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PMID- 17915529

OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20071005
DCOM- 20071206
PUBM- Print
IS - 1553-7250 (Print)
VI - 33
IP - 9
DP - 2007 Sep
TI - Using the Communication and Teamwork Skills (CATS) Assessment to measure
health
care team performance.
PG - 549-58
AB - BACKGROUND: Patient safety administrators, educators, and researchers are
striving to understand how best to monitor and improve team skills and
determine
what approaches to monitoring best suit their organizations. A behavior-
based
tool, based on principles of crisis resource management (CRM) in nonmedical
industries, was developed to quantitatively assess communication and team
skills
of health care providers in a variety of real and simulated clinical
settings.
THE CATS ASSESSMENT: The Communication and Teamwork Skills (CATS) Assessment
has
been developed through rapid-cycle improvement and piloted through
observation of
videotaped simulated clinical scenarios, realtime surgical procedures, and
multidisciplinary rounds. Specific behavior markers are clustered into four
categories-coordination, cooperation, situational awareness, and
communication.
Teams are scored in terms of the occurrence and quality of the behaviors.
The
CATS Assessment results enable clinicians to view a spectrum of scores-from
the
overall score for the categories to specific behaviors. CONCLUSION: The CATS
Assessment tool requires statistical validation and further study to
determine if
it reliably quantifies health care team performance. The patient safety
community
is invited to use and improve behavior-based observation measures to better
evaluate their training programs, continue to research and improve
observation
methodology, and provide quantifiable, objective feedback to their
clinicians and
organizations.
AD - Partners Healthcare, Boston, USA. AFRANKEL@PARTNERS.ORG
FAU - Frankel, Allan
AU - Frankel A
FAU - Gardner, Roxane
AU - Gardner R
FAU - Maynard, Laura
AU - Maynard L
FAU - Kelly, Andrea
AU - Kelly A
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf
JT - Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety / Joint Commission
Resources
JID - 101238023
SB - IM
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Gastric Bypass
MH - Humans
MH - *Interdisciplinary Communication
MH - Quality Assurance, Health Care/standards
MH - Safety Management/standards
MH - Surgery Department, Hospital
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
MH - United States
EDAT- 2007/10/06 09:00
MHDA- 2007/12/07 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2007 Sep;33(9):549-58.

PMID- 15576702
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20041203
DCOM- 20050217
LR - 20071114
PUBM- Print
IS - 1475-3898 (Print)
VI - 13
IP - 6
DP - 2004 Dec
TI - Simulation based teamwork training for emergency department staff: does it
improve clinical team performance when added to an existing didactic
teamwork
curriculum?
PG - 417-21
AB - OBJECTIVE: To determine if high fidelity simulation based team training can
improve clinical team performance when added to an existing didactic
teamwork
curriculum. SETTING: Level 1 trauma center and academic emergency medicine
training program. PARTICIPANTS: Emergency department (ED) staff including
nurses,
technicians, emergency medicine residents, and attending physicians.
INTERVENTION: ED staff who had recently received didactic training in the
Emergency Team Coordination Course (ETCC) also received an 8 hour intensive
experience in an ED simulator in which three scenarios of graduated
difficulty
were encountered. A comparison group, also ETCC trained, was assigned to
work
together in the ED for one 8 hour shift. Experimental and comparison teams
were
observed in the ED before and after the intervention. DESIGN: Single,
crossover,
prospective, blinded and controlled observational study. Teamwork ratings
using
previously validated behaviorally anchored rating scales (BARS) were
completed by
outside trained observers in the ED. Observers were blinded to the
identification
of the teams. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between
experimental
and comparison groups at baseline. The experimental team showed a trend
towards
improvement in the quality of team behavior (p = 0.07); the comparison group
showed no change in team behavior during the two observation periods (p =
0.55).
Members of the experimental team rated simulation based training as a useful
educational method. CONCLUSION: High fidelity medical simulation appears to
be a
promising method for enhancing didactic teamwork training. This approach,
using a
number of patients, is more representative of clinical care and is therefore
the
proper paradigm in which to perform teamwork training. It is, however,
unclear
how much simulator based training must augment didactic teamwork training
for
clinically meaningful differences to become apparent.
AD - Department of Emergency Medicine, 1 Hoppin Street, Suite 106, Providence, RI
02903, USA. Mshapiro@Lifespan.org
FAU - Shapiro, M J
AU - Shapiro MJ
FAU - Morey, J C
AU - Morey JC
FAU - Small, S D
AU - Small SD
FAU - Langford, V
AU - Langford V
FAU - Kaylor, C J
AU - Kaylor CJ
FAU - Jagminas, L
AU - Jagminas L
FAU - Suner, S
AU - Suner S
FAU - Salisbury, M L
AU - Salisbury ML
FAU - Simon, R
AU - Simon R
FAU - Jay, G D
AU - Jay GD
LA - eng
GR - P20 HS 11592/HS/United States AHRQ
GR - P20 HS11553/HS/United States AHRQ
GR - U13 HS11905/HS/United States AHRQ
PT - Clinical Trial
PT - Controlled Clinical Trial
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
PL - England
TA - Qual Saf Health Care
JT - Quality & safety in health care
JID - 101136980
SB - H
CIN - Qual Saf Health Care. 2004 Dec;13(6):413-4. PMID: 15576699
MH - Adult
MH - Chi-Square Distribution
MH - Cross-Over Studies
MH - Curriculum
MH - Emergency Medicine/*education
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Inservice Training
MH - Male
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration/standards
MH - *Patient Simulation
MH - Prospective Studies
EDAT- 2004/12/04 09:00
MHDA- 2005/02/18 09:00
AID - 13/6/417 [pii]
AID - 10.1136/qhc.13.6.417 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Qual Saf Health Care. 2004 Dec;13(6):417-21.

PMID- 12546286
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20030127
DCOM- 20030205
LR - 20061115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0017-9124 (Print)
VI - 37
IP - 6
DP - 2002 Dec
TI - Error reduction and performance improvement in the emergency department
through
formal teamwork training: evaluation results of the MedTeams project.
PG - 1553-81
AB - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of training and institutionalizing
teamwork behaviors, drawn from aviation crew resource management (CRM)
programs,
on emergency department (ED) staff organized into caregiver teams. STUDY
SETTING:
Nine teaching and community hospital EDs. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective
multicenter
evaluation using a quasi-experimental, untreated control group design with
one
pretest and two posttests of the Emergency Team Coordination Course (ETCC).
The
experimental group, comprised of 684 physicians, nurses, and technicians,
received the ETCC and implemented formal teamwork structures and processes.
Assessments occurred prior to training, and at intervals of four and eight
months
after training. Three outcome constructs were evaluated: team behavior, ED
performance, and attitudes and opinions. Trained observers rated ED staff
team
behaviors and made observations of clinical errors, a measure of ED
performance.
Staff and patients in the EDs completed surveys measuring attitudes and
opinions.
DATA COLLECTION: Hospital EDs were the units of analysis for the seven
outcome
measures. Prior to aggregating data at the hospital level, scale properties
of
surveys and event-related observations were evaluated at the respondent or
case
level. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A statistically significant improvement in
quality of
team behaviors was shown between the experimental and control groups
following
training (p = .012). Subjective workload was not affected by the
intervention (p
= .668). The clinical error rate significantly decreased from 30.9 percent
to 4.4
percent in the experimental group (p = .039). In the experimental group, the
ED
staffs' attitudes toward teamwork increased (p = .047) and staff assessments
of
institutional support showed a significant increase (p = .040). CONCLUSION:
Our
findings point to the effectiveness of formal teamwork training for
improving
team behaviors, reducing errors, and improving staff attitudes among the
ETCC-trained hospitals.
AD - Crew Performance Group, Dynamics Research Corporation, Andover, MA 01810,
USA.
FAU - Morey, John C
AU - Morey JC
FAU - Simon, Robert
AU - Simon R
FAU - Jay, Gregory D
AU - Jay GD
FAU - Wears, Robert L
AU - Wears RL
FAU - Salisbury, Mary
AU - Salisbury M
FAU - Dukes, Kimberly A
AU - Dukes KA
FAU - Berns, Scott D
AU - Berns SD
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Multicenter Study
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PL - United States
TA - Health Serv Res
JT - Health services research
JID - 0053006
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - *Attitude of Health Personnel
MH - Control Groups
MH - Curriculum
MH - Emergency Service, Hospital/manpower/*standards
MH - Health Services Research
MH - Hospitals, Community
MH - Hospitals, Teaching
MH - Humans
MH - *Inservice Training
MH - Medical Errors/*prevention & control/statistics & numerical data
MH - Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
MH - Patient Care Team/*standards
MH - Program Evaluation
MH - Prospective Studies
MH - *Total Quality Management
EDAT- 2003/01/28 04:00
MHDA- 2003/02/06 04:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Health Serv Res. 2002 Dec;37(6):1553-81.

PMID- 11883168
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20020308
DCOM- 20020405
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 1087-0652 (Print)
VI - 10
IP - 3
DP - 2002 Mar
TI - How to appraise your teamwork performance.
PG - 38, 47-8, 33
AD - Brown-Spath & Associates, Forest Grove, OR, USA.
FAU - Spath, Patrice
AU - Spath P
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Hosp Case Manag
JT - Hospital case management : the monthly update on hospital-based care
planning and
critical paths
JID - 9603097
SB - H
MH - *Case Management
MH - Employee Performance Appraisal/*methods
MH - Humans
MH - Patient Care Team/*standards
MH - United States
EDAT- 2002/03/09 10:00
MHDA- 2002/04/06 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Hosp Case Manag. 2002 Mar;10(3):38, 47-8, 33.

PMID- 11771373
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20011228
DCOM- 20020122
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0197-2510 (Print)
VI - 26
IP - 12
DP - 2001 Dec
TI - Teamwork. University of Miami uses competition to sharpen EMS team
performance.
PG - 44-51
AB - Many argue that experience is the best teacher. However, it's often
dangerous for
the patient and impractical for an EMS system to assess prehospital
providers in
their actual working environment. Simulated scenario competition fosters
clearer
thinking and translates into more effective action and enhanced patient
outcomes
during true emergencies.
AD - Medical Training and Simulation Laboratory, University of Miami School of
Medicine, Center for Research in Medical Education, USA.
Gmiller@med.miami.edu
FAU - Miller, G T
AU - Miller GT
FAU - Gordon, D L
AU - Gordon DL
FAU - Issenberg, S B
AU - Issenberg SB
FAU - LaCombe, D M
AU - LaCombe DM
FAU - Brotons, A A
AU - Brotons AA
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - JEMS
JT - JEMS : a journal of emergency medical services
JID - 8102138
SB - H
MH - *Clinical Competence
MH - *Competitive Behavior
MH - Education, Continuing
MH - Emergency Medical Services/standards
MH - Emergency Medical Technicians/*standards
MH - Florida
MH - Humans
MH - Patient Care Team/*standards
MH - Planning Techniques
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2002/01/05 10:00
MHDA- 2002/01/23 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - JEMS. 2001 Dec;26(12):44-51.

PMID- 17941169
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20071017
DCOM- 20071019
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 1068-8838 (Print)
VI - 81
IP - 9
DP - 2007 Sep
TI - Quest for Quality Prize. 2007 finalist: Integris Baptist Medical Center,
Oklahoma
City. Transparency and teamwork drive quality.
PG - 80
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Hosp Health Netw
JT - Hospitals & health networks / AHA
JID - 9312077
SB - AIM
SB - IM
MH - *Awards and Prizes
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Humans
MH - Institutional Management Teams
MH - Multi-Institutional Systems/*standards
MH - Oklahoma
MH - Portraits as Topic
MH - *Quality Assurance, Health Care
MH - Social Responsibility
EDAT- 2007/10/19 09:00
MHDA- 2007/10/20 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Hosp Health Netw. 2007 Sep;81(9):80.

PMID- 17702216
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070817
DCOM- 20070912
PUBM- Print
IS - 0018-7208 (Print)
VI - 49
IP - 4
DP - 2007 Aug
TI - Effects of sleep loss on team decision making: motivational loss or
motivational
gain?
PG - 646-60
AB - OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of 30 hr of sleep loss and continuous
cognitive
work on performance in a distributed team decision-making environment.
BACKGROUND: To date, only a few studies have examined the effect of sleep
loss on
distributed team performance, and only one other to our knowledge has
examined
the relationship between sleep loss and social-motivational aspects of teams
(Hoeksema-van Orden, Gaillard, & Buunk, 1998). METHOD: Sixteen teams
participated; each comprised 4 members. Three team members made threat
assessments on a military surveillance task and then forwarded their
judgments
electronically to a team leader, who made a final assessment on behalf of
the
team. RESULTS: Sleep loss had an antagonistic effect on team decision-making
accuracy and decision time. However, the performance loss associated with
fatigue
attributable to sleep loss was mediated by being part of a team, as compared
with
performing the same task individually - that is, we found evidence of a
"motivational gain" effect in these sleepy teams. We compare these results
with
those of Hoeksema-van Orden et al. (1998), who found clear evidence of a
"social
loafing" effect in sleepy teams. CONCLUSION: The divergent results are
discussed
in the context of the collective effort model (Karau & Williams, 1993) and
are
attributable in part to a difference between independent and interdependent
team
tasks. APPLICATION: The issues and findings have implications for a wide
range of
distributed, collaborative work environments, such as military network-
enabled
operations.
AD - Defence Research and Development Canada, 1133 Sheppard Ave. West, PO Box
2000,
Toronto, Ontario, Canada M3M 3B9. joe.baranski@drdc-rddc.gc.ca
FAU - Baranski, Joseph V
AU - Baranski JV
FAU - Thompson, Megan M
AU - Thompson MM
FAU - Lichacz, Frederick M J
AU - Lichacz FM
FAU - McCann, Carol
AU - McCann C
FAU - Gil, Valerie
AU - Gil V
FAU - Pasto, Luigi
AU - Pasto L
FAU - Pigeau, Ross A
AU - Pigeau RA
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Hum Factors
JT - Human factors
JID - 0374660
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Adult
MH - Canada
MH - *Decision Making
MH - *Group Processes
MH - Humans
MH - Military Personnel
MH - *Motivation
MH - Sleep Deprivation/physiopathology/*psychology
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2007/08/19 09:00
MHDA- 2007/09/13 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Hum Factors. 2007 Aug;49(4):646-60.

PMID- 17688152
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070810
DCOM- 20070824
PUBM- Print
IS - 0031-5125 (Print)
VI - 104
IP - 3 Pt 1
DP - 2007 Jun
TI - Analysis of the efficacy of possessions in boys' 16-and-under basketball
teams:
differences between winning and losing teams.
PG - 961-4
AB - The purpose of this study was to analyze the ball possessions of winning and
losing basketball teams in formative years (16 years and under). The sample
was
3,897 ball possessions from 24 games of the boys' 16-and-under finals of the
Andalusion Championship, Spain. The variables studied were game outcome,
participation, and the initiation and end of each ball possession. Winning
teams
used more fast breaks and fewer set offenses in their ball possessions.
Winning
teams had shorter ball possessions and more passes and participating
players.
Dynamic game styles are necessary in youth basketball, focusing on
continuously
off-balancing the opponent through fast breaks and a high number of passes
in set
offenses.
AD - Faculty of Health, Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, Catholic University
Saint Anthony of Murcia, Avenida de los Jeronimos s/n, 30107 Guadalupe,
Murcia
Spain. eortega@pdi.ucam.edu
FAU - Ortega, Enrique
AU - Ortega E
FAU - Palao, Jose Manuel
AU - Palao JM
FAU - Gomez, Miguel Angel
AU - Gomez MA
FAU - Lorenzo, Alberto
AU - Lorenzo A
FAU - Cardenas, David
AU - Cardenas D
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Percept Mot Skills
JT - Perceptual and motor skills
JID - 0401131
SB - IM
MH - *Achievement
MH - Adolescent
MH - Age Factors
MH - Basketball/psychology/*statistics & numerical data
MH - *Competitive Behavior
MH - Cooperative Behavior
MH - Group Processes
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Motor Skills
MH - Sex Factors
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2007/08/11 09:00
MHDA- 2007/08/25 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Percept Mot Skills. 2007 Jun;104(3 Pt 1):961-4.

PMID- 17656421
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20071206
DCOM- 20080206
PUBM- Print-Electronic
IS - 1468-2834 (Electronic)
VI - 36
IP - 6
DP - 2007 Nov
TI - The older persons' assessment and liaison team 'OPAL': evaluation of
comprehensive geriatric assessment in acute medical inpatients.
PG - 670-5
AB - BACKGROUND: Reducing hospital length of stay (LOS) in older acute medical
inpatients is a key productivity measure. Evidence-based predictors of
greater
LOS may be targeted through Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA).
OBJECTIVE:
Evaluate a novel service model for CGA screening of older acute medical
inpatients linked to geriatric intervention. SETTING: Urban teaching
hospital.
SUBJECTS: Acute medical inpatients aged 70+ years. INTERVENTION:
Multidisciplinary CGA screening of all acute medical admissions aged 70+
years
leading to (a) rapid transfer to geriatric wards or (b) case-management on
general medical wards by Older Persons Assessment and Liaison team (OPAL).
METHODS: Prospective pre-post comparison with statistical adjustment for
baseline
factors, and use of national benchmarking LOS data. Pre-OPAL (n = 46) and
post-OPAL (n = 49) cohorts were similarly identified as high-risk by the CGA
screening tool, but only post-OPAL patients received the intervention.
RESULTS:
Pre-OPAL, 0% fallers versus 92% post-OPAL were specifically assessed and/or
referred to a falls service post-discharge. Management of delirium, chronic
pain,
constipation, and urinary incontinence similarly improved. Over twice as
many
patients were transferred to geriatric wards, with mean days from admission
to
transfer falling from 10 to 3. Mean LOS fell by 4 days post-OPAL. Only the
OPAL
intervention was associated with LOS (P = 0.023) in multiple linear
regression
including case-mix variables (e.g. age, function, 'geriatric giants').
Benchmarking data showed the LOS reduction to be greater than comparable
hospitals. CONCLUSION: CGA screening of acute medical inpatients leading to
early
geriatric intervention (ward-based case management, appropriate transfer to
geriatric wards), improved clinical effectiveness and general hospital
performance.
AD - Department of Ageing and Health, Guys and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust,
UK.
danielle.harari@kcl.ac.uk
FAU - Harari, D
AU - Harari D
FAU - Martin, F C
AU - Martin FC
FAU - Buttery, A
AU - Buttery A
FAU - O'Neill, S
AU - O'Neill S
FAU - Hopper, A
AU - Hopper A
LA - eng
PT - Evaluation Studies
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20070726
PL - England
TA - Age Ageing
JT - Age and ageing
JID - 0375655
SB - IM
MH - *Acute Disease/rehabilitation/therapy
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Case Management/trends
MH - Delivery of Health Care/trends
MH - Diagnosis-Related Groups/trends
MH - Female
MH - Geriatric Assessment/*methods
MH - Health Services for the Aged/*trends
MH - Hospitals, Teaching
MH - Humans
MH - Inpatients
MH - Length of Stay/*trends
MH - Male
MH - Patient Transfer/trends
EDAT- 2007/07/28 09:00
MHDA- 2008/02/07 09:00
PHST- 2007/07/26 [aheadofprint]
AID - afm089 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/ageing/afm089 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Age Ageing. 2007 Nov;36(6):670-5. Epub 2007 Jul 26.

PMID- 17567904
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070716
DCOM- 20070910
PUBM- Electronic
IS - 1741-7015 (Electronic)
VI - 5
DP - 2007
TI - Multidisciplinary team meetings and their impact on workflow in radiology
and
pathology departments.
PG - 15
AB - BACKGROUND: The development of multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTMs) for
radiology and pathology is a burgeoning area that increasingly impacts on
work
processes in both of these departments. The aim of this study was to examine
work
processes and quantify the time demands on radiologists and pathologists
associated with MDTM practices at a large teaching hospital. The
observations
reported in this paper reflect a general trend affecting hospitals and our
conclusions will have relevance for others implementing clinical practice
guidelines. METHODS: For one month, all work related to clinical meetings
between
pathology and radiology with clinical staff was documented and later
analysed.
RESULTS: The number of meetings to which pathology and radiology contribute
at a
large university teaching hospital, ranges from two to eight per day,
excluding
grand rounds, and amounts to approximately 50 meetings per month for each
department. For one month, over 300 h were spent by pathologists and
radiologists
on 81 meetings, where almost 1000 patients were discussed. For each meeting
hour,
there were, on average, 2.4 pathology hours and 2 radiology hours spent in
preparation. Two to three meetings per week are conducted over a
teleconferencing
link. Average meeting time is 1 h. Preparation time per meeting ranges from
0.3
to 6 h for pathology, and 0.5 to 4 for radiology. The review process in
preparation for meetings improves internal quality standards. Materials
produced
externally (for example imaging) can amount to almost 50% of the material to
be
reviewed on a single patient. The number of meetings per month has increased
by
50% over the past two years. Further increase is expected in both the
numbers and
duration of meetings when scheduling issues are resolved. A changing trend
in the
management of referred patients with the development of MDTMs and the
introduction of teleconferencing was noted. CONCLUSION: Difficulties are
being
experienced by pathology and radiology departments participating fully in
several
multidisciplinary teams. Time spent at meetings, and in preparation for
MDTMs is
significant. Issues of timing and the coordination of materials to be
reviewed
are sometimes irreconcilable. The exchange of patient materials with outside
institutions is a cause for concern when full data are not made available in
a
timely fashion. The process of preparation for meetings is having a positive
influence on quality, but more resources are needed in pathology and
radiology to
realise the full benefits of multidisciplinary team working.
AD - Department of Computer Science, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
kaneb@cs.tcd.ie
FAU - Kane, Bridget
AU - Kane B
FAU - Luz, Saturnino
AU - Luz S
FAU - O'Briain, D Sean
AU - O'Briain DS
FAU - McDermott, Ronan
AU - McDermott R
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20070613
PL - England
TA - BMC Med
JT - BMC medicine
JID - 101190723
SB - IM
MH - *Group Processes
MH - Humans
MH - Ireland
MH - Organizational Case Studies
MH - Pathology Department, Hospital/*organization & administration
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Radiology Department, Hospital/*organization & administration
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
MH - Time Management/methods
MH - Workload
EDAT- 2007/06/15 09:00
MHDA- 2007/09/11 09:00
PHST- 2006/12/19 [received]
PHST- 2007/06/13 [accepted]
PHST- 2007/06/13 [aheadofprint]
AID - 1741-7015-5-15 [pii]
AID - 10.1186/1741-7015-5-15 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO - BMC Med. 2007 Jun 13;5:15.

PMID- 17559969
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070920
DCOM- 20071005
LR - 20071203
PUBM- Print-Electronic
IS - 1097-6760 (Electronic)
VI - 50
IP - 4
DP - 2007 Oct
TI - Shifting toward balance: measuring the distribution of workload among
emergency
physician teams.
PG - 419-23
AB - STUDY OBJECTIVE: The objective of this investigation is to determine
time-dependent workload patterns for emergency department (ED) physician
teams
across work shifts. A secondary aim was to demonstrate how ED demand
patterns and
the timing of shift changes influence the balance of workload among a
physician
team. METHODS: Operational measurements of an adult ED were collected from a
clinical information system to characterize physician workload patterns
during
all current work shifts. Plots of patient load versus time were developed
for
each physician shift, in which patient load was defined as the number of
patients
a physician simultaneously managed at a point in time. Patient-load curves
for
each shift were superimposed during 24 hours to display how patient load was
distributed among a team of physicians. RESULTS: Resident shift changes
during
daily peak occupancy periods caused patient load imbalances so that
residents on
a particular shift consistently managed a disproportionate number of
patients
(mean 9.4 patients; 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.7 to 12.1 patients)
compared
with other residents on duty (mean 3.4 patients; 95% CI 2.1 to 4.7
patients).
CONCLUSION: Physician patient load patterns and ED demand patterns should be
taken into consideration when physician shift times are scheduled so that
patient
load may be balanced among a team. Real-time monitoring of physician patient
load
may reduce stress and prevent physicians from exceeding their safe capacity
for
workload.
AD - Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University School of
Engineering, Nashville, TN, USA. scott.r.levin@vanderbilt.edu
FAU - Levin, Scott
AU - Levin S
FAU - Aronsky, Dominik
AU - Aronsky D
FAU - Hemphill, Robin
AU - Hemphill R
FAU - Han, Jin
AU - Han J
FAU - Slagle, Jason
AU - Slagle J
FAU - France, Daniel J
AU - France DJ
LA - eng
GR - 1R21 LM009002-01/LM/United States NLM
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
DEP - 20070607
PL - United States
TA - Ann Emerg Med
JT - Annals of emergency medicine
JID - 8002646
SB - AIM
SB - IM
MH - Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration
MH - Emergency Service, Hospital/*manpower/organization & administration
MH - Humans
MH - Medical Staff, Hospital/*organization & administration
MH - Observation
MH - Patient Care Management/organization & administration
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
MH - Retrospective Studies
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
MH - United States
MH - *Workload
EDAT- 2007/06/15 09:00
MHDA- 2007/10/06 09:00
PHST- 2006/06/07 [received]
PHST- 2007/03/14 [revised]
PHST- 2007/04/06 [accepted]
PHST- 2007/06/07 [aheadofprint]
AID - S0196-0644(07)00452-0 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2007.04.007 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Ann Emerg Med. 2007 Oct;50(4):419-23. Epub 2007 Jun 7.

