenery and an
astonishing array of oppor-
tunities for discovery. Seat-
tle’s Convention and Visitors
Bureau is an active partner
with the state in attracting
visitors and continues to
work with smaller commu-
nities to introduce visitors
to destinations throughout
Washington.

“Tourism is a vital ingredi-
ent in the economic vitality
of our state and I applaud
the work of Seattle’s Con-
vention and Visitors Bureau
to spread the word about
the endless opportunities
in Washington. I wish them
continued success.”
Chris Gregoire
governor of Washington
national Outlook
Domestic leisure travel volume increased 2 percent in 2006 and is expected to
increase another 1-2 percent in 2007.
Projected total travel expenditures in 2006 were up 7.5 percent to $702.5 billion
with a forecasted increase of another 5.3 percent to $739.6 billion in 2007.
international travel to the u.S. experienced record volume of 51.4 million (up 4 per-
cent) and record receipts of $113 billion with further growth forecast for 2007 and beyond.
Domestic business travel volume was fat in 2006 but is expected to increase 1-2
percent in 2007.
Source: The Travel Industry Association of America (TIA), U.S. Department of Commerce, ITA, Offce of Travel & Tourism
Seattle/king County Outlook
Washington State Outlook
tourism is one of the state’s largest industries, among aerospace, software and
agriculture, and generated a record $12.7 billion in visitor spending in 2005 (up 6.7
percent). king County accounts for 42 percent of all state travel spending.
143,700 jobs are supported by tourism in Washington State
tourism generates state and local tax revenues of $845 million
Source: Dean Runyan Associates 2005

Marketing Plan
9
FaCtS, FigureS anD Data
Lodging
$980 m/22.7%
Miscellaneous
and Convenience
$238 m/5.5%
Local
Transportation
$387 m/8.9%
Entertainment
$348 m/8.0%
Meals & Beverages
$1,324 m/30.6%
Shopping
$1,045 m/24.2%
2005 King County Estimated Visitor Expenditures ($4.32 billion)
Source: CIC Research Inc.
2005 King County Visitor Generated Tax Revenues ($376 million)
Source: CIC Research Inc.
Sales Tax
$316m / 84%
Convention Tax
$36m / 10%
Rental Car Tax
$24m / 6%

Seattle and King County
attracted record numbers
of visitors last year. They
came for our rich culture
and heritage, wealth of
outdoor recreation and
sporting events, restau-
rants, wineries, shopping
and to attend meetings
at conference centers
and hotels throughout
the county. Thanks in
part to the ongoing mar-
keting efforts of Seattle’s
Convention and Visitors
Bureau, the region can
expect continued tourism
growth in the future.”
Ron Sims
king County executive
Seattle Visitor Profle
Source: CIC Research Inc.
Age: 40 years old
Median household income: $62,600
Average group size: 2.3 people
Average length of stay: 7.4 nights
Average spend per visit: $474
Average spend per day: $64
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Rest of U.S.
& Overseas
52%
Canada
5%
Montana
3%
Washington
12%
California
14%
Oregon
8%
Texas
3%
Idaho
3%
2005 Seattle Source Markets
Source: CIC Research Inc.
2005 Primary Purpose of Trip/
Overnight Visitors to King County
Source: CIC Research Inc.
Other
Convention/
Conference
Pleasure/Vacation
Visiting Friends/
Relatives
20%
2%
9%
0% 10% 30% 40%
8%
50%
41%
Business
40%
2005 Summary Characteristics of Overnight Visitors
Source: CIC Research Inc.
Income
Daily Spend
Average Days
Total Spend
$63,300 $68,600 $60,100 $62,600
$60 $137 $116 $64
7.8 4.3 5.5 7.4
$468 $589 $638 $474
Tourist
Average or
Median
Average
Hotel/Motel
Guest
Average
Convention
Delegate
Hotel Average Daily Rates
Source: Smith Travel Research
2002
King County
(32,000 rooms)
Downtown Seattle
(11,800 rooms)
2003 2004 2005 2006 YTD
(October)
$90
$120
$150
$99
$127
$98
$123
$100
$128
$106
$134
$119
$152
Hotel Occupancy Percentage
Source: Smith Travel Research
2002
King County
(32,000 rooms)
Downtown Seattle
(11,800 rooms)
2003 2004 2005 2006 YTD
(October)
60%
70%
80%
61%
65.7%
63.1%
67.0%
65.0%
69.1%
68.5%
73.1%
72.5%
76.5%
Hotel Revenue Per Available Room (RevPAR)
Source: Smith Travel Research
2002
King County
(32,000 rooms)
Downtown Seattle
(11,800 rooms)
2003 2004 2005 2006 YTD
(October)
$50
$90
$130
$61
$99
$61
$82
$65
$88
$72
$98
$87
$117
Hotel/Motel
11
Marketing Plan FaCtS, FigureS anD Data
transportation
Airline Industry
Trough the third quarter of 2006, U.S. airlines have seen
an increase in domestic passengers (up .2 percent), international
passengers (up 5.9 percent) and total passengers (up .9 percent).
(Source: Bureau of Transportation Statistics)
Sea-Tac International Airport surpassed 30 million pas-
sengers for the frst time in 2006, making it the 17th busiest
commercial service airport in the United States.
(Source: Port of Seattle)
Rail Travel
Amtrak trains carried 24.3 million passengers in fscal year
2006, marking the fourth consecutive year of record ridership.
(Source: Amtrak)
In 2006, Amtrak trains carried 583,766 passengers to and
from Seattle.
(Source: Amtrak)
Cruise Industry
Cruise ships hosted 11.7 million passengers around the
world in 2006, with 31 million Americans declaring a strong
intent to cruise within the next three years.
(Source: Cruise Lines International Association)
2006 was the eighth consecutive year of growth for Port of
Seattle cruise sailings and passenger volumes.
(Source: Port of Seattle)
Marketing Plan
11
Arrived
by Air
44%
Other
9%
Arrived
by Auto
48%
2005 Transportation to King County
Source: CIC Research Inc.
0
50
100
150
200
1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
148
99
75
59
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196
2007(e)
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190
Hotel Market Comparision:
Downtown Seattle vs. National Average
Through Third Quarter 2006
Source: Smith Travel Research
RevPAR
80
0
$99
160
National Average Downtown Seattle Average
$63
Occupancy Percentage
65.2
76.3
ADR
$97
$152
$116
Sea-Tac International Airport Passenger Volume
Source: Port of Seattle
24,000,000
26,000,000
28,000,000
30,000,000
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006(f)
3
5
0
,
0
0
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n
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26,799,913
26,738,558
27,036,073
28,804,554
29,289,026
30,000,000+
Port of Seattle Cruise Ship Sailings
Source: Port of Seattle
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Te SCVB Membership Department connects local busi-
nesses with the lucrative visitor market through a wide range
of publications and a host of signature events, seminars and
orientations throughout the year.
Since SCVB members target a wide variety of markets and
employ difering strategies for reaching them, the Member-
ship team is available to recommend specifc SCVB pro-
grams that ft member needs. Finding the most cost-efective
solutions for members is always a priority.
In 2007, several initiatives will be employed to enhance the
business of more than 1,000 SCVB member organizations,
connecting their products and services with tourists, conven-
tion delegates, meeting planners, professional travel planners
and the media.
actions for 2007 will include:
integrate the new Seattle brand into all
SCVB collateral materials, including the e-news-
letter, event invitations and notifcations of
upcoming marketing opportunities.
Create new member promotional opportu-
nities on the redesigned SCVB website.
improve and enhance the membership
content on the SCVB website.
install new software for improved mem-
ber access to information and data collection.
enhance the SCVB electronic newsletter to
provide more timely and useful news to members.
membership
opportunities
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Calendar of Member Events and Promotional Opportunities
(Subject to change; updates available to members via SCVB web site)
Marketing Plan
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MeMBerSHiP OPPOrtunitieS
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January “Presenting the 2007 SCVB Marketing Plan” annual presentation
“Night at the Sonics” evening event
“Getting the Most from Your Membership” meeting
March “Olympic Sculpture Park” breakfast event
April “Getting the Most from Your Membership” meeting
May “Cruise Industry Kickoff” luncheon event
June “Unlocking the Meetings and Convention Market” how-to event
July “Getting the Most from Your Membership” meeting
September Washington Wine networking event
October “Getting the Most from Your Membership” meeting
November “Internet Marketing” how-to event
December “Annual Holiday Breakfast”
Ongoing SCVB website advertising and links
Citywide Concierge Center bookings and referral programs
Airport brochure distribution
Visitor mailing lists and brochure direct mail programs
Member-to-member mailing list and e-mailing program
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Membership
WSCTC SCVB
Hotel Community
Visitors &
Customers
The Seattle Partnership
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Te meetings industry is a global economic engine that contributes more
than $122.3 billion to the U.S. economy alone, according to the Conven-
tion Industry Council (CIC). In 2006, the global meetings industry is
expected to grow for a third consecutive year, according to Meeting Profes-
sionals International (MPI), signaling a positive economic impact on many
facets of the industry, including hotels, airlines and convention centers.
According to the 2004 ExPact Study (DMAI’s Convention Expenditure
and Impact Study), spending averages for an event with exhibitors totalled
$945 per delegate, $6,753 per exhibiting company and $454,673 per
event organizer.
In 2006, it is estimated that Seattle’s meetings and conventions market
exceeded $650 million in economic impact throughout the region. Meetings
and conventions generated through SCVB were valued at more than $402
million in economic impact.
convention sales
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“in the 18 years since the Washington State
Convention & trade Center opened, millions of
delegates attending events here have pumped over
$2 billion into the state’s economy. the Center has
been directly responsible for the creation of thou-
sands of good jobs in our region, a steady fow of
revenue to business and government, and a lower
tax burden for residents of Washington state.”
Frank K. Finneran
Chairman, Washington State Convention & trade Center
Washington State Convention & Trade Center
Board of Directors
left to right:
Susana Gonzalez-Murillo, Vice Chair Deryl Brown-Archie,
Kathy Coffey, Jerome L. Hillis, Chairman and CEO
Frank K. Finneran, J. Terry McLaughlin, Karen Wong,
Robert J. Flowers, Rick S. Bender
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Marketing Plan COnVentiOn SaleS anD SerViCeS
Alison
LaFollette
Washington D.C. Offce
Wendy
Petersen
Midwest Offce
Stephanie
Trout
Washington D.C. Offce
Te SCVB sales team works cohesively with Seattle’s destination sales and marketing
team, composed of hotels, the WSCTC and SCVB member businesses, to forge a com-
petitive advantage and ofer consistent, unifed professionalism to its customers.
SCVB Headquarters
Eight convention sales managers are based in the Seattle headquarters ofce. Te ofce
generates leads from all market segments throughout the U.S.
Washington, D.C. Offce
Two sales team members are located in the SCVB Washington, D.C. ofce. Washing-
ton, D.C. houses more than 7,000 associations, ranking frst in the country. SCVB
team members in this ofce generate leads from all market segments in Te District of
Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.
Midwest Offce
One sales team member is located in the SCVB Midwest ofce. Chicago and the sur-
rounding area ranks second in the U.S. in number of association headquarters with ap-
proximately 2,000 organizations. Te Midwest Ofce generates leads from all market seg-
ments in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin.
