Student Senate voted 57-7-3

to oppose the new social media
policy in a resolution during
the weekly meeting Wednesday
evening.
Te resolution urged the
Kansas Board of Regents to
suspend the policy and replace
it with something new that
respects public-employee
speech protected by the First
Amendment.
“Te policy is really, really
vague,” said Garrett Farlow,
university afairs associate
senator and author of the
resolution. “It can apply to
any type of situation involving
social media if a professor were
to send out anything putting
the University in a negative
light.”
Farlow said the policy is
more intrusive to the rights
of students and professors
than helpful in restricting
controversial comments.
Following journalism
professor David Guth’s
controversial tweet regarding
the National Rife Association
in September, the Kansas
Board of Regents approved
an amendment in December
addressing social media use of
KU faculty and staf.
Te policy change grants
the chancellors of board
universities the right to suspend,
dismiss or terminate faculty
or staf based on improper
social media use. Te term
“improper” blankets actions
like disclosing confdential
information, inciting violence,
and communication through
social media to accomplish
ofcial duties.
Chancellor Bernadette
Gray-Little said in a previous
article that faculty and staf are
concerned the policy will be too
restrictive, limiting their ability
to voice important issues.
Te Kansas State University
publication Te Collegian
also indicated that faculty felt
the policy endangered free
speech rights. Tis included
professor Phillip Nel, who
responded with what he
called an experiment of civil
disobedience.
Nel encouraged his Twitter
followers to tweet anything
using “#ksspeech” to determine
the restrictions of the
social media policy. Farlow
recommended taking part in
the movement.
“Te more steam we get
behind this, the more change
we’ll see,” said Farlow.
Student Senate also
condemned the policy
unanimously in a meeting
on Feb. 6 because members
felt it infringes upon the
First Amendment, conficts
with principles of academic
freedom, hurts the recruitment
and retention of faculty and
poses a threat to the higher
education systems of Kansas.
In addition, Student
Senate resolution asked for a
suspension of the policy until
April, when a work group set
up by the board will attempt
to address concerns and ofer
Until recently, nearly
everybody Lawanna Crow
knew was either using or
dealing dope.
Crow, a 49-year-old woman
from Wichita, has been sober
for two and a half years. She
found the support she needed
afer hitting rock bottom:
homeless and addicted to
crack. She knocked on the
Lawrence Community Shelter
door to ask for help.
“Tey saw something in me
here at the shelter that I didn’t
see in myself,” Crow said.
She’s always optimistic,
complimenting others’
accomplishments and smiling.
Next month, Crow hopes to
pass the GED test.
In sixth grade, Crow
dropped out of school. She
was slower than other people
in class. She didn’t want to
be put in special education
classes or get teased by the
other kids.
“I was embarrassed so I quit
going,” Crow said.
Crow started working part-
time at a Burger King. She
helped around the house too,
babysitting some of her three
brothers and six sisters.
It was 1987 when she really
got into the crack scene. Te
frst time she used, she didn’t
know the weed joint her
cousin passed her was laced.
She smoked on a pipe at her
apartment, other peoples’
houses or driving around
town.
“I didn’t get paranoid or
psycho like some people do
on it; I just had fun,” Crow
said. “And I felt popular.
Because people hung out with
me when I was partying.”
Crow thinks she’d be a
millionaire if she could go
back and count all the money
she stole and hustled to spend
on crack.
She voided receipts of big
meal orders to steal from
work. She shoplifed. She stole
a friend’s 42-inch fat-screen
television. She was in and out
of jail for prostitution. One
time, she said, a dope dealer
put a hit out on her afer she
drugged his drink and stole
his stash.
“When you’re out there on
that, you don’t care what you
do to get it,” Crow said. “You
don’t care who you hurt. All
you worried about is that next
high.”