PMID- 17547309
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070605
DCOM- 20070628
PUBM- Print
IS - 0095-6562 (Print)
VI - 78
IP - 5 Suppl
DP - 2007 May
TI - Linguistic correlates of team performance: toward a tool for monitoring team
functioning during space missions.
PG - B86-95
AB - INTRODUCTION: Approaches to mitigating the likelihood of psychosocial
problems
during space missions emphasize preflight measures such as team training and
team
composition. Additionally, it may be necessary to monitor team interactions
during missions for signs of interpersonal stress. The present research was
conducted to identify features in team members' communications indicative of
team
functioning. METHODS: Team interactions were studied in the context of six
computer-simulated search and rescue missions. There were 12 teams of 4 U.S.
men
who participated; however, the present analyses contrast the top two teams
with
the two least successful teams. Communications between team members were
analyzed
using linguistic analysis software and a coding scheme developed to
characterize
task-related and social dimensions of team interactions. Coding reliability
was
established by having two raters independently code three transcripts.
Between-rater agreement ranged from 78.1 to 97.9%. RESULTS: Team performance
was
significantly associated with team members' task-related communications,
specifically with the extent to which task-critical information was shared.
Successful and unsuccessful teams also showed different interactive
patterns, in
particular concerning the frequencies of elaborations and no-responses.
Moreover,
task success was negatively correlated with variability in team members'
word
count, and positively correlated with the number of positive emotion words
and
the frequency of assenting relative to dissenting responses. CONCLUSIONS:
Analyses isolated certain task-related and social features of team
communication
related to team functioning. Team success was associated with the extent to
which
team members shared task-critical information, equally participated and
built on
each other's contributions, showed agreement, and positive affect.
AD - School of Lit., Communication and Culture, Georgia Institute of Technology,
686
Cherry Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0165, USA. ute.fischer@gatech.edu
FAU - Fischer, Ute
AU - Fischer U
FAU - McDonnell, Lori
AU - McDonnell L
FAU - Orasanu, Judith
AU - Orasanu J
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PL - United States
TA - Aviat Space Environ Med
JT - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine
JID - 7501714
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - *Aerospace Medicine
MH - Chi-Square Distribution
MH - *Communication
MH - Computer Simulation
MH - *Cooperative Behavior
MH - Decision Making
MH - Humans
MH - *Linguistics
MH - Male
MH - Rescue Work/*organization & administration
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2007/06/06 09:00
MHDA- 2007/06/29 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007 May;78(5 Suppl):B86-95.

PMID- 17547308
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070605
DCOM- 20070628
PUBM- Print
IS - 0095-6562 (Print)
VI - 78
IP - 5 Suppl
DP - 2007 May
TI - Markers for enhancing team cognition in complex environments: the power of
team
performance diagnosis.
PG - B77-85
AB - Team cognition has been identified as a key component to achieve mission
goals in
dynamic, team-based, stressful, distributed and multicultural operations.
Effective team performance in complex environments requires that team
members
hold a shared understanding of the task, their equipment, and their
teammates.
So, many of the simulation-based training (SBT) systems and programs have
been
designed (partly) to enhance shared/team cognition. However, these
simulation
systems lack the sufficient robustness in their performance assessment tools
or
capabilities (if they have any) to allow for a rich and deep understanding
of
team cognition. Therefore, the purpose of this article is fourfold: I) to
present
a brief account of team cognition; 2) to develop the concept of performance
diagnosis and present SBT as an approach to the performance diagnosis of
team
cognition; 3) to present a set of illustrative behavioral markers of team
cognition; and 4) to explicate how these elements (performance diagnosis,
team
cognition, and SBT) can be leveraged to increase training effectiveness
through
the development of performance profiles--a rich, detailed, and informative
set of
metrics--and cognitive and behavioral indicators or illustrative markers of
team
cognition. Research needs are discussed in terms of realizing the potential
of
this approach in operational and embedded training contexts.
AD - Associate, Institute for Simulation and Training, Modeling and Simulation
Graduate Program, University of Central Florida, 3100 Technology Parkway,
Suite
319, Orlando, FL 32826, USA.
FAU - Salas, Eduardo
AU - Salas E
FAU - Rosen, Michael A
AU - Rosen MA
FAU - Burke, C Shawn
AU - Burke CS
FAU - Nicholson, Denise
AU - Nicholson D
FAU - Howse, William R
AU - Howse WR
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PT - Review
PL - United States
TA - Aviat Space Environ Med
JT - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine
JID - 7501714
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Cognition/*physiology
MH - *Cooperative Behavior
MH - Humans
MH - Military Medicine
MH - Military Personnel/*psychology
MH - Models, Psychological
MH - Operations Research
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
MH - War
RF - 84
EDAT- 2007/06/06 09:00
MHDA- 2007/06/29 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007 May;78(5 Suppl):B77-85.

PMID- 17547307
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070605
DCOM- 20070628
PUBM- Print
IS - 0095-6562 (Print)
VI - 78
IP - 5 Suppl
DP - 2007 May
TI - Characterizing team performance in network-centric operations: philosophical
and
methodological issues.
PG - B71-6
AB - The recently promulgated doctrine of network-centric warfare suggests that
increases in shared situation awareness and self-synchronization will be
emergent
properties of densely connected military networks. What it fails to say is
how
these enhancements are to be measured. The present article frames the
discussion
as a question of how to characterize team performance, and considers such
performance in the context of its hypothetical components: situation
awareness,
workload, and error. This examination concludes that reliable measures of
these
constructs are lacking for teams, even when they exist for individual
operators,
and that this is due to philosophical and/or methodological flaws in their
conceptual development. Additional research is recommended to overcome these
deficiencies, as well as consideration of novel multidisciplinary approaches
that
draw on methodologies employed in the social, physical, and biological
sciences.
AD - Air Force Research Laboratory, 2255 H Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force
Base, OH
45433-7022, USA. Robert.bolia@wpafb.af.mil
FAU - Bolia, Robert S
AU - Bolia RS
FAU - Nelson, W Todd
AU - Nelson WT
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PT - Review
PL - United States
TA - Aviat Space Environ Med
JT - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine
JID - 7501714
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - *Awareness
MH - Cognition/*physiology
MH - *Cooperative Behavior
MH - Humans
MH - *Man-Machine Systems
MH - Military Medicine
MH - Military Personnel/*psychology
MH - Operations Research
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
MH - User-Computer Interface
MH - War
MH - Workload
RF - 25
EDAT- 2007/06/06 09:00
MHDA- 2007/06/29 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007 May;78(5 Suppl):B71-6.

PMID- 17547306
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070605
DCOM- 20070628
PUBM- Print
IS - 0095-6562 (Print)
VI - 78
IP - 5 Suppl
DP - 2007 May
TI - Augmenting team cognition in human-automation teams performing in complex
operational environments.
PG - B63-70
AB - There is a growing reliance on automation (e.g., intelligent agents,
semi-autonomous robotic systems) to effectively execute increasingly
cognitively
complex tasks. Successful team performance for such tasks has become even
more
dependent on team cognition, addressing both human-human and human-
automation
teams. Team cognition can be viewed as the binding mechanism that produces
coordinated behavior within experienced teams, emerging from the interplay
between each team member's individual cognition and team process behaviors
(e.g.,
coordination, communication). In order to better understand team cognition
in
human-automation teams, team performance models need to address issues
surrounding the effect of human-agent and human-robot interaction on
critical
team processes such as coordination and communication. Toward this end, we
present a preliminary theoretical framework illustrating how the design and
implementation of automation technology may influence team cognition and
team
coordination in complex operational environments. Integrating constructs
from
organizational and cognitive science, our proposed framework outlines how
information exchange and updating between humans and automation technology
may
affect lower-level (e.g., working memory) and higher-level (e.g., sense
making)
cognitive processes as well as teams' higher-order "metacognitive" processes
(e.g., performance monitoring). Issues surrounding human-automation
interaction
are discussed and implications are presented within the context of designing
automation technology to improve task performance in human-automation teams.
AD - SA Technologies, 13863 Countryplace Dr., Orlando, FL 32826, USA.
haydee.cuevas@satechnologies.com
FAU - Cuevas, Haydee M
AU - Cuevas HM
FAU - Fiore, Stephen M
AU - Fiore SM
FAU - Caldwell, Barrett S
AU - Caldwell BS
FAU - Strater, Laura
AU - Strater L
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PT - Review
PL - United States
TA - Aviat Space Environ Med
JT - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine
JID - 7501714
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Automation
MH - Cognition/*physiology
MH - *Cooperative Behavior
MH - Humans
MH - *Man-Machine Systems
MH - Models, Theoretical
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
RF - 33
EDAT- 2007/06/06 09:00
MHDA- 2007/06/29 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007 May;78(5 Suppl):B63-70.

PMID- 17547305
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070605
DCOM- 20070628
PUBM- Print
IS - 0095-6562 (Print)
VI - 78
IP - 5 Suppl
DP - 2007 May
TI - Implications for studying team cognition and team performance in network-
centric
warfare paradigms.
PG - B58-62
AB - Network-centric warfare's (NCW) information-rich systems involving
sophisticated
sensors, tracking systems, smart weapons, and enhanced digital
communications
threaten to overload combatants with voluminous amounts of data. It is
unclear
whether warfighters will perceive such extensive data as actionable
information
to which they will respond accurately in a timely enough manner. Members of
small
teams in command and control centers, operating in crew-served vehicles, or
simply "grunting it out" as ground-pounding infantrymen, may be disparately
separated by space, but will communicate and be connected by electronic
linkages,
e.g., radio, text messages, situation displays, or global positioning data.
However, team members will also have to remember shared mental models of
tasks at
hand, pay attention to and share common situation awareness in complex
operational environments, perform team cognition and team coordination, and
integrate both lower and higher cognitive processes with those of team
behaviors.
Such exceptional capabilities are required more now than ever before; such
capabilities today are far from assured. After two workshops to establish
performance metrics for assessing cognitive performance of military
personnel in
NCW, this preface introduces five manuscripts addressing team cognition and
team
performance from both a theoretical and a practical perspective. The authors
of
this preface question if NCW, and perhaps the politico-social ramifications
of
modern warfare, have already outstripped behavioral scientists' approach to
researching team cognition and team performance-expertise that is so
crucially
needed for combatants on the rapidly changing 21st-century battlegrounds.
AD - Wexford Group International, Vienna, VA, USA.
FAU - Krueger, Gerald P
AU - Krueger GP
FAU - Banderet, Louis E
AU - Banderet LE
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PL - United States
TA - Aviat Space Environ Med
JT - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine
JID - 7501714
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - *Cognition
MH - Communication
MH - *Cooperative Behavior
MH - *Decision Making
MH - Humans
MH - *Man-Machine Systems
MH - *Military Medicine
MH - Military Personnel/*psychology
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
MH - War
EDAT- 2007/06/06 09:00
MHDA- 2007/06/29 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007 May;78(5 Suppl):B58-62.

PMID- 17503682
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070516
DCOM- 20070703
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 1553-7250 (Print)
VI - 33
IP - 5
DP - 2007 May
TI - How do teams in quality improvement collaboratives interact?
PG - 267-76
AB - BACKGROUND: The multi-organizational collaborative is a popular model for
quality
improvement (QI) initiatives. It assumes organizations will share
information and
social support. However, there is no comprehensive documentation of the
extent to
which teams do interact. Considering QI collaboratives as networks,
interactions
among reams were documented, and the associations between network roles and
performance were examined. METHODS: A telephone survey of official team
contact
persons for 94 site teams in three QI collaborarives was conducted in 2002
and
2003. Four performance measures were used to assess the usefulness of ties
to
other teams and being considered a leader by peers. RESULTS: Eighty percent
of
the teams said they would contact another team again if they felt the need.
Teams
made a change as a direct result of interaction in 86% of reported
relationships.
Teams typically exchanged tools such as software and interacted outside of
planned activities. Having a large number of ties to other teams is strongly
related to the number of mentions as a leader. Both of these variables are
related to faculty-assessed performance, number of changes the ream made to
improve care, and depth of those changes. DISCUSSION: The Findings suggest
that
collaborative teams do indeed exchange important information, and the social
dynamics of the collaborarives contribute to individual and collaborative
success.
AD - Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School
of
Public Health, Baltimore, USA.
FAU - Marsteller, Jill A
AU - Marsteller JA
FAU - Shortell, Stephen M
AU - Shortell SM
FAU - Lin, Michael
AU - Lin M
FAU - Mendel, Peter
AU - Mendel P
FAU - Dell, Elizabeth
AU - Dell E
FAU - Wang, Stephanie
AU - Wang S
FAU - Cretin, Shan
AU - Cretin S
FAU - Pearson, Marjorie L
AU - Pearson ML
FAU - Wu, Shin-Yi
AU - Wu SY
FAU - Rosen, Mayde
AU - Rosen M
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf
JT - Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety / Joint Commission
Resources
JID - 101238023
SB - IM
MH - Asthma/therapy
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Chronic Disease/*therapy
MH - *Cooperative Behavior
MH - Depressive Disorder/therapy
MH - Diabetes Mellitus/therapy
MH - Health Care Surveys
MH - Heart Failure/therapy
MH - Humans
MH - *Interdisciplinary Communication
MH - Leadership
MH - Management Quality Circles/*organization & administration
MH - *Models, Organizational
MH - Multi-Institutional Systems/organization & administration/*standards
MH - *Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
MH - Social Support
MH - Total Quality Management/*methods
EDAT- 2007/05/17 09:00
MHDA- 2007/07/04 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2007 May;33(5):267-76.

PMID- 17487527
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070618
DCOM- 20071012
PUBM- Print
IS - 0364-2313 (Print)
VI - 31
IP - 7
DP - 2007 Jul
TI - Observational teamwork assessment for surgery (OTAS): refinement and
application
in urological surgery.
PG - 1373-81
AB - BACKGROUND: Teamwork in surgical teams is at the forefront of good practice
guidelines and empirical research as an important aspect of safe surgery. We
have
developed a comprehensive assessment for teamwork in surgery-the
Observational
Teamwork Assessment for Surgery (OTAS)-and we have tested it for general
surgical
procedures. The aim of the research reported here was to extend the
assessment to
urology procedures. METHODS: After refining the original assessment, we used
it
to observe 50 urology procedures. The OTAS comprises a procedural task
checklist
that assesses patient, equipment/provisions, and communication tasks as well
as
ratings on five team behavior constructs (communication, cooperation,
coordination, leadership, and monitoring). Teamwork was assessed separately
in
the surgical, anesthesia, and nursing subteams in the operating theater. We
also
assessed the reliability of the behavioral scoring. RESULTS: Regarding task
completion, a number of communication and equipment/provisions tasks were
not
routinely performed during the operations we observed. Regarding teamwork-
related
behaviors, adequate reliability was obtained in the scoring of behaviors.
Anesthetists and nurses obtained their lowest scores on communication.
Surgeons'
scores revealed a more complex pattern. In addition to low scores on
communication, surgeons' teamwork behaviors appeared to deteriorate as the
procedures were finishing. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that OTAS is
applicable to various branches of surgery. Separate assessment of the
subteams in
the operating theater provides useful information that can be used to build
targeted teamwork training aiming to improve surgical patients' safety and
outcomes.
AD - Clinical Safety Research Unit, Department of Bio-Surgery and Surgical
Technology,
Imperial College, 10th Floor, QEQM Building, St. Mary's Hospital, London W2
1NY,
UK. s.undre@imperial.ac.uk
FAU - Undre, Shabnam
AU - Undre S
FAU - Sevdalis, Nick
AU - Sevdalis N
FAU - Healey, Andrew N
AU - Healey AN
FAU - Darzi, Ara
AU - Darzi A
FAU - Vincent, Charles A
AU - Vincent CA
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - World J Surg
JT - World journal of surgery
JID - 7704052
SB - IM
MH - Humans
MH - *Interdisciplinary Communication
MH - Interprofessional Relations
MH - *Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Physician-Nurse Relations
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
MH - *Urologic Surgical Procedures
EDAT- 2007/05/10 09:00
MHDA- 2007/10/13 09:00
AID - 10.1007/s00268-007-9053-z [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - World J Surg. 2007 Jul;31(7):1373-81.

PMID- 17447666
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070423
DCOM- 20070608
PUBM- Print
IS - 0018-7208 (Print)
VI - 49
IP - 2
DP - 2007 Apr
TI - Errors in the heat of battle: taking a closer look at shared cognition
breakdowns
through teamwork.
PG - 243-56
AB - OBJECTIVE: We developed a theoretically based taxonomy for classifying
shared
cognition breakdowns related to teamwork which contribute to fratricide
incidents. BACKGROUND: Fratricide on the battlefield is an inescapable cost
of
war. A number of technological advancements have been made in terms of
combat
identification systems to reduce the risk of these incidents. However,
fratricide
continues to occur at alarming rates. METHOD: We take a human-centered
approach
to understanding errors leading to fratricide incidents by focusing on
shared
cognition. We turn to the literature and provide the theoretical foundations
for
an error classification taxonomy to improve understanding of why fratricide
incidents occur. RESULTS: Based on our review of the literature, we
identified a
number of problem areas leading to fratricide incidents. However, many of
the
cited contributing factors were broad terms (e.g., poor coordination) and
did
little to tell us why the breakdown occurred and where improvements are
needed.
Therefore, we chose to focus on one specific area--teamwork breakdowns--and
discuss in depth how these breakdowns contribute to fratricide. CONCLUSION:
In
this paper, we take a first step toward proposing a taxonomy that allows for
the
diagnostic assessment of what causes teamwork breakdowns in fratricide. We
understand that a taxonomy is only as good as the data available and
encourage
richer case studies from which to learn. APPLICATION: To apply this taxonomy
in
an operational setting, we provide a set of behavioral markers that can be
used
to identify teamwork breakdowns on the battlefield.
AD - Institute for Simulation & Training, University of Central Florida, 3100
Technology Pkwy., Orlando, FL 32826, USA. kwilson@ist.ucf.edu
FAU - Wilson, Katherine A
AU - Wilson KA
FAU - Salas, Eduardo
AU - Salas E
FAU - Priest, Heather A
AU - Priest HA
FAU - Andrews, Dee
AU - Andrews D
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PL - United States
TA - Hum Factors
JT - Human factors
JID - 0374660
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Attitude
MH - Cause of Death
MH - Cognition/*classification
MH - *Communication
MH - Confusion
MH - *Cooperative Behavior
MH - *Group Processes
MH - Homicide/psychology
MH - Humans
MH - Military Personnel/*psychology
MH - Organizational Culture
MH - *Risk-Taking
MH - Safety
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
MH - Trust
MH - *War
EDAT- 2007/04/24 09:00
MHDA- 2007/06/09 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Hum Factors. 2007 Apr;49(2):243-56.
PMID- 17353837
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070313
DCOM- 20070413
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0966-0461 (Print)
VI - 16
IP - 1
DP - 2007 Jan 11-24
TI - Developing the role of a ward housekeeper within a multidisciplinary team.
PG - 56-9
AB - The implementation of a housekeeper induction competency programme
demonstrates
the innovative way that the clinical standards facilitator has led the
development of the housekeeping service at one NHS Trust. This service has
been
developed to ensure that there is sufficient training, support and
opportunity to
share best practice for the housekeepers. A Trust-wide approach using the
multidisciplinary team (including dieticians, catering and facilities
managers)
has contributed to the raising of standards in meeting the patients'
nutritional
needs, as well as improving the ward environment. NHS Estates guidance (DH,
2001b) relating to the housekeeping service and the Essence of Care
benchmarks
for nutrition (DH, 2001a) were used to provide this framework for continuous
quality improvement.
AD - Birmingham Heartlands NHS Foundation Trust, Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham.
FAU - Richmond, Jo
AU - Richmond J
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - England
TA - Br J Nurs
JT - British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)
JID - 9212059
SB - N
MH - Benchmarking/organization & administration
MH - Clinical Competence
MH - Cooperative Behavior
MH - Food Service, Hospital/organization & administration
MH - Great Britain
MH - Health Facility Environment
MH - Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
MH - Health Planning
MH - Hospital Units/*organization & administration
MH - Housekeeping, Hospital/*organization & administration
MH - Humans
MH - Inservice Training/organization & administration
MH - Organizational Innovation
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration
MH - Practice Guidelines as Topic
MH - *Professional Role
MH - State Medicine/organization & administration
MH - Total Quality Management/*organization & administration
EDAT- 2007/03/14 09:00
MHDA- 2007/04/17 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Br J Nurs. 2007 Jan 11-24;16(1):56-9.

PMID- 17310668
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070221
DCOM- 20070313
PUBM- Print
IS - 0893-2190 (Print)
VI - 20
IP - 4
DP - 2006 Oct-Dec
TI - Best practices in perinatal care: the role of rapid response teams in
perinatal
units.
PG - 287-9
AD - Mahlmeister & Associates, San Francisco, Calif., USA.
FAU - Mahlmeister, Laura R
AU - Mahlmeister LR
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - J Perinat Neonatal Nurs
JT - The Journal of perinatal & neonatal nursing
JID - 8801387
SB - N
MH - Benchmarking
MH - *Emergencies
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Infant, Newborn
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Perinatal Care/organization & administration/*standards
MH - Postnatal Care/organization & administration/*standards
MH - Pregnancy
MH - Prenatal Care/organization & administration/*standards
MH - *Quality of Health Care
MH - United States
EDAT- 2007/02/22 09:00
MHDA- 2007/03/14 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - J Perinat Neonatal Nurs. 2006 Oct-Dec;20(4):287-9.

PMID- 17308443
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070219
DCOM- 20070510
PUBM- Print
IS - 0887-6274 (Print)
VI - 21
IP - 2
DP - 2007 Mar-Apr
TI - Developing rapid response teams: best practices through collaboration.
PG - 85-92; quiz 93-4
AD - The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78701, USA.
FAU - Grimes, Corinne
AU - Grimes C
FAU - Thornell, Betty
AU - Thornell B
FAU - Clark, Angela P
AU - Clark AP
FAU - Viney, Mary
AU - Viney M
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Review
PL - United States
TA - Clin Nurse Spec
JT - Clinical nurse specialist CNS
JID - 8709115
SB - N
MH - Benchmarking/*organization & administration
MH - *Cooperative Behavior
MH - Early Diagnosis
MH - Forecasting
MH - Hospital Mortality
MH - Humans
MH - *Interprofessional Relations
MH - Leadership
MH - Nurse Clinicians/*organization & administration
MH - Nurse's Role
MH - Nursing Assessment/organization & administration
MH - Nursing Records
MH - Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration
MH - Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Program Development/methods
MH - Program Evaluation
MH - Resuscitation/nursing/*standards
MH - Time Factors
MH - Total Quality Management/organization & administration
MH - United States/epidemiology
RF - 37
EDAT- 2007/02/20 09:00
MHDA- 2007/05/11 09:00
AID - 00002800-200703000-00007 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Clin Nurse Spec. 2007 Mar-Apr;21(2):85-92; quiz 93-4.