Front row, left to right: Joan Cahill, Season Hansen, Julia Smith
Second row, left to right: Janet Hunter, Joan Magnano-Damm,
Julianne Gaffeld, Cynthia Lydum
third row, left to right: Tasha Sawabini, Lauren Curtin, Tim Quigley,
Audrey Fan
Back row, left to right: Tom Norwalk, Chris Garratt, Michael McQuade
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S Seattle Market update
Washington State Convention & Trade Center
Te WSCTC’s consistent and well-deserved reputation as a midsized,
frst class facility—focused on quality service and culinary excel-
lence—is rare in the convention center world and very benefcial to
Seattle’s convention sales eforts. Te center’s on-site Tasting Room,
which opened in 2005, is still a unique selling feature among conven-
tion centers and continues to help diferentiate the WSCTC from other
centers. Te center is now being sold and marketed more like a “great
hotel” than a convention center, due to its excellent core location, focus
on service and the balanced hotel inventory within 2 to 3 blocks. Tese
attributes, combined with a vibrant, dynamic and healthy downtown,
have helped Seattle overcome the center’s size limitations.
Hotels, Off-Site Venues
and Conference Centers
In Spring 2007, the Sheraton Seattle Hotel will open a second tower
with 415 guestrooms and more than 31,000 square feet of new, addi-
tional meeting space. Tis will bring the expanded property to a total of
1,253 guestrooms and 75,000 square feet of meeting space, making it
Seattle’s frst 1,000-plus-guestroom hotel. Te addition will be a key fac-
tor in attracting conventions and meetings to Seattle and the WSCTC.
Te ability to now ofer a 1,000-room block in one property with such
close proximity to the center is a major selling feature. Te new Sheraton
Seattle tower guestrooms will increase Seattle’s “Select Hotel” supply by
an additional 5 percent in 2007.
Market Segments
All Meetings and Conventions: 2001-10/31/2006
Misc. 3%
Medical/Health
Organizations 20%
Corporate 16%
Cultural 2%
Trade/Business
Associations 10%
Trade/Consumer Shows 2%
Scientific Engineering
Societies 15%
SMERF 8%
Education 9%
Sports/Athletics 4%
Legal /Government 11%
Market Segments/WSCTC
WSCTC Meetings and Conventions: 2001-10/31/2006
Misc. 2%
Medical/Health
Organizations 27%
Trade/Consumer
Shows 1%
Corporate 15%
Trade/Business
Associations 10%
Scientific Engineering
Societies 21%
SMERF 3%
Education 11%
Cultural 2%
Legal /Government 8%
* Includes Illinois, Indiana, Iowa,
Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri,
Ohio, Wisconsin
DC/MD/VA
31%
Other
21%
Washington
State
15%
New York
7%
Midwest*
17%
California
5%
Colorado
4%
Geographic Origin—USA
WSCTC Meetings and Conventions
(Room Nights) 2001-10/31/2006
DC/MD/VA
29%
Other
22%
Washington
State
19%
New York
6%
Midwest*
15%
California
6%
Colorado
3%
* Includes Illinois, Indiana, Iowa,
Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri,
Ohio, Wisconsin
Geographic Origin—USA
All Meetings and Conventions
(Room Nights) 2001-10/31/2006
17
Marketing Plan COnVentiOn SaleS anD SerViCeS
WaMu Teater at Qwest Field Events Center opened in late 2006. Tis
multi-purpose music and live entertainment venue is ideal for corporate
events, seminars and special events with fexible seating capacity between
3,300 and 7,000 people and space for meetings, receptions or food and
beverage service.
Meeting Market Segments
Seattle’s large and internationally acclaimed infrastructure of medicine,
research, biotechnology, technology and aerospace—coupled with world-
class academia—ofers a very compelling and competitive advantage over
other destinations in luring scientifc, medical and engineering associations.
Seattle’s meeting market mix is diversifed, healthy and continues to show
growth in the higher revenue generating segments. Due to the extensive
ofering of both urban and outdoor attractions, Seattle continues to attract
these types of groups.
Seattle’s strongest market segments are also the ones most coveted by every
competing destination and mega-hotel center. SCVB’s competitive posture
will be to protect and defend Seattle’s market share while aggressively fnd-
ing new, frst-time convention center user groups.
Health and Medical Associations
Te worldwide reputations of the University of Washington and Fred
Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, in addition to Seattle’s emerging bio-
tech industry, all contribute to Seattle’s dominance in this market segment.
Additionally, Seattle is home to an abundance of teaching hospitals which
ofer research opportunities and talented and tenured medical stafs. Seattle’s
number one market segment holds potential for further growth, as associa-
tions within this segment are experiencing record-breaking attendance.
Recent groups have included the North American Spine Association (6,400
attendees), International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
(5,000) and Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (3,000).
Scientifc/Engineering Associations
Tis market segment delivers reliable room nights. Chal-
lenges in booking these groups include both the short-
term booking commitments and the ultra-conservative
contracting of just half of their anticipated blocks. Recent
groups have included the American Society of Mass
Spectrometry (6,000 attendees), the American Society
of Safety Engineers (4,500) and American Statistical As-
sociation (5,500).
“Our annual meeting in Seattle was a huge success. We
did have some initial concerns about moving from a hotel
to a convention center, but i am happy to report that every-
one in Seattle made the transition seamless and your staff
and facilities exceeded our expectations in service and
hospitality. We look forward to coming back to Seattle for
a future meeting.”
Heather Brinton Parker, CMP
Director, Offce of Membership & Constituent Services
association of american Medical Colleges
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above: Washington State Convention & trade Center.
Below: WaMu theatre at Qwest Field events Center
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Corporate Meetings
Te current state of the economy and corporate market is healthy, which
has resulted in increased individual business travel as well as corporate
meetings. Tis trend is projected to continue through 2007. With many of
the major Fortune 500 corporations headquartered in the greater Seattle
area (Microsoft, Starbucks, Washington Mutual), the region’s hospitality
community has greatly benefted from increased meetings-related produc-
tivity of these companies.
Fueled by Boeing’s recent success, regional industry such as biotech and
technology are expected to continue to thrive, which in turn will spur further
growth in hospitality business. Te growth of regional cruise ship sailings will
also stimulate revenues for the incentive market with specifc emphasis in the
insurance and fnancial industries.

To capitalize on such regional growth, SCVB has re-deployed its sales force to
allow two managers to prospect and capture more short-term meeting opportu-
nities for bureau members.

Despite the strong regional economy and increased national meeting
demand, Seattle continues to face some challenges in the corporate meet-
ings market. Short-term availability and double-bedded room inventory
can create logistical challenges for the SCVB sales team. However, these
same changes allow SCVB to showcase one of its biggest selling features:
a sales team made up of professionals who understand the complexity and
intensity of planning corporate meetings.
Corporate groups typically have two to three of-site receptions for attend-
ees during their meetings. Fortunately, Seattle has many unique venues,
such as Experience Music Project and the Museum of Flight, to accom-
modate groups sized between 1,500 and 2,000. Te new 5,300-seat WaMu
Teater at Qwest Field & Events Center compliments this inventory of
venues and will help entice larger groups.
Education Associations
Education association meeting planners continue to report record at-
tendance when gathering in Seattle. Many factors unique to Seattle con-
tribute to this phenomenon, including a strong academic community,
the compact meetings package of downtown Seattle and having twice
been named “America’s Most Educated City.” Some recent groups have
included the American Association of Medical Colleges (4,000 attend-
ees) and the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administra-
CITY FACILITY
EXHIBIT
SPACE
MEETING
SPACE
COMMITTABLE HOTEL
ROOMS ON PEAK NIGHT
SALES
PERSONNEL
TOTAL CVB
BUDGET
Seattle
Washington State Convention
& Trade Center
205,700 57,000 4,000 16 $8,168,000
Anaheim Anaheim Convention Center 815,000 130,000 not supplied 15 $9,000,000
Vancouver, BC
Vancouver Convention &
Exhibition Centre
91,000 25,000 6,704 13 $10,820,625
San Francisco Moscone Center (North, South & West) 638,376 359,000 6,000 15 $14,000,000
San Diego San Diego Convention Center 525,701 204,114 6,775 28 $12,323,734
Los Angeles Los Angeles Convention Center 720,000 150,000 not supplied 22 $18,000,000
Phoenix Phoenix Convention Center 146,000 80,000 2,185 21 $13,700,000
Denver Colorado Convention Center 584,000 100,000 5,500 20 $12,500,000
Competitive Landscape
19
Marketing Plan COnVentiOn SaleS anD SerViCeS
tors (2,500). Seattle’s strong recent hotel performance has increased downtown
room rates, causing some rated education associations to look to other, more
economical cities.
Trade/Business/Commercial Associations
Although slow to emerge from the poor economy, this segment tends to book short-
term and is cautious and conservative in projecting room blocks. Tis segment ofers
an excellent potential to host large groups. Recent groups have included the Project
Management Institute (4,000 attendees), Professional Association for SQL Server
(1,600) and International Association of Culinary Professionals (1,500).
Government Meetings
Success in the government market segment is largely based on supply and demand.
Tis is true throughout Seattle’s competitive set and around the country. Recent
increases in the government per diem for King and Pierce Counties have helped some
hotels to continue to book this business. Since this market segment is still desirable by
many member hotels, SCVB will continue to actively sell and compete in this segment.
Recent groups have included the National Recreation & Park Association (8,000
attendees) and United States Department of Energy (2,000).
getting reaDy
FOr PCMa in 2008
Seattle will host the Professional Conven-
tion Management association (PCMa) an-
nual Meeting January 13-17, 2008. this is the
frst meeting in the Pacifc northwest for this
international association of meetings indus-
try professionals dedicated to educating and
promoting the value of professional convention
management. Seattle is poised to take advan-
tage of the exposure and maximize the poten-
tial for future meeting business.
the convention will showcase Seattle and
the surrounding area to 2,500-3,200 meeting
professionals, CeOs and meetings and con-
vention industry suppliers, many of whom are
decision-makers of future business.
the economic impact for the immediate
meeting in January 2008 is $4.5 million, though
the potential economic impact from future
business stimulated by the meeting is several
times greater.
the combined buying power of PCMa
members is more than $18 billion in potential
meetings and conventions.
throughout 2007, SCVB will prepare to
host PCMa, engaging the participation of
Seattle’s destination sales and services team.
For more information, contact Joan Cahill at
(206) 461-5834 or jcahill@visitseattle.org.

We are extremly pleased
to bring the PCMA Annual
Meeting to Seattle for the
frst time in 2008. As the
meeting industry’s premier
event, the PCMA Annual
Meeting has historically
drawn over 3,000 senior-
level industry professionals
and generated an estimated
$200-300 million to its host
city over the next fve to
10 years. Seattle’s unique
combination of natural
beauty and innovative
urban pulse will make it an
exceptional annual meeting
destination that is sure to
appeal to our attendees.”
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Deborah Sexton
President and CeO
PCMa and PCMa educational
Foundation
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Multi-Cultural Associations and Groups
SCVB has a long-term commitment to this market segment, identifying
and targeting organizations with the potential to meet in Seattle and,
when possible, joining or otherwise engaging key associations within
the segment. SCVB’s role with the National Coalition of Black Meeting
Planners (NCBMP) has broadened to include a mentoring role involv-
ing new NCBMP members attending their conference. Recent groups
have included the National Association of Independent Schools People
of Color Conference (2,600 attendees), Asian Northwest Cultural Edu-
cation Association (5,000) and Te Links Incorporated (3,500).
