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DAILY LESSON PLAN I.

INTRODUCTION Teacher’s Name: Matthew Piech Date: November 18, 2011 Subject: Science Grade: Adult Time Allotted: 75 minutes II. RATIONALE AND BACKGROUND The General English (GE) Branch at the Defense Language Institute English Language Center (DLIELC) serves two distinct groups of non-native English speaking students: (1) new U.S. Army recruits who do not yet communicate well enough in English to enter basic training; and (2) NATO-allied military personnel from around the world. The GE curriculum not only includes general English topics, but also military topics of general nature highlighting the typical language military personnel will encounter in their professional and vocational career fields. GE students who attain their required English Comprehension Level (ECL) score typically either advance to Specialized English (SE) training at the DLIELC or return to their homelands. This class consists of eight international military students originating from Colombia, Indonesia, Lebanon, Mongolia, Morocco, Taiwan, Thailand, and Turkey. Six of the eight students are at the intermediate-level and two are at the high-beginning level. Prior to this class, students will have begun a thematic unit on the science lab focusing specifically on the US Naval Research Laboratory. Today learners will be introduced to vocabulary needed to conduct an experiment on the scientific principles behind submarines. For the purposes of this TS 734 assignment, I have based this lesson on the following Kansas High School Social Science and ESOL Standards: CONTENT STANDARD: Grades 8-12: Standard 2B – Physics. The student will develop an understanding of the structure of atoms, compounds, chemical reactions, and the interactions of energy and matter. Benchmark 1: The student will understand the relationships between force and motion. Indicator 1f: The force that one object exerts on a second object has the same magnitude but opposite direction as the force that the second object exerts on the first.

pronunciation. LESSON OBJECTIVES: Beginning-level Content Learning Objective: After learning 15 content-area vocabulary words and. non-verbal. participating in an interactive class presentation on the scientific principles behind submarines. with the aid of a graphic organizer. Intermediate: Use general grade-level academic vocabulary. Beginning-level Language Development Objective: After conducting a science experiment on how submarines dive and surface. Beginning: Use basic general academic vocabulary. non-verbal and text support. within simple questions and statements. and text support. 8 or more questions answered correctly indicates mastery. Use vocabulary to communicate effectively in speaking. with the aid of a graphic organizer. 8 or more questions answered correctly indicates mastery. participating in an interactive class presentation on the scientific principles behind submarines. the learner will be able to respond orally to five experiment-related questions supported by visual.ESOL STANDARD: Domain 2: Speaking. within scaffolded academic discussions. Beginning-level Social/Language Learning Strategy Objective: After learning 15 content-area vocabulary words and. Intermediate-level Content Learning Objective: After learning 15 content-area vocabulary words and participating in an interactive class presentation on the scientific principles behind submarines. the student will complete a 10item true/false and multiple choice quiz on the Laws (with extra time provided if needed). the learner will use visual aids to work cooperatively and professionally with an intermediate-level partner . non-verbal. III. and nonverbal communication strategies. and text support. supported by visual. English learners will speak English fluently for a variety of interpersonal and academic purposes using appropriate vocabulary. 4 or more correct responses indicates mastery. with visual. including terms used as academic language functions. Standard 3: Vocabulary. including terms used as academic language functions. 4 or more correct responses indicates mastery. the student will complete a 10-item true/false and multiple choice quiz on the Laws. the learner will be able to discuss the answers to five experiment-related questions. Intermediate-level Language Development Objective: After conducting a science experiment on how submarines dive and surface.

LIST OF RESOURCES: Equipment:                1 desktop or laptop computer connected to an interactive whiteboard with audio speakers 8 laptop computers for student use 12 liters of water 4 empty 2-liter plastic soda bottles with tops 4 measuring cups 4 drinking straws (plus two extras) 4 rubber bands (plus two extras) 4 pairs of scissors 20 paper clips. Pascal’s Principle. 6 out of 6 steps performed correctly indicates mastery. CURRICULUM AND LINGUISTIC ANALYSES: Curriculum Concepts: Students will gain a conceptual and practical understanding of the scientific principles behind submarines. specifically: Archimedes’ Principle. preferably made from plastic 1 plastic tub with water outlet hose 1 weighted buoyancy object 1 digital kitchen scale 1 bicycle tire pump 1 un-inflated ball 1 uncooked. IV. Intermediate-level Social/Language Learning Strategy Objective: After learning 15 content-area vocabulary words and participating in an interactive class presentation on the scientific principles behind submarines.to complete a six-step science experiment. the learner will work cooperatively and professionally with a partner to complete a six-step science experiment. unshelled egg (plus one extra) Handouts & Other Materials:        Multimedia PowerPoint presentation: The Scientific Principles behind Submarines Handout 1: Linguistic Function & Lesson Vocabulary Handout 2: The Scientific Principles behind Submarines – Graphic Organizer Handout 3: Six-Step Submarine Science Experiment – Instructions Handout 4: Six-Step Submarine Science Experiment – Visual Aids Quiz: The Scientific Principles behind Submarines Oral Language Score Sheet V. 6 out of 6 steps performed correctly indicates mastery. and Boyle’s Law .