When she lef her husband,
she had nothing to take with
her and nowhere else to go
but the Lawrence Community
Shelter. A case manager
Volume 126 Issue 77 kansan.com Thursday, February 13, 2014
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2014 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 2B
CROSSWORD 5A
CRYPTOQUIPS 5A
OPINION 4A
SPORTS 1B
SUDOKU 5A
Sunny. Zero percent
chance of rain. Wind
SW at 10 mph.
To tell someone
you love them.
Index Don’t
Forget
Today’s
Weather
Forty-six, wintery mix
HI: 46
LO: 29
HELPING THE HOMELESS
UDK
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
WEEKEND EDITION
LAWRENCE
EMILY DONOVAN
news@kansan.com
Local woman finds needed support through Lawrence Community Shelter
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Lawanna Crow, a 49-year-old woman from Wichita, has been sober for two and a half years. After seeking help
from the Lawrence Community Shelter, she now volunteers at the shelter’s kitchen and is taking classes at the
Adult Learning Center in Lawrence to prepare for the GED test.

“You don’t care who you hurt.
All you worried about is that
next high.”
LAWANNA CROW
Lawrence citizen
SEE HELP PAGE 3A
CAMPUS
Student Senate addresses social media policy
AMELIA ARVESEN
news@kansan.com
SEASON TIPOFF
PAGE 1B Jayhawks have high expectations for the season
Lawrence Community
Shelter facts
— 125 beds available
— 40 family members, 85
single clients
— 75 percent male / 25
percent female
— One-third of clients stay
for fewer than 10 days. One
-third stay for 10 to 20 days.
One-third stay for more than
20 days.
— 501(c)3 private non-profit
usually at maximum capacity
in winter months
— In constant need of:
cereal, coffee, socks
Check out the video
on kansan.com
FRANK WEIRICH/KANSAN
Student Senate passed a resolution on Wednesday opposing the Kansas Board of Regents’ social media policy
that gives chancellors the right to penalize faculty or staff for improper social media use.
SEE SENATE PAGE 3A
With 6 million college
graduates currently
unemployed and future job
prospects looking bleak,
moving back home afer
graduation isn’t considered a
safety net anymore, it is nearly
a foregone conclusion.
According to recent fgures
from the Census Bureau, 1
in 3 young adults ages 18
to 34 live with their parents
or in-laws, which is leading
many students to believe
they should not distance
themselves too much from
home during their college
years. For students at the
University, this means calling
back home every once in a
while is a must.
Kyle Bishop, a sophomore
from Wichita, calls home
once a week, something he
said is necessary for everyone,
especially those who may feel
the need to move back home.
“I defnitely think people
should keep a close tie with
their family,” Bishop said. “It’s
important to keep in touch
in case things go wrong, you
want to have that safety net.
You want to be there for them
and they want to be there for
you.”
With the ability to stay
in touch through multiple
diferent platforms, like email,
text message and Facebook,
young adults and their
parents are fnding it much
easier to stay in constant
contact as well, which could
beneft their relationship. A
study from Brigham Young
University revealed that those
who connected with their
parents through Facebook
were more likely to have
positive social behavior than
those who didn’t.
But for Bishop, avoiding
Facebook and sticking to one
simple phone call a week is
enough.
“I try to stay away from
involvement with social
media and my family,”
Bishop said. “Texting I try
to keep to a minimum too.
It’s mainly just a phone call
to keep it concise. I think it’s
better that way.”
A recent study from the
University of Maryland
asked college students to
go 24 hours without cell
phones and social media,
and the results showed that
students had a difcult time
not speaking with their
parents. About 20 percent
of the students said they felt
most disconnected from
their mothers.
Carlie Hall, a sophomore
from Kansas City, Kan.,
said she felt this way in her
frst year at the University,
but the frequency she’s
called and visited home has
decreased signifcantly as
her time in Lawrence has
increased.
“My freshman year I
would always call my mom
on the weekends; I missed
her a lot,” Hall said. “I went
home every other weekend
too, but now I maybe go
once a month or less. I just
have a lot more to do now.