Sports
SCVB works in conjunction with the Seattle Sports Commission to
create greater awareness of the destination’s strength as a sports event
and related meeting site. As the Seattle Sports Commission gains
momentum, there are more opportunities to book such business.
In 2006, SCVB has generated close to 10,000 room nights in the
sports market with another 8,100 tentative room nights. SCVB and
Seattle Sports Commission staf will attend the National Association
of Sports Commissions and participate in several other bid presenta-
tions throughout the year. Recent groups have included the Amateur
Softball Association of America’s Girls A Level National Fast Pitch
Championships, the Senior Softball Association’s Senior Softball
World Championship and the Eritrean Sports Federation in North
America’s Annual Sports Festival.
Competition and lost Business
Seattle’s number one overriding selling feature is a small to mid-sized
convention center ofering a high-quality meeting experience in the
heart of a vibrant and walkable downtown. Te WSCTC size and
very limited or non-existent expansion opportunities currently make
it the smallest convention center among Seattle’s competitive set. Re-
cently completed or ongoing expansion projects in Vancouver, Denver
and Phoenix further eclipse Seattle’s convention center capabilities
and position in the west. In fact, new TAP (Trends Analysis Projec-
tions) data, based on a broader competitive set of 17 cities, ranks
Seattle last in size of convention center meeting and exhibition space.
Tis new reality makes Seattle’s strategy of protecting and defend-
ing market share of high-end segment associations more critical
now than ever before. Finding new and emerging groups that could
utilize a convention center is also key. Central to both strategies is
how Seattle and the WSCTC are diferentiated in a very competitive
and overbuilt convention facility market.
Seattle’s excellent product and strong partnership sales eforts have
aforded a very high conversion (closing) percentage of tentative
business, running more than 30 percent. However, current trends
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100,000
200,000
Hotel
Rates
Date
Availability
WSCTC
Size
HQ Hotel
Size
2004 Year-End 2005 Year-End 2006 YTD
(October)
131
172
159
133
142
184
78
60
106 107
109
127
Lost Convention Room Nights
2004-10/31/2006
2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12%
Las Vegas
Denver
Portland
Vancouver
Anaheim
Salt Lake City
Orlando
New Orleans
San Francisco
10.7
6.9
6.2
5.8
3.6
3.5
2.9
2.9
2.8
San Diego
9.8
Lost Business Analysis—% of Top Cities
Room Nights Lost 2001-10/31/2006
60.0
90.0
70.0
80.0
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2010+
67.6
72.4
77.2
80.5
82.3
85.1
92.7
Total Convention Center Space (National)
(in millions of square feet)
Source: Tradeshow Week
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indicate that Seattle is increasingly loosing future business due
to high hotel rates and losing meeting space. Tese two trends
are not expected to change in 2007. Tere will be more pressure
on SCVB to convert future business (that fts for the city) in a
high-demand, high RevPAR environment. Te strong Seattle sales
partnership and new, highly-visible destination brand will help.
looking ahead
Simply put, 2007 has the potential to be the best meeting and
convention year in recent Seattle history.
Not only is the total room night pace up by more than 8
percent (during same period for 2006), but the placement of
the 2007 business is extraordinarily good for Seattle’s hospi-
tality partners. Currently, business on the books for the frst
quarter of 2007 is 120 percent ahead of 2006. Tis translates
to 137,000 room nights compared with 57,000 room nights
in 2006. Conversely, group business on the books for the high
transient demand third quarter of 2007 is down 25 percent,
allowing hotels to manage yield and sell more transient business
in the prime summer months.
As identifed previously, 2008 does continue to provide some
short-term booking opportunities but SCVB is working diligent-
ly with its hotel and convention center partners to fll the space.
Currently, the pace of group business on the books is behind by
19 percent. However, an aggressive need period action plan has
been in place for months and, encouragingly, the tentative pipe-
line for 2008 business is growing. Te most critical action step
is the conversion of the current tentative backlog. It is expected
300,000
400,000
500,000
600,000
439,258
2001
488,438
2002
484,193
2003
485,463
2004
535,194
2005
542,000
2006(f )
555,000
2007(f )
Booking Goals vs. Actual—Historical Comparision
* Citywide and WSCTC Bookings
2002 ACTUAL 2003 ACTUAL 2004 ACTUAL 2005 ACTUAL 2006 ACTUAL (F) 2007 GOALS
WSCTC*
53
331,833
57
333,609
45
343,461
53
345,779
42
362,280
48
365,000
Hotels
450
205,341
485
201,570
442
225,766
570
195,458
553
171,972
575
200,000
Total
503
537,174
542
535,179
487
569,227
623
541,237
595
534,252
623
565,000
WSCTC Room Night Comparison
Total Room Nights Booked by Quarter (through 12/1/06)
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
1st Qtr 48,204 56,458 126,933 33,515 49,526
2nd Qtr 106,158 113,065 93,814 72,436 130,850
3rd Qtr 91,974 110,489 81,370 73,612 35,337
4th Qtr 79,307 49,657 61,002 53,466 19,475
TOTAL 325,643 329,669 363,119 233,029 235,188
Consumed/Booked Group Room
Nights - History/Forecast
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that by early 2007 the large pace diferential for 2008 will be down to 5
percent below the prior year. In comparison with 2007—a record year
that will be a hard act to follow—this is relatively good news.
Te only other major concern for the future (besides traditional need
periods and potential waterfront tunnel/viaduct impacts) is converting
2012 tentatives. At this time, the conversion rate for 2012 is at 17 percent
(compared to the average of 30 percent). Te good news is that there is a
strong tentative pipeline at this point for 2012.
Strategies and tactics
Leverage and Communicate Seattle and the New Seattle
Destination Brand: Strategically place advertising and editorial mes-
sages in key convention trade media throughout 2007.
Execute Strategic Need Periods Action Plan: Working with the
WSCTC and Seattle hotel partners, address need periods by market seg-
ment for 2008 and further years; promote a future booking calendar that
encourages Seattle hot dates, utilizing ConventionPlanit, Hot Rates and
SCVB’s PCMA database agreement; communicate need periods to third-
party organizations and GSOs; and promote key connections with third
parties, ConferenceDirect, HelmsBriscoe and Expedient.
Build Tentative Backlog to 1.2 Million Room Nights for All
Future Years: Increase the current backlog by 15 percent over 2006
by creating new selling opportunities and markets (including secondary
markets such as Denver, Minneapolis, New York and California) and
modifying the sales incentive plan for both the regional sales ofce and
Seattle team to focus on tentative production.
Re-deploy SCVB Sales Team to Focus on Short-Term Busi-
ness Opportunities and Need Periods: Dedicate more attention
to top-producing and high-potential market segments, leverage short-term
opportunities with Hot Rates, ConventionPlanit and similar conven-
tion industry web sites, increase the number of sales trips to key markets
and create a second sales position dedicated to top regional and national
Fortune 500 opportunities.
Leverage PCMA Investment to Maximize Potential 2008 on
ROI: Deploy a Special Projects Director to manage all aspects of PCMA
planning and coordinate direct sales and promotional opportunities to
all PCMA members throughout 2007, including promotion at the 2007
PCMA conference in Toronto.
Create New Selling Opportunities and Markets for the
Seattle Partnership: Focusing on secondary markets, identify and
develop new or emerging groups within this industry that may consider
Seattle. Additional sales eforts will encourage appropriately-sized groups
to meet at WSCTC; targets will be growing groups that have not previ-
ously considered meeting at a convention center.
Continue to Advocate Building Seattle’s Group Base During
Future High Occupancy, High Rate and RevPAR Periods:
Establish quarterly strategy meetings with TAP Task Force, reestablish
bimonthly WSCTC/SCVB booking calendar reviews, distribute regular
Convention Alerts to a broader audience and increase awareness of the
importance of the convention industry in Seattle.
Create One-Of-A-Kind Customer Advisory Board: Work in
conjunction with the Washington State Convention & Trade Center to
provide industry feedback, competitive marketing data and other informa-
tion that is crucial to crafting a competitive advantage in the meetings
and conventions market.
Partner with the Sheraton Seattle and Capitalize on its Sec-
ond Tower Opening in 2007: Target new groups through sales and
public relations activities, coordinating quarterly strategy meetings with
senior Sheraton management, WSCTC and SCVB and other partners,
and aggressively publicize Seattle’s new 1,000-room convention hotel to
convention trade media.
Enhance Marketing Technology: Develop Informz marketing
technology to communicate with meeting planners in a more personal and
cost-efective way; expand the meeting planners portion of the SCVB web
site with client tools, new content and an electronic, downloadable version
of the Seattle Event Planning Kit.
Maintain Minority Outreach Sales Efforts: Continue strong
visibility and sales activity in the National Coalition of Black Meeting
Planners organization and assess involvement with the Hispanic Meeting
Planners organization.
Leverage Local Connections: Protect and defend Seattle’s market
share with Microsoft, Starbucks, Washington Mutual and other key local
accounts with assistance from the SCVB board of directors; and continue
to solicit SCVB and WSCTC boards to help identify new prospects for
meetings and conventions.
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Marketing Plan COnVentiOn SaleS anD SerViCeS
Date eVent lOCatiOn
5-7 Association for Convention Operations Management Toronto
7-10 Professional Convention Management Association Toronto
20-23 Meeting Professionals International—Professional Education Conference New Orleans
7-8 ConferenceDirect Annual Meeting Chicago
11-14 CESSE Midwinter Board Meeting Tucson
1 Destination Showcase Washington, D.C.
26-27 Pharmaceutical Meeting Planners Forum Philadelphia
15-17 PCMA Leadership Conference Orlando
17-20 National Association of Sports Commissions Dallas
2-6 Society of Government Meeting Professionals Atlantic City
10-11 Chicago Client Event Chicago
3-5 Washington Society of Association Executives Vancouver
13 PCMA Foundation Dinner Washington, D.C.
14 Greater Washington Society of Association Executives—
Springtime in the Park Washington, D.C.
17-20 Council of Engineering & Scientifc Society Executives (CESSE) Halifax, Nova Scotia
18-21 Destination Marketing Association International Pittsburgh
29-31 Meeting Professionals Internationa—World Education Conference Montreal
11-14 American Society of Association Executives Chicago
5-6 Affordable Meetings Washington, D.C.
TBD Washington D.C. Client Event Washington, D.C.
TBD Financial Insurance Conference Planners TBD
TBD National Coalition of Black Meeting Planners TBD
TBD PCMA Greater Midwest Chapter Annual Meeting Chicago
11 Association Forum Holiday Showcase Chicago
28-30 International Association of Exhibitions and Events San Diego
TBD Meeting Professionals Internationa—MACE Washington, D.C.
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November
December
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Travel, Promotion and Trade Shows - January - December, 2007
24
Te Convention and Visitor Services (CVS) team refect, provide
and enhance every customer experience in Seattle. Team members
are often the direct contact point between visitors and members
and are the ambassadors of Seattle’s hospitality community. Te
CVS team includes: Convention Services, Convention Housing
and the Citywide Concierge Center. In a city known worldwide
for outstanding service, the CVS mission is to enhance every
guest experience and stimulate economic beneft for members.