PMID- 17266484
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070201
DCOM- 20070424
PUBM- Print
IS - 0156-5788 (Print)
VI - 31
IP - 1
DP - 2007 Feb
TI - Improving emergency department efficiency by patient streaming to outcomes-
based
teams.
PG - 16-21
AB - OBJECTIVE: To describe the process and results of a process redesign based
on
task analysis and lean thinking approaches aimed at improving emergency
department (ED) efficiency. METHODS: Before-and-after study comparing 12-
month
periods before and after the process redesign for total episodes of
ambulance
bypass, waiting times (overall and by triage category) and total ED time
(overall
and by triage category). Time data were analysed using non-parametric
methods.
RESULTS: The years were broadly comparable, with the exception that there
was an
8.4% increase in total hours of care delivered (a marker of ED workload) in
the
year after the change. Episodes of ambulance bypass reduced by 55% (120 v
54).
There were statistically significant waiting times reductions for triage
categories 3 and 5 (median reductions 5 and 11 minutes respectively). There
was
an increase in total ED time for triage category 3 (median increase 7 min)
and a
decrease for categories 4 and 5 (median reduction 14 and 18 min,
respectively).
CONCLUSION: ED process redesign based on task analysis and lean thinking
approaches can result in improved ED efficiency.
AD - Department of Emergency Medicine, Western Hospital, Private Bag, Footscray,
Melbourne, VIC 3011, Australia. Anne-Maree.Kelly@wh.org.au
FAU - Kelly, Anne-Maree
AU - Kelly AM
FAU - Bryant, Michael
AU - Bryant M
FAU - Cox, Lisa
AU - Cox L
FAU - Jolley, Damien
AU - Jolley D
LA - eng
PT - Evaluation Studies
PT - Journal Article
PL - Australia
TA - Aust Health Rev
JT - Australian health review : a publication of the Australian Hospital
Association
JID - 8214381
SB - H
MH - Adult
MH - *Efficiency, Organizational
MH - Emergency Service, Hospital/*organization & administration/utilization
MH - Great Britain
MH - Hospital Restructuring/*methods
MH - Hospitals, Teaching/organization & administration
MH - Humans
MH - Length of Stay
MH - Organizational Case Studies
MH - *Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
MH - Patient Admission
MH - *Patient Care Team
MH - Patient Discharge
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
MH - Time Factors
MH - Triage
MH - Victoria
EDAT- 2007/02/03 09:00
MHDA- 2007/04/25 09:00
PHST- 06/03/22 [received]
PHST- 06/10/05 [accepted]
AID - ahr_31_1_016 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Aust Health Rev. 2007 Feb;31(1):16-21.

PMID- 17180265
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070711
DCOM- 20070822
PUBM- Print-Electronic
IS - 1432-2218 (Electronic)
VI - 21
IP - 6
DP - 2007 Jun
TI - A laboratory study on anticipatory movement in laparoscopic surgery: a
behavioral
indicator for team collaboration.
PG - 935-40
AB - BACKGROUND: To assess team collaboration in the context of laparoscopic
surgery,
laparoscopic cutting tasks performed by single operators and dyad teams were
observed. Our previous work suggested that the anticipatory movement
performed by
a teammate may lead to a shorter total task time than for a single bimanual
operator. This report further explores this phenomenon by quantifying the
frequency of anticipatory movements and discussing their significance to
team
collaboration. METHODS: Subjects were required to reach, grasp, and cut a
piece
of thread using a laparoscopic grasper and scissors. The task was performed
by
either 8 individual subjects bimanually or 16 paired subjects unimanually
(using
their preferred hands). The performances were video recorded. The total task
time, the time used for thread grasping and cutting, and the number of
anticipatory movements were computed and compared between the single
operator and
the dyad team group. In this report, anticipatory movement is defined as
movements of the scissors before the completion of grasping and holding the
thread. RESULTS: Shorter durations of total task time were shown for the
dyad
than for the bimanual group. Anticipatory movements were counted
significantly
more often when the scissors were controlled by a teammate on the dyad team
(96%)
than when they were controlled by the preferred hand of the operator (45%).
The
number of anticipatory movements increased with practice, but no significant
difference was shown among practice phases. CONCLUSION: Higher frequency of
anticipatory movement was observed in the dyad team, which led to superior
performance for team collaboration, as compared with that of the single
operator.
Performance of anticipatory movements in the dyad team was explained by a
shared
mental model, which postulates combined capacity for information processing
among
team members. Results have implications for surgical education, team
training,
and error prevention in the performance of laparoscopic surgery.
AD - Minimally Invasive Surgery, Legacy Health System, Portland, Oregon 97210,
USA.
bzhengbc@hotmail.com
FAU - Zheng, B
AU - Zheng B
FAU - Swanstrom, L L
AU - Swanstrom LL
FAU - MacKenzie, C L
AU - MacKenzie CL
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20061216
PL - Germany
TA - Surg Endosc
JT - Surgical endoscopy
JID - 8806653
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - *Cooperative Behavior
MH - Education, Medical
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Laparoscopy
MH - Male
MH - Motor Activity
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
MH - Time Factors
MH - Video Recording
EDAT- 2006/12/21 09:00
MHDA- 2007/08/23 09:00
PHST- 2006/07/14 [received]
PHST- 2006/09/25 [accepted]
PHST- 2006/07/14 [revised]
PHST- 2006/12/16 [aheadofprint]
AID - 10.1007/s00464-006-9090-y [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Surg Endosc. 2007 Jun;21(6):935-40. Epub 2006 Dec 16.

PMID- 17085603
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20061106
DCOM- 20070209
PUBM- Print
IS - 1075-2730 (Print)
VI - 57
IP - 11
DP - 2006 Nov
TI - State mental health policy: statewide implementation of the crisis
intervention
team program: the Ohio model.
PG - 1569-71
AB - This column discusses ways that states can implement community-based best
practices statewide, by using the crisis intervention team (CIT) model as an
example. Although state mental health authorities may want to use a top-down
approach to ensure uniform, high-quality implementation, programs may be
more
likely to succeed if they arise as bottom-up, grassroots innovations.
Programs
like CIT are especially challenging to implement because they involve
collaboration between complex systems and affect multiple stakeholders. The
column describes lessons learned in Ohio in hopes of assisting other states
in
implementing this and other innovations.
AD - Summit County Alcohol, Drug Addiction, and Mental Health Services Board, 100
West
Cedar Street, Akron, OH 44307, USA. munetzm@admboard.org
FAU - Munetz, Mark R
AU - Munetz MR
FAU - Morrison, Ann
AU - Morrison A
FAU - Krake, Joe
AU - Krake J
FAU - Young, Blair
AU - Young B
FAU - Woody, Michael
AU - Woody M
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - Psychiatr Serv
JT - Psychiatric services (Washington, D.C.)
JID - 9502838
SB - IM
CIN - Psychiatr Serv. 2006 Dec;57(12):1811; author reply 1811-2. PMID: 17158506
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Community Mental Health Services/*legislation & jurisprudence/*organization
&
administration/standards
MH - *Crisis Intervention
MH - Health Policy/*legislation & jurisprudence
MH - Humans
MH - Mental Disorders/*therapy
MH - Ohio
MH - *Patient Care Team
MH - *Public Policy
EDAT- 2006/11/07 09:00
MHDA- 2007/02/10 09:00
AID - 57/11/1569 [pii]
AID - 10.1176/appi.ps.57.11.1569 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Psychiatr Serv. 2006 Nov;57(11):1569-71.
PMID- 17049477
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20070605
DCOM- 20070906
PUBM- Print-Electronic
IS - 0003-6870 (Print)
VI - 38
IP - 5
DP - 2007 Sep
TI - Effects of chemical protective equipment on team process performance in
small
unit rescue operations.
PG - 591-600
AB - In the event of a nuclear, biological, or chemical terrorist attack against
civilians, both military and civilian emergency response teams must be able
to
respond and operate efficiently while wearing protective equipment. Chemical
protective equipment protects the user by providing a barrier between the
individual and hazardous environment. Unfortunately, the same equipment that
is
designed to support the user can potentially cause heat stress, reduced task
efficiency, and reduced range-of-motion. Targeted Acceptable Responses to
Generated Events of Tasks (TARGETS), an event-based team performance
measurement
methodology was used to investigate the effects of Mission Oriented
Protective
Posture (MOPP) on the behavioral processes underlying team performance
during
simulated rescue tasks. In addition, this study determined which team
processes
were related to team performance outcomes. Results of six primary analyses
indicated that team process performance was not degraded by MOPP 4 on any
rescue
task and that the team processes critical for successful task performance
are
task-dependent. This article discusses the implications of these results
with
respect to the study design and the limitations of using an event-based team
performance measurement methodology.
AD - Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, SH 223, Cleveland, OH 44115-
2214,
USA. n.grugle@csuohio.edu
FAU - Grugle, Nancy L
AU - Grugle NL
FAU - Kleiner, Brian M
AU - Kleiner BM
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20061017
PL - England
TA - Appl Ergon
JT - Applied ergonomics
JID - 0261412
RN - 0 (Hazardous Substances)
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - *Chemical Terrorism
MH - Group Processes
MH - *Hazardous Substances
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Occupational Health
MH - Protective Clothing/*standards
MH - *Rescue Work
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
MH - United States
EDAT- 2006/10/20 09:00
MHDA- 2007/09/07 09:00
PHST- 2005/08/26 [received]
PHST- 2006/07/17 [revised]
PHST- 2006/08/02 [accepted]
PHST- 2006/10/17 [aheadofprint]
AID - S0003-6870(06)00128-1 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.apergo.2006.08.003 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Appl Ergon. 2007 Sep;38(5):591-600. Epub 2006 Oct 17.

PMID- 17008260
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20060929
DCOM- 20061205
PUBM- Print
IS - 0014-0139 (Print)
VI - 49
IP - 12-13
DP - 2006 Oct 10-22
TI - Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork (EAST): a novel integration of
ergonomics
methods to analyse C4i activity.
PG - 1345-69
AB - C4i is defined as the management infrastructure needed for the execution of
a
common goal supported by multiple agents in multiple locations and
technology. In
order to extract data from complex and diverse C4i scenarios a descriptive
methodology called Event Analysis for Systemic Teamwork (EAST) has been
developed. With over 90 existing ergonomics methodologies already available,
the
approach taken was to integrate a hierarchical task analysis, a coordination
demand analysis, a communications usage diagram, a social network analysis,
and
the critical decision method. The outputs of these methods provide two
summary
representations in the form of an enhanced operation sequence diagram and a
propositional network. These offer multiple overlapping perspectives on key
descriptive constructs including who the agents are in a scenario, when
tasks
occur, where agents are located, how agents collaborate and communicate,
what
information is used, and what knowledge is shared. The application of these
methods to live data drawn from the UK rail industry demonstrates how
alternative
scenarios can be compared on key metrics, how multiple perspectives on the
same
data can be taken, and what further detailed insights can be extracted. The
ultimate aim of EAST is, by applying it across a number of scenarios in
different
civil and military domains, to provide data to develop generic models of C4i
activity and to improve the design of systems aimed at enhancing this
management
infrastructure.
AD - Defence Technology Centre for Human Factors Integration, School of
Engineering
and Design, Brunel University, Uxbridge, UB8 3PH, UK.
guy.walker@brunel.ac.uk
FAU - Walker, Guy H
AU - Walker GH
FAU - Gibson, Huw
AU - Gibson H
FAU - Stanton, Neville A
AU - Stanton NA
FAU - Baber, Chris
AU - Baber C
FAU - Salmon, Paul
AU - Salmon P
FAU - Green, Damian
AU - Green D
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - England
TA - Ergonomics
JT - Ergonomics
JID - 0373220
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - *Communication
MH - *Cooperative Behavior
MH - *Decision Making
MH - *Efficiency
MH - *Goals
MH - Great Britain
MH - *Human Engineering
MH - Humans
MH - Models, Organizational
MH - Models, Theoretical
MH - Organizational Objectives
MH - Railroads
MH - Social Support
MH - Systems Analysis
MH - *Systems Theory
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2006/09/30 09:00
MHDA- 2006/12/09 09:00
AID - P1109547472NU120 [pii]
AID - 10.1080/00140130600612846 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Ergonomics. 2006 Oct 10-22;49(12-13):1345-69.

PMID- 17008254
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20060929
DCOM- 20061205
PUBM- Print
IS - 0014-0139 (Print)
VI - 49
IP - 12-13
DP - 2006 Oct 10-22
TI - Speech acts, communication problems, and fighter pilot team performance.
PG - 1226-37
AB - Two aspects of team communication, speech acts and communication problems,
and
their relation to team performance in a team air combat simulator were
studied.
The purpose was to enhance the understanding of how team performance is
related
to team communication. Ten Swedish fighter pilots and four fighter
controllers of
varying experience participated. Data were collected during fighter
simulator
training involving four pilots and one fighter controller in each of two
teams.
Speech acts were collapsed over seven categories and communication problems
over
five categories. Communication was studied from two perspectives: critical
situation outcome and mission outcome. Some problems were closely related to
particular speech acts. Speech act frequency, especially meta-communications
and
tactics, was highest when winning. However, the timing of tactics in
critical
situations needs further research. Communication problem frequency was
highest
for runs which ended equally. The most common problem was simultaneous
speech,
possibly because of the simulator radio system. The number of speech acts
was
related to enhanced performance but in a complex manner. Thus in order to
work
efficiently team members need to communicate, but to communicate
sufficiently and
at appropriate times. This work has applications for fighter pilot and
controller
team training and the development of communication standards.
AD - Man-System Interaction, Command and Control Systems, Swedish Defence
Research
Agency FOI, Linkoping, Sweden. jonathan.svensson@foi.se
FAU - Svensson, Jonathan
AU - Svensson J
FAU - Andersson, Jan
AU - Andersson J
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - England
TA - Ergonomics
JT - Ergonomics
JID - 0373220
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Aerospace Medicine
MH - *Aircraft
MH - *Communication
MH - Computer Simulation
MH - Cooperative Behavior
MH - Humans
MH - *Military Medicine
MH - Military Personnel/*psychology
MH - Pilot Projects
MH - *Speech
MH - Sweden
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
MH - War
EDAT- 2006/09/30 09:00
MHDA- 2006/12/09 09:00
AID - V5Q8160P3U353524 [pii]
AID - 10.1080/00140130600612671 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Ergonomics. 2006 Oct 10-22;49(12-13):1226-37.

PMID- 16885245
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20060803
DCOM- 20070327
PUBM- Print
IS - 1475-3901 (Electronic)
VI - 15
IP - 4
DP - 2006 Aug
TI - Defining the technical skills of teamwork in surgery.
PG - 231-4
AB - Developments in surgical technology and procedure have accelerated and
altered
the work carried out in the operating theatre/room, but team modelling and
training have not co-evolved. Evidence suggests that team structure and role
allocation are sometimes unclear and contentious, and coordination and
communication are not fully effective. To improve teamwork, clinicians need
models that specify team resources, structure, process and tasks. They also
need
measures to assess performance and methods to train teamwork strategically.
An
effective training strategy might be to incorporate teamwork with other
technical
skills training in simulation. However, the measures employed for enhancing
teamwork in training and practice will need to vary in their object of
analysis,
level of technical specificity, and system scope.
AD - Clinical Safety Research Unit, Imperial College, University of London, St
Mary's
Hospital, London W2 1NY, UK. a.healey@imperial.ac.uk
FAU - Healey, A N
AU - Healey AN
FAU - Undre, S
AU - Undre S
FAU - Vincent, C A
AU - Vincent CA
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - England
TA - Qual Saf Health Care
JT - Quality & safety in health care
JID - 101136980
SB - H
MH - Clinical Competence/*standards
MH - Cooperative Behavior
MH - Humans
MH - Inservice Training/*methods
MH - Interdisciplinary Communication
MH - *Models, Organizational
MH - Operating Room Nursing/*education/standards
MH - Patient Care Team/*standards
MH - Quality Assurance, Health Care
MH - Surgery/*education/standards
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2006/08/04 09:00
MHDA- 2007/03/28 09:00
AID - 15/4/231 [pii]
AID - 10.1136/qshc.2005.017517 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Qual Saf Health Care. 2006 Aug;15(4):231-4.

PMID- 16878033
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20060821
DCOM- 20060929
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0090-3493 (Print)
VI - 34
IP - 9
DP - 2006 Sep
TI - Findings of the first consensus conference on medical emergency teams.
PG - 2463-78
AB - BACKGROUND: Studies have established that physiologic instability and
services
mismatching precede adverse events in hospitalized patients. In response to
these
considerations, the concept of a Rapid Response System (RRS) has emerged.
The
responding team is commonly known as a medical emergency team (MET), rapid
response team (RRT), or critical care outreach (CCO). Studies show that an
RRS
may improve outcome, but questions remain regarding the benefit, design
elements,
and advisability of implementing a MET system. METHODS: In June 2005 an
International Conference on Medical Emergency Teams (ICMET) included experts
in
patient safety, hospital medicine, critical care medicine, and METs. Seven
of 25
had no experience with an RRS, and the remainder had experience with one of
the
three major forms of RRS. After preconference telephone and e-mail
conversations
by the panelists in which questions to be discussed were characterized,
literature reviewed, and preliminary answers created, the panelists convened
for
2 days to create a consensus document. Four major content areas were
addressed:
What is a MET response? Is there a MET syndrome? What are barriers to METS?
How
should outcome be measured? Panelists considered whether all hospitals
should
implement an RRS. RESULTS: Patients needing an RRS intervention are suddenly
critically ill and have a mismatch of resources to needs. Hospitals should
implement an RRS, which consists of four elements: an afferent, "crisis
detection" and "response triggering" mechanism; an efferent, predetermined
rapid
response team; a governance/administrative structure to supply and organize
resources; and a mechanism to evaluate crisis antecedents and promote
hospital
process improvement to prevent future events.
AD - Departments of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of
Medicine, PA, USA. DEVITAM@UPMC.EDU
FAU - Devita, Michael A
AU - Devita MA
FAU - Bellomo, Rinaldo
AU - Bellomo R
FAU - Hillman, Kenneth
AU - Hillman K
FAU - Kellum, John
AU - Kellum J
FAU - Rotondi, Armando
AU - Rotondi A
FAU - Teres, Dan
AU - Teres D
FAU - Auerbach, Andrew
AU - Auerbach A
FAU - Chen, Wen-Jon
AU - Chen WJ
FAU - Duncan, Kathy
AU - Duncan K
FAU - Kenward, Gary
AU - Kenward G
FAU - Bell, Max
AU - Bell M
FAU - Buist, Michael
AU - Buist M
FAU - Chen, Jack
AU - Chen J
FAU - Bion, Julian
AU - Bion J
FAU - Kirby, Ann
AU - Kirby A
FAU - Lighthall, Geoff
AU - Lighthall G
FAU - Ovreveit, John
AU - Ovreveit J
FAU - Braithwaite, R Scott
AU - Braithwaite RS
FAU - Gosbee, John
AU - Gosbee J
FAU - Milbrandt, Eric
AU - Milbrandt E
FAU - Peberdy, Mimi
AU - Peberdy M
FAU - Savitz, Lucy
AU - Savitz L
FAU - Young, Lis
AU - Young L
FAU - Harvey, Maurene
AU - Harvey M
FAU - Galhotra, Sanjay
AU - Galhotra S
LA - eng
PT - Comment
PT - Consensus Development Conference
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Crit Care Med
JT - Critical care medicine
JID - 0355501
SB - AIM
SB - IM
CON - Crit Care Med. 2006 Sep;34(9):2507-9. PMID: 16921331
CIN - Crit Care Med. 2007 Mar;35(3):992-3. PMID: 17421116
CIN - Crit Care Med. 2007 Mar;35(3):993; author reply 993-4. PMID: 17421117
EIN - Crit Care Med. 2006 Dec;34(12):3070. Harvey, Maurene [added]
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Critical Care/*organization & administration
MH - Emergency Service, Hospital/*organization & administration
MH - Humans
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Quality Assurance, Health Care
MH - Terminology as Topic
MH - United States
RF - 16
EDAT- 2006/08/01 09:00
MHDA- 2006/09/30 09:00
AID - 10.1097/01.CCM.0000235743.38172.6E [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Crit Care Med. 2006 Sep;34(9):2463-78.

PMID- 16845814
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20060718
DCOM- 20060804
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0954-7762 (Print)
VI - 102
IP - 26
DP - 2006 Jun 27-Jul 3
TI - Improving team meetings to support discharge planning.
PG - 32-5
AB - Following the establishment of a discharge working group, several concerns
were
raised about the management of multidisciplinary team (MDT) discharge
meetings
throughout the trust. A project was established to observe MDT meetings,
identify
good practice and produce practice guidance to improve standards and achieve
consistency throughout the organisation.
AD - Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London.
FAU - Tarling, Maggie
AU - Tarling M
FAU - Jauffur, Hassam
AU - Jauffur H
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - England
TA - Nurs Times
JT - Nursing times
JID - 0423236
SB - N
MH - *Attitude of Health Personnel
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Communication
MH - Decision Making, Organizational
MH - Documentation
MH - Focus Groups
MH - Guidelines as Topic
MH - Humans
MH - Interprofessional Relations
MH - Leadership
MH - Length of Stay
MH - London
MH - Needs Assessment
MH - Nursing Methodology Research
MH - Patient Care Planning/*organization & administration
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Patient Discharge/*standards
MH - Personnel, Hospital/*psychology
MH - Professional Role/psychology
MH - Professional Staff Committees/organization & administration
MH - Qualitative Research
MH - Questionnaires
MH - Social Support
MH - Total Quality Management/*organization & administration
EDAT- 2006/07/19 09:00
MHDA- 2006/08/05 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Nurs Times. 2006 Jun 27-Jul 3;102(26):32-5.

PMID- 16803725
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20060628
DCOM- 20060912
LR - 20061115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0014-0139 (Print)
VI - 49
IP - 10
DP - 2006 Aug 15
TI - Cognitive diversity and team performance in a complex multiple task
environment.
PG - 934-54
AB - This article examines the multiple effects of cognitive diversity in teams
operating complex human-machine-systems. The study employed a PC-based
multiple-task environment, called the Cabin Air Management System, which
models a
process control task in the operational context of a spacecraft's life
support
system. Two types of cognitive diversity were examined: system understanding
and
team specialization. System understanding referred to the depth of
understanding
team members were given during training (low-level procedure-oriented vs.
high
level knowledge-oriented training). Team specialization referred to the
degree to
which knowledge about system fault scenarios was distributed between team
members
(specialized vs. non-specialized). A total of 72 participants took part in
the
study. After having received 4.5 h of training on an individual basis,
participants completed a 1-h experimental session, in which they worked in
two-person teams on a series of fault scenarios of varying difficulty.
Measures
were taken of primary and secondary task performance, system intervention
and
information sampling strategies, system knowledge, subjective operator
state,
communication patterns and conflict. The results provided evidence for the
benefits of cognitive diversity with regard to system understanding. This
manifested itself in better primary task performance and more efficient
manual
system control. No advantages were found for cognitive diversity with regard
to
specialization. There was no effect of cognitive diversity on intra-team
conflict, with conflict levels generally being very low. The article
concludes
with a discussion of the implications of the findings for the engineering of
cognitive diversity in teams operating complex human-machine-systems.
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Fribourg, Rue de Faucigny 2, 1700
Fribourg, Switzerland. juergen.sauer@unifr.ch
FAU - Sauer, Jurgen
AU - Sauer J
FAU - Felsing, Tobias
AU - Felsing T
FAU - Franke, Holger
AU - Franke H
FAU - Ruttinger, Bruno
AU - Ruttinger B
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - England
TA - Ergonomics
JT - Ergonomics
JID - 0373220
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Adult
MH - *Cognition
MH - *Cooperative Behavior
MH - Female
MH - Germany
MH - Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Man-Machine Systems
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2006/06/29 09:00
MHDA- 2006/09/13 09:00
AID - P7670M11W610417N [pii]
AID - 10.1080/00140130600577502 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Ergonomics. 2006 Aug 15;49(10):934-54.