I’m more comfortable on
my own and Lawrence is
home now, K.C. isn’t.”
Ramon Guerrero, a second-
year student from Topeka, has
a slightly diferent perspective
when it comes to contacting
his parents. Guerrero spent
fve years in the military afer
high school before coming to
the University, and he said his
years spent abroad without
the ability to speak with
loved ones forced him to view
things a bit diferently.
“I found out calling home
ends up becoming a luxury,
you can just live your life,”
Guerrero said. “I frmly
believe the frst year being
away from home is the
hardest, but it makes the
meetings that much more
meaningful.”
Guerrero added that living
completely on your own can
be a scary concept, and may
make you want to give your
mom and dad a visit a little
more frequently.
“When everything’s in your
name, it’s just crazy,” Guerrero
said. “It makes you appreciate
family a lot more, it makes
you realize what they’ve done
for you.”
— Edited by Julie Etzler
What: Spring 2014 Engineering &
Computing Career Fair
When: Noon to 4 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, 5th floor
About: Employers will meet with
students from a number of engi-
neering and computing careers.
What: J Boog
When: 8 p.m.
Where: The Bottleneck
About: J Boog, a reggae singer
from California, will perform at the
Bottleneck. Advance tickets $13,
$15 at the door.
What: “Jayhawkers” film premiere
When: Friday, Feb. 14,
7 p.m. & 9 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 15,
11 a.m., 7 p.m. & 9 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 16,
1 p.m., 4 p.m. & 7 p.m.
Where: The Lied Center
About: Film professor Kevin Willmott’s
independent film starring Justin
Wesley as Wilt Chamberlain. General
admission $10.
What: Men’s basketball game vs.
TCU
When: 3 p.m.
Where: Allen Fieldhouse
About: The Jayhawks take on
the TCU Horned Frogs at Allen
Fieldhouse.
Calendar
Thursday, Feb. 13 Friday, Feb. 14 Saturday, Feb. 15 Sunday, Feb. 16
NEWS MANAGEMENT
Editor-in-chief
Katie Kutsko
Managing editor – production
Allison Kohn
Managing editor – digital media
Lauren Armendariz
Associate production editor
Madison Schultz
Associate digital media editor
Will Webber
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT
Advertising director
Sean Powers
Sales manager
Kolby Botts
Digital media and sales manager
Mollie Pointer
NEWS SECTION EDITORS
News editor
Emma LeGault
Associate news editor
Duncan McHenry
Sports editor
Blake Schuster
Associate sports editor
Ben Felderstein
Entertainment editor
Christine Stanwood
Special sections editor
Dani Brady
Head copy chief
Tara Bryant
Copy chiefs
Casey Hutchins
Hayley Jozwiak
Paige Lytle
Design chiefs
Cole Anneberg
Trey Conrad
Designers
Ali Self
Clayton Rohlman
Hayden Parks
Opinion editor
Anna Wenner
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Associate photo editor
Michael Strickland
ADVISERS
Media director and
content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 PAGE 2A
CONTACT US
editor@kansan.com
www.kansan.com
Newsroom: (785)-766-1491
Advertising: (785) 864-4358
Twitter: @KansanNews
Facebook: facebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the
student newspaper of the University
of Kansas. The first copy is paid
through the student activity fee.
Additional copies of The Kansan
are 50 cents. Subscriptions can
be purchased at the Kansan
business office, 2051A Dole Human
Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside
Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045.
The University Daily Kansan (ISSN
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more on what you’ve read in today’s
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KJHK is the student voice in radio.
Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae,
sports or special events, KJHK 90.7
is for you.
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1000 Sunnyside Avenue
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weather,
Jay?
What’s the
— weather.com
SATURDAY
HI: 50
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Cloudy. 10 pecent
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WSW at 18 mph.
Fifty is nifty.