Strategies and tactics
Increase Convention Spend for SCVB Members in
2007: Increase revenue opportunities and business referrals to
SCVB members from all areas of CVS and investigate and build
new revenue opportunities.
Provide Attendance Boosting Strategies: Stimulate
attendance for 2007 and 2008 conventions through promotional
travel, collateral and partner collaboration.
Promote the Value and Impact of Convention and
Visitor Spending: Communicate, publicize and educate
members about the value and importance of the meetings and
visitor industry in Seattle.
Defend and Increase the Share of Convention Hous-
ing Business for 2007 and 2008: Promote SCVB housing
services early in the sales process and support throughout the
service contact.
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convention and visitor services
Convention Housing—
Historical and Proposed 2007
2006 2007
# Groups 15 14
# Rooms 22,332 22,075
# Room nights 97,082 105,579
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Jan 5 - 7
Association for Convention Operations Management (ACOM) Toronto
Jan 7 - 10
Professional Convention Management Association (PCMA) Toronto
Mar 24 - 29
Society of Toxicology Charlotte, NC
Aug 22 - 24
Passkey Group Housing Forum Boston
Oct 11 - 14
Western Association of Convention and Visitors Bureaus Anchorage
left to right: Ann Peavey, Kae Block, Susan Ranney,
Adriane Friedman
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Te SCVB Tourism Development team works proactively with the Port
of Seattle and Washington State Tourism to expand the base of destina-
tion product and increase the number, length of stay and average spend
of international visitors to Seattle, Washington State and the Pacifc
Northwest.
Situation analysis
Te U.S. Department of Commerce predicts a 6 percent increase in
overseas visitors to the U.S. in 2007 over 2006, following growth of 7
percent in 2006 over 2005.
Riding the same positive trend, Seattle received a record 347,000 over-
seas visitors in 2005, up from 325,000 in 2004. Seattle’s primary mar-
kets of Japan, the United Kingdom and Ireland, Australia and Germany
remain steady. France, Taiwan and Korea are strong secondary markets.
Emerging markets such as China, Mexico and Latin America are evalu-
ated and addressed as new air service is added.
Overseas travelers take longer trips and spend more than domestic travel-
ers. Many have visited the United States multiple times and are seeking
new destinations and experiences. A trend toward independent travel
(FIT), as opposed to group travel, is expected to continue. Other trends
include shorter decision-making and booking times, increasing online
travel purchases and targeting specifc consumer market segments.
Te Travel Industry Association of America (TIA) and other travel asso-
ciations are coordinating industry and governmental eforts to mini-
mize the impact of high fuel costs and fuel surcharges, security concerns
and airport security requirements, new border entry procedures and
passport requirements and other potentially negative infuences on
overseas travel to the U.S.
Primary Markets
Japan
Japan is expected to be the number one international overseas market
for Seattle and Washington State in 2007. As Japanese baby boomers
begin to retire, the potential for longer-stay, higher-spend visitors will
continue to grow. Te destination’s consistent presence, promotion and
successful brand campaign (“Seattle-Washington, Living Cool, Loving
Nature”) have helped keep Japanese consumer, travel trade and media
interest in Seattle and Washington State high. In 2007, SCVB and its
partners will expand on the destination’s base of appeal from baseball,
nature and lifestyle to include Lifestyles Of Health And Sustainability
(LOHAS), currently a strong trend in Japan and one that fts naturally
with Seattle’s image as a clean, relaxed, safe, unique American destination
that is relatively close to Japan. Japanese travelers continue to be drawn
by the region’s fresh seafood, delicious cuisine and award-winning local
wines and beer. In 2007, Washington wine tourism will be an emphasis
in destination marketing eforts. Other Japanese target
markets include women in their 30s and 40s, mothers
and daughters, “Renaissance Men” in their 30s and 40s,
technical tour groups and students of all ages.
United Kingdom and Ireland
Travelers from the United Kingdom to the U.S. are expect-
ed to increase by 6 percent in 2006, the same percentage
gain as in 2005. Te UK is the second largest market for
Seattle and Washington State, although the largest market
for the U.S. as a whole. Te UK economy is expected to
remain in a state of growth (about 2.5 percent annually
through 2009). UK consumers typically spend 12.7 nights
on a U.S. holiday and they are likely to take multiple
holidays during the year.
Ireland, although a separate market, is easily accessed using
existing resources in the UK and and so marketing initiatives
are combined. Te Irish market grew 11 percent in 2005
and further growth of 17 percent is expected for 2006.
international tourism development
left to right: Michael Kurtz, Brad Jones, Marj Snyder, Joshua Ratliff
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Baby Boomers are currently the most infuential
purchasing group for travel in the UK. 61 percent of
all adults are Internet users with 32 percent of UK
consumers making online travel bookings last year. By
2010, Mintel, a consumer research frm, expects that
50 percent of all travel will be booked online. However,
complicated long-haul trips and niche market products
do not sell as well online. Coach touring continues to
fall as the “older” market looks for more exciting holi-
day experiences.
In June 2006, British Airways added three weekly
roundtrip fights between London’s Heathrow Airport
and Seattle to accommodate demand.
2007 SCVB marketing eforts in the UK and Ireland
will focus on the three largest growth areas: city breaks, pre- and post-
cruise opportunities and niche markets. Niche markets with potential
from the UK include bird watching, eco-tours, soft adventure, garden
tours, golf, wine and culinary tours, walking and hiking tours, spas
and well being. Eforts will also include working with companies using
multimedia combinations to sell holiday experiences online.
Australia
Australia became the sixth largest overseas market for the U.S. in 2005
with a record 581,000 visitors, a 12 percent increase over 2004. Further
growth is expected for 2006 and 2007. Te average length of stay in the
U.S. increased to 24 nights in 2005, up from three nights in 2004. Te
Australian dollar has risen against the U.S. dollar in recent years, making
the U.S. seem more afordable. Te top-three activities of Aussie travelers
are dining in restaurants, shopping and sightseeing in cities. Increased
air service to San Francisco and Vancouver, B.C. in 2006 will make
Seattle more easily accessible in 2007. Marketing eforts in Australia will
continue to focus on the travel trade and media.
Germany
Arrivals from Germany grew 7 percent in 2005 and forecasts for growth
of 7 percent and 5 percent in 2006 and 2007, respectively, clearly
indicate that German travel to the U.S. has bounced back from a few
years ago. Annual leave for Germans is up to six weeks which allows for
plenty of time to take a U.S. holiday. Te western states continue to be
popular and once frst tier attractions such as the Grand Canyon and
the Southwest have been explored, German travelers tend to be inter-
ested in returning to the Pacifc Northwest on a future trip. Marketing
eforts will focus on select tour operators and media.
Secondary Markets
France
Te U.S. is one of the top choices among long-haul destinations for French
travelers. Tere has been some increase in product to Seattle and Washing-
ton State. One of the most noticeable trends in France is the rapid growth
of the Internet for planning and booking trips. SCVB will continue to
partner with the Port of Seattle and Washington State Tourism to solicit
and obtain new air service between France and Seattle while simultaneously
maintaining tourism marketing contract support in France to raise the
destination profle among French media and travel trade.
emerging Markets
China
Chinese visitors to the U.S. rose to 405,000 in 2005. Tis signifcant infux
ranked China 12th among international arrivals to the U.S., up 33 percent
since 2004. Tere has been a 40 percent shift from business to leisure travel
among frst-time Chinese visitors to the U.S. Seattle and Washington State,
among other destinations on the West Coast of the U.S., receive signifcant
ongoing business travel from this market and growing interest from the
Chinese travel trade and media in promoting it as a travel destination to
Chinese consumers. In 2007, SCVB will participate in a sales mission to
China and proactively work with the Chinese travel industry and media to
increase awareness and stimulate desire to visit Seattle and Washington State.
Strategies and tactics
Grow Primary Markets: Concentrate marketing eforts on Japan,
the UK, Australia and Germany with continued retention of contracted
representation in each market.
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Expand Product: Proactively work with key travel producers to create
new and expanded Seattle and regional products and itineraries, specif-
cally targeting untapped niche markets that ft the destination.
Conduct Sales Calls: Increase destination awareness and stimulate
product development with an aggressive schedule of direct sales and media
calls on targeted accounts in primary overseas markets and North Ameri-
can afliate ofces.
Expand Destination Media Coverage: Stimulate positive media
coverage to support sales of existing, and development of new, tour product.
Host FAM Trips: Familiarize qualifed travel trade clients and media
with the destination via regular inbound site inspections and tours.
Promote New Air Service: Work with the Port of Seattle to attract
and retain international airlines at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.
Enhance Website: Continue to customize SCVB website with foreign
languages and create greater oferings and ease of use for overseas visitors.
Work with Suppliers: Proactively seek cooperative marketing
opportunities with key airlines and well-known regional and global
companies and organizations.
Target Trade Events: Participate in selected travel industry trade
events throughout the year.
Further Enhance our Regional Partnerships: Work coopera-
tively with other local, state and provincial destination marketing orga-
nizations to increase the visibility of Seattle and the Pacifc Northwest.
Work as a Partnership: Maintain strong partnership with the Port
of Seattle and Washington State Tourism, cooperatively marketing the
entire destination.
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Date eVent lOCatiOn
Jan 9-10 Receptive Services Association New York
Jan. 22-23 NAJ Tour Operator Summit & Marketplace Los Angeles
Jan. 31 Tour Operator and Media Sales Calls Paris /
Feb. 9 London
Feb. 12-15 Go West Travel Summit Portland
Feb. 19-22 Visit USA Seminars Australia
Mar. TBA Japan Sales Mission Tokyo
Mar. 7-11 International Tourism Exchange (ITB) Berlin
May 14-17 Active America Travel Summit Minneapolis
June TBA NAJ Tour Operator Summit East New York
Sept. TBA JATA/See America Week Tokyo
Oct. 23-25 TIA Outlook Forum Charlotte, NC
Nov TBA China Sales Trip Shanghai / Taipei
Dec. 6-7 CITAP Marketplace Vancouver, B.C.
Te Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) travel market
represents $65 billion in the U.S., according to Community Marketing
Inc.’s Gay Market Research and Development Lab. A 2005 survey of
this demographic group indicated:
Median household income is $87,500.
LGBT travelers took an average of six overnight trips
in the last twelve months and 87 percent took at least one
long leisure trip. 53 percent spent $5,000 or more per year
on vacations.
73 percent belong to a frequent fyer program.
98 percent of respondents indicated that a destination’s
gay-friendly reputation infuenced their decision to visit and
59 percent said gay-welcoming hotels were very important.
SCVB works collegially with its member or-
ganizations and marketing partners to pro-
actively target this market. 2007 initiatives
will include:
Expand Partnerships: With the Greater Seattle Business Association
(GSBA) and other allied organizations, share leads and attend events
and tradeshows.
Establish Seattle LGBT Tourism Marketing Coalition: Include
staf members and representatives from key organizations and events as well
as elected ofcials.
Develop Seattle LGBT Brand Under the Umbrella of the Se-
attle Brand.
Create a Seattle LGBT Travel Brochure: For use in collateral, SCVB
web site and cooperative advertising.
Identify Advertising Opportunities: Public/private co-ops in select
publications, SCVB web site and other opportunities.