PMID- 16738468
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20060601
DCOM- 20070105
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 1529-7764 (Print)
VI - 11
IP - 3
DP - 2006 May-Jun
TI - Productive interdisciplinary team relationships: the hospitalist and the
case
manager.
PG - 160-4
AB - Since the introduction of the National Patient Safety Goals (Joint
Commission
International Center for Patient Safety, 2005) into the Joint Commission on
Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations standards, there appears to be a
positive movement toward improvement in patient care outcomes and safety.
Case
management has been an integral part of the care team, and has emphasized
standards of performance in quality of care, collaboration and resource
utilization since 1995. When Leapfrog defined hospitalist intensivists as
one of
the three requirements necessary to be a safe hospital, an opportunity was
borne
to create a professional partnership. With the patient and the safety as the
central focus of care, case managers and hospitalists are beginning to
exponentially change the face of healthcare. This article will demonstrate
the
value of this partnership.
AD - Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine Meidcal Center,
Orange,
CA 92868, USA. anamin@uci.edu
FAU - Amin, Alpesh N
AU - Amin AN
FAU - Owen, Mary M
AU - Owen MM
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Lippincotts Case Manag
JT - Lippincott's case management : managing the process of patient care
JID - 100961551
SB - N
MH - Benchmarking/organization & administration
MH - California
MH - Case Management/*organization & administration
MH - *Cooperative Behavior
MH - Disease Management
MH - Efficiency, Organizational
MH - Heart Failure/diagnosis/drug therapy
MH - Hospitalists/education/*organization & administration
MH - Humans
MH - *Interprofessional Relations
MH - Leadership
MH - Organizational Objectives
MH - Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)/organization & administration
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Patient Discharge
MH - Patient Satisfaction
MH - Practice Guidelines as Topic
MH - Professional Competence
MH - Professional Role
MH - Professional Staff Committees/organization & administration
MH - Safety Management/organization & administration
MH - Total Quality Management/*organization & administration
EDAT- 2006/06/02 09:00
MHDA- 2007/01/06 09:00
AID - 00129234-200605000-00008 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Lippincotts Case Manag. 2006 May-Jun;11(3):160-4.

PMID- 16596833
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20060406
DCOM- 20060720
LR - 20061115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0160-9289 (Print)
VI - 29
IP - 3
DP - 2006 Mar
TI - Primary percutaneous coronary intervention in acute myocardial infarction:
direct
transportation to catheterization laboratory by emergency teams reduces
door-to-balloon time.
PG - 112-6
AB - BACKGROUND: Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is the
recommended
revascularization strategy for patients presenting with acute ST-elevation
myocardial infarction (STEMI). In most hospitals, transfer of patients with
STEMI
is organized from the emergency site via emergency room (medical and
cardiologic
evaluation) and then to the catheterization laboratory. HYPOTHESIS: In this
prospective study, we sought to evaluate the effect of a logistic
modification in
this treatment process. METHODS: Local emergency ambulance teams were
instructed
to identify and evaluate patients with STEMI eligible for direct PCI and to
transport them directly to the cardiac catheterization laboratory for
immediate
percutaneous coronary intervention ("ER bypass"). This study prospectively
included 74 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndromes (STEMI) and
compared them with a matched historic control group ("ER evaluation").
Primary
endpoint was the reduction in door-to-balloon time; secondary endpoint was
quality of preclinical emergency diagnosis. RESULTS: Median door-to-balloon
time
was reduced by 27 min. Primary interventional success was achieved in 92% of
patients. Preclinical emergency diagnoses were correct in 95% of patients.
CONCLUSION: The preclinical emergency diagnosis of STEMI was reliable.
Direct
transport of patients with STEMI to the cardiac catheterization laboratory
and
early preclinical alert by the interventional PCI team significantly reduces
door-to-balloon-times compared with established standard processes-of-care
for
patients considered for primary PCI.
AD - Universitatsklinik Freiburg, Department of Cardiology, Germany.
andreasvandeloo@aol.com
FAU - van de Loo, Andreas
AU - van de Loo A
FAU - Saurbier, Bernward
AU - Saurbier B
FAU - Kalbhenn, Johannes
AU - Kalbhenn J
FAU - Koberne, Frank
AU - Koberne F
FAU - Zehender, Manfred
AU - Zehender M
LA - eng
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Evaluation Studies
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Clin Cardiol
JT - Clinical cardiology
JID - 7903272
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Ambulances/*standards
MH - Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary/*methods
MH - Cardiac Care Facilities
MH - Case-Control Studies
MH - Emergency Medical Technicians
MH - Female
MH - Germany
MH - Heart Catheterization/*standards/trends
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Myocardial Infarction/*diagnosis/mortality/*therapy
MH - Patient Care Team
MH - Patient Transfer/*methods/standards
MH - Probability
MH - Prospective Studies
MH - Quality of Health Care
MH - Reproducibility of Results
MH - Risk Assessment
MH - Severity of Illness Index
MH - Survival Rate
MH - Time and Motion Studies
MH - Treatment Outcome
MH - *Triage
EDAT- 2006/04/07 09:00
MHDA- 2006/07/21 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Clin Cardiol. 2006 Mar;29(3):112-6.

PMID- 16540848
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20060316
DCOM- 20060713
PUBM- Print
IS - 0195-9131 (Print)
VI - 38
IP - 3
DP - 2006 Mar
TI - Effects of caffeine on prolonged intermittent-sprint ability in team-sport
athletes.
PG - 578-85
AB - PURPOSE: Caffeine can be a powerful ergogenic aid for the performance of
prolonged, submaximal exercise. Little evidence, however, supports an
ergogenic
effect of caffeine on intermittent-sprint performance. Hence, this study was
conducted to examine the effects of acute caffeine ingestion on prolonged
intermittent-sprint performance. METHODS: Using a double-blind,
placebo-controlled design, 10 male team-sport athletes (amateur level,
VO2peak
56.5 +/- 8.0 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)) completed two exercise trials, separated
by 7
d, 60 min after ingestion of either 6 mg x kg(-1) caffeine or placebo. The
exercise trial was performed on a front-access cycle ergometer and consisted
of 2
x 36-min halves, each composed of 18 x 4-s sprints with 2-min active
recovery at
35% VO2peak between each sprint. Urinary caffeine levels were measured after
exercise. RESULTS: The total amount of sprint work performed during the
caffeine
trial was 8.5% greater than that performed during the placebo trial in the
first
half (75,165.4 +/- 3,902.9 vs 69,265.6 +/- 3,719.7 J, P < 0.05), and was
7.6%
greater in the second half (73,978.7 +/- 4,092.6 vs 68,783.2 +/- 3,574.4 J,
P <
0.05). Similarly, the mean peak power score achieved during sprints in the
caffeine trial was 7.0% greater than that achieved during the placebo trial
in
the first half (1330.9 +/- 68.2 vs 1244.2 +/- 60.7 W, P < 0.05), and was
6.6%
greater in the second half (1314.5 +/- 68.4 vs 1233.2 +/- 59.9 W, P < 0.05).
Urinary caffeine levels following the caffeine trial ranged from 3.5 to 9.1
microg x mL(-1) (6.9 +/- 0.6 microg x mL(-1)). CONCLUSION: This study
revealed
that acute caffeine ingestion can significantly enhance performance of
prolonged,
intermittent-sprint ability in competitive, male, team-sport athletes.
AD - Laboratory, School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of
Western Australia, Crawley, West Australia, Australia.
kts@graduate.uwa.edu.au
FAU - Schneiker, Knut Thomas
AU - Schneiker KT
FAU - Bishop, David
AU - Bishop D
FAU - Dawson, Brian
AU - Dawson B
FAU - Hackett, Laurence Peter
AU - Hackett LP
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Med Sci Sports Exerc
JT - Medicine and science in sports and exercise
JID - 8005433
RN - 58-08-2 (Caffeine)
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Caffeine/administration & dosage/*pharmacology
MH - Double-Blind Method
MH - Exercise
MH - Exercise Test
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Oxygen Consumption
MH - Placebo Effect
MH - *Running
MH - *Sports
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
MH - Western Australia
EDAT- 2006/03/17 09:00
MHDA- 2006/07/14 09:00
AID - 10.1249/01.mss.0000188449.18968.62 [doi]
AID - 00005768-200603000-00025 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Mar;38(3):578-85.

PMID- 16435704
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20060126
DCOM- 20060228
LR - 20061115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0018-7208 (Print)
VI - 47
IP - 3
DP -2005 Fall
TI -Team task analysis: identifying tasks and jobs that are team based.
PG -654-69
AB -This paper presents initial information on the development and validation of
three team task analysis scales. These scales were designed to
quantitatively
assess the extent to which a group of tasks or a job is team based. During a
2-week period, 52 male students working in 4-person teams were trained to
perform
a complex highly interdependent computer-simulated combat mission consisting
of
both individual- and team-based tasks. Our results indicated that the scales
demonstrated high levels of interrater agreement. In addition, the scales
differentiated between tasks that were predetermined to be individual versus
team
based. Finally, the results indicated that job-level ratings of team
workflow
were more strongly related to team performance than were aggregated task-
level
ratings of team-relatedness or team workflow. These results suggest that the
scales presented here are an effective means of quantifying the extent to
which
tasks or jobs are team based. A research and practical implication of our
findings is that the team task analysis scales could serve as criterion
measures
in the evaluation of team training interventions or predictors of team
performance.
AD - Department of Psychology, Texas A&M University, College Station 77843-4235,
USA.
wea@psyc.tamu.edu
FAU - Arthur, Winfred Jr
AU - Arthur W Jr
FAU - Edwards, Bryan D
AU - Edwards BD
FAU - Bell, Suzanne T
AU - Bell ST
FAU - Villado, Anton J
AU - Villado AJ
FAU - Bennett, Winston Jr
AU - Bennett W Jr
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PL - United States
TA - Hum Factors
JT - Human factors
JID - 0374660
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Adult
MH - Computer Simulation
MH - Humans
MH - Interpersonal Relations
MH - Male
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2006/01/27 09:00
MHDA- 2006/03/01 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Hum Factors. 2005 Fall;47(3):654-69.

PMID- 16395015
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20060105
DCOM- 20060224
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0360-4039 (Print)
VI - 36
IP - 1
DP - 2006 Jan
TI - Best-practice interventions: how a rapid response team saves lives.
PG - 36-40
AD - Critical Care and Transplant Services, University of Pittsburgh Medical
Center-Presbyterian Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
FAU - Scholle, Carol C
AU - Scholle CC
FAU - Mininni, Nicolette C
AU - Mininni NC
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Nursing
JT - Nursing
JID - 7600137
SB - N
MH - Benchmarking/*organization & administration
MH - Heart Arrest/diagnosis/mortality/prevention & control
MH - Humans
MH - Nurse's Role
MH - Nursing Assessment/organization & administration
MH - Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/*organization & administration/psychology
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Patient Selection
MH - Pennsylvania/epidemiology
MH - Practice Guidelines as Topic
MH - Respiratory Therapy/methods/nursing
MH - *Resuscitation/methods/nursing
MH - Time Factors
EDAT- 2006/01/06 09:00
MHDA- 2006/02/25 09:00
AID - 00152193-200601000-00037 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Nursing. 2006 Jan;36(1):36-40.

PMID- 16368614
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20051221
DCOM- 20060516
PUBM- Print
IS - 0264-0414 (Print)
VI - 24
IP - 1
DP - 2006 Jan
TI - Relationships between cohesion, collective efficacy and performance in
professional basketball teams: an examination of mediating effects.
PG - 59-68
AB - The main aim of this study was to examine mediating effects in the
relationships
between cohesion, collective efficacy and performance in professional
basketball
teams. A secondary aim was to examine the correlates of collective efficacy
in a
professional sport. A total of 154 French and foreign professional players
completed French or English versions of questionnaires about cohesion and
collective efficacy. Two composite measures of individual performance were
used
(pre- and post-performance). Individual-level analyses were performed.
Regression
analyses supported two mediating relationships with collective efficacy as a
mediator of the pre-performance - Group integration-task relationship, and
Group
integration-task as a mediator of the pre-performance - collective efficacy
relationship. Statistical analyses indicated that neither Group integration-
task
nor collective efficacy was a better mediator in the relationship between
pre-performance and the other group variables. Results also revealed
positive
relationships between three dimensions of cohesion (i.e. Individual
attractions
to the group-task, Group integration-task, Group integration-social) and
collective efficacy. These findings suggest that in professional basketball
teams, staff members should look after athletes who perform at a lower or
below
their usual level because their performances might lead them into a downward
cohesion - collective efficacy spiral. Staff members should also develop a
high
quality of group functioning, both on and off the basketball court, given
its
relationship with collective efficacy.
AD - Universite de Reims, UFR STAPS, Reims, France. jp.heuze@univ-reims.fr
FAU - Heuze, Jean-Philippe
AU - Heuze JP
FAU - Raimbault, Nicolas
AU - Raimbault N
FAU - Fontayne, Paul
AU - Fontayne P
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - England
TA - J Sports Sci
JT - Journal of sports sciences
JID - 8405364
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - *Basketball
MH - *Competitive Behavior
MH - France
MH - *Group Processes
MH - Humans
MH - Questionnaires
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2005/12/22 09:00
MHDA- 2006/05/17 09:00
AID - P2V2322808J81870 [pii]
AID - 10.1080/02640410500127736 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Sports Sci. 2006 Jan;24(1):59-68.

PMID- 16316282
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20051130
DCOM- 20060209
LR - 20061115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0021-9010 (Print)
VI - 90
IP - 6
DP - 2005 Nov
TI - Contingent leadership and effectiveness of trauma resuscitation teams.
PG - 1288-96
AB - This research investigated leadership and effectiveness of teams operating
in a
high-velocity environment, specifically trauma resuscitation teams. On the
basis
of the literature and their own ethnographic work, the authors proposed and
tested a contingency model in which the influence of leadership on team
effectiveness during trauma resuscitation differs according to the
situation.
Results indicated that empowering leadership was more effective when trauma
severity was low and when team experience was high. Directive leadership was
more
effective when trauma severity was high or when the team was inexperienced.
Findings also suggested that an empowering leader provided more learning
opportunities than did a directive leader. The major contribution of this
article
is the linkage of leadership to team effectiveness, as moderated by
relatively
specific situational contingencies.
CI - ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved).
AD - Department of Management, School of Business, Montclair State University, 1
Normal Avenue, Montclair, NJ 07043, USA. yuns@mail.montclair.edu
FAU - Yun, Seokhwa
AU - Yun S
FAU - Faraj, Samer
AU - Faraj S
FAU - Sims, Henry P Jr
AU - Sims HP Jr
LA - eng
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PL - United States
TA - J Appl Psychol
JT - The Journal of applied psychology
JID - 0222526
SB - IM
MH - Adaptation, Psychological
MH - Adult
MH - *Anthropology, Cultural
MH - Clinical Competence
MH - Female
MH - Group Processes
MH - Group Structure
MH - Humans
MH - Inservice Training
MH - *Leadership
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Models, Statistical
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Power (Psychology)
MH - Resuscitation/*education
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
MH - Treatment Outcome
MH - Wounds and Injuries/*therapy
EDAT- 2005/12/01 09:00
MHDA- 2006/02/10 09:00
AID - 2005-14549-020 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/0021-9010.90.6.1288 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Appl Psychol. 2005 Nov;90(6):1288-96.

PMID- 16286872
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20051115
DCOM- 20060119
PUBM- Print
IS - 0195-9131 (Print)
VI - 37
IP - 11
DP - 2005 Nov
TI - Multiple effects of caffeine on simulated high-intensity team-sport
performance.
PG - 1998-2005
AB - INTRODUCTION: Caffeine enhances performance of single bouts of endurance
exercise, but its effects on repeated bouts typical of those in high-
intensity
team sports are unclear. PURPOSE: To investigate effects of caffeine in a
performance test simulating physical and skill demands of a rugby union
game.
METHODS: The study was a double-blind, randomized, crossover design in which
nine
competitive male rugby players ingested either caffeine (6 mg.kg(-1) body
mass)
or placebo (dextrose) 70 min before performing a rugby test. Each test
consisted
of seven circuits in each of two 40-min halves with a 10-min half-time rest.
Each
circuit included stations for measurement of sprint time (two straight-line
and
three agility sprints), power generation in two consecutive drives, and
accuracy
for passing balls rapidly. Interstitial fluid was sampled transdermally by
electrosonophoresis before ingestion of caffeine or placebo and then before
testing, at half-time, and immediately after testing; samples were assayed
chromatographically for caffeine and epinephrine concentrations. RESULTS:
The
effects of caffeine on mean performance (+/-90% confidence limits) over all
14
circuits were: sprint speeds, 0.5% (+/-1.7%) through 2.9% (+/-1.3%); first-
drive
power, 5.0% (+/-2.5%); second-drive power, -1.2% (+/-6.8%); and passing
accuracy,
9.6% (+/-6.1%). The enhancements were mediated partly through a reduction of
fatigue that developed throughout the test and partly by enhanced
performance for
some measures from the first circuit. Caffeine produced a 51% (+/-11%)
increase
in mean epinephrine concentration; correlations between individual changes
in
epinephrine concentration and changes in performance were mostly unclear,
but
there were some strong positive correlations with sprint speeds and a strong
negative correlation with passing accuracy. CONCLUSION: Caffeine is likely
to
produce substantial enhancement of several aspects of high-intensity team-
sport
performance.
AD - Division of Sport and Recreation, Auckland University of Technology, New
Zealand.
FAU - Stuart, Gene R
AU - Stuart GR
FAU - Hopkins, Will G
AU - Hopkins WG
FAU - Cook, Christian
AU - Cook C
FAU - Cairns, Simeon P
AU - Cairns SP
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Randomized Controlled Trial
PL - United States
TA - Med Sci Sports Exerc
JT - Medicine and science in sports and exercise
JID - 8005433
RN - 0 (Central Nervous System Stimulants)
RN - 0 (Placebos)
RN - 51-43-4 (Epinephrine)
RN - 58-08-2 (Caffeine)
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Adult
MH - Caffeine/*pharmacology
MH - Central Nervous System Stimulants/*pharmacology
MH - Cross-Over Studies
MH - Double-Blind Method
MH - Epinephrine/blood
MH - Fatigue
MH - Football/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Physical Fitness
MH - Placebos
MH - Running/physiology
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2005/11/16 09:00
MHDA- 2006/01/20 09:00
AID - 00005768-200511000-00024 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Nov;37(11):1998-2005.

PMID- 16138657
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20050905
DCOM- 20051208
PUBM- Print
IS - 1476-3141 (Print)
VI - 4
IP - 2
DP - 2005 Jul
TI - Anthropometric and physical abilities profiles: US National Skeleton Team.
PG - 197-214
AB - The aim of this study was to characterize sprint ability, anthropometry, and
lower extremity power in the US National Team Skeleton athletes. Fourteen
athletes (male n = 7; mean +/- SD: height 1.794 +/- 0.063 m, body mass 81.2
+/-
3.7 kg, age 26.9 +/- 4.1 years; female n = 7; 1.642 +/- 0.055 m, 60.1 +/-
5.9 kg,
27.3 +/- 6.9 years) volunteered to participate. Sprinting ability was
measured
over multiple intervals using custom infrared timing gates in both an
upright and
a crouched sprint. The crouched sprint was performed while pushing a
wheeled-simulated skeleton sled on rails on an outdoor skeleton and
bobsleigh
start track. Crouched skeleton sprint starts were able to achieve about 70%
to
85% of the upright sprint times. The mean somatotype ratings for females
were:
3.5-3.5-2.1, and males: 3.6-4.9-1.9. Lower extremity strength and power were
measured via vertical jumps on a portable force platform using squat and
countermovement jumps, and jumps with added mass. Jump height, power, rate
offorce development and peak force were determined from force-time data.
Lower
extremity strength and power were strongly correlated with both upright and
crouched sprint times. The results indicated that these athletes are strong
sprinters with varying body structures, mostly mesomorphic, and that
stronger and
more powerful athletes tend to be better starters.
AD - USA Olympic Committee, Division of Coaching and Sport Sciences, Colorado
Springs,
CO, USA.
FAU - Sands, William A
AU - Sands WA
FAU - Smith, L Sarah L
AU - Smith LS
FAU - Kivi, Derek M R
AU - Kivi DM
FAU - McNeal, Jeni R
AU - McNeal JR
FAU - Dorman, Jason C
AU - Dorman JC
FAU - Stone, Michael H
AU - Stone MH
FAU - Cormie, Prue
AU - Cormie P
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - Scotland
TA - Sports Biomech
JT - Sports biomechanics / International Society of Biomechanics in Sports
JID - 101151352
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Anthropometry/methods
MH - Body Size/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Leg/physiology
MH - Male
MH - Motor Activity/*physiology
MH - Muscle, Skeletal/physiology
MH - Running/physiology
MH - Sex Factors
MH - Sports/*physiology
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2005/09/06 09:00
MHDA- 2005/12/13 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Sports Biomech. 2005 Jul;4(2):197-214.

PMID- 16018327
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20050715
DCOM- 20051011
PUBM- Print
IS - 0095-6562 (Print)
VI - 76
IP - 7 Suppl
DP - 2005 Jul
TI - Assessing performance in complex team environments.
PG - C31-3
AB - This paper provides a brief introduction to team performance assessment. It
highlights some critical aspects leading to the successful measurement of
team
performance in realistic console operations; discusses the idea of process
and
outcome measures; presents two types of team data collection systems; and
provides an example of team performance assessment. Team performance
assessment
is a complicated endeavor relative to assessing individual performance.
Assessing
team performance necessitates a clear understanding of each operator's task,
both
at the individual and team level, and requires planning for efficient data
capture and analysis. Though team performance assessment requires
considerable
effort, the results can be very worthwhile. Most tasks performed in Command
and
Control environments are team tasks, and understanding this type of
performance
is becoming increasingly important to the evaluation of mission success and
for
overall system optimization.
AD - Fatigue Countermeasures Branch, Biosciences and Protection Division, Human
Effectiveness Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Brooks City-Base,
TX
78235, USA. Jeff.Whitmore@brooks.af.mil
FAU - Whitmore, Jeffrey N
AU - Whitmore JN
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Aviat Space Environ Med
JT - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine
JID - 7501714
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Humans
MH - *Military Medicine
MH - *Operations Research
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
MH - United States
EDAT- 2005/07/16 09:00
MHDA- 2005/10/12 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Aviat Space Environ Med. 2005 Jul;76(7 Suppl):C31-3.

PMID- 15960086
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20050617
DCOM- 20050719
LR - 20061115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0018-7208 (Print)
VI - 47
IP - 1
DP - 2005 Spring
TI - Effects of automation of information-processing functions on teamwork.
PG - 50-66
AB - We investigated the effects of automation as applied to different stages of
information processing on team performance in a complex decision-making
task.
Forty teams of 2 individuals performed a simulated Theater Defense Task.
Four
automation conditions were simulated with computer assistance applied to
realistic combinations of information acquisition, information analysis, and
decision selection functions across two levels of task difficulty. Multiple
measures of team effectiveness and team coordination were used. Results
indicated
different forms of automation have different effects on teamwork. Compared
with a
baseline condition, an increase in automation of information acquisition led
to
an increase in the ratio of information transferred to information
requested; an
increase in automation of information analysis resulted in higher team
coordination ratings; and automation of decision selection led to better
team
effectiveness under low levels of task difficulty but at the cost of higher
workload. The results support the use of early and intermediate forms of
automation related to acquisition and analysis of information in the design
of
team tasks. Decision-making automation may provide benefits in more limited
contexts. Applications of this research include the design and evaluation of
automation in team environments.
AD - Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3094,
Durham,
NC, 27710, USA. melanie.wright@duke.edu
FAU - Wright, Melanie C
AU - Wright MC
FAU - Kaber, David B
AU - Kaber DB
LA - eng
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PL - United States
TA - Hum Factors
JT - Human factors
JID - 0374660
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Automation/instrumentation/*methods
MH - Aviation/instrumentation/*methods
MH - Computer Simulation
MH - *Decision Making, Computer-Assisted
MH - Humans
MH - Internal-External Control
MH - Interprofessional Relations
MH - Man-Machine Systems
MH - Military Personnel
MH - Problem Solving
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
MH - Workload
EDAT- 2005/06/18 09:00
MHDA- 2005/07/20 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Hum Factors. 2005 Spring;47(1):50-66.