FRIDAY
HI: 37
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Cloudy. Zero percent
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NW at 15 mph.
Thirty-seven ain’t heaven.
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Fifty-nine, feeling fine.
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What: KU Opera: The Tragedy of
Carmen
When: 2:30 p.m.
Where: Robert Baustian Theatre,
Murphy Hall
About: The KU School of Music
presents “The Tragedy of Car-
men.” Tickets $15 for adults, $10
for seniors and students. Tickets
available in 460 Murphy Hall.
WE’RE HERE TO LISTEN
LOCAL NUMBER: 785-841-2345
NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION
LIFELINE: 800-273-8255
"Caring Support Now. We Know How to Help."
FAMILY
Students stay connected with parents
CODY KUIPER
news@kansan.com
1 in 3 young adults ages 18-34 live with their
parents or inlaws.
Studies show young people who connect
with their parents on Facebook exhibit more
positive social behavior.
In a recent study, 20 percent of students
who did not use their phones or computers
for 24 hours said they felt most disconnect-
ed from their mothers.
QUICK HITS
The town of Verona, Italy
receives about 1,000
Valentines letters and cards
each year addressed to
Shakespeare’s Juliet.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 PAGE 3A THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
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checked her in, giving her one
of the shelter’s 125 beds, some
shampoo and soap, a warm
shower, three meals a day and
vouchers to buy clothing from
Walmart.
She enrolled in a savings
program, putting all of her
earnings into an account she
said she won’t touch until she’s
ready to rent a home of her
own. Te shelter found and
encouraged her to enroll in
a long-term substance abuse
program. It was there she
learned to live without drugs.
“If I wanted to take a step
in helping the people that’s
helping me, I couldn’t keep
going into that cycle,” Crow
said.
“You just have to stay on
top of it, one day at a time,”
said Loring Henderson, the
shelter’s executive director.
Henderson said the shelter
helps people to set a plan, to
become confdent they can
achieve their own goals and
to get the tools they need to
do so. Te shelter provides
medication for those who
need it and helps send clients
to other programs, such
as addiction counseling or
halfway housing. Te shelter
also provides bus passes so
clients like Crow can get to
class, or where they need to be,
and provides social support.
“I fgured, if these people
can see something in me,
there’s got to be something
there,” Crow said. “And I got
to get the help that I know I
need.”
Crow takes free science,
math, social studies, reading
and writing classes at the Adult
Learning Center to prepare
for the GED test. Math is her
favorite subject, even though
it’s also the hardest for her to
visualize. She listens and isn’t
afraid to ask questions if she
doesn’t understand.
“I’m determined today,”
Crow said. “I wanna reach
my goals and I want to be
successful. To fulfll my heart’s
desire, this is what I got to do.”
“Education is the number
one way to step up out of
poverty,” said Rick Henry,
director of the Adult Learning
Center. “Students who
graduate from high school or
have a GED have far higher
earning power than people
without a diploma.”
Crow volunteers now
too: opening the shelter’s
kitchen and selling “Change
of Heart,” Lawrence’s street
newspaper written for, by
and about homeless people.
Volunteering and going to
class helps her feel confdent,
reminding her she can have a
life without drugs and alcohol.
Once she gets her diploma,
Crow wants to help others
dealing with addiction as a
peer mentor in an addiction
counseling program.
“I want to be able to share
my experiences with them,”
she said. “Maybe they’ll want
to grab a hold and get their
lives together too.”
Te Lawrence Community
Shelter accepts food, item
and entertainment donations.
Volunteers can help serve
food or tutor. But, Crow said,
helping homelessness can
be as easy as saying hello to
someone on Massachusetts
Street.
“Some people just want you
to listen to them,” Crow said.
“It’s not necessarily giving all
the time. Some people might
just need a hug, you know?”