Promote Seattle Events to LGBT Target Markets: Seattle Pride,
Seattle Lesbian & Gay Film Festival, Seattle Men’s Chorus, Seattle Women’s
Chorus and others.
Develop Public/Private Delegation: Participate in LGBT travel
expos in West Hollywood, San Francisco and San Diego, as well as Pride
events in Vancouver, B.C. and Portland feeder markets.
Maintain Active Membership in the International Gay & Les-
bian Travel Association.
lesbian, gay,
Bisexual and transgender
travel Marketing
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nOrtH aMeriCan tOuriSM DeVelOPMent
Te Tourism Development team works with tour operators, wholesalers,
travel agents, group leaders, airlines, cruise lines and other segments of
the professional travel trade throughout North America to expand leisure
travel to Seattle and the Pacifc Northwest.
United States
Competition for the consumer dollar will continue to grow in 2007.
Travelers make decisions based on their interests as well as on the options
available for the time and dollars they have to spend. Additional factors
in travel decisions will continue to include the consumer confdence level,
the cost of hotels, the price of fuel, Homeland Security issues, air safety
and dependability and the ease of travel planning and booking.
Hotels are enjoying the highest occupancy rates since
1996. The average room rate nationwide is predicted to
increase another 5.2 percent in 2007. While luxury rates are
readily available, more moderate rates can be found based on
traveler fexibility.
Source: Bjorn Hanson of PricewaterhouseCoopers
Packaged travel is growing exponentially in popular-
ity. It often provides to both groups and individual travel-
ers experiences that are not available to individual buyers
along with the assurance that the details have been planned
by professionals. Packaging, whether luxury, moderate or
economy, provides value and saves planning time.
By 2020, there will be 700 million people over age 65
worldwide. While their interests are varied, travel is the
activity that tops this generation’s list of planned activities.
Their travel interests include:
- Spas and relaxation travel
- Wine and culinary experiences
- gardening
- arts and crafts
- Outdoor recreation (including golf)
- Women-only travel
- Volunteerism and charitable donating
- Music and theater
- Cruising
- Pet travel
- Medical/life-enhancement travel
Many of these are shared by the “Gen X-ers” and “Millenni-
als” including the student markets.
Source: Deloitte & Touche
Canada
New WHITI regulations require passports for all air travel between the
United States and Canada—efective Jan. 23, 2007. Passports, or a new
document to be determined, will be required for land and sea travel be-
tween the two countries by June 1, 2009, or possibly earlier. Considering
the number of travelers in both countries without passports, communica-
tion, consistency in border procedures and the ease, or lack of, in the in-
terim border crossing process will play a major part in decisions to travel.
Washington ranked third in states visited by Canadians in
2005: 1,612,000 visits, and 4,588,000 nights, with expenditures
of approximately C$ 310,000,000.
Source: Statistics Canada
Most statistics show an annual 5 percent increase in travel
from Canada to the united States. Much of this is considered to
be day trips and visits with friends and family.
north american tourism development
“Seattle is my ‘kid in a candy store’
city. as a tour operator, Seattle is not
only a vibrant destination in its own
right, it’s the gateway to national parks,
the ferry system of Puget Sound and
dozens of wonderful off-the-beaten-track
destinations.”
Mark Hoffman, CTP
Owner
Sports leisure Vacations
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Cruise Marketing
The 2007 cruise season in Seattle will see continued
growth. There will be increased ship departures and approxi-
mately 18 percent more passengers than 2006. The Port of
Seattle is estimating 210 premium ship vessel movements
and 412,000 passengers (one-way count).
On average, professional travel planners are responsible
for booking 85–90 percent of cruises departing from Seattle.
During cruise season, two ships will be departing
Seattle every Friday, Saturday and Sunday on seven-day
round-trips to Alaska.
Approximately 10 three- and four-day cruises are sched-
uled for the shoulder season of September 21 to October 29,
with the last ship returning on November 2.
Repositioning cruises at the beginning and end of the cruise
season offer an added bonus and enticement for travelers.
The niche cruise market is also important to Seattle, both
early and late in the season when the small ships are reposi-
tioned to and from their seasonal bases in Alaska.
Cruise West will offer its eight-day “Pacifc Northwest
Coastal Escape” in April and September.
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Marketing Plan
Strategies and tactics
Promote Seattle as a Cruise Port and Pre-Post Destination:
Work with the Port of Seattle, cruise lines, travel planners and local sup-
pliers to promote cruising from Seattle, as well as from the Northwest in
general and encourage pre- and post-cruise stays.
Maintain and Expand Travel Trade Contact Base: Develop
new tour operator, travel agent and other travel planner relationships in
both current and untapped market areas through sales calls, direct mail,
e-mail and participation in trade events. Continue to work with clients
already in place.
Grow Product: Assist travel professionals in expanding their current
product and encourage new itineraries and components that draw on
the experiential variety found in Seattle and other parts of Washington
State and the Pacifc Northwest.
Assist in Expanding Availability of Collateral: Work with local
and regional DMOs and suppliers to develop sample itineraries and
individual itinerary components responsive to current afnity market
and general interest demand.
Regional Cooperation: Work with local and regional DMOs,
associations and key suppliers to enhance visibility for the region. Share
marketing ideas, participate in joint projects subject to budget and goals
and share leads as appropriate.
TD Website Expansion: Work with Tourism Development staf to
develop and expand an itinerary section for the TD section of SCVB’s
website. Participate in the expansion of the TD site in general.
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February 15-17 Bank Travel Conference Jacksonville, FL
February 26-March 2 Two Nation Vacation Travel Shows Arizona & California
March 30-April 1
CLIA Cruise3Sixty Ft. Lauderdale, FL
April 25-28
NTA Spring Meet Kelowna, B.C.
May 29-June 3
Travel Trade 26th Annual Cruise-a-Thon Seattle
June 7-10
Travel Alliance Partners Meeting (TAP) TBD
July 5-8
Holland America Signature of Excellence FAM Seattle
TBD
Washington State Tourism Conference TBD
Fall TBD
North West Cruiseship Assoc. Business Conference Seattle
November 2-6
NTA Annual Convention Kansas City, MO
December TBD*
Travel Trade 23rd Annual Leisure Travel-Home Based
Winter Cruise-a-Thon Ft. Lauderdale, FL
TBD
U.S. and Canadian Sales Calls
TBD
Select Inbound Professional Travel Planner FAMS
and Training Sessions
*Participation depends on where the summer 2008 Cruise-a-thon will be held.
Te primary function of the SCVB Public Relations department is
to increase the economic impact of tourism in the city and county
by stimulating editorial media coverage, strategically working across
leisure, business, convention trade and travel trade markets.
Situation analysis
In 2006, Seattle enjoyed a type of recognition in the media it hadn’t
seen for the better part of a decade. For the frst time since 2000, the
city was ranked among the top ten destinations in two of the most
prestigious leisure travel publications in the nation.
In August 2006, Travel + Leisure magazine released its 11th annual
World’s Best Awards poll, naming Seattle 10th among the top cities in
the United States and Canada. Ten in November 2006, Condé Nast
Traveler magazine’s Readers’ Choice Awards named Seattle ninth among
U.S. cities. Both of these polls were based on surveys of readers’ travel
experiences in the cities listed.
Te public relations team will use the momentum generated by these
and other accolades to continue and expand upon current eforts to
promote the city as a leisure, business and convention destination.
Strategies and tactics
Orchestrate Organizational Communications: Build and
disseminate strong communication programs that drive the key mes-
sages of SCVB and Seattle’s tourism industry.
Host Visiting Media: Host more than 200 qualifed visiting
journalists throughout the year via individual visits and group press
trips, working cooperatively with Society of American Travel Writers
members and travel suppliers.
Pitch “No-Host” Media: Target high-producing journalists with
story pitches that don’t require a Seattle visit, aggressively positioning
SCVB as a trusted source of timely and relevant Seattle news.
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PuBliC relatiOnS
Conduct Media Calls: Call on the most infuential con-
sumer, convention and travel trade media in key markets such
as New York, San Francisco and Southern California.
Promote the Destination at Media Marketplaces:
Attend the top travel industry media marketplaces including
Society of American Travel Writers (SATW) and Public Rela-
tions Society of America (PRSA) Travel & Tourism Section.
Produce Regular Destination News: Double distribu-
tion of 2006’s well-received Seattle Travel News e-newsletter,
providing prepared editorial copy and photos to more than
3,000 North American journalists each month.
Run Strong PR Campaigns: Run publicity campaigns that
support the Seattle Super Saver program, Seattle’s convention
industry, cultural tourism, pre- and post-cruise visits, food and
wine, LGBT travel and the SCVB destination brand.
Work Closely with Destination Public Relations
Team: Amplify positive media exposure by working coopera-
tively with public relations colleagues at member and partner
organizations, sharing media leads and hosting opportunities
and employing joint messages for destination campaigns and
other programs.
Marketing Plan
88
left to right:
Heather Bryant, David Blandford, Matt Wakefeld
Editorial Media Coverage
Equivalent Advertising Value (in millions)
20
10
15
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006(f)
$16.8
$12
$14.5
$15
$15.5
$16.5
$17.3
* Metronatural brand launch ad value totalled
separately $15 million
Editorial Media Coverage Circulation
(in millions)
300
400
500
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
490
510
460
425
403
387
332
2005 2006(f)
* Metronatural brand launch circulation totalled
separately 170 million
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in addition to 2006 totals shown here, metronatural brand launch circulation was 170 million
and equivalent advertising value was $15 million worldwide.
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Jan-Mar Seattle Super Saver Value Season Publicity Campaign
April New York Media Blitz New York
Apr 21 - 25 TIA International PowWow Media Marketplace Anaheim
May Northern California Media Blitz San Francisco
May Southern California Media Blitz Los Angeles/
San Diego
June 2 - 6 Society of American Travel Writers Western Chapter Meeting Hawaii
June 20 - 22 PRSA Travel & Tourism Conference/Media Marketplace Los Angeles
Sept 2 - 6 Society of American Travel Writers International Meeting UK
Monthly Travel media newsletter to full media list
Ongoing Seattle brand publicity campaign
Press releases to select media based on news
Host journalists on assignment
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“No matter how many times I fy into Seattle from the east, the view from the left side of the plane on a
clear day never ceases to take my breath away, the majestic, snow-capped peak of Mt. Rainier jutting out of
the landscape like a welcoming beacon.

Seattle is small and manageable with dramatic architecture…surrounded on all sides by mountains and
water, and dazzling natural beauty.

As this paper’s Finicky Traveler columnist, I’m known as a tough critic of places that don’t live up to the
hype, but Seattle is one destination that I’ve had few quibbles with since I frst visited 15 years ago.”
Laura Landro
travel Columnist, Wall Street Journal
august 19, 2006
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Marketing Plan Cultural tOuriSM
Te Citywide Concierge and Visitor Center (CVC) strives daily to maintain a high
standard of service for Seattle visitors while working to stimulate business referrals for
SCVB member organizations.
In 2006, the CVC expanded services for its customers and generated more visits and re-
cord-high revenue via more restaurant reservations, tickets for tours, theater and events,
as well as increased sales of Seattle CityPasses and Metro bus passes.
Visitor Information
Te center ofers an extensive, on-site library of brochures, guides, maps and other useful
visitor information free of charge, allowing SCVB members exposure to thousands of lei-
sure and business travelers, convention attendees and local consumers who pass through
the concierge center each year.