PMID- 15943207
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20050609
DCOM- 20050902
LR - 20061115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0095-6562 (Print)
VI - 76
IP - 6 Suppl
DP - 2005 Jun
TI - Multi-team dynamics and distributed expertise in imission operations.
PG - B145-53
AB - The evolution of space exploration has brought an increased awareness of the
social and socio-technical issues associated with team performance and task
coordination, both for the onboard astronauts and in mission control.
Spaceflight
operations create a unique environment in which to address classic group
dynamics
topics including communication, group process, knowledge development and
sharing,
and time-critical task performance. Mission operations in the early years of
the
21st century have developed into a set of complex, multi-team task settings
incorporating multiple mission control teams and flight crews interacting in
novel ways. These more complex operational settings help highlight the
emergence
of a new paradigm of distributed supervisory coordination, and the need to
consider multiple dimensions of expertise being supported and exchanged
among
team members. The creation of new mission profiles with very long-duration
time
scales (months, rather than days) for the International Space Station, as
well as
planned exploration missions to the Moon and Mars, emphasize fundamental
distinctions from the 40 yr from Mercury to the Space Shuttle. Issues in
distributed expertise and information flow in mission control settings from
two
related perspectives are described. A general conceptual view of knowledge
sharing and task synchronization is presented within the context of the
mission
control environment. This conceptual presentation is supplemented by
analysis of
quasi-experimental data collected from actual flight controllers at NASA-
Johnson
Space Center, Houston, TX.
AD - School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
47907-2023, USA. bscaldwell@purdue.edu
FAU - Caldwell, Barrett S
AU - Caldwell BS
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PL - United States
TA - Aviat Space Environ Med
JT - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine
JID - 7501714
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - *Aerospace Medicine
MH - Astronauts/*psychology/standards
MH - *Behavioral Research
MH - Cooperative Behavior
MH - Efficiency, Organizational
MH - *Group Processes
MH - Humans
MH - Information Systems
MH - Interpersonal Relations
MH - Organizational Objectives
MH - *Professional Competence
MH - *Space Flight
MH -Task Performance and Analysis
MH -Texas
MH -Time Factors
MH -United States
MH -United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration/*organization &
administration
OTO - NASA
OT - NASA Discipline Space Human Factors
OT - Non-NASA Center
IR - Caldwell BS
FIR - Caldwell, B S
IRAD- Purdue U, W Lafayette, IN
GN - NASA: Grant numbers: NASA NAG 9-1008, NASA NAG 9-1292, IN space grant
consortium
NASA NAG 4-40114.
EDAT- 2005/06/10 09:00
MHDA- 2005/09/03 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Aviat Space Environ Med. 2005 Jun;76(6 Suppl):B145-53.

PMID- 15903369
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20050520
DCOM- 20050901
PUBM- Print
IS - 1064-8011 (Print)
VI - 19
IP - 2
DP - 2005 May
TI - Measurement of talent in team handball: the questionable use of motor and
physical tests.
PG - 318-25
AB - Testing for selection is one of the most important fundamentals in any
multistep
sport program. In most ball games, coaches assess motor, physical, and
technical
skills on a regular basis in early stages of talent identification and
development. However, selection processes are complex, are often
unstructured,
and lack clear-cut theory-based knowledge. For example, little is known
about the
relevance of the testing process to the final selection of the young
prospects.
The purpose of this study was to identify motor, physical, and skill
variables
that could provide coaches with relevant information in the selection
process of
young team handball players. In total, 405 players (12-13 years of age at
the
beginning of the testing period) were recommended by their coaches to
undergo a
battery of tests prior to selection to the Junior National Team. This number
is
the sum of all players participating in the different phases of the program.
However, not all of them took part in each testing phase. The battery
included
physical measurements (height and weight), a 4 x 10-m running test,
explosive
power tests (medicine ball throw and standing long jump), speed tests (a 20-
m
sprint from a standing position and a 20-m sprint with a flying start), and
a
slalom dribbling test. Comparisons between those players eventually selected
to
the Junior National Team 2-3 years later with those not selected
demonstrated
that only the skill test served as a good indicator. In all other
measurements, a
wide overlap could be seen between the results of the selected and
nonselected
players. It is suggested that future studies investigate the usefulness of
tests
reflecting more specific physical ability and cognitive characteristics.
AD - The Zinman College of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Wingate
Institute,
Netanya, Israel and Faculty of Education, University of Haifa, Haifa,
Israel.
lidor@macam.ac.il
FAU - Lidor, Ronnie
AU - Lidor R
FAU - Falk, Bareket
AU - Falk B
FAU - Arnon, Michal
AU - Arnon M
FAU - Cohen, Yoram
AU - Cohen Y
FAU - Segal, Gil
AU - Segal G
FAU - Lander, Yael
AU - Lander Y
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - J Strength Cond Res
JT - Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength &
Conditioning
Association
JID - 9415084
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Adolescent
MH - Age Factors
MH - Aptitude/*physiology
MH - *Aptitude Tests
MH - Child
MH - Competitive Behavior
MH - Female
MH - Follow-Up Studies
MH - Group Processes
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Physical Education and Training/methods
MH - Sports/*physiology
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2005/05/21 09:00
MHDA- 2005/09/02 09:00
AID - 10.1519/1533-4287(2005)19[318:MOTITH]2.0.CO;2 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Strength Cond Res. 2005 May;19(2):318-25.

PMID- 15701944
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20050209
DCOM- 20050315
PUBM- Print
IS - 1529-7713 (Print)
VI - 6
IP - 1
DP - 2005
TI - Measuring college sailing teams ability: an application of the many-facet
Rasch
model to ordinal data.
PG - 57-70
AB - For those who look at typical approaches to sports ranking, sailing seems an
almost impossible challenge, thereby making the evidence supporting Rasch
measurement in this study even more intriguing. This article describes our
application of MFRM and the results from our analysis of one year's data
from the
North American college sailing competitions. We discuss the following issues
for
inclusion in the development of a Rasch model useful to college sailing team
ability: 1. The level of data quality (as described by Stevens, 1946) 2. The
connectedness of the contests 3. Empty cells (missing data) 4. Interpreting
outliers, trends, or unusual results 5. Judges' or polls' bias Our results
indicate the utility and precision of MFRM as a tool generally appropriate
for
ordinal ranking applications and sailing ability specifically.
AD - College of Education, University of South Florida St. Petersburg, 140 7th
Avenue
South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, USA. wslang@tempest.coedu.usf.edu
FAU - Lang, William Steve
AU - Lang WS
FAU - Wilkerson, Judy R
AU - Wilkerson JR
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - J Appl Meas
JT - Journal of applied measurement
JID - 101084377
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Data Collection
MH - Humans
MH - *Models, Theoretical
MH - Reproducibility of Results
MH - Ships
MH - *Sports
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2005/02/11 09:00
MHDA- 2005/03/16 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - J Appl Meas. 2005;6(1):57-70.

PMID- 15682566
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20050201
DCOM- 20050224
PUBM- Print
IS - 1047-5311 (Print)
VI - 16
IP - 12
DP - 2004 Dec
TI - Buying time, saving lives: hospital rapid response teams find ways to reduce
mortality outside the ICU.
PG - 2-9, 1
AB - Many studies in recent years have shown that many critical cardiovascular
and
respiratory events in hospitals are preceded by warning signs hours before
the
events themselves occur. Two facilities have created award-winning rapid
response
teams that are making a difference for not only the patients who encounter
these
critical events but the entire organization as well.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Qual Lett Healthc Lead
JT - The Quality letter for healthcare leaders
JID - 9309472
SB - H
MH - Colorado
MH - Heart Arrest/mortality
MH - *Hospital Mortality
MH - Humans
MH - Intensive Care Units
MH - Quality Assurance, Health Care/*organization & administration
MH - Respiratory Insufficiency/mortality
MH - Time and Motion Studies
EDAT- 2005/02/03 09:00
MHDA- 2005/02/25 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Qual Lett Healthc Lead. 2004 Dec;16(12):2-9, 1.

PMID- 15633837
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20050106
DCOM- 20050201
PUBM- Print
IS - 0954-7762 (Print)
VI - 100
IP - 50
DP - 2004 Dec 14-2005 Jan 3
TI - The essence of teamwork.
PG - 24-5
FAU - Sandiford, Rebecca
AU - Sandiford R
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - England
TA - Nurs Times
JT - Nursing times
JID - 0423236
SB - N
MH - *Awards and Prizes
MH - Benchmarking/*organization & administration
MH - England
MH - Humans
MH - Nursing Staff, Hospital/*organization & administration
MH - *Patient Care Team
EDAT- 2005/01/07 09:00
MHDA- 2005/02/03 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Nurs Times. 2004 Dec 14-2005 Jan 3;100(50):24-5.

PMID- 15631917
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20050105
DCOM- 20050217
LR - 20061115
PUBM- Print
IS - 1072-7515 (Print)
VI - 200
IP - 1
DP - 2005 Jan
TI - Assessing team performance in the operating room: development and use of a
"black-box" recorder and other tools for the intraoperative environment.
PG - 29-37
AB - BACKGROUND: The objective of this research was to develop a digital system
to
archive the complete operative environment along with the assessment tools
for
analysis of this data, allowing prospective studies of operative
performance,
intraoperative errors, team performance, and communication. Ability to study
this
environment will yield new insights, allowing design of systems to avoid
preventable errors that contribute to perioperative complications. STUDY
DESIGN:
A multitrack, synchronized, digital audio-visual recording system (RATE
tool) was
developed to monitor intraoperative performance, including software to
synchronize data and allow assignment of independent observational scores.
Cases
were scored for technical performance, participants' situational awareness
(knowledge of critical information), and their comfort and satisfaction with
the
conduct of the procedure. RESULTS: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (n = 10) was
studied. Technical performance of the RATE tool was excellent. The RATE tool
allowed real time, multitrack data collection of all aspects of the
operative
environment, while permitting digital recording of the objective assessment
data
in a time synchronized and annotated fashion during the procedure. The mean
technical performance score was 73% +/- 28% of maximum (perfect)
performance.
Situational awareness varied widely among team members, with the attending
surgeon typically the only team member having comprehensive knowledge of
critical
case information. CONCLUSIONS: The RATE tool allows prospective analysis of
performance measures such as technical judgments, team performance, and
communication patterns, offers the opportunity to conduct prospective
intraoperative studies of human performance, and allows for postoperative
discussion, review, and teaching. This study also suggests that gaps in
situational awareness might be an underappreciated source of operative
adverse
events. Future uses of this system will aid teaching, failure or adverse
event
analysis, and intervention research.
AD - Department of Systems and Information Engineering, University of Virginia,
Charlottesville, VA 22908-0709, USA.
FAU - Guerlain, Stephanie
AU - Guerlain S
FAU - Adams, Reid B
AU - Adams RB
FAU - Turrentine, F Beth
AU - Turrentine FB
FAU - Shin, Thomas
AU - Shin T
FAU - Guo, Hui
AU - Guo H
FAU - Collins, Stephen R
AU - Collins SR
FAU - Calland, J Forrest
AU - Calland JF
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PL - United States
TA - J Am Coll Surg
JT - Journal of the American College of Surgeons
JID - 9431305
SB - AIM
SB - IM
MH - *Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic
MH - Clinical Competence
MH - Communication
MH - Humans
MH - Interprofessional Relations
MH - Operating Rooms
MH - *Patient Care Team
MH - *Process Assessment (Health Care)
MH - *Software Design
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
MH - User-Computer Interface
MH - *Video Recording
EDAT- 2005/01/06 09:00
MHDA- 2005/02/18 09:00
PHST- 2004/04/30 [received]
PHST- 2004/07/22 [revised]
PHST- 2004/08/11 [accepted]
AID - S1072-7515(04)01251-7 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2004.08.029 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Am Coll Surg. 2005 Jan;200(1):29-37.

PMID- 15465939
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20041006
DCOM- 20041214
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 1475-3898 (Print)
VI - 13
IP - 5
DP - 2004 Oct
TI - RCGP Quality Team Development programme: an illuminative evaluation.
PG - 356-62
AB - BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in quality initiatives that are
locally
owned and delivered, team based, multiprofessional, and formative. The Royal
College of General Practitioners' Quality Team Development (QTD) programme
is one
such initiative aimed at developing primary healthcare teams and their
services.
AIMS: To evaluate QTD from the perspective of participants and assessors.
SETTING: UK primary health care. DESIGN AND METHOD: Twelve of 14 practices
and
all four primary care organisations (PCOs) approached agreed to participate.
Thirty four semi-structured interviews were conducted with key stakeholders.
The
interviews were taped, transcribed, and analysed using the constant
comparative
method. RESULTS: The QTD programme appears to be highly valued by
participating
organisations. Practice based respondents perceived it as acceptable and
feasible, and reported positive changes in teamwork and patient services.
They
valued its formative, participative, and multiprofessional nature,
especially the
peer review element. PCOs saw QTD as a method of delivering on prevailing
national policies on clinical quality and modernization agendas as well as
promoting interorganizational collaboration. The main concerns raised were
the
workload, particularly for assessors, and maintaining the quality of the
assessments and the programme. CONCLUSION: This qualitative study suggests
positive benefits for participants in the QTD programme. However, such
practices
are a self-selecting innovative minority. Further research is needed on more
typical practices to identify barriers to their participation in QTD or
other
formative, team based quality improvement programmes.
AD - University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK.
f.macfarlane@surrey.ac.uk.
FAU - Macfarlane, F
AU - Macfarlane F
FAU - Greenhalgh, T
AU - Greenhalgh T
FAU - Schofield, T
AU - Schofield T
FAU - Desombre, T
AU - Desombre T
LA - eng
PT - Evaluation Studies
PT - Journal Article
PL - England
TA - Qual Saf Health Care
JT - Quality & safety in health care
JID - 101136980
SB - H
MH - *Attitude of Health Personnel
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Cooperative Behavior
MH - England
MH - Family Practice/organization & administration/*standards
MH - Humans
MH - Interviews as Topic
MH - Management Quality Circles
MH - Patient Care Team/organization & administration/standards
MH - Primary Health Care/organization & administration/*standards
MH - Program Development
MH - Qualitative Research
MH - Rural Health Services/standards
MH - Societies, Medical
MH - Total Quality Management/*methods
MH - Urban Health Services/standards
MH - Wales
EDAT- 2004/10/07 09:00
MHDA- 2004/12/16 09:00
AID - 13/5/356 [pii]
AID - 10.1136/qhc.13.5.356 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Qual Saf Health Care. 2004 Oct;13(5):356-62.

PMID- 15333524
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20040830
DCOM- 20050301
PUBM- Print
IS - 1472-0213 (Electronic)
VI - 21
IP - 5
DP - 2004 Sep
TI - Team triage improves emergency department efficiency.
PG - 542-4
AB - OBJECTIVE: To see whether three hours of combined doctor and nurse triage
would
lead to earlier medical assessment and treatment and whether this benefit
would
carry on for the rest of the day when normal triage had resumed. METHOD:
Eight
days were randomly selected; four for team triage and four for the normal
nurse
led triage. Team triage was coordinated by a middle grade or consultant from
9 am
to 12 noon. Times to triage, to see a doctor, radiology, admission, and
discharge
were recorded. No additional medical or nursing staff were used and staffing
levels were similar each day. All patients including blue light emergencies
and
minor injuries were included. RESULTS: Median times were significantly
reduced
(p<0.05) during the intervention to triage (2 min v 7 min, p = 0. 029), to
see a
doctor (2 min v 32 min, p = 0.029), and to radiology (11.5 min v 44.5 min, p
=
0.029). Waiting times at midday were longer for patients in the non-
intervention
group. More patients were seen and discharged within 20 minutes in the
intervention group (18 of 95 (19%) v 2 of 69 (3%) p = 0.0043). No
significant
knock on effect was demonstrable for the remaining 21 hours after the
intervention ceased. CONCLUSION: Three hours of combined doctor and nurse
triage
significantly reduces the time to medical assessment, radiology, and to
discharge
during the intervention period. Waiting times at midday were shorter in the
triage group. There was no significant knock on effect the rest of the day.
AD - Emergency Department, Royal Victoria Hospital, Grosvenor Road, Belfast BT12
6AB,
UK.
FAU - Subash, F
AU - Subash F
FAU - Dunn, F
AU - Dunn F
FAU - McNicholl, B
AU - McNicholl B
FAU - Marlow, J
AU - Marlow J
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - England
TA - Emerg Med J
JT - Emergency medicine journal : EMJ
JID - 100963089
SB - IM
MH - Appointments and Schedules
MH - Efficiency, Organizational
MH - Emergency Nursing/*organization & administration
MH - Emergency Service, Hospital/*organization & administration/utilization
MH - Health Services Research
MH - Humans
MH - Medical Staff, Hospital/organization & administration
MH - Northern Ireland
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Time and Motion Studies
MH - Triage/*organization & administration
MH - Waiting Lists
EDAT- 2004/08/31 05:00
MHDA- 2005/03/02 09:00
AID - 10.1136/emj.2002.003665 [doi]
AID - 21/5/542 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Emerg Med J. 2004 Sep;21(5):542-4.

PMID- 15231353
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20040702
DCOM- 20041109
LR - 20060614
PUBM- Print
IS - 0304-3894 (Print)
VI - 111
IP - 1-3
DP - 2004 Jul 26
TI - Safety investigation of team performance in accidents.
PG - 97-104
AB - The paper presents the capacities of the performance evaluation of teamwork
(PET)
method. Its practicability and efficiency are illustrated by retrospective
human
reliability analyse of the famous nuclear and maritime accidents. A
quantitative
assessment of operators' performance on the base of thermo-hydraulic (T/H)
calculations and full-scope simulator data for set of NPP design basic
accidents
with WWER is demonstrated. The last data are obtained on the 'WWER-1000'
full-scope simulator of Kozloduy NPP during the regular practical training
of the
operators' teams. An outlook on the "evaluation system of main control room
(MCR)
operators' reliability" project, based on simulator data of operators'
training
is given.
AD - Department of Thermal and Nuclear Power Engineering, Technical University of
Sofia, 8 Kliment Ohridski Street, Room 2356, 1797, Bulgaria. gip@tu-sofia.bg
FAU - Petkov, G
AU - Petkov G
FAU - Todorov, V
AU - Todorov V
FAU - Takov, T
AU - Takov T
FAU - Petrov, V
AU - Petrov V
FAU - Stoychev, K
AU - Stoychev K
FAU - Vladimirov, V
AU - Vladimirov V
FAU - Chukov, I
AU - Chukov I
LA - eng
PT - Evaluation Studies
PT - Journal Article
PL - Netherlands
TA - J Hazard Mater
JT - Journal of hazardous materials
JID - 9422688
SB - IM
MH - Accidents, Radiation
MH - Disaster Planning/methods
MH - Humans
MH - Institutional Management Teams/*organization & administration
MH - Models, Organizational
MH - Pilot Projects
MH - Retrospective Studies
MH - Risk Assessment/methods
MH - Safety Management/*methods/*organization & administration
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2004/07/03 05:00
MHDA- 2004/11/13 09:00
AID - 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2004.02.013 [doi]
AID - S0304389404000925 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Hazard Mater. 2004 Jul 26;111(1-3):97-104.

PMID- 15195403
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20040615
DCOM- 20040723
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 1087-0652 (Print)
VI - 12
IP - 6
DP - 2004 Jun
TI - Physician buy-in helps PI team reduce LOS.
PG - 89-90
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Hosp Case Manag
JT - Hospital case management : the monthly update on hospital-based care
planning and
critical paths
JID - 9603097
SB - H
MH - Attitude of Health Personnel
MH - Benchmarking/*statistics & numerical data
MH - Cooperative Behavior
MH - *Databases as Topic
MH - Humans
MH - Length of Stay
MH - Maryland
MH - Medical Audit/*statistics & numerical data
MH - Medical Staff, Hospital/*psychology/standards
MH - Pneumonia/*therapy
EDAT- 2004/06/16 05:00
MHDA- 2004/07/24 05:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Hosp Case Manag. 2004 Jun;12(6):89-90.

PMID- 15146742
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20040518
DCOM- 20040615
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0017-8012 (Print)
VI - 82
IP - 5
DP - 2004 May
TI - Can absence make a team grow stronger?
PG - 131-7, 152
AB - Some projects have such diverse requirements that they need a variety of
specialists to work on them. But often the best-qualified specialists are
scattered around the globe, perhaps at several companies. Remarkably, an
extensive benchmarking study reveals, it isn't necessary to bring team
members
together to get their best work. In fact, they can be even more productive
if
they stay separated and do all their collaborating virtually. The scores of
successful virtual teams the authors examined didn't have many of the
psychological and practical obstacles that plagued their more traditional,
face-to-face counterparts. Team members felt freer to contribute--especially
outside their established areas of expertise. The fact that such groups
could not
assemble easily actually made their projects go faster, as people did not
wait
for meetings to make decisions, and individuals, in the comfort of their own
offices, had full access to their files and the complementary knowledge of
their
local colleagues. Reaping those advantages, though, demanded shrewd
management of
a virtual team's work processes and social dynamics. Rather than depend on
videoconferencing or e-mail, which could be unwieldy or exclusionary,
successful
virtual teams made extensive use of sophisticated online team rooms, where
everyone could easily see the state of the work in progress, talk about the
work
in ongoing threaded discussions, and be reminded of decisions, rationales,
and
commitments. Differences were most effectively hashed out in tele-
conferences,
which team leaders also used to foster group identity and solidarity. When
carefully managed in this way, the clash of perspectives led not to acrimony
but,
rather, to fundamental solutions, turning distance and diversity into
competitive
advantage.
AD - Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California, Los Angeles,
USA.
majchrza@usc.edu
FAU - Majchrzak, Ann
AU - Majchrzak A
FAU - Malhotra, Arvind
AU - Malhotra A
FAU - Stamps, Jeffrey
AU - Stamps J
FAU - Lipnack, Jessica
AU - Lipnack J
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Harv Bus Rev
JT - Harvard business review
JID - 9875796
SB - H
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Computer Communication Networks/*utilization
MH - Cooperative Behavior
MH - Cultural Diversity
MH - Electronic Mail/utilization
MH - Group Processes
MH - Humans
MH - Institutional Management Teams/*organization & administration
MH - Internationality
MH - Internet/utilization
MH - *Interprofessional Relations
MH - Online Systems/*utilization
MH - *Specialism
MH - *User-Computer Interface
EDAT- 2004/05/19 05:00
MHDA- 2004/06/16 05:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Harv Bus Rev. 2004 May;82(5):131-7, 152.

PMID- 15043232
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20040326
DCOM- 20040423
LR - 20051116
PUBM- Print
IS - 0090-3493 (Print)
VI - 32
IP - 2 Suppl
DP - 2004 Feb
TI - Improving medical crisis team performance.
PG - S61-5
AD - Peter Winter Institute for Simulation Education and Research, The Department
of
Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, UPMC
Health
System, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
FAU - DeVita, Michael A
AU - DeVita MA
FAU - Schaefer, John
AU - Schaefer J
FAU - Lutz, John
AU - Lutz J
FAU - Dongilli, Thomas
AU - Dongilli T
FAU - Wang, Henry
AU - Wang H
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Review
PL - United States
TA - Crit Care Med
JT - Critical care medicine
JID - 0355501
SB - AIM
SB - IM
MH - Clinical Competence
MH - *Crisis Intervention/education
MH - Disaster Planning/organization & administration
MH - Humans
MH - *Patient Care Team/organization & administration
MH - Patient Simulation
MH - Pennsylvania
MH - Program Development
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
RF - 14
EDAT- 2004/03/27 05:00
MHDA- 2004/04/24 05:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Crit Care Med. 2004 Feb;32(2 Suppl):S61-5.

PMID- 15002359
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20040308
DCOM- 20040331
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 1541-1052 (Print)
VI - 11
IP - 3
DP - 2004 Mar
TI - Physician buy-in helps PI team reduce LOS.
PG - 32-3
AB - Benchmarking database helps win oversceptical physicians. The Initiative is
positioned as an education collaborative. An opportunity assessment is
conducted
to identify clinical area to target.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Healthcare Benchmarks Qual Improv
JT - Healthcare benchmarks and quality improvement
JID - 101151031
SB - H
MH - *Attitude of Health Personnel
MH - *Benchmarking
MH - Cooperative Behavior
MH - Critical Pathways
MH - Databases as Topic
MH - Humans
MH - Length of Stay
MH - Maryland
MH - Medical Staff, Hospital/*psychology/standards
MH - Pneumonia/therapy
MH - *Process Assessment (Health Care)
EDAT- 2004/03/09 05:00
MHDA- 2004/04/01 05:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Healthcare Benchmarks Qual Improv. 2004 Mar;11(3):32-3.