— Edited by Tara Bryant
HELP FROM PAGE 1A
TECHNOLOGY
French president visits Silicon Valley
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO —
France’s president met with
Silicon Valley and government
leaders in the heart of tech
country Wednesday, just days
afer a French regulator hit
Google with an embarrassing
regulatory slap and afer years
of eforts to wrest more taxes
from tech frms.
President Francois Hollande
was greeted at San Francisco
City Hall by Mayor Ed Lee,
California Lt. Gov. Gavin
Newsom and former U.S.
Secretary of State George
Shultz as school children
waved French and American
fags on the stairway of the
rotunda.
More than 300 French
companies have ofces in
California, and a large portion
of U.S. investments in France
are from California, Hollande
told the crowd at a City Hall
reception in his honor.
“It is here in California
that the world of tomorrow
is being invented,” Hollande
said. “For centuries, France
has wanted to change the
world. Together, we can.”
Later in the day, Hollande
and members of his cabinet
had lunch at a French
restaurant with Google
executive chairman Eric
Schmidt; Sheryl Sandberg,
chief operating ofcer of
Facebook; and Twitter
chairman and co-founder Jack
Dorsey.
Most of the luncheon was
closed to the media, and no
details of the discussions were
released.
Hollande points to the U.S.
tech industry as an economic
success that he hopes to
replicate at home. But he’s
also been among the leaders
of Europe’s fght to prevent
what the continent sees as a
systematic attempt by tech
frms to invade privacy and
avoid paying their corporate
fair share.
Hollande later met with
French entrepreneurs
and inaugurated an ofce
in the gritty Dogpatch
neighborhood aimed at
supporting their eforts to
gain a foothold in Silicon
Valley. Tat meeting also was
mostly private.
Marie Buhot-Launay, who
heads marketing for the
ofce, said staf members
were giddy that Hollande
was throwing government
support behind the venture,
given the intense competition
French innovators face from
competitors in Germany,
Finland and Ireland.
“For French entrepreneurs,
the American dream still
exists and especially in Silicon
Valley,” she said.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
French president Francois Hollande, at right, waves as he arrives at city hall on Wednesday in San Francisco.
The French president visited San Francisco to meet politicians, lunch with Silicon Valley tech executives and
inaugurate a new U.S.-French Tech Hub.
recommendations to deal
with social media use
boundaries.
Other business discussed
at the meeting included the
following:
·Student senators who
attended the Higher
Education Day in Topeka on
Tuesday declared meetings
with legislators a success but
they will continue to work
toward the elimination of
textbook sales tax.
·Education Opportunity
Fund hearings begin this
weekend. Fee, block and line
hearings will be conducted
in the following weeks.
— Edited by Katie Gilbaugh
SENATE FROM PAGE 1A
T
here is no shortage
of environmental
causes these days.
Between saving the whales
and “going green” it seems
everyone has a cause they’re
supporting. While this has
helped promote a sense of
environmentalism among
millions of people, the
eforts of environmental
organizations in recent
years have yet to yield a
strategy for changing one of
the biggest contributors to
global warming: the exhaust
expelled by millions of cars
every day.
According to a 2011 report
released by Ward Auto,
the total number of cars
in the world has surpassed
the 1 billion mark. Te
United States contributes
the largest number of cars
at approximately 239.8
million vehicles.
Not only do these millions
of vehicles clog America’s
highways, they contribute
unprecedented pollution
to the atmosphere.
According to an article
in Te Washington Post,
global vehicle emissions
account for approximately
23 percent of all greenhouse
emissions around the
world.
One would think that
combating such a large
contributor to global
warming would be a top
priority for environmental
organizations. But little
has been done to curb
the increasing emissions
pumped into the
atmosphere, particularly in
nations like China, whose
population is expected to
only increase its demand for
vehicles in the coming years.
One viable option for
combating climate change
while also increasing the
efciency of American
transportation is the
adoption of a mass transit
system similar to that of
Europe’s bullet trains. Tese
trains use only a fraction of
the fuel than widely used
modes of transportation,
all while transporting
thousands of commuters
every day.