Multilingual Services
To accommodate increasing numbers of international visitors in Seattle, the center
strengthened its seasonal multilingual services in 2006 with additional team members
conversant in Japanese, Spanish and other languages.
Remote Convention Services
Te center’s remote desk continued to meet the needs of meeting and convention
delegates at the Washington State Convention & Trade Center, serving more than 20
groups throughout 2006. Operating as a streamlined version of the permanent con-
cierge center, the remote concierge desk brought a high level of service to the exhibit
foor of the convention center.
Expansion of a Successful Business Model in 2007
During the coming year, promotion of the Citywide Concierge and Visitor Center will
help build on the center’s 2006 success, stimulating yet greater awareness of the opera-
tion for Seattle visitors and locals alike.
citywide concierge
and visitor center
2005 8,629 1,405 10,034
(Aug. thru Dec.)
2006 19,176 1,698 20,874
(Jan. through Nov.)
Visitor Counts Aug.-Nov.
*Began acquiring data 8/05
CVC WSCTC Total
CityWiDe COnCierge anD ViSitOr Center
back row, left to right:
Mayumi Nishikawa, Ann Peavey,
Elina Awaya
Front, left to right:
Janet Olin, Lu Gardiner
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Comparison of CVC Activity, 2005/2006 YTD
Restaurant Referrals (Jan.-Nov.)
# of bookings # of diners
2005 630 2,243
2006 751 3,012
Number of Visitor Packet Requests (Jan.-Nov.)
2005 27,002
2006 35,021
86
Te SCVB Cultural Tourism program promotes Seattle and King County
as a prime destination to experience arts, history, culture and heritage. Te
program competitively positions the region to attract the desirable and
sizeable market segment known as cultural travelers.
Cultural Tourism is one of the fastest-growing segments of the tourism
industry:
in one year, more than 100 million u.S. travelers took a trip
specifcally to experience an arts or cultural event, according
to the travel industry association of america and Smithsonian
magazine in 2003.
Visitors to Seattle and king County spend money on cultural
tickets and admissions, food, lodging, shopping and transporta-
tion. new money spent on cultural product in king County from
sources originating from outside king County has increased by
more than 90 percent in fve years (source: arts Fund).
27 percent of all king County cultural audiences come from
outside king County (source: arts Fund).
according to americans for the arts, the Seattle-tacoma
area has more arts-related businesses, institutions and organiza-
tions per capita than any other u.S. metropolitan area, including:
- 25 professional theater companies
- More than 14 noteworthy museums
- 15 symphony orchestras
- Some of the country’s best festivals
- Hundreds of music venues
the region’s expansive cultural offerings and growing cul-
tural infrastructure are demand generators for tourism.
Strategies and tactics
Manage a Content-Rich Website: Following the expansion and
enhancement of the cultural tourism web pages at visitseattle.org/cultural,
maintain it as a dynamic and compelling resource for the more than 40
percent of cultural travelers who rely on the Internet as their primary source
of travel planning information.
Conduct Destination Marketing Programs: Produce SCVB
marketing campaigns tied to cultural events with strong appeal to travelers,
such as Seattle Art Museum exhibits (the Van Gogh to Mondrian exhibit
drew 38 percent of audiences from outside Washington State), Seattle
Opera’s 2005 Ring Cycle (which drew ticketbuyers from 49 states and 19
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cultural tourism
Tracey Wickersham,
Director of Cultural
Tourism, enjoys a
rare quiet moment in
Benaroya Hall. Noted
for its outstanding
acoustics, the hall
hosted nearly 800
events in the most
recently completed
season, including 220
performances by the
Seattle Symphony.
Of note: 24 percent
of Symphony ticket
buyers come from
outside King County
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“eagle,” 1971, by alexander Calder. gift of Jon and Mary Shirley, 2000.69 ,
© 2006 estate of alexander Calder / artist rights Society (arS), new york,
Photo During inStallatiOn: Paul Macapia
87
Marketing Plan Cultural tOuriSM
foreign countries), fagship festivals such as Bumbershoot and the Seattle
International Film Festival, as well as other signifcant cultural events.

Create Cultural and Heritage Itineraries: Create a series of cultural
heritage guides that highlight Seattle’s cultural diversity and guide visitors to
culturally signifcant locations.
Host 2007 Cultural & Heritage Tourism Alliance Conference:
Showcase Seattle to key industry leaders in cultural and heritage tourism by
hosting the 2007 annual conference.
Promote Cultural Packages: Collaboratively market member hotel/
cultural attraction packages via the Seattle Super Saver program.
Create Cultural Tourism Components for Key SCVB Initia-
tives: Develop channels for cultural cross-marketing with programs such
as Seattle Super Saver and America’s Greatest Cities.
Manage Destination Events Calendar: Produce the online cultural
events calendar at www.visitseattle.org, maintaining an active database of
approximately 5,000 events happening within the next two years in the
Seattle and King County area. Tis calendar draws signifcant trafc to
the visitseattle.org website and the database is also used to create travel
planning itineraries for conventions, groups, travel professionals and
leisure travelers.
Support Fresh Sheet Program: Work with the Market the Arts Task
Force, composed of regional arts marketing professionals, and project man-
agement partner BeDynamic to provide the monthly “Fresh Sheet” program
of cultural event information distributed to all regional hotel concierges and
other interested industry professionals.
Produce Cultural Hot Sheet: Produce and distribute the monthly
cultural “Hot Sheet” to hospitality sales and marketing professionals and
the tourism trade, ofering frst news of major upcoming arts and cultural
events in the greater Seattle area over the next
12 months.
Strengthen Cultural Cascades Part-
nership: Collaboratively manage the
Cultural Cascades regional cultural tour-
ism marketing partnership with Vancouver
B.C., Tacoma, Portland, Eugene, and
travel partner Amtrak Cascades. Develop
regional cross-marketing programs, create
advertising and marketing tools and work
together to efectively promote the region
as a prime cultural destination. Maintain
www.culturalcascades.com.
Create Promotional Tools: Research and produce cultural travel
marketing and promotional tools. Work in concert with the community’s
ethnic and heritage organizations, arts and cultural groups and outside
funding partners.
Integrate Cultural Tourism: Provide consistent cultural messages for
other SCVB marketing/PR programs. Work closely with Tourism Develop-
ment and the Public Relations departments to capitalize on the widespread
appeal of cultural tourism, which enables SCVB to generate positive news
stories and promote appropriate cultural travel oferings to the professional
travel trade.
Serve as a Resource: Serve as a resource and training partner for
community arts and heritage groups. Ofer presentations on the value of
cultural tourism and strategies on how best to market programs to visitors.
“Garrison Keillor once said that all tourism is cultural tourism. We travel to
experience a destination’s unique history, the art that defnes a region and
the culture that gives us insight into a community’s character and sense of
place. Seattle has one of the great cultural communities in the country and
is adding cultural attractions at a dizzying pace. 2007 will be a banner year
with the opening of the expanded Seattle Art Museum and new Olympic
Sculpture Park. It is a great place to visit and experience.”
Jim Kelly
executive Director, 4Culture
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Bumbershoot, Seattle’s Music & arts Festival
To further enhance Seattle’s tourism profle,
SCVB launched the new brand, metronatural, in
2006, accompanied by a new generation of promo-
tional tools including photography, brochures and
guides, web site content, advertising and more.
In 2007, this powerful brand platform will help
Seattle’s destination marketing team maximize
awareness of the city, region and of SCVB mem-
ber businesses.
Te SCVB Marketing Services Department will
continue to build exposure for metronatural
throughout the year while simultaneously harness-
ing the new brand as a marketing advantage for
Seattle and the region.
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Strategies and actions
Targeted Convention Trade Ad Campaign
A particular emphasis will be placed on the important meetings and conventions market
that serves as the economic engine for the regional tourism industry. A $300,000
convention trade advertising campaign will run throughout 2007, targeting key meeting
planner audiences.
Leisure Travel Ads
Position brand-themed ads in leisure travel publications that promise the greatest ROI;
explore cooperative advertising with SCVB members and marketing partners.
Enhance SCVB Web Site
Expand new 1,000-plus page destination web site for visitors, meeting planners, profes-
sional travel planners, media and SCVB members. Enhance navigation, provide the
option to download all SCVB collateral material and provide additional resources that
will position visitseattle.org as the primary resource for travel to Seattle.
Establish Strategic Partnerships
Work with members, partners and the Seattle community to maximize the reach of
combined audiences.
Strengthen Competitive Advantage
Utilize the metronatural brand to diferentiate and clearly articulate Seattle from com-
peting destinations and distinguish it from many previous misconceptions. Te brand
will align Seattle’s beauty, bounty of attractions and unique civic personality with a
marketable visitor experience.
left to right: Sarah Lee, Elias Calderon, Lara Dickson
1 : having the characteristics of a
world-class metropolis within wild,
beautiful natural surroundings
2 : A blending of clear skies and
expansive water with a fast-paced
city life - n. 3 : one who respects the
environment and lives a balanced
lifestyle of urban and natural
experiences 4 : Seattle
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Marketing SerViCeS
Seattle’s Convention and Visitors Bureau
Discover metronatural at www.visitseattle.org
Seattle is a city like no other. It’s a place where salmon
swim upstream in the middle of town. Where bald eagles
share the sky with jet planes. It’s where vibrant city and the
wonders of nature combine to create a place that’s as
unique as it is unforgettable. In Seattle, each day changes
your perspective on the next. So even when you’re window-
shopping one day, the experience of kayaking the day
before stays with you. That’s because once you visit a place
like Seattle, it never truly leaves you.
Civilization. As nature intended.
Civilization.
As nature intended.
Seattle’s Convention and Visitors Bureau
Discover metronatural at www.visitseattle.org
Seattle is a city like no other. It’s a place where salmon
swim upstream in the middle of town. Where bald eagles
share the sky with jet planes. It’s where vibrant city and the
wonders of nature combine to create a place that’s as
unique as it is unforgettable. In Seattle, each day changes
your perspective on the next. So even when you’re window-
shopping one day, the experience of kayaking the day
before stays with you. That’s because once you visit a place
like Seattle, it never truly leaves you.
Civilization. As nature intended.
89
Marketing Plan
In its 16th season, Seattle Super Saver continues to grow and has
positioned itself as the alternative hotel distribution system for
hotels and visitors alike. Now ofering 86 hotels in and around
Seattle, from budget-conscious properties to fve-star, full-service
hotels, Seattle Super Saver distinguishes itself from its competitors
by the high level of service ofered through www.seattlesupersaver.
com and its call center, which is operated seven days a week.
One-quarter of travelers who booked accommodation reservations did
so online in 2005, up 9 percent from the previous year. Hotel chain
websites were used most often to make Internet reservations, followed
by other online booking services (such as online travel agencies and
mega travel sites). Nearly as many travelers booking lodging reserva-
tions used chain 800 telephone numbers, but this was down 5 percent
from 2004. Te largest share of travelers making reservations made
them directly with the property, but this also declined in frequency
compared to the prior year (Source: TIA – TravelCom 2006).
As of November 2006, Seattle Super Saver had produced a record
$9.2 million in hotel revenue and more than 80,000 room nights
since the online program was revamped in late 2003. Te trafc to
the website continues to grow with an average of 550,000 unique
visitors per year.