PMID- 14767251
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20040209
DCOM- 20040525
LR - 20061115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0195-9131 (Print)
VI - 36
IP - 2
DP - 2004 Feb
TI - Physical fitness, injuries, and team performance in soccer.
PG - 278-85
AB - PURPOSE: To investigate the relationship between physical fitness and team
success in soccer, and to test for differences in physical fitness between
different player positions. METHODS: Participants were 306 male soccer
players
from 17 teams in the two highest divisions in Iceland. Just before the start
of
the 1999 soccer season, the following variables were tested: height and
weight,
body composition, flexibility, leg extension power, jump height, and peak O2
uptake. Injuries and player participation in matches and training were
recorded
through the 4-month competitive season. Team average physical fitness was
compared with team success (final league standing) using a linear regression
model. Physical fitness was also compared between players in different
playing
positions. RESULTS: A significant relationship was found between team
average
jump height (countermovement jump and standing jump) and team success (P =
0.009
and P = 0.012, respectively). The same trend was also found for leg
extension
power (P = 0.097), body composition (% body fat, P = 0.07), and the total
number
of injury days per team (P = 0.09). Goalkeepers demonstrated different
fitness
characteristics from outfield players. They were taller and heavier, more
flexible in hip extension and knee flexion, and had higher leg extension
power
and a lower peak O2 uptake. However, only minor differences were observed
between
defenders, midfield players, and attackers. CONCLUSION: Coaches and medical
support teams should pay more attention to jump and power training, as well
as
preventive measures and adequate rehabilitation of previous injuries to
increase
team success.
AD - Department of Physiology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
FAU - Arnason, Arni
AU - Arnason A
FAU - Sigurdsson, Stefan B
AU - Sigurdsson SB
FAU - Gudmundsson, Arni
AU - Gudmundsson A
FAU - Holme, Ingar
AU - Holme I
FAU - Engebretsen, Lars
AU - Engebretsen L
FAU - Bahr, Roald
AU - Bahr R
LA - eng
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - Med Sci Sports Exerc
JT - Medicine and science in sports and exercise
JID - 8005433
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Anthropometry
MH - Athletic Injuries/*epidemiology
MH - Humans
MH - Iceland/epidemiology
MH - Leg/physiology
MH - Male
MH - Movement/physiology
MH - Muscle, Skeletal/physiology
MH - Oxygen Consumption/physiology
MH - *Physical Fitness
MH - Soccer/*injuries/*statistics & numerical data
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2004/02/10 05:00
MHDA- 2004/05/27 05:00
AID - 10.1249/01.MSS.0000113478.92945.CA [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004 Feb;36(2):278-85.

PMID- 14516247
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20030930
DCOM- 20031104
LR - 20061115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0021-9010 (Print)
VI - 88
IP - 5
DP - 2003 Oct
TI - Team learning: collectively connecting the dots.
PG - 821-35
AB - This article tests the degree to which personal and situational variables
impact
the acquisition of knowledge and skill within interactive project teams. On
the
basis of the literature regarding attentional capacity, constructive
controversy,
and truth-supported wins, the authors examined the effects of cognitive
ability,
workload distribution, Agreeableness, Openness to Experience, and structure
on
team learning. Results from 109 four-person project teams working on an
interdependent command and control simulator indicated that teams learned
more
when composed of individuals who were high in cognitive ability and when the
workload was distributed evenly. Conversely, team learning was negatively
affected when teams were composed of individuals who were high in
Agreeableness.
Finally, teams using a paired structure learned more than teams structured
either
functionally or divisionally. Theoretical and practical implications are
discussed, as well as possible limitations and directions for future
research.
AD - Department of Management and Policy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
85721-0108, USA. ellis@eller.arizona.edu
FAU - Ellis, Aleksander P J
AU - Ellis AP
FAU - Hollenbeck, John R
AU - Hollenbeck JR
FAU - Ilgen, Daniel R
AU - Ilgen DR
FAU - Porter, Christopher O L H
AU - Porter CO
FAU - West, Bradley J
AU - West BJ
FAU - Moon, Henry
AU - Moon H
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PL - United States
TA - J Appl Psychol
JT - The Journal of applied psychology
JID - 0222526
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Institutional Management Teams
MH - Interpersonal Relations
MH - *Knowledge
MH - *Learning
MH - Male
MH - *Personality
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2003/10/01 05:00
MHDA- 2003/11/05 05:00
AID - 10.1037/0021-9010.88.5.821 [doi]
AID - 2003-08045-004 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Appl Psychol. 2003 Oct;88(5):821-35.

PMID- 12888723
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20030730
DCOM- 20031031
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0744-6314 (Print)
VI - 34
IP - 8
DP - 2003 Aug
TI - Propelling your team to the top.
PG - 10
AB - Learn the 10 benchmarks of forward movement for nurse managers.
AD - Health Resources Unlimited, Hohenwald, TX, USA.
FAU - Cohen, Shelley
AU - Cohen S
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Nurs Manage
JT - Nursing management
JID - 8219243
SB - N
MH - Adaptation, Psychological
MH - Attitude of Health Personnel
MH - Benchmarking/*organization & administration
MH - Humans
MH - Leadership
MH - Nurse Administrators/*organization & administration/psychology
MH - *Nurse's Role
MH - Professional Competence
EDAT- 2003/07/31 05:00
MHDA- 2003/11/01 05:00
AID - 00006247-200308000-00006 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Nurs Manage. 2003 Aug;34(8):10.

PMID- 12675392
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20030404
DCOM- 20030415
LR - 20061115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0021-9010 (Print)
VI - 88
IP - 1
DP - 2003 Feb
TI - Team adaptation and postchange performance: effects of team composition in
terms
of members' cognitive ability and personality.
PG - 27-39
AB - The present study extended research on relationships between individual
differences and individual-level adaptation (J. A. LePine. J. A. Colquitt, &
A.
Erez, 2000). This study focused on team-level relationships (N = 73 teams)
and
demonstrated that after an unforeseen change in the task context,
performance was
superior for teams with members who had higher cognitive ability,
achievement,
and openness and who had lower dependability. These relationships were
mediated
by a measure of role structure adaptation (i.e., the effectiveness with
which
teams adapted their role structure when faced with an unforeseen change in
their
task context). Members' individual differences did not explain variance in
team
performance prior to the unforeseen change in the task context. Overall,
results
suggest differential relationships for team composition across routine and
changing task contexts.
AD - Department of Management, Warrington College of Business Administration,
University of Florida, Gainesville 32611-7165, USA.
lepineja@notes.cba.ufl.edu
FAU - LePine, Jeffrey A
AU - LePine JA
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PL - United States
TA - J Appl Psychol
JT - The Journal of applied psychology
JID - 0222526
SB - IM
MH - Adaptation, Psychological
MH - Adult
MH - *Cognition
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Institutional Management Teams
MH - Interpersonal Relations
MH - Male
MH - *Personality
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2003/04/05 05:00
MHDA- 2003/04/16 05:00
PST - ppublish
SO - J Appl Psychol. 2003 Feb;88(1):27-39.

PMID- 12671168
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20030402
DCOM- 20030425
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 1098-4275 (Electronic)
VI - 111
IP - 4 Pt 2
DP - 2003 Apr
TI - Implementing potentially better practices for multidisciplinary team
building:
creating a neonatal intensive care unit culture of collaboration.
PG - e482-8
AB - OBJECTIVE: Part of the process of deriving and refining the CARE
(communication,
accountability, respect, empowerment) focus group's potentially better
practices
(PBPs) for multidisciplinary teamwork was to evaluate and experience the
PBPs
through implementation. METHODS: The 4 neonatal intensive care units (NICUs)
in
the CARE focus group each worked with implementation of the PBPs. The choice
of
initial PBP and method of implementation was left up to each NICU's core
team.
RESULTS: The experience of each of the PBPs that is reported was selected
from
only 1 of the NICUs. These are summarized and described in a plan-do-study-
act
type of format. CONCLUSIONS: There was no ideal PBP with which to start. The
intertwined nature of all of the PBPs provided additional opportunities to
implement other PBPs. A change seemed to be a matter first of vocabulary,
then of
tentative acceptance, followed by gradual integration into the culture.
Change
was facilitated when there was acknowledgment of a need to do things
differently
by the NICU leadership. Although the validity of the PBPs and their
importance in
cultural change have yet to be confirmed, once there was a persisting intent
to
change, the makeup of the NICU culture moved to embrace change as part of
its
culture.
AD - Presbyterian St Luke's Medical Center, Denver, Colorado, USA.
marksbrown@compuserve.com
FAU - Brown, Mark S
AU - Brown MS
FAU - Ohlinger, Judy
AU - Ohlinger J
FAU - Rusk, Connie
AU - Rusk C
FAU - Delmore, Paula
AU - Delmore P
FAU - Ittmann, Patricia
AU - Ittmann P
CN - CARE Group
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Pediatrics
JT - Pediatrics
JID - 0376422
SB - AIM
SB - IM
MH - *Benchmarking
MH - Communication
MH - Cooperative Behavior
MH - Health Plan Implementation/*methods
MH - Humans
MH - Infant, Newborn
MH - Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/*organization & administration/standards
MH - Leadership
MH - Organizational Innovation
MH - Organizational Objectives
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Questionnaires
MH - Total Quality Management/*methods
MH - United States
EDAT- 2003/04/03 05:00
MHDA- 2003/04/26 05:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Pediatrics. 2003 Apr;111(4 Pt 2):e482-8.

PMID- 12437851
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20021119
DCOM- 20021226
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0014-0139 (Print)
VI - 45
IP - 10
DP - 2002 Aug 15
TI - Spinal loads during individual and team lifting.
PG - 671-81
AB - The aim of this experiment was to compare lumbar spinal loads during
individual
and team lifting tasks. Ten healthy male subjects performed individual lifts
with
a box mass of 15, 20 and 25 kg and two-person team lifts with a box mass of
30,
40 and 50 kg from the floor to standing knuckle height. Boxes instrumented
with
force transducers were used to measure vertical and horizontal hand forces,
whilst sagittal plane segmental kinematics were determined using a video
based
motion measurement system. Dynamic L4/L5 torques were calculated and used in
a
single equivalent extensor force model of the lumbar spine to estimate L4/L5
compression and shear forces. A significant reduction in L4/L5 torque and
compression force of approximately 20% was found during team lifts compared
to
individual lifts. Two main reasons for the reduced spinal loads in team
lifting
compared to individual lifting were identified: (1) the horizontal hand
force
(i.e. pulling force) was greater in team lifting, and (2) the horizontal
position
of the hands was closer to the lumbar spine during team lifts. The
horizontal
hand force and position of the hands had approximately equal contributions
in
reducing the spinal load during team lifting compared to individual lifting.
AD - Biomechanics Dynamics Group, School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science,
Griffith University, Gold Coast, PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre 9726,
Queensland,
Australia. g.dennis@mailbox.gu.edu.au
FAU - Dennis, G J
AU - Dennis GJ
FAU - Barrett, R S
AU - Barrett RS
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - England
TA - Ergonomics
JT - Ergonomics
JID - 0373220
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Adult
MH - Biomechanics
MH - *Human Engineering
MH - Humans
MH - *Lifting
MH - Male
MH - Queensland
MH - Spine/*physiology
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2002/11/20 04:00
MHDA- 2002/12/27 04:00
AID - 10.1080/00140130210148537 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Ergonomics. 2002 Aug 15;45(10):671-81.

PMID- 12435552
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20021118
DCOM- 20030107
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0277-9536 (Print)
VI - 56
IP - 1
DP - 2003 Jan
TI - The clinical governance of the soul: 'deep management' and the self-
regulating
subject in integrated community mental health teams.
PG - 67-81
AB - Health professionals have often been described as if they were in conflict
with
the new managerialist spirit in health care. However, because of their
distributed and mobile sites of intervention, the work of community teams
presents particular problems for traditional notions of management. In this
UK
study we identify how mental health team members are regulated by means of a
subtle 'deep management'. Team members point to a lack of management
direction
from senior colleagues, even though some of them participate in the
management
process themselves. However, the lack of overt management leads them to
prioritise clients and foreground professional identities in performing
their
duties and much additional administrative work besides. This also meant that
the
organisational structure-the team-was defined in subjective terms.
Participants
had become self-regulating 'deep managed' subjects under a largely hands-off
management regime.
AD - Faculty of Health and Community Studies, De Montfort University, Milton
Keynes,
UK. brown@dmu.ac.uk
FAU - Brown, Brian
AU - Brown B
FAU - Crawford, Paul
AU - Crawford P
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - England
TA - Soc Sci Med
JT - Social science & medicine (1982)
JID - 8303205
SB - IM
MH - Administrative Personnel
MH - Clinical Competence
MH - Community Mental Health Services/manpower/*organization & administration
MH - Decision Making, Organizational
MH - Great Britain
MH - Health Services Research
MH - Humans
MH - Interviews as Topic
MH - Occupational Therapy
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Process Assessment (Health Care)
MH - Professional Autonomy
MH - Psychiatry
MH - Psychology, Clinical
MH - Qualitative Research
MH - Rural Health Services/organization & administration
MH - Social Work, Psychiatric
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2002/11/19 04:00
MHDA- 2003/01/08 04:00
AID - S0277953602000084 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Soc Sci Med. 2003 Jan;56(1):67-81.

PMID- 12095185
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20020703
DCOM- 20020712
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0277-0903 (Print)
VI - 39
IP - 4
DP - 2002 Jun
TI - Towards excellence in asthma management (TEAM): a populational disease-
management
model.
PG - 341-50
AB - Asthma management is not always optimal, and deficiencies such as inadequate
treatment and insufficient patient education are often reported. Towards
Excellence in Asthma Management (TEAM) is a four-phase disease management
program
of the Quebec Asthma Education Network (QAEN), to be carried out over a 5-
year
period. The program aims to achieve a continuous improvement of asthma
management
by caregivers and patients. The first phase, completed in January 2000,
consisted
of determining the actual level of asthma-associated morbidity and mortality
in
various Quebec regions. The second phase, which began in September 1999,
included
three parts: 1. Definition of the burden of asthma, taking into account the
socioeconomic consequences of the disease and the quality of life of the
patients, 2. Comparison of current medical practices with the Canadian
Asthma
Consensus Guidelines for adult and pediatric populations, 3. Evaluation of
the
level of compliance with medical treatment and with the environmental
changes
recommended to asthmatic patients. This phase is carried out via a cohort
study
of physicians, mainly general practitioners and pediatricians, generating a
patient cohort study, in addition to substudies evaluating specific aspects
of
asthma care. Once the care gap is identified, it will be possible to define,
apply, and evaluate a series of interventions for physicians, other health
professionals, and patients. The interventions will be particularly targeted
at
regions where asthma incidence and morbidity are higher. We hope that this
model
of disease management will progressively reduce the burden associated with
asthma, and potentially other chronic diseases, and will result in the more
effective use of health services.
AD - Institut de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de l'Universite Laval, Hopital
Laval,
Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.
FAU - Boulet, Louis-Philippe
AU - Boulet LP
FAU - Thivierge, Robert L
AU - Thivierge RL
FAU - Amesse, Andre
AU - Amesse A
FAU - Nunes, Fatima
AU - Nunes F
FAU - Francoeur, Suzanne
AU - Francoeur S
FAU - Collet, Jean-Paul
AU - Collet JP
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Review
PL - United States
TA - J Asthma
JT - The Journal of asthma : official journal of the Association for the Care of
Asthma
JID - 8106454
SB - IM
MH - Asthma/drug therapy/*therapy
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Canada
MH - Cohort Studies
MH - *Disease Management
MH - Guideline Adherence
MH - Humans
MH - Practice Guidelines as Topic
MH - Quebec
MH - Total Quality Management/*methods
RF - 53
EDAT- 2002/07/04 10:00
MHDA- 2002/07/13 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - J Asthma. 2002 Jun;39(4):341-50.

PMID- 12048333
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20020605
DCOM- 20020717
LR - 20051116
PUBM- Print
IS - 0195-9131 (Print)
VI - 34
IP - 6
DP - 2002 Jun
TI - The 4000-m team pursuit cycling world record: theoretical and practical
aspects.
PG - 1029-36
AB - Due to constant competition conditions, track cycling can be accurately
modeled
through physiological and biomechanical means. Mathematical modeling
predicts an
average workload of 520 W for every team member for a new team pursuit world
record. Performance in team pursuit racing is highly dependent on aerobic
capacity, anaerobic skills, and aerodynamic factors. The training concept of
the
2000 record-breaking team pursuit team was based on unspecific training of
these
qualities and periodical, short-term recall of previously acquired track
specific
skills. Aerobic performance was trained through high overall training
mileage
(29,000-35,000 km.yr-1) with workload peaks during road stage races. Before
major
track events, anaerobic performance, and track-specific technical and motor
skills were improved through discipline-specific track training. Training
intensities were monitored through heart rate and lactate field tests during
defined track-training bouts, based on previously performed laboratory
exercise
tests. During pursuit competition, analysis of half-lap split times allowed
an
estimation of the individual contribution of each rider to the team's
performance
and thereby facilitated modifications in team composition to optimize race
speed.
The theoretically predicted performance necessary for a new world record was
achieved through careful planning of training and competition schedules
based on
a concise theoretical concept and the high physiological capacities of the
participating athletes.
AD - Medizinische Universitatsklinik, Abteilung Rehabilitative und Praventive
Sportmedizin, Freiburg, Germany. olaf@msm1.ukl.uni-freiburg.de
FAU - Schumacher, Yorck Olaf
AU - Schumacher YO
FAU - Mueller, Peter
AU - Mueller P
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Review
PL - United States
TA - Med Sci Sports Exerc
JT - Medicine and science in sports and exercise
JID - 8005433
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Anthropometry
MH - Bicycling/*physiology
MH - Competitive Behavior/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Models, Biological
MH - Physical Education and Training/*methods
MH - Predictive Value of Tests
MH - Sports Medicine/methods
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
RF - 28
EDAT- 2002/06/06 10:00
MHDA- 2002/07/18 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2002 Jun;34(6):1029-36.

PMID- 12043829
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20020604
DCOM- 20021120
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0264-0414 (Print)
VI - 20
IP - 5
DP - 2002 May
TI - Influence of physiological characteristics on selection in a semi-
professional
first grade rugby league team: a case study.
PG - 399-405
AB - The aim of this study was to determine whether the physiological
characteristics
of players influence selection in a semi-professional first grade rugby
league
team. Sixty-six semi-professional rugby league players aged 24+/-4 years
(mean
+/- s) were monitored over two competitive seasons. The players underwent
measurements of body mass, muscular power (vertical jump), speed (10, 20, 30
and
40 m sprint), agility (Illinois agility run) and estimated maximal aerobic
power
(multi-stage fitness test) 1 week before their first competition match.
After
selection for either the first or second grade team, the results of all
physiological tests were collated and analysed to determine if there were
any
physiological differences between players selected for the two teams.
Players
selected to play in the first grade team were significantly (P< 0.05) older
(25+/-4 vs 22+/-4 years) and heavier (93+/-10 vs 86+/-10 kg) and had more
playing
experience (18+/-6 vs 15+/-6 years) than second grade players. Muscular
power,
speed, agility and estimated maximal aerobic power were not significantly
different (P > 0.05) between first grade and second grade players. These
results
suggest that the physiological capacities of players do not influence
selection
in a semi-professional first grade rugby league team. Rather, player
selection
appears to be based on body mass, playing experience and skill. These
results
support the need for a standardized skills performance test for semi-
professional
rugby league players.
AD - School of Health Science, Griffith University Gold Coast, Queensland,
Australia.
t_gabbett@hotmail.com
FAU - Gabbett, Tim J
AU - Gabbett TJ
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - England
TA - J Sports Sci
JT - Journal of sports sciences
JID - 8405364
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Age Factors
MH - Body Composition/physiology
MH - Football/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Motor Skills/physiology
MH - Muscle, Skeletal/physiology
MH - Oxygen Consumption/physiology
MH - Personnel Selection/*methods
MH - Physical Fitness/physiology
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2002/06/05 10:00
MHDA- 2002/11/26 04:00
PST - ppublish
SO - J Sports Sci. 2002 May;20(5):399-405.

PMID- 11974110
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20020426
DCOM- 20020625
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0029-6570 (Print)
VI - 14
IP - 52
DP - 2000 Sep 13-19
TI - Evidence-based practice in neurology: a team approach to development.
PG - 43-5
AB - Healthcare practitioners aspire to evidence-based practice, but in reality,
many
find it difficult to integrate the findings and recommendations of research
studies and practice development projects into practice. One potential
solution
is a team approach to evaluating the available evidence and adapting it for
use
in a particular setting. Success depends on maintaining a team approach and
ensuring that all staff members have access to the relevant information
collated
on the particular area of practice.
AD - School of Health Care, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford.
FAU - Kirrane, C
AU - Kirrane C
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - England
TA - Nurs Stand
JT - Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987)
JID - 9012906
SB - N
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Education, Nursing, Continuing/*organization & administration
MH - Evidence-Based Medicine/*education
MH - Humans
MH - Inservice Training/*organization & administration
MH - Needs Assessment
MH - *Neurology/*education
MH - Nursing Staff, Hospital/*education
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Practice Guidelines as Topic
MH - Program Development/methods
MH - Specialties, Nursing/*education
EDAT- 2002/04/27 10:00
MHDA- 2002/06/26 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Nurs Stand. 2000 Sep 13-19;14(52):43-5.

PMID- 11916213
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20020327
DCOM- 20020409
LR - 20061115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0021-9010 (Print)
VI - 87
IP - 1
DP - 2002 Feb
TI - The impact of cross-training on team effectiveness.
PG - 3-13
AB - The authors examined the role of cross-training in developing shared
team-interaction mental models, coordination, and performance in a 2-
experiment
study using computer simulation methodology (for Experiment 1, N = 45 teams;
for
Experiment 2, N = 49 teams). Similar findings emerged across the 2
experiments.
First, cross-training enhanced the development of shared team-interaction
models.
Second, coordination mediated the relationship between shared mental models
and
team performance. However, there was some inconsistency in the findings
concerning the depth of cross-training necessary for improving shared mental
models. Results are discussed in terms of the impact of different levels of
cross-training on team effectiveness.
AD - Department of Psychology, Florida International University, Miami 33199,
USA.
marksm@fiu.edu
FAU - Marks, Michelle A
AU - Marks MA
FAU - Sabella, Mark J
AU - Sabella MJ
FAU - Burke, C Shawn
AU - Burke CS
FAU - Zaccaro, Stephen J
AU - Zaccaro SJ
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PL - United States
TA - J Appl Psychol
JT - The Journal of applied psychology
JID - 0222526
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Computer Simulation
MH - Decision Making
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Institutional Management Teams
MH - Interpersonal Relations
MH - Male
MH - *Models, Organizational
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2002/03/28 10:00
MHDA- 2002/04/10 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - J Appl Psychol. 2002 Feb;87(1):3-13.

PMID- 11811568
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20020128
DCOM- 20020514
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0264-0414 (Print)
VI - 20
IP - 2
DP - 2002 Feb
TI - Team cohesion and team success in sport.
PG - 119-26
AB - The main aim of this study was to examine the relationship between task
cohesiveness and team success in elite teams using composite team estimates
of
cohesion. A secondary aim was to determine statistically the consistency
(i.e.
'groupness') present in team members' perceptions of cohesion. Elite
university
basketball teams (n = 18) and club soccer teams (n = 9) were assessed for
cohesiveness and winning percentages. Measures were recorded towards the end
of
each team's competitive season. Our results indicate that cohesiveness is a
shared perception, thereby providing statistical support for the use of
composite
team scores. Further analyses indicated a strong relationship between
cohesion
and success (r = 0.55-0.67). Further research using multi-level statistical
techniques is recommended.
AD - School of Kinesiology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
bcarron@uwo.ca
FAU - Carron, Albert V
AU - Carron AV
FAU - Bray, Steven R
AU - Bray SR
FAU - Eys, Mark A
AU - Eys MA
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - England
TA - J Sports Sci
JT - Journal of sports sciences
JID - 8405364
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Basketball
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Interpersonal Relations
MH - Male
MH - Soccer
MH - *Sports
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2002/01/29 10:00
MHDA- 2002/05/15 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - J Sports Sci. 2002 Feb;20(2):119-26.

PMID- 11729447
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20011203
DCOM- 20011217
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 1083-7183 (Print)
VI - 8
IP - 11
DP - 2001 Nov
TI - Technology, DM team up to secure capitation profits.
PG - 161-3
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Capitation Manag Rep
JT - Capitation management report
JID - 9891256
SB - H
MH - Benchmarking
MH - *Capitation Fee
MH - Coronary Artery Disease/*therapy
MH - *Disease Management
MH - Humans
MH - Kentucky
MH - Patient Education as Topic
MH - Quality Assurance, Health Care
MH - Treatment Outcome
MH - United States
EDAT- 2001/12/04 10:00
MHDA- 2002/01/05 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Capitation Manag Rep. 2001 Nov;8(11):161-3.