Then. Model the structure using the three examples provided and then allow students the opportunity to practice. Begin the class by telling students that today they will be continuing their lesson on naval science.). Continue using this PowerPoint for Steps 4-6. Preview the lesson objectives with the students. transmit (v. . Respond accordingly. uniformly (adv. Provide the two beginning-level students with the corresponding graphic organizer.).).). *Note – The link to this video is embedded in the second slide of The Scientific Laws behind Submarines PowerPoint presentation.). Structure – causeconnectoreffect thus therefore consequently as a result Vocabulary – afloat (adj. Activate students’ prior learning by asking for volunteers to remind the class what they learned yesterday about the US Naval Research Laboratory. Emphasize that students will be expected to use this structure throughout today’s lesson. Explain that today the class will be looking at the scientific principles behind submarines.). 4. Introduction and Motivation: 1. 3.) VI.). hydraulic (adj.). Encourage students to refer to this handout as needed during today’s lesson. Introduce today’s language function to the class.Linguistic Analysis: Function – Students will express cause and effect. confined (adj. submerge (v.).). Lesson Body: Sequence: I. 5. force (n. PROCEDURES A. principle (n.) inversely (adv.). Introduce the 15 content-area vocabulary words that will be featured in the lesson. exert (v.). constant (adj. 6. 2. Ask learners if any of them have ever been on an active-duty or retired submarine. density (n. B. vary (v. Deliver an interactive class presentation on the scientific principles behind submarines using the accompanying PowerPoint presentation.). buoyancy (n. Inform students that you are going to show them a short video clip entitled United States Submarines to introduce today’s lesson. volume (n. distribute the language function and lesson vocabulary handout to the class.

1. E. E. D. After students are convinced. unshelled eggs in the palm of your hand. Weigh the cup and water. B. Choose a different student volunteer. one of the plastic measuring cups. 1. Mini-Experiment I: A. the weighted buoyancy object. Allow other students to attempt to break the egg in a similar fashion if they do not believe the principle. 1. Have the student weigh the weighted buoyancy object and record the weight. 2. C. This demonstrates Pascal’s Principle of Transmission of Fluid: the pressure applied to a confined fluid is transmitted uniformly throughout the fluid. Mini-Experiment II: A. Select a student volunteer 1. 2. 3. Tell the student to begin applying pressure to the egg with his/her four fingers. Record the weight. Explain to the class that this simple experiment demonstrates Archimedes Principle of Buoyancy: the buoyant force of an object is equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Have him or her wait until the displaced water enters into the measuring cup. Direct the student to do the same. Wrap all four fingers around the egg but do not use your thumb. Place the plastic tub with the water outlet hose. Position the water hose outlet to drain into the empty measuring cup. Regardless of how much pressure the student exerts. Direct the student to subtract the weight of the empty measuring cup from the weight of the measuring cup with water. D. B. 2. Record the weight. Direct the student to place the empty measuring cup on the scale. C. Have the student steadily increase the pressure in order to break the egg. Have the student do the same with the second egg. The difference will equal the weight of the weighted buoyancy object. break the egg to demonstrate that it is indeed a real egg. Fill the plastic tub with 4 liters of water. Have the student place the weighted buoyancy object into the water in the plastic tub.Conduct each of the following mini-experiments after showing the slides where the scientist and his principle are introduced. he or she will be unable to break the egg. and the digital kitchen scale onto an empty student desk. . Take one of the uncooked.

the volume inside the cylinder is doubled and the pressure is halved. C. 1. III. Explain that you will distribute a six-step process that they must follow to conduct the experiment. Then. Monitor progress to ensure that all six steps are performed correctly and that the pairs interact cooperatively and professionally. Encourage students to practice using the cause and effect language structure as often as possible throughout the experiment when communicating with their partner. Inform the class that each of them will work with a partner to conduct the experiment. V. Review the answers with the class while students check their partners’ papers. II. they are going to conduct a science experiment to see first-hand how the scientific principles behind submarines operate. call them out into the hallway one by one to provide oral answers to the five experiment-related questions. Then. Authentic Communication: Tell students that in a moment. Have him or her raise and lower the handle a couple of times to show that air being compressed in the cylinder is being forced out through the hose. collect quizzes to review results. As the student raises and lowers the handle. 1. explain that as the volume inside the cylinder is being reduced. have him or her use the pump to begin inflating the ball. Select another student volunteer. IV. have students exchange papers. B. Administer the quiz on the scientific principles behind submarines. using the ball as the reference point. thereby forcing the air out of the hose. the pressure is increasing. explain that as the student raises the handle on the pump. Encourage students to use today’s content-area vocabulary and the cause and effect language structure in their responses. This time. They are to communicate orally with one another to ensure the experiment is executed appropriately. Tell students that the experiment they will be conducting shortly on the scientific principles behind submarines integrates all three of the principles just observed. After everyone has finished. Ensure that each beginning-level student receives a “Six-Step Submarine Science Experiment – Visual Aids” handout in addition to the instructions. D. Hand the student the bicycle tire pump.Mini-Experiment III: A. Direct the student to connect the air hose to the un-inflated ball. As students complete the experiment. Be sure to provide the two . explain that as the volume is halved inside the ball the pressure is doubled. Each beginning-level student should be paired with an intermediate-level learner. Thereafter.

VI.beginning-level students with visual. and Boyle’s Law? Plans for Remediation: Students needing remediation will meet with the teacher before or after class during Supplemental Learning Time (SLT) as required by DLIELC policy. EVALUATION: Informal Assessment: Students will be assessed informally in the following ways: (1) the completion of a short quiz on the scientific principles behind submarines. Formal Assessment: Students will be assessed formally at the end of the week via a written quiz. C. Review: Restate the main concepts covered in today’s lesson through a quick review. Use the oral language score sheet to record students’ results. Social Media Program: Direct students who have completed their oral reports to use the class page on Twiducate to discuss other day-to-day operations which may be governed by Archimedes’ Principle. and Boyle’s Law. and (3) oral responses to five experimentrelated questions. Pascal’s Principle. and text support. Lesson Closure 1. Higher-Level Questions: When does a scientific hypothesis become a scientific principle? What are some other day-to-day operations which may be governed by Archimedes’ Principle. . non-verbal. Pascal’s Principle. (2) the observation of students working cooperatively and professionally to complete all six steps of the submarine science experiment. VII.