In May 2006, a new look and feel for Seattle Super Saver was
unveiled. After gathering feedback from visitors for more than
two years, the new site introduced a wealth of information
geared toward travelers planning their vacations. Six new sec-
tions provided detailed information on Seattle attractions, shop-
ping, dining, arts, cultural and sports events.
Traveler’s tips as well as general information,
maps and transportation options were also
added. Tis expansion has positioned Seattle
Super Saver as not only a hotel booking site
but also as a one-stop resource for planning
and buying travel.
Strategies and tactics
Expand Geographic Inventory: Continue
to expand throughout the Seattle metro area
with a diverse ofering of hotels catering to dif-
ferent market segments.
Continue to Grow Organically in
Search Engines: Maximize our positioning
on search engine results in order to drive incre-
mental trafc and revenue at a lower cost.
Website Content: Continually update and
provide relevant destination information for
visitors planning trips in order to increase the
look-to-book ratio and become a one-stop alter-
native for travelers.
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seattle super saver
left to right: Tanya Seeburger, Steve Jaquith, Cheryl Fischer.
not pictured: Rosie Ching, Yolanda Gordon.
Seattle Super Saver reservation team
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Multilingual Support: Introduce microsites in
foreign languages geared toward overseas and domes-
tic travelers whose preferred language is other than
English in order to build confdence in Seattle Super
Saver brand, product and services.
Add packaging or Promotional Compo-
nent: Explore package distribution in conjunction
with attractions, retail, restaurants and sports and
cultural organizations, ofering travelers a unique
and attractive add-on to their hotel stay.
Continually Improve Technology: Enhance
the current technology platform in order to provide
visitors with a fast, reliable user interface as well as
an efcient and personalized experience when call-
ing the Seattle Super Saver phone center.
E-mail Marketing: Continuously promote ofers
from member hotels through the Seattle Super Saver
e-mail marketing database, targeting special events,
holidays or need periods.
Seattle SuPer SaVer
41
Marketing Plan
Seattle Super Saver
Net Revenue Nov 2003 - Oct 2006
Seattle Super Saver
Net Room Nights Nov 2003 - Oct 2006
$0
$1,900,000
$3,800,000
$5,700,000
$7,600,000
$9,500,000
Web Call Center
$9,343,557
$3,199,124
$6,144,433
0
17,000
34,000
51,000
68,000
85,000
Web Call Center
80,420
26,449
53,971
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seattle sports commission
Mission
Te Seattle Sports Commission’s (SSC) mission is to
create economic development in the Puget Sound region
through sports.
Situation analysis
Sports are critical components of the multi-billion dollar
tourism industry in Western Washington. Seattle’s reputa-
tion as a world-class destination is enhanced by assets such
as its professional franchises, endless ecotourism opportu-
nities, boating, golf and winter sports.
Te importance of a destination’s sports and recreation
oferings extends beyond visitors watching a game at a local
stadium. Convention delegates and business and leisure
travelers want to know what they can do once their meetings
are over or their cruise is fnished. Seattle’s wide variety of
activities and attractions put it ahead of other destinations
and is often the reason a person chooses this city over others.
Te power of sports was clearly on display during the
Seahawks recent run to the Super Bowl in Detroit. Te
City of Seattle received a staggering supply of promotion
through national and international media, which is ex-
Support Seattle Sports
Sports have changed the landscape of Seattle over the past decade, but
have only begun to tap into its potential in this region.
Seattle is the birthplace of many revolutionary ideas that turned into
some of the greatest innovations of the past century. the people of this
city have had an impact on fight, technology, music and other ground-
breaking discoveries that shape lives around the globe. Surrounded by a
backdrop of Mother nature’s fnest offerings, the city has achieved more
in its short history than most could hope to accomplish.
now is the time to embrace the next big ideas and take the actions that
shape the next century of this region and the world. Seattle has the
potential to be mentioned among the world’s elite cities, so be bold,
confdent and set ambitious goals that make this a reality. Dream of the
impossible and make it possible.
the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver have clearly awakened
Seattle’s tourism industry and may serve as a catalyst for hosting
world-class events with enormous economic impact. During a joint
meeting in Vancouver, the board of directors for Seattle’s Convention
and Visitors Bureau and tourism Vancouver voted unanimously to study
the viability of bidding on international competitions such as World Cup
Soccer, a World’s Fair and the Summer Olympics.
Seattle has hosted all-Star games, nCaa Final Fours and the goodwill
games, but what has it done lately? Mega-events such as the World
Cup, Olympics, Super Bowl, naSCar, college bowl games and others
would offer major economic benefts for the community and country, but
a can-do attitude is needed to stay in the running. Seattle needs to see
itself as the host of such events.
Just like atlanta, los angeles, Salt lake City and other major cities in
the united States, this region is capable of hosting international competi-
tions. these types of events cost millions or billions of dollars, but would
provide an incredible return on investment. each would place Seattle
among the world’s elite cities, but they require a fnancial commitment.
to reach its potential, Seattle needs to think big and take bigger actions.
Please consider investing in the Seattle Sports Commission and the
future of this region.
left to right: Kati Wescott, Ralph Morton,
Tasha Sawabini, Kara Mulfur
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48
Marketing Plan Seattle SPOrtS COMMiSSiOn
tremely valuable in a state with a limited marketing budget. Whether Seattleites were watch-
ing the games on television, attending them at Qwest Field or proudly sporting team colors, a
sense of pride and identity rallied the community behind a common cause.
Strategies and tactics
Attract and Develop Events
Te SSC explores opportunities to create and attract events for the Puget Sound region that
draw out-of-state visitors. SSC seeks business with the potential to stimulate economic devel-
opment, the viability in Seattle’s sports landscape, the ability to enhance the quality of life for
local residents and the beneft to a community-based charity.
Serve as Washington’s Sports Authority
Te SSC has a strong reputation in Washington and nationally as a leader in the sports
industry. Te organization is driven by support from private and public entities that provide
the resources to serve as an economic engine in the Pacifc Northwest.
Create Economic Development and Retention
From the Sonics to the NCAA to NASCAR, the SSC works on projects that create eco-
nomic growth in the region and help retain a strong corporate base. Sports and recreation
provide a direct and indirect fnancial beneft to the community. Tis includes the stadiums,
arenas and golf courses where competitions take place, which serve both as gathering places
and catalysts for growth.
Preserve Seattle’s Sports Culture
Te sports franchises are a part of Seattle’s culture, as are the outdoor recreation opportuni-
ties on the mountains and waterways surrounding the city. Tey are a part of what makes
this a great place to live and one of the premier international destinations. Te SSC works
proactively to maintain Seattle’s reputation as a “major league” city.
Provide Return on Investment
Te SSC targets events that have a signifcant return on investment for the community,
particularly annual events with long-term fnancial beneft. Tis includes events that bring
thousands of participants and spectators during a traditionally slow period for the tourism
industry. Tis drives media exposure, creates sponsorship opportunities and leaves a lasting
legacy for the community.
Unite the Community
Te SSC brings together the sports franchises, public ofcials, business leaders and others in
the Seattle area to help achieve the region’s potential.
Build Financial Resources for Attracting Events
Te Seattle Sports and Event Fund (SSEF) is a nonproft (501(c)3) organization created by
the SSC to promote amateur athletics and ftness-related programs. Funds from the SSEF
will go directly toward creating or attracting amateur sporting events that bring economic
development to the region and promote a healthy lifestyle for Washington residents.
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TARGETED EVENTS TO ATTRACT
WIAA High School Championships
NCAA Baseball Regional / Super Regional
PAC-10 Basketball Tournament (KeyArena)
World Cyber Games (Qwest or KeyArena)
NCAA Women’s Volleyball Final Four (KeyArena)
NCAA Swimming Championship (Aquatic Center)
NCAA Basketball – 1st & 2nd Round, Regionals (KeyArena)
Western States Police and Fire Games
Motor Sports Facility (Multiple Annual Event – Kitsap)
NCAA Division 1 Men’s and Women’s Golf Championship
NCAA Women’s Basketball Final Four (KeyArena)
Super Bowl (Qwest Field)
TARGETED EVENTS TO CREATE
Northwest Bowl (Qwest Field, Benefting Children’s Hospital)
AVP Pro Beach Volleyball (Marymoor Park)
Great Northwest Games (Powered by You)
Grand Sumo (Business & Cultural Exchange)
T-Mobile Links (SSC Golf Outing)
T-Mobile Basketball (High School Pre-Season Tournament)
Emerald City Roast (Sports Celebrity Roast)
Boeing Greater Seattle Classic (Supporting Role)
Major Winter Sports Event
NCAA Baseball (Safeco)
3 on 3 Basketball / Flag Football Tournaments (Marymoor)
High Profle Road Race (Seattle Stampede)
Adventure Race / Eco-Tourism
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Date eVent PlaCe
Feb 28 – Mar 3, 2007 WIAA Boys High School State Basketball Championship
KeyArena,
Bank of America Arena
Apr 23 - 25 / 2007 PAC-10 Women’s Golf Championship Seattle
Apr 2007 - Oct 2007 Seattle Mariners Baseball Safeco Field
Apr 2007 - Oct 2007 Emerald Downs KeyArena
May 2007- Sept 2007 Seattle Storm Basketball KeyArena
July 2007 - Aug 2007 Seafair Seattle
Aug 20-26, 2007 Boeing Greater Seattle Classic (BGSC) TPC Snoqualmie Ridge
Sept 2007 T-Mobile Links Golf Tournament --
Sept 2007 – Jan 2007 Seattle Seahawks Football Qwest Field
Fall 2007 World Cyber Games Seattle
Oct 2007 – Apr 2007 Seattle Sonics Basketball KeyArena
4S
Marketing Plan Seattle SPOrtS COMMiSSiOn
Doug Armintrout, Armintrout Corporation
Bob Aylward, Seattle Mariners Baseball Club
Kim Bedier, Everett Events Center
Mike Belcher, T-Mobile, USA, Inc.
Darren Berg, MTR Western
Biff Brotherton, Brotherton Cadillac
Karen Bryant, Seattle Sonics & Storm
Mike Colbrese, WIAA
Ed Cooney, Macy’s Northwest
Darlene Corkrum, Virginia Mason Medical Center
Ron Crockett, Emerald Downs
Bob Donegan, Ivar’s
Pete Finlon
George Fleming
Bob Flowers, Washington Mutual, Retired
Robert E. (Bob) Giles, Perkins Coie
Andy Geiger
Michele Grosenick, Clear Channel
D. Wayne Gittinger, Lane Powell
Jim Hill, Kemper Development Company
Yogi Hutsen, Coastal Hotel Group
Elisabeth James, Westin Seattle
Nick Keller, Keller Supply
Jim Kerr, DA Davidson & Co.
Katherine Kertzman, Seattle Southside Visitor Services
Mitch Koch, Microsoft Corp.
Steve Leahy, Greater Seattle Chamber of Commerce
Kathy Lombardo, CH2M Hill
Chad Mackay, Mackay Restaurants
Robert F. Marcovitch, K2 Sports
Robert P. McCleskey, Sellen Construction Co.