PMID- 11715125
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20011121
DCOM- 20011213
PUBM- Print
IS - 1537-0240 (Print)
VI - 1
IP - 1
DP - 2001 Sep
TI - Your practice's most important 'work-in'. Bringing certified nurse
practitioners
on to the treatment team.
PG - 60-5
AD - Luther Midelfort Clinic/Hospital, Mayo Health System, Eau Claire, Wis., USA.
anderson.benjamin@mayo.edu
FAU - Anderson, B
AU - Anderson B
FAU - Rozich, J
AU - Rozich J
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - MGMA Connex
JT - MGMA connexion / Medical group Management Association
JID - 101127723
SB - H
MH - Cost-Benefit Analysis
MH - Efficiency, Organizational
MH - Fees, Medical
MH - Nurse Practitioners/*utilization
MH - Personnel Selection
MH - Physician-Nurse Relations
MH - Practice Management, Medical/economics/*organization & administration
MH - Time and Motion Studies
MH - United States
EDAT- 2001/11/22 10:00
MHDA- 2002/01/05 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - MGMA Connex. 2001 Sep;1(1):60-5.

PMID- 11597047
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20011012
DCOM- 20011204
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0033-2941 (Print)
VI - 88
IP - 3 Pt 2
DP - 2001 Jun
TI - Team members' and supervisors' ratings of team performance: a case of
inconsistency.
PG - 1015-22
AB - This study used measures of team performance, organizational support, and
supervisors' judgment to examine the consistency of ratings of teams by both
their members as well as their supervisors. For 75 team members from 13
different
work teams in different organizations Pearson correlation coefficients were
used
to assess the consistency of ratings of these measures within the teams and
between teams and supervisors. The results indicate the need for rater
training,
both at the team and supervisor levels.
AD - Department of Psychology, The University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
babbitt@ucalgary.ca
FAU - Kline, T J
AU - Kline TJ
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Psychol Rep
JT - Psychological reports
JID - 0376475
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - *Attitude
MH - *Cooperative Behavior
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Organization and Administration
MH - Random Allocation
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2001/10/13 10:00
MHDA- 2002/01/05 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Psychol Rep. 2001 Jun;88(3 Pt 2):1015-22.
PMID- 11552092
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20010911
DCOM- 20020301
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 1061-9259 (Print)
VI - 12
IP - 5
DP - 2001 Sep-Oct
TI - Team-oriented outcomes.
PG - 34-5
AD - CQI, San Diego, CA, USA. cqi@value.net
FAU - Rieve, J A
AU - Rieve JA
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Case Manager
JT - The Case manager
JID - 9305123
SB - N
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Case Management/*organization & administration
MH - *Communication
MH - Humans
MH - *Interprofessional Relations
MH - Job Description
MH - Occupational Health Services/*organization & administration
MH - Outcome Assessment (Health Care)/*organization & administration
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Professional Role
MH - *Rehabilitation, Vocational
EDAT- 2001/09/12 10:00
MHDA- 2002/03/02 10:01
AID - S1061-9259(01)30807-X [pii]
AID - 10.1067/mcm.2001.118776 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Case Manager. 2001 Sep-Oct;12(5):34-5.

PMID- 11477048
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20010730
DCOM- 20011004
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0263-2136 (Print)
VI - 18
IP - 4
DP - 2001 Aug
TI - The EFQM excellence model is useful for primary health care teams.
PG - 407-9
AB - BACKGROUND: Primary care teams are facing an increased need to develop
quality
programmes at local level. GPs must lead this process and promote a positive
organizational culture if they want to achieve and maintain a continuous
improvement of the service. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to
test
the applicability and reliability of the European Foundation for Quality
Management (EFQM) excellence model self-assessment questionnaire in a
primary
health care organization. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was carried out of
the
EFQM questionnaire to compare the scores achieved by a primary health care
team
in Spain caring for 42 000 inhabitants using internal self-assessment with
the
scores achieved by professional management auditors through an external
audit.
RESULTS: The scores of each criterion achieved by self-evaluation are
similar to
or lower than those assessed by the external evaluation. There is agreement
in
the areas suitable for improvement. CONCLUSIONS: The experience proves the
applicability of the EFQM excellence model for primary health care teams and
its
reliability, at least when the team undergoing self-assessment know they are
going to be re-evaluated. There is high concordance in the identification of
areas for improvement.
AD - Divisio d'Atencio Primaria, Institut Catala de la Salut, C/Gran Via de les
Corts,
Catalanes, 587, 08007 Barcelona, Spain.
FAU - Gene-Badia, J
AU - Gene-Badia J
FAU - Jodar-Sola, G
AU - Jodar-Sola G
FAU - Peguero-Rodriguez, E
AU - Peguero-Rodriguez E
FAU - Contel-Segura, J C
AU - Contel-Segura JC
FAU - Moliner-Molins, C
AU - Moliner-Molins C
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Validation Studies
PL - England
TA - Fam Pract
JT - Family practice
JID - 8500875
SB - IM
MH - *Benchmarking
MH - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH - Humans
MH - *Models, Organizational
MH - Organizational Culture
MH - Patient Care Team/standards
MH - Primary Health Care/*standards
MH - *Quality of Health Care
MH - Questionnaires
MH - Reproducibility of Results
MH - Spain
EDAT- 2001/07/31 10:00
MHDA- 2001/10/05 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Fam Pract. 2001 Aug;18(4):407-9.

PMID- 11419804
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20010622
DCOM- 20010712
LR - 20061115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0021-9010 (Print)
VI - 86
IP - 3
DP - 2001 Jun
TI - A note on the stability of team performance.
PG - 446-50
AB - Yearly winning percentages of 23 professional basketball teams over a 10-
year
period were used to evaluate the stability of team performance. The
intercorrelation matrix produced by these data is characterized by strong,
positive correlations in adjacent time periods. As the number of intervening
time
periods increased, however, the observed correlations systematically
decreased
and ultimately became negative. Significant negative correlations of earlier
performance with later performance are almost never observed with typical
time-related performance data. Possible explanations and boundary conditions
for
these atypical results are discussed.
AD - Department of Psychology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118,
USA.
rlandis1@mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu
FAU - Landis, R S
AU - Landis RS
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - J Appl Psychol
JT - The Journal of applied psychology
JID - 0222526
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Attitude
MH - *Basketball
MH - Humans
MH - Longitudinal Studies
MH - Male
MH - Motivation
MH - *Organizational Culture
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
MH - Time Factors
EDAT- 2001/06/23 10:00
MHDA- 2001/07/13 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - J Appl Psychol. 2001 Jun;86(3):446-50.

PMID- 11373185
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20010524
DCOM- 20010712
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 1080-3548 (Print)
VI - 7
IP - 2
DP - 2001
TI - Fundamentals of the model behind the COSMOS methodology used for team
assessment
in simulator training.
PG - 163-78
AB - Team working is the basic way of working in the control rooms of hazardous
technologies and therefore its quality is a safety-relevant issue. In
addition to
the technological competence it is also crucial for the crews to have the
necessary communicational skills. During simulator training these skills can
only
be improved if the simulator use is embedded in an appropriate setting. To
support this skill acquisition a computer-supported methodology called
COSMOS
(COmputer Supported Method for Operators' Self-assessment) has been
developed.
With its help more effective communication and more complete shared mental
models
can be fostered. This paper is a report on the psychological fundamentals
and the
mathematical model of the COSMOS methodology.
AD - Department of Ergonomics and Psychology, Budapest University of Technology
and
Economics, Hungary. izsolajos@erg.bme.hu
FAU - Izso, L
AU - Izso L
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Int J Occup Saf Ergon
JT - International journal of occupational safety and ergonomics : JOSE
JID - 9507598
SB - IM
MH - Accidents, Radiation/*prevention & control
MH - *Communication
MH - *Computer Simulation
MH - Humans
MH - *Power Plants
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
MH - Video Recording
EDAT- 2001/05/25 10:00
MHDA- 2001/07/13 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Int J Occup Saf Ergon. 2001;7(2):163-78.

PMID- 11351509
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20010515
DCOM- 20010726
LR - 20051116
PUBM- Print
IS - 1522-4821 (Print)
VI - 3
IP - 1
DP - 2001 Winter
TI - The development and implementation of a crisis response team in a school
setting.
PG - 35-46
AB - Traumatic events and subsequent crises within the school setting can have a
devastating effect on students, faculty, staff and paebts. Crises serve to
compromise the most important mission of the school, i.e., learning. A
school
crisis response plan is a mandatory aspect of effective educational planning
and
administration. This paper reviews the need for and development of a school-
based
crisis intervention system.
AD - Loyola College, Maryland, USA.
FAU - Eaves, C
AU - Eaves C
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Review
PL - United States
TA - Int J Emerg Ment Health
JT - International journal of emergency mental health
JID - 100888872
SB - IM
MH - Crisis Intervention/manpower/methods/*organization & administration
MH - Humans
MH - *Program Development
MH - *Schools
MH - Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/*therapy
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
RF - 38
EDAT- 2001/05/16 10:00
MHDA- 2001/07/28 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Int J Emerg Ment Health. 2001 Winter;3(1):35-46.

PMID- 11323555
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20010427
DCOM- 20010621
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0195-9131 (Print)
VI - 33
IP - 5
DP - 2001 May
TI - Little effect of caffeine ingestion on repeated sprints in team-sport
athletes.
PG - 822-5
AB - PURPOSE: The effect of caffeine ingestion on sprint performance is unclear.
We
have therefore investigated its effect on performance in a test that
simulates
the repeated sprints of team sports. METHODS: In a randomized double-blind
crossover experiment, 16 male team-sport athletes ingested either caffeine
(6
mg.kg-1 of body mass) or a placebo 60 min before performing a repeated 20-m
sprint test. The test consisted of 10 sprints, each performed within 10 s
and
followed by rest for the remainder of each 10 s. The caffeine and placebo
trials
followed a familiarization trial, and the time between consecutive trials
was 2-3
d. To allow estimation of variation in treatment effects between
individuals,
nine subjects performed three more trials without a supplement 7-14 d later.
We
estimated the smallest worthwhile effect on sprint time in a team sport to
be
approximately 0.8%. RESULTS: Mean time to complete 10 sprints increased by
0.1%
(95% likely range -1.5 to 1.7%) with caffeine ingestion relative to placebo.
Individual variation in this effect was a standard deviation of 0.7% (-2.7
to
2.9%). Time to complete the 10th sprint was 14.4% longer than the first;
caffeine
increased this time by 0.7% (-1.8 to 3.2%) relative to placebo, and
individual
variation in this effect was 2.4% (-3.4 to 4.9%). CONCLUSION: The observed
effect
of caffeine ingestion on mean sprint performance and fatigue over 10 sprints
was
negligible. The true effect on mean performance could be small at most,
although
the true effects on fatigue and on the performance of individuals could be
somewhat larger. Pending confirmatory research, team-sport athletes should
not
expect caffeine to enhance sprint performance.
AD - Center for Sport and Exercise Science, The Waikato Polytechnic, Hamilton,
New
Zealand. sccdp@twp.ac.nz
FAU - Paton, C D
AU - Paton CD
FAU - Hopkins, W G
AU - Hopkins WG
FAU - Vollebregt, L
AU - Vollebregt L
LA - eng
PT - Clinical Trial
PT - Journal Article
PT - Randomized Controlled Trial
PL - United States
TA - Med Sci Sports Exerc
JT - Medicine and science in sports and exercise
JID - 8005433
RN - 0 (Central Nervous System Stimulants)
RN - 0 (Placebos)
RN - 58-08-2 (Caffeine)
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Adult
MH - Anaerobic Threshold
MH - Caffeine/*pharmacology
MH - Central Nervous System Stimulants/*pharmacology
MH - Double-Blind Method
MH - Fatigue
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Physical Endurance/*drug effects
MH - Placebos
MH - Running/*physiology
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2001/04/27 10:00
MHDA- 2001/06/22 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 May;33(5):822-5.

PMID- 11187617
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20010118
DCOM- 20010222
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0926-9630 (Print)
VI - 77
DP - 2000
TI - Analysis and modeling of the treatment process characterizing the
cooperation
within multi-professional treatment teams.
PG - 57-61
AB - We would like to introduce several aspects of the analysis and modeling of
the
treatment process characterizing the cooperation within multi-professional
treatment teams. We will determine what is meant by a treatment process in
order
to then look at five views and four levels of their description. We will
introduce possible methods for surveying and describing it. Currently an
extensive analysis of the current state of the treatment process and of the
weaknesses is underway in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
of
the Heidelberg University Medical Center.
AD - Institute for Medical Biometry and Informatics, Department of Medical
Informatics, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120
Heidelberg,
Germany.
FAU - Ammenwerth, E
AU - Ammenwerth E
FAU - Ehlers, F
AU - Ehlers F
FAU - Eichstadter, R
AU - Eichstadter R
FAU - Haux, R
AU - Haux R
FAU - Kruppa, B
AU - Kruppa B
FAU - Parzer, P
AU - Parzer P
FAU - Pohl, U
AU - Pohl U
FAU - Resch, F
AU - Resch F
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - Netherlands
TA - Stud Health Technol Inform
JT - Studies in health technology and informatics
JID - 9214582
SB - T
MH - *Computer Simulation
MH - Delivery of Health Care/*statistics & numerical data
MH - Efficiency, Organizational/*statistics & numerical data
MH - Humans
MH - Mathematical Computing
MH - Medical Staff, Hospital/*statistics & numerical data
MH - Patient Care Team/*statistics & numerical data
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2001/02/24 12:00
MHDA- 2001/03/03 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Stud Health Technol Inform. 2000;77:57-61.

PMID- 11143135
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20001219
DCOM- 20010125
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 1040-7480 (Print)
VI - 16
IP - 5
DP - 2000 Sep-Oct
TI - At Virginia Mason Medical Center, they practice team medicine. And, they own
the
name.
PG - 18-23, 3
AB - The marketing team at Seattle's Virginia Mason Hospital, discovered the
institution's strongest branding point was the teamwork style of medicine
regularly practiced. Establishing a service mark on Team Medicine (SM), the
hospital employs graphic ads that tell true stories of recovery and cure,
quoting
several doctors as well as the patients.
FAU - Botvin, J
AU - Botvin J
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Profiles Healthc Mark
JT - Profiles in healthcare marketing
JID - 8804347
SB - H
MH - Advertising as Topic
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Hospitals, Group Practice/*organization & administration
MH - Humans
MH - Interprofessional Relations
MH - Marketing of Health Services/*methods
MH - Mass Media
MH - *Patient Care Team
MH - Product Line Management/*methods
MH - Virginia
EDAT- 2001/01/06 11:00
MHDA- 2001/02/28 10:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Profiles Healthc Mark. 2000 Sep-Oct;16(5):18-23, 3.

PMID- 11009759
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20000825
DCOM- 20000825
LR - 20001218
PUBM- Print
IS - 1091-6768 (Print)
VI - 7
IP - 4
DP - 2000 Apr
TI - Teamwork helps cut ED wait times.
PG - 40-1
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - UNITED STATES
TA - Healthc Benchmarks
JT - Healthcare benchmarks
JID - 9800467
SB - H
MH - Emergency Service, Hospital/*organization & administration
MH - Institutional Management Teams
MH - Michigan
MH - Models, Organizational
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
MH - *Time Management
EDAT- 2000/09/30 11:00
MHDA- 2000/09/30 11:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Healthc Benchmarks. 2000 Apr;7(4):40-1.

PMID- 10975179
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20000919
DCOM- 20000919
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0014-0139 (Print)
VI - 43
IP - 8
DP - 2000 Aug
TI - Effects of two types of intra-team feedback on developing a shared mental
model
in Command & Control teams.
PG - 1167-89
AB - In two studies, the effect of two types of intra-team feedback on developing
a
shared mental model in Command & Control teams was investigated. A
distinction is
made between performance monitoring and team self-correction. Performance
monitoring is the ability of team members to monitor each other's task
execution
and give feedback during task execution. Team self-correction is the process
in
which team members engage in evaluating their performance and in determining
their strategies after task execution. In two experiments the opportunity to
engage in performance monitoring, respectively team self-correction, was
varied
systematically. Both performance monitoring as well as team self-correction
appeared beneficial in the improvement of team performance. Teams that had
the
opportunity to engage in performance monitoring, however, performed better
than
teams that had the opportunity to engage in team self-correction.
AD - TNO Human Factors Research Institute, Department of Groupwork, Soesterberg,
The
Netherlands. Rasker@tm.tno.nl
FAU - Rasker, P C
AU - Rasker PC
FAU - Post, W M
AU - Post WM
FAU - Schraagen, J M
AU - Schraagen JM
LA - eng
PT - Clinical Trial
PT - Journal Article
PT - Randomized Controlled Trial
PL - ENGLAND
TA - Ergonomics
JT - Ergonomics
JID - 0373220
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - *Communication
MH - *Decision Making, Organizational
MH - Female
MH - *Group Processes
MH - Humans
MH - Linear Models
MH - Male
MH - *Models, Theoretical
MH - Netherlands
MH - Rescue Work/organization & administration
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2000/09/07 11:00
MHDA- 2000/09/23 11:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Ergonomics. 2000 Aug;43(8):1167-89.

PMID- 10975177
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20000919
DCOM- 20000919
LR - 20051116
PUBM- Print
IS - 0014-0139 (Print)
VI - 43
IP - 8
DP - 2000 Aug
TI - The potential for social contextual and group biases in team decision-
making:
biases, conditions and psychological mechanisms.
PG - 1129-52
AB - This paper provides a critical review of social contextual and group biases
that
are relevant to team decision-making in command and control situations.
Motivated
by the insufficient level of attention this area has received, the purpose
of the
paper is to provide an insight into the potential that these types of biases
have
to affect the decision-making of such teams. The biases considered are:
false
consensus, groupthink, group polarization and group escalation of
commitment. For
each bias the following four questions are addressed. What is the
descriptive
nature of the bias? What factors induce the bias? What psychological
mechanisms
underlie the bias? What is the relevance of the bias to command and control
teams? The analysis suggests that these biases have a strong potential to
affect
team decisions. Consistent with the nature of team decision-making in
command and
control situations, all of the biases considered tend to be associated with
those
decisions that are important or novel and are promoted by time pressure and
high
levels of uncertainty. A concept unifying these biases is that of the shared
mental model, but whereas false consensus emanates from social projection
tendencies, the rest emanate from social influence factors. The authors also
discuss the 'tricky' distinction between teams and groups and propose a
revised
definition for command and control team. Finally, the authors emphasize the
need
for future empirical research in this area to pay additional attention to
the
social side of cognition and the potential that social biases have to affect
team
decision-making.
AD - Department of Cognitive Psychology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The
Netherlands. PE.Jones@psy.vu.nl
FAU - Jones, P E
AU - Jones PE
FAU - Roelofsma, P H
AU - Roelofsma PH
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Review
PL - ENGLAND
TA - Ergonomics
JT - Ergonomics
JID - 0373220
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - *Decision Making, Organizational
MH - *Group Processes
MH - Humans
MH - *Institutional Management Teams
MH - Models, Psychological
MH - *Social Behavior
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
RF - 67
EDAT- 2000/09/07 11:00
MHDA- 2000/09/23 11:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Ergonomics. 2000 Aug;43(8):1129-52.

PMID- 10975174
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20000919
DCOM- 20000919
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0014-0139 (Print)
VI - 43
IP - 8
DP - 2000 Aug
TI - A method for measuring team skills.
PG - 1076-94
AB - A method for identifying and measuring team skills, specifying team training
objectives and the objective assessment of team performance is described.
First,
a theoretical model of team performance is outlined and then a version of
Hierarchical Task Analysis specially adapted to analysing team tasks is
described. The two are then combined into an event-related measurement
scheme,
which provides a set of objective criteria by which key team skills can be
assessed. The method is illustrated by an example from a basic Anti-
Submarine
Warfare training exercise which forms part of the Principal Warfare
Officer's
course at the Royal Naval School of Maritime Operations. The potential of
the
method is discussed, including the opportunities it may provide for the
standardization of team performance assessment and in the use of new
technology
in the partial automation of shore-based and ship-board team training.
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
J.Annett@warwick.ac.uk
FAU - Annett, J
AU - Annett J
FAU - Cunningham, D
AU - Cunningham D
FAU - Mathias-Jones, P
AU - Mathias-Jones P
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - ENGLAND
TA - Ergonomics
JT - Ergonomics
JID - 0373220
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Great Britain
MH - *Group Processes
MH - Humans
MH - Inservice Training/methods
MH - *Institutional Management Teams
MH - Military Personnel
MH - Models, Theoretical
MH - Reproducibility of Results
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2000/09/07 11:00
MHDA- 2000/09/23 11:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Ergonomics. 2000 Aug;43(8):1076-94.

PMID- 10975173
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20000919
DCOM- 20000919
LR - 20051116
PUBM- Print
IS - 0014-0139 (Print)
VI - 43
IP - 8
DP - 2000 Aug
TI - Teamwork in multi-person systems: a review and analysis.
PG - 1052-75
AB - As the scope and complexity of modern task demands exceed the capability of
individuals to perform, teams are emerging to shoulder the burgeoning
requirements. Accordingly, researchers have striven to understand and
enhance
human performance in team settings. The purpose of this review is to
summarize
that research, from the theoretical underpinnings that drive it, to the
identification of team-level elements of success, to the methodologies and
instruments that capture and measure those characteristics. Further
specified are
three important avenues to creating successful teams: team selection, task
design
and team training. In other words, one can select the right people, provide
them
with a task engineered for superior performance and train them in the
appropriate
skills to accomplish that task. Under task design, new technologies and
automation are examined that both support and impede team functioning.
Finally,
throughout are provided critical remarks about what is known about teamwork
and
what is needed to be known to move the science and practice of team
performance
forward. The paper concludes with the identification of team issues that
require
further investigation.
AD - Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division, Orlando, FL 32826-3224,
USA.
FAU - Paris, C R
AU - Paris CR
FAU - Salas, E
AU - Salas E
FAU - Cannon-Bowers, J A
AU - Cannon-Bowers JA
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Review
PL - ENGLAND
TA - Ergonomics
JT - Ergonomics
JID - 0373220
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Efficiency
MH - *Group Processes
MH - *Human Engineering
MH - Humans
MH - Inservice Training
MH - *Institutional Management Teams
MH - Models, Theoretical
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
RF - 118
EDAT- 2000/09/07 11:00
MHDA- 2000/09/23 11:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Ergonomics. 2000 Aug;43(8):1052-75.

PMID- 10975172
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20000919
DCOM- 20000919
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0014-0139 (Print)
VI - 43
IP - 8
DP - 2000 Aug
TI - Team work--a problem for ergonomics?
PG - 1045-51
FAU - Annett, J
AU - Annett J
LA - eng
PT - Editorial
PL - ENGLAND
TA - Ergonomics
JT - Ergonomics
JID - 0373220
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - *Group Processes
MH - *Human Engineering
MH - Humans
MH - Inservice Training
MH - *Institutional Management Teams
MH - Models, Organizational
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2000/09/07 11:00
MHDA- 2000/09/23 11:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Ergonomics. 2000 Aug;43(8):1045-51.

PMID- 10917151
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20000817
DCOM- 20000817
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0018-7208 (Print)
VI - 42
IP - 1
DP - 2000 Spring
TI - Measuring team knowledge.
PG - 151-73
AB - Multioperator tasks often require complex cognitive processing at the team
level.
Many team cognitive processes, such as situation assessment and
coordination, are
thought to rely on team knowledge. Team knowledge is multifaceted and
comprises
relatively generic knowledge in the form of team mental models and more
specific
team situation models. In this methodological review paper, we review recent
efforts to measure team knowledge in the context of mapping specific methods
onto
features of targeted team knowledge. Team knowledge features include type,
homogeneity versus heterogeneity, and rate of knowledge change. Measurement
features include knowledge elicitation method, team metric, and aggregation
method. When available, we highlight analytical conclusions or empirical
data
that support a connection between team knowledge and measurement method. In
addition, we present empirical results concerning the relation between team
knowledge and performance for each measurement method and identify research
and
methodological needs. Addressing issues surrounding the measurement of team
knowledge is a prerequisite to understanding team cognition and its relation
to
team performance and to designing training programs or devices to facilitate
team
cognition.
AD - Department of Psychology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces 88003,
USA.
cooke@crl.nmsu.edu
FAU - Cooke, N J
AU - Cooke NJ
FAU - Salas, E
AU - Salas E
FAU - Cannon-Bowers, J A
AU - Cannon-Bowers JA
FAU - Stout, R J
AU - Stout RJ
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - UNITED STATES
TA - Hum Factors
JT - Human factors
JID - 0374660
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - *Cognitive Science
MH - Decision Making
MH - Humans
MH - Knowledge
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2000/08/05 11:00
MHDA- 2000/08/19 11:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Hum Factors. 2000 Spring;42(1):151-73.