So if the mass transit
system adopted by Europe
has proved so efective
in decreasing trafc and
greenhouse gas emissions,
why has the United States
been so slow to adopt such
a system?
One reason may be
the unique culture of
the United States, where
individuality is favored
more than communal
activities, making the
commute on a high-speed
train less appealing than
a one-person commute.
In addition, the American
highway system, which
has been in place or
under construction since
former President Dwight
Eisenhower approved it in
1956, would cost untold
millions — if not billions —
to uproot and replace with
train tracks.
Te costs to create and
maintain a mass transit
system in the United States
may come with serious
costs, but the benefts of
such a system, should it
come to be, would help to
combat one of the most
serious causes of global
warming. Millions of people
would be able to travel long
distances more efciently
and with less of an efect
on the environment. If the
United States were to adopt
such a system, the world
would be one step closer
to establishing a greener
and more sustainable
environment.
Rob Pyatt is a junior from
St. Joseph, Mo. studying
journalism.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 PAGE 4A
To the gaggle of giggling girls at
Anschutz everyday, all day, take
your courtship else where, I have
work to do.
Let’s be honest, the Olympics jokes
are ‘Sochi’eesy this year.
1. Mascots are not costumes 2. Yes
sometimes we smile in suit
As Friday approaches and single
women are disheartened by not
having a date for Valentine’s Day,
here is my message to you: you are
all BEAUTIFUL in EVERY way! Don’t
ever forget that.
I hate that I am so diligent a stu-
dent I don’t have time to get free
condoms. #ProtectYourLilJay
Actually, they have audio of Orr
saying ‘piece of crap’, so it’s a
fact.
Imagine Gordon Ramsay playing
Flappy Bird.
Corbin girls why you so cold. Take
my (whole) bag of pizza rolls =(
Shout out to whoever does the
weather section in the UDK for
using Beatles lyrics!
To the person who cut in the
chicken cheddar wrap line at the
Underground. You’re the scum of
the earth.
I promise that 3d model I was
working on in class wasn’t a
penis... It just kinda really looked
like one
Reading the FFA and realizing you
missed a word or had bad gram-
mar is a good indicator on how the
previous day was for you
Robinson to snow in ten minutes...
Holy s***
Whenever I eat Lunchables, I will
ALWAYS think about school field
trips as a kid
Good thing everyone on campus
knows I’m the guy who choked
on a hot dog at E’s the other day
and had to go to the ER,
I feel really cool
Dear in need of a cuddle
buddy, I can help
KU #randomraps - eating a sand-
wich in the cold, call it subzero
If I marry my current boyfriend,
I’d be an art teacher with the last
name Stoner. How appropriate.
Psssshht...Valentine’s day.
Whatever, just another Friday.
There’s a time and place for
talking on the phone. Please feel
free to find somewhere private
instead of broadcasting your life
to the library. Thanks
Text your FFA
submissions to
(785) 289–8351 or
at kansan.com
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@AndreaXStewartX
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it’s just another day...nothing to
celebrate
@lauwrenorder
@KansanOpinion House of Cards
Season 2! WHOO!
@elenacleaves
@KansanOpinion Splitting a heart-
shaped pizza with my lady friend
while we each drown in our own
bottle of pink moscato
What are your plans
for Valentine’s Day?
FFA OF THE DAY


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O
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your opinions, and we just might publish them.
NATIONAL
Government should invest
in alternative transportation
T
here is a new
discrimination. One
that everyone struggles
with, even me. I am 19 years
old. I haven’t seen much of the
world, but the little bit that I
have seen is enough to teach me
a few things. Discrimination
in our generation is not the
same as it was in 1960. Today,
we fght a diferent battle, the
battle of self-discrimination.
Te Oxford dictionary
defnes discrimination as “the
unjust or prejudicial