Gary McGill, Children’s Hospital
Kirk Nelson, Qwest
Patrick Patrick
Pam Pearson, KCPQ
Bruce Richards, USGA Board Member
John Rizzardini, Seattle Seahawks
Greg Root, SuperGraphics
James E. (Jim) Schlueter, Boeing Commercial Airplanes
Pete Shimer, Deloitte & Touche
Mark Shuken, Fox Sports Net, Northwest Region
Dick Thompson
Todd Turner, University of Washington
Jim Weber, Brooks Sports
Don Welsh, Seattle’s Convention & Visitors Bureau
John Woodin, KIRO TV
SEATTLE SPORTS COMMISSION BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Partnerships information
Te backbone of the Seattle Sports Commission is its extensive net-
work of partners.
With the help of these partners, the Seattle Sports Commission aggres-
sively markets the region as a top destination for sports and recreational
attractions. Only through this joint efort is the SSC able to make a
distinct impact on the Seattle area’s economic development.
Te SSC deeply values the relationships it has formed with its current
partners and is constantly looking to expand the network of individu-
als and organizations dedicated to stimulating economic development
through sport. Te following are the investment levels for partners:
Puget Sound level $25,000
Mt. Rainier level $10,000
Olympic level $5,000
Cascade level $2,500
Partners at all levels will receive invitations to social functions, mention in
SSC publications, recognition on the Seattle Sports Commission website
(www.seattlesports.org) and participation in the annual golf outing.
Become a Champion
If you or your company would like to support the SSC and get involved in
generating sports business for the region, become a Champion. Contribution
levels are $1,000 or $500. Each includes networking opportunities through-
out the year. You will have the option of contributing directly to the SSC or
to the Seattle Sports and Event Fund (501 (c) 3), which is tax-deductible.
46
Executive/
Administration
Don Welsh
President and CeO
(206) 461-5800
dwelsh@visitseattle.org
Tom Norwalk
Senior VP Sales and Marketing
(206) 461-5833
tnorwalk@visitseattle.org
Kathleen Shepard
executive assistant
(206) 461-5837
kshepard@visitseattle.org
Accounting
Michael DeAtley
Chief Financial Offcer
(206) 461-5821
mdeatley@visitseattle.org
Joy M. Sherard
accounting Manager
(206) 461-5831
jsherard@visitseattle.org

Convention Sales
Joan Cahill, CMP
Director, Special Projects
(206) 461-5834
jcahill@visitseattle.org
Janet Hunter
Director of Sales
(206) 461-5802
jhunter@visitseattle.org
Alison LaFollette
Director, Washington D.C. Offce
(410) 535-7500
alafollette@visitseattle.org
Wendy Petersen
Director, Midwest Offce
(219) 227-6373
wpetersen@visitseattle.org
Audrey R. Fan
Convention Sales Manager
(206) 461-5832
afan@visitseattle.org
Christopher M. Garratt
Convention Sales Manager
(206) 461-5842
cgarratt@visitseattle.org
Cynthia Lydum
Convention Sales Manager
(206) 461-5818
clydum@visitseattle.org
Joan Magnano-Damm
Convention Sales Manager
(206) 461-5889
jmagnano-damm@visitseattle.org
Tim Quigley
Convention Sales Manager
(206) 461-5838
tquigley@visitseattle.org
Tasha Sawabini
Convention Sales Manager
(206) 461-5836
tsawabini@visitseattle.org
Stephanie Trout
Convention Sales Manager,
Washington D.C. Offce
(571) 748-4952
strout@visitseattle.org
Julia Smith
Sales Systems Coordinator
(206) 461-5847
jsmith@visitseattle.org
SCVB StaFF liSt
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accounting
Michael DeAtley, Joy Sherard
administration
Kathleen Shepard
Human resources
Susan Treder
information Services
Mark Nold, Alan Motley
Back row, left to right:
Susan Treder, Michael DeAtley
Front row, left to right:
Joy Sherard, Mark Nold,
Kathleen Shepard, Alan Motley
47
Marketing Plan SCVB StaFF liSt
Lauren Curtin
Convention Sales and Services
Coordinator
(206) 461-5829
lcurtin@visitseattle.org
Julianne Gaffeld
Convention Sales and Services
Coordinator
(206) 461-5835
jgaffeld@visitseattle.org
Season K. Hansen
Convention Sales and Services
Coordinator
(206) 461-5848
shansen@visitseattle.org
Convention Services
Kae H. Block, CMP
Director, Convention and Visitor
Services
(206) 461-5874
kblock@visitseattle.org
Adriane O. Friedman
Convention Services Manager
(206) 461-5846
afriedman@visitseattle.org
Ann Peavey
Manager, Citywide Concierge and
Visitor Center
(206) 461-5885
apeavey@visitseattle.org
Susan Ranney
Convention Housing Manager
(206) 461-5894
sranney@visitseattle.org
Cultural Tourism
Tracey Wickersham
Director of Cultural tourism
(206)461-5812
twickersham@visitseattle.org
Human Resources
Susan Treder
Manager, Human resources &
Special Projects
(206) 461-5825
streder@visitseattle.org
Information Services
Mark Nold
Director, technology Services
(206) 461-5851
mnold@visitseattle.org
Alan Motley
System Services Coordinator
(206) 461-5808
amotley@visitseattle.org
Marketing Services
and Seattle Super Saver
Elias Calderon
Director, Marketing Services
(206) 461-5872
ecalderon@visitseattle.org
Lara Dickson
Creative Services Manager
(206) 461-5873
ldickson@visitseattle.org
Sarah N. Lee
Marketing Coordinator
(206) 461-5849
slee@visitseattle.org
Susan Ranney
Convention Housing Manager
(206) 461-5894
sranney@visitseattle.org
Steve Jaquith
Senior Housing Coordinator
(206) 461-5870
sjaquith@visitseattle.org
Rosie Ching
Housing Coordinator
(206) 461-5862
rching@visitseattle.org
Cheryl Fischer
Housing Coordinator
(206) 461-5866
cfscher@visitseattle.org
Yolanda Gordon
Housing Coordinator
(206) 461-5827
ygordon@visitseattle.org
Tanya Seeburger
Housing Coordinator
(206) 461-5839
tseeburger@visitseattle.org
Membership
Steve Maris
Membership Director
(206) 461-5822
smaris@visitseattle.org
Rosemary Rasp
Member Services Manager
(206) 461-5824
rrasp@visitseattle.org
Public Relations
David Blandford, APR
Director of Public relations
(206) 461-5806
dblandford@visitseattle.org
Heather Bryant
Public relations Manager
(206) 461-5805
hbryant@visitseattle.org
Matt Wakefeld
Senior Public relations Coordinator
(206) 461-5820
mwakefeld@visitseattle.org
Seattle Sports
Commission
Ralph L. Morton
executive Director
(206) 461-5819
rmorton@seattlesports.org
Tasha Sawabini
Sports Conventions and events
Sales Manager
(206) 461-5836
tsawabini@visitseattle.org
Kati Wescott
Project Manager
(206) 461-5844
kwescott@seattlesports.org
Kara Mulfur
Marketing Coordinator
(206) 461-5803
sscmarketing@seattlesports.org
Tourism
Development
Brad Jones, CTP
Director, tourism Development
uk, europe and australia
(206) 461-5816
bjones@visitseattle.org
Michael Kurtz
Director, tourism Development
asia and latin america
(206) 461-5817
mkurtz@visitseattle.org
Marj Snyder
Director, tourism Development
uSa and Canada
(206) 461-5804
msnyder@visitseattle.org
Joshua Ratliff
Senior tourism Development
Coordinator
(206) 461-5815
jratliff@visitseattle.org
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4B
Chair:
Jeffrey Wright
Chairman
Space Needle Corporation
203 6th Ave. N
Seattle, WA 98109
Past Chair:
Carla Murray
Regional Vice President
Starwood Hotels
1400 Sixth Ave.
Seattle, WA 98101
Executive Committee:
Frank Finneran
President
Frank K. Finneran & Company
2100 Tird Ave. Ste. 2206
Seattle, WA 98121
Yogi Hutsen
President
Coastal Hotel Group
2101 Fourth Ave., Ste. 2250
Seattle, WA 98121
Kevin Hylton
Chief Financial Offcer
Ackerley Partners, LLC
601 Union St. Suite 3003
Seattle, WA 98101
Irv Sandman, Esquire
Graham & Dunn
Pier 70, 2801 Alaskan Way, Ste. 300
Seattle, WA 98121
Craig Schafer
Owner
Hotel Ändra
2000 Fourth Ave.
Seattle, WA 98121
James Treadway
Chief Executive Offcer
MTM Luxury Lodging
3435 Carillon Point
Kirkland, WA 98033
Directors:
Paul Allen
Vice President, Alaska Marketing
Holland America Line
300 Elliott Ave. W
Seattle, WA 98119
Darrell Bryan
Executive Vice President
& General Manager
Clipper Navigation, Inc.
2701 Alaskan Way, Pier 69
Seattle, WA 98121
John Christison
President
Washington State Convention
& Trade Center
800 Convention Place
Seattle, WA 98101
Dennis Clark
General Manager
Te Fairmont Olympic Hotel
411 University Street
Seattle, WA 98101
Kevin P. Cooney
Sales Manager
NW Cable News
333 Dexter Ave. N.
Seattle, WA 98101
Jan Drago
Councilmember
Seattle City Council
PO Box 34025
Seattle, WA 98124-4025
Nancy Finch
General Manager
Renaissance Seattle
515 Madison Street
Seattle, WA 98104
David Gudgel
Vice President and COO
Shore to Sea Services, LLC
2255 Harbor Avenue SW
Seattle, WA 98126
Pete Indahl
Director, CLM Pacifc NW District
American Express Establishment Srvcs.
5114 Pt. Fosdick Dr. N.W. #E
PMB #294
Gig Harbor, WA 98335
Deborah Jacobs
City Librarian
Seattle Public Library
1000 Fourth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
Chad Mackay
President & COO
Mackay Restaurant Group
10 Harrison St., #311
Seattle, WA 98109
seattle’s convention
and visitors bureau
BOarD OF
DireCtOrS
SCVB Executive Committee
left to right: Don Welsh, Kevin Hylton, Jim Treadway, Yogi Hutsen,
Carla Murray, Jeffrey Wright.
not pictured: Frank Finneran, Irv Sandman
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Karl Kruger
General Manager
Te Edgewater
Pier 67, 2411 Alaskan Way
Seattle, WA 98121
Toshi Moriguchi
Managing Director-Treasurer
Uwajimaya
PO Box 3642
Seattle, WA 98124
John Okamoto
Chief Administrative Offcer
Pier 69 Corporation
PO Box 1209
Seattle, WA 98111
Keri Robinson
General Manager
Sheraton Seattle Hotel & Towers
1400 Sixth Ave.
Seattle, WA 98101
Jeff Singsaas
General Manager
Microsoft Events & Studios
One Microsoft Way
Redmond, WA 98052-6399
A. Carl Smith
President
ACS & Associates
PO Box 78157
Seattle, WA 98178-8580
Gregory B. Smith
Principle
Urban Visions
900 4th Ave. Suite 2925
Seattle, WA 98164
Mark Stiebeling
General Manager
Grand Hyatt Seattle & Hyatt @ Olive 8
721 Pine St.
Seattle, WA 98101
Brad Walker
Director, Leisure Marketing
Alaska Airlines
P.O. Box 68900
Seattle, WA 98168
notes, ideas, brilliant thoughts
49
Marketing Plan