PMID- 10763526
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20000525
DCOM- 20000525
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0270-1367 (Print)
VI - 71
IP - 1
DP - 2000 Mar
TI - Students' precision and interobserver reliability of performance assessment
in
team sports.
PG - 85-91
AD - Department of Kinesiology, Pennsylvania State University, USA. jfr8@psu.edu
FAU - Richard, J F
AU - Richard JF
FAU - Godbout, P
AU - Godbout P
FAU - Grehaigne, J F
AU - Grehaigne JF
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - UNITED STATES
TA - Res Q Exerc Sport
JT - Research quarterly for exercise and sport
JID - 8006373
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Child
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Observer Variation
MH - Reproducibility of Results
MH - Sports/*standards
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 2000/04/14 09:00
MHDA- 2000/06/08 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Res Q Exerc Sport. 2000 Mar;71(1):85-91.

PMID- 10662218
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20000105
DCOM- 20000105
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 8756-8047 (Print)
VI - 15
IP - 11
DP - 1999 Nov
TI - Teamwork is pathway to the top.
PG - 26, 28
FAU - Mathias, J M
AU - Mathias JM
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - UNITED STATES
TA - OR Manager
JT - OR manager
JID - 8700332
SB - H
MH - Benchmarking
MH - California
MH - Humans
MH - Operating Rooms/*standards
MH - *Patient Care Team
MH - Quality Assurance, Health Care
MH - *Thoracic Surgery
EDAT- 2000/02/08
MHDA- 2000/02/08 00:01
PST - ppublish
SO - OR Manager. 1999 Nov;15(11):26, 28.

PMID- 10558058
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 19991020
DCOM- 19991020
LR - 20001218
PUBM- Print
IS - 1062-2551 (Print)
VI - 21
IP - 4
DP - 1999 Jul-Aug
TI - Achieving faster quality improvement through the 24-hour team.
PG - 4-10; quiz 10, 56
AB - This article describes how Great Plains Regional Medical Center (GPRMC) in
North
Platte, NE, changed its quality improvement (QI) methodology and its mind-
set
toward team time management to accelerate its improvement efforts. The "24-
hour
road map" and the improved FOCUS-PDSA methodology, coupled with strong
leadership, make up the team time management element that has been missing
from
healthcare quality improvement but is critically needed to accelerate the
process. At GPRMC, a major criterion for success is now a 6-month-or-less
improvement cycle for cross-functional teams to complete their QI efforts.
The
lessons learned at GPRMC can help others in healthcare improve quality,
lower
costs, and do both more quickly.
AD - Great Plains Regional Medical Center, North Platte, NE, USA.
FAU - Carboneau, C E
AU - Carboneau CE
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - UNITED STATES
TA - J Healthc Qual
JT - Journal for healthcare quality : official publication of the National
Association
for Healthcare Quality
JID - 9202994
SB - H
MH - Appointments and Schedules
MH - Education, Continuing
MH - Hospital Administration/*standards
MH - *Institutional Management Teams
MH - Leadership
MH - *Management Quality Circles
MH - Models, Organizational
MH - Nebraska
MH - Planning Techniques
MH - Process Assessment (Health Care)
MH - Rehabilitation/organization & administration
MH - Time and Motion Studies
MH - Total Quality Management/*methods/organization & administration
EDAT- 1999/11/11
MHDA- 1999/11/11 00:01
PST - ppublish
SO - J Healthc Qual. 1999 Jul-Aug;21(4):4-10; quiz 10, 56.

PMID- 10557661
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 19991001
DCOM- 19991001
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0268-9235 (Print)
VI - 13
IP - 1
DP - 1999
TI - Teamwork in health care. Lessons from the literature and from good practice
around the world.
PG - 51-8
AB - It is becoming more difficult to provide health care that meets the needs of
patients within tight budget constraints. This article suggests that one way
forward is to channel the energies of people more constructively to work as
teams. Some definitions are shown for teams and teamwork, and four benefits
suggested of effective teamwork: learning and development, resource
management,
task performance and communications. In each of these four areas, examples
are
given from the international world of health care of how teamwork can be
achieved. Finally, it is concluded that teamwork can be difficult, but that
it is
worth pursuing.
AD - School of Management Studies for the Service Sector, University of Surrey,
Guildford, UK.
FAU - Ingram, H
AU - Ingram H
FAU - Desombre, T
AU - Desombre T
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - ENGLAND
TA - J Manag Med
JT - Journal of management in medicine
JID - 8705942
SB - H
MH - Great Britain
MH - *Group Processes
MH - Humans
MH - *Institutional Management Teams
MH - Interprofessional Relations
MH - Learning
MH - *Patient Care Team
MH - State Medicine/*organization & administration
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 1999/11/11
MHDA- 1999/11/11 00:01
PST - ppublish
SO - J Manag Med. 1999;13(1):51-8.

PMID- 10387881
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 19990623
DCOM- 19990623
LR - 20001218
PUBM- Print
IS - 8756-8047 (Print)
VI - 15
IP - 5
DP - 1999 May
TI - Culture, teamwork help better performers shine.
PG - 20-1, 24, 26
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - UNITED STATES
TA - OR Manager
JT - OR manager
JID - 8700332
SB - H
MH - Benchmarking/*organization & administration
MH - Data Collection
MH - Efficiency, Organizational
MH - Multi-Institutional Systems/organization & administration/standards
MH - Operating Rooms/*organization & administration
MH - *Organizational Culture
MH - Patient Care Team/standards
MH - Time and Motion Studies
MH - United States
EDAT- 1999/07/01
MHDA- 1999/07/01 00:01
PST - ppublish
SO - OR Manager. 1999 May;15(5):20-1, 24, 26.

PMID- 10387186
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 19990602
DCOM- 19990602
LR - 20001218
PUBM- Print
IS - 1094-253X (Print)
VI - 2
IP - 11
DP - 1998 Nov
TI - Benchmark data, improved productivity help team save $6.9 million in labor
costs.
PG - 168-70, 161
AB - Using data analysis to manage labor: A 400-bed hospital cut $6.9 million
from its
labor budget by analyzing each request for a new or replacement staff
member. A
team analyzed internal data on labor expenses by department and compared it
with
national and regional benchmarks. Find out what they did next.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - UNITED STATES
TA - Data Strateg Benchmarks
JT - Data strategies & benchmarks : the monthly advisory for health care
executives
JID - 9807026
SB - H
MH - Benchmarking/*organization & administration
MH - Cost Allocation
MH - Cost Savings
MH - Efficiency, Organizational/*statistics & numerical data
MH - Hospital Bed Capacity, 300 to 499
MH - Hospitals, Community/economics/*manpower/utilization
MH - Indiana
MH - Management Quality Circles
MH - Organizational Policy
MH - Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/*economics/statistics & numerical data
EDAT- 1999/07/01
MHDA- 1999/07/01 00:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Data Strateg Benchmarks. 1998 Nov;2(11):168-70, 161.

PMID- 10345016
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 19990305
DCOM- 19990305
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 1079-0349 (Print)
VI - 7
IP - 10
DP - 1998 Oct
TI - Hospital-owned practices succeed with solid teams.
PG - 116-8
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - UNITED STATES
TA - Physician Relat Update
JT - Physician relations update / American Health Consultants
JID - 9709715
SB - H
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Conflict (Psychology)
MH - Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration
MH - Efficiency, Organizational
MH - Guidelines as Topic
MH - Hospital-Physician Joint Ventures/*organization & administration/standards
MH - *Institutional Management Teams
MH - Management Quality Circles
MH - Missouri
MH - Ownership
EDAT- 1999/05/27
MHDA- 1999/05/27 00:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Physician Relat Update. 1998 Oct;7(10):116-8.

PMID- 10075356
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 19990407
DCOM- 19990407
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0004-8682 (Print)
VI - 69
IP - 3
DP - 1999 Mar
TI - An evaluation of trauma team leader performance by video recording.
PG - 183-6
AB - BACKGROUND: Team leader performance in trauma resuscitations was assessed
using a
published system to assess the utility of video recording and to assess the
current early management of trauma at The Royal Melbourne Hospital,
Melbourne,
Australia. METHODS: Fifty trauma resuscitations were videotaped over a 21-
month
period. Each videotape was assessed by an emergency physician. RESULTS: The
team
leader was an emergency physician in 37 resuscitations, an emergency
medicine
registrar in eight and a surgical registrar in five. The mean team leader
score
was 68.5 +/- 8.5 (range 45-78, maximum possible 80). The average time to
primary
survey completion was 3.3 +/- 1.7 min, second phase of resuscitation up to
and
including chest radiography 14.1 +/- 8.5 min, to completion of secondary
survey
and announcement of overall plan 30 +/- 20 min. Frequent deficiencies are
documented. Problems with videotaping included forgetting/lack of motivation
to
start taping, forgetting to turn on the sound, difficulty discerning size of
cannulae and logistical problems with only one cubicle outfitted for
videotaping.
Advantages included lack of intrusion into the resuscitation, increased
vigilance
by team members aware of the possibility of taping, ability to assess tapes
at
leisure and team leader performance in after-hours resuscitations.
CONCLUSIONS:
Video recording is a useful method for the assessment of team member
performance
in trauma resuscitations. Deficiencies in resuscitation technique can be
identified and fed back to those involved. Medico-legal issues have not
proved to
be a barrier to the use of the technique. A reliable method of starting
taping is
needed.
AD - Emergency Department, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Victoria, Australia.
pdr@ed.medrmh.unimelb.edu.au
FAU - Ritchie, P D
AU - Ritchie PD
FAU - Cameron, P A
AU - Cameron PA
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - AUSTRALIA
TA - Aust N Z J Surg
JT - The Australian and New Zealand journal of surgery
JID - 0373115
SB - IM
MH - Humans
MH - *Leadership
MH - Patient Care Team/*standards
MH - Quality Assurance, Health Care
MH - Resuscitation
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
MH - Trauma Centers/*organization & administration
MH - Traumatology/manpower/organization & administration
MH - *Video Recording
MH - Wounds and Injuries/*therapy
EDAT- 1999/03/13
MHDA- 1999/03/13 00:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Aust N Z J Surg. 1999 Mar;69(3):183-6.

PMID- 10064281
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 19990420
DCOM- 19990420
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0309-2402 (Print)
VI - 29
IP - 1
DP - 1999 Jan
TI - Evaluating clinical outcome and staff morale in a rehabilitation team for
people
with serious mental health problems.
PG - 44-51
AB - Tameside and Glossop rehabilitation team (in England) have developed a
progressive and targeted service for people with serious mental health
problems
through the systematic implementation of research-based evidence in practice
and
service configuration. This study was undertaken to provide a method of
auditing
the clinical outcome of the service and monitoring staff morale in a manner
which
could be integrated in the day to day delivery of services, and which could
inform future service developments. Changes in the functioning of the total
population of rehabilitation team clients were assessed over a 1-year period
by
Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) ratings at 6-monthly intervals.
Factors causing stress and stress levels among all staff were assessed using
the
Mental Health Stress Questionnaire. The findings give clear indications of
areas
of the service which needed improving or changing, and identify ways in
which the
ongoing process of data collection might be refined.
AD - School of Nursing, University of Manchester, England.
FAU - Brooker, C
AU - Brooker C
FAU - Molyneux, P
AU - Molyneux P
FAU - Deverill, M
AU - Deverill M
FAU - Repper, J
AU - Repper J
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - ENGLAND
TA - J Adv Nurs
JT - Journal of advanced nursing
JID - 7609811
SB - IM
SB - N
MH - Benchmarking/methods
MH - Community Mental Health Services/methods/*organization & administration
MH - Data Collection/methods
MH - England
MH - Humans
MH - Mental Disorders/economics/nursing/*rehabilitation
MH - *Morale
MH - Nursing Staff/psychology
MH - Outcome Assessment (Health Care)/*methods
MH - *Patient Care Team
MH - Stress, Psychological/psychology
EDAT- 1999/03/04
MHDA- 1999/03/04 00:01
PST - ppublish
SO - J Adv Nurs. 1999 Jan;29(1):44-51.

PMID- 9934033
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 19990506
DCOM- 19990506
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0966-0461 (Print)
VI - 7
IP - 20
DP - 1998 Nov 12-25
TI - Discharge planning: establishing an effective coordination team.
PG - 1263-7
AB - This article investigates the developing role of the discharge coordinator
and
explores how safe, effective and timely discharge from hospital can be
achieved.
In January 1996, a team of four discharge coordinators were jointly
appointed by
the King's Healthcare NHS Trust in partnership with the local social
services
department. The coordinators were appointed to work with the
multidisciplinary
teams to improve trustwide discharge planning practice. The team focused on
six
core objectives: central coordination, open interagency communication,
continuing
education, patient advocacy, information resource and audit of discharges.
Despite the ward staff's early difficulties regarding the nature of the
role, the
team did begin to collaborate effectively when working alongside all members
of
the multidisciplinary team and with patients and families.
FAU - Summerton, H
AU - Summerton H
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - ENGLAND
TA - Br J Nurs
JT - British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)
JID - 9212059
SB - N
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Cooperative Behavior
MH - Humans
MH - Job Description
MH - Needs Assessment
MH - Organizational Objectives
MH - Patient Care Planning/*organization & administration
MH - Patient Care Team/*organization & administration
MH - Patient Discharge/*standards
MH - Social Work/*organization & administration
EDAT- 1999/02/06
MHDA- 1999/02/06 00:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Br J Nurs. 1998 Nov 12-25;7(20):1263-7.

PMID- 9819581
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 19981203
DCOM- 19981203
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 0014-0139 (Print)
VI - 41
IP - 11
DP - 1998 Nov
TI - Task and training requirements analysis methodology (TTRAM): an analytic
methodology for identifying potential training uses of simulator networks in
teamwork-intensive task environments.
PG - 1678-97
AB - A methodology designed to identify potential application areas for use of
networked simulations is presented. The technique, known as task and
training
requirements analysis methodology (TTRAM), has been independently applied to
the
analysis of numerous US military aircraft simulator networking requirements,
and
appears to effectively discriminate tasks that are prone to skill decay,
that are
critical to mission success, that require high levels of internal and
external
teamwork, and that require additional training support.
AD - InterScience America, Inc., Leesburg, VA 20176-4173, USA.
FAU - Swezey, R W
AU - Swezey RW
FAU - Owens, J M
AU - Owens JM
FAU - Bergondy, M L
AU - Bergondy ML
FAU - Salas, E
AU - Salas E
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - ENGLAND
TA - Ergonomics
JT - Ergonomics
JID - 0373220
SB - IM
SB - S
MH - Aviation
MH - *Computer Communication Networks
MH - *Computer Simulation
MH - *Computer-Assisted Instruction
MH - Humans
MH - Military Personnel
MH - *Task Performance and Analysis
EDAT- 1998/11/20
MHDA- 1998/11/20 00:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Ergonomics. 1998 Nov;41(11):1678-97.

PMID- 10182961
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 19981022
DCOM- 19981022
LR - 20071115
PUBM- Print
IS - 1097-9530 (Print)
VI - 6
IP - 8
DP - 1998 Aug
TI - Teamwork, accountability cut discharge-to-bill time.
PG - 98-100
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - UNITED STATES
TA - Patient Focus Care Satisf
JT - Patient-focused care and satisfaction / American Health Consultants
JID - 9802916
SB - H
MH - Abstracting and Indexing as Topic/standards
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over
MH - Hospitals, Pediatric/*economics
MH - Kentucky
MH - Management Audit
MH - Medical Record Administrators
MH - *Patient Credit and Collection
MH - *Patient Discharge
MH - Time Management
EDAT- 1998/07/06
MHDA- 1998/07/06 00:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Patient Focus Care Satisf. 1998 Aug;6(8):98-100.

PMID- 9568552
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 19980624
DCOM- 19980624
LR - 20060828
PUBM- Print
IS - 1070-3241 (Print)
VI - 24
IP - 3
DP - 1998 Mar
TI - Rapid improvement teams.
PG - 119-29
AB - BACKGROUND: Suggestions, most of which are supported by empirical studies,
are
provided on how total quality management (TQM) teams can be used to bring
about
faster organizationwide improvements. SUGGESTIONS: Ideas are offered on how
to
identify the right problem, have rapid meetings, plan rapidly, collect data
rapidly, and make rapid whole-system changes. Suggestions for identifying
the
right problem include (1) postpone benchmarking when problems are obvious,
(2)
define the problem in terms of customer experience so as not to blame
employees
nor embed a solution in the problem statement, (3) communicate with the rest
of
the organization from the start, (4) state the problem from different
perspectives, and (5) break large problems into smaller units. Suggestions
for
having rapid meetings include (1) choose a nonparticipating facilitator to
expedite meetings, (2) meet with each team member before the team meeting,
(3)
postpone evaluation of ideas, and (4) rethink conclusions of a meeting
before
acting on them. Suggestions for rapid planning include reducing time spent
on
flowcharting by focusing on the future, not the present. Suggestions for
rapid
data collection include (1) sample patients for surveys, (2) rely on
numerical
estimates by process owners, and (3) plan for rapid data collection.
Suggestions
for rapid organizationwide implementation include (1) change membership on
cross-functional teams, (2) get outside perspectives, (3) use unfolding
storyboards, and (4) go beyond self-interest to motivate lasting change in
the
organization. CONCLUSIONS: Additional empirical investigations of time saved
as a
consequence of the strategies provided are needed. If organizations solve
their
problems rapidly, fewer unresolved problems may remain.
AD - Health Administration Program, Cleveland State University, OH 44115, USA.
FAU - Alemi, F
AU - Alemi F
FAU - Moore, S
AU - Moore S
FAU - Headrick, L
AU - Headrick L
FAU - Neuhauser, D
AU - Neuhauser D
FAU - Hekelman, F
AU - Hekelman F
FAU - Kizys, N
AU - Kizys N
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - UNITED STATES
TA - Jt Comm J Qual Improv
JT - The Joint Commission journal on quality improvement
JID - 9315239
SB - IM
MH - Benchmarking/organization & administration
MH - Communication
MH - Data Collection/methods
MH - Decision Making, Organizational
MH - Group Processes
MH - Hospital Administration/*standards
MH - Institutional Management Teams/*organization & administration
MH - *Management Quality Circles
MH - Planning Techniques
MH - Time Factors
MH - Total Quality Management/*organization & administration
MH - United States
EDAT- 1998/05/06
MHDA- 1998/05/06 00:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Jt Comm J Qual Improv. 1998 Mar;24(3):119-29.

PMID- 10178091
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 19980514
DCOM- 19980514
LR - 20001218
PUBM- Print
IS - 0882-1577 (Print)
VI - 79
IP - 2
DP - 1998 Mar-Apr
TI - A framework for improving quality. Using project study teams, Providence
Health
System tackles problem areas.
PG - 56-60
AB - To identify issues for quality improvement and monitoring, an organization
first
articulates its service mission and objectives. The organization uses
internal
measurements and self-examination with external accountability and
benchmarks to
select a manageable number of projects for study. Supported by collected
evidence, published data, and broad-based approval, projects focus on the
process
or outcomes of care, frequency of services, or patient populations. An
accountable leader selects team members from the affected disciplines, who
review
evidence, agree on what and how to measure, determine implementation
strategies,
and develop an evaluation plan. The team meets established targets to track
the
project's progress and shares results with other teams. Providence Health
System
(PHS) his integrated its continuum of care through quality study groups
(e.g.,
CORE) and improved communication systems. The Guideline Evaluation and
Redesign
(GEAR) projects compare PHS performance against outside standards, studying
eight
patient conditions (e.g., geriatric depression, hysterectomy) to decrease
hospital days without compromising care. Each team is encouraged to develop
guidelines for admission, discharge, and hospital care in their specialty
areas.
These projects are balanced between surgical and nonsurgical conditions and
across clinical programs to engage different staffs. The PHS Population
Health
Improvement (PHI) teams used feasibility studies of eight patient
populations to
identify ways to improve quality of care based on internal and external
evidence.
The high-risk pregnancy team has redesigned staffing and implemented case
management, and the Medicare and Medicaid projects have developed risk
screens
for new patient members.
AD - Center for Outcomes Research and Education, Providence Health System,
Portland,
OR, USA.
FAU - London, M R
AU - London MR
FAU - Klug, C D
AU - Klug CD
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - UNITED STATES
TA - Health Prog
JT - Health progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)
JID - 8500263
SB - H
MH - Benchmarking
MH - Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/*standards
MH - Group Processes
MH - Management Quality Circles/*organization & administration
MH - Northwestern United States
MH - Oregon
MH - Organizational Case Studies
MH - Pilot Projects
MH - Process Assessment (Health Care)
MH - *Quality Indicators, Health Care
MH - Social Responsibility
MH - Total Quality Management/*methods
MH - United States
EDAT- 1998/02/06
MHDA- 1998/02/06 00:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Health Prog. 1998 Mar-Apr;79(2):56-60.

PMID- 10177563
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 19980428
DCOM- 19980428
LR - 20041117
PUBM- Print
IS - 1091-6768 (Print)
VI - 5
IP - 3
DP - 1998 Mar
TI - Pediatric facility links teamwork, OR productivity.
PG - 32-4
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - UNITED STATES
TA - Healthc Benchmarks
JT - Healthcare benchmarks
JID - 9800467
SB - H
MH - Appointments and Schedules
MH - *Benchmarking
MH - California
MH - Child
MH - Data Collection
MH - Hospitals, Pediatric/standards
MH - Humans
MH - Patient Care Team
MH - Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
MH - Surgery Department, Hospital/*standards
EDAT- 1998/02/06
MHDA- 1998/02/06 00:01
PST - ppublish
SO - Healthc Benchmarks. 1998 Mar;5(3):32-4.

PMID- 12747342
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 20030515
DCOM- 20030529
LR - 20061115
PUBM- Print
IS - 0529-5769 (Print)
VI - 41
IP - 1
DP - 2003 Mar
TI - Performance evaluation of quality improvement team in an anesthesiology
department.
PG - 13-9
AB - BACKGROUND: In health care community, quality improvement pathway has always
been
treated as critical index to control cost, improve efficiency and promote
service
quality, particularly in the last decade. From theoretical standpoint,
clinical
practice as well as research data, quality improvement team has been
demonstrated
to play an important role in the adaptation to the changing health
environment
and enhancement of the competition through the improvement process. The
purpose
of this study was to explore members' job satisfaction, morale,
organizational
commitment and inventory management through quality improvement team
intervention
in a department of anesthesiology. METHODS: This study was of a
quasi-experimental and longitudinal design. The subjects involved 45 nurse
anesthetists (the experiment group, intervention of quality improvement
team) and
50 operation room nurses (control group) in a general hospital. The quality
improvement team had been initiated and implemented pursuant to the quality
improvement process for 8 months. GEEs (Generalized Estimating Equations)
model
was used to examine the differences in job satisfaction, morale,
organizational
commitment, and the inventory management was also examined between two
groups.
RESULTS: After control of all variables, except education background, such
as
age, marital status, education, position and nursing experience, a natural
growth
effect was observed on quality improvement team. The results revealed that
the
experimental group showed significant positive effects on both job
satisfaction
and organizational commitment after the intervention. The morale scale did
not
differ significantly between two groups. In the inventory management, the
experimental group successfully decreased the monthly consumable materials
stock
with a descending rate of 24.8%, while in the control group, the inventory
was
increased 16.9% in the basal stock instead. CONCLUSIONS: As other previous
reports did, the present study also demonstrated that intervention of the
quality
improvement team improves the nurse anesthetists' job satisfaction, such as
promotion of autonomy, organizational policy and positive member
interaction.
Moreover, it improves work efficiency, service quality as well as control of
the
stock inventory.
AD - Nursing Department, Tainan Military Hospital, Taiwan.
FAU - Wang, Fu-Lan
AU - Wang FL
FAU - Lee, Li-Chuan
AU - Lee LC
FAU - Lee, Sheu-Hua
AU - Lee SH
FAU - Wu, Shang-Liang
AU - Wu SL
FAU - Wong, Chih-Shung
AU - Wong CS
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - China (Republic: 1949- )
TA - Acta Anaesthesiol Sin
JT - Acta anaesthesiologica Sinica
JID - 9432542
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - *Anesthesiology/organization & administration/standards
MH - Humans
MH - Inventories, Hospital
MH - *Job Satisfaction
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Morale
MH - *Quality of Health Care
EDAT- 2003/05/16 05:00
MHDA- 2003/05/30 05:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Acta Anaesthesiol Sin. 2003 Mar;41(1):13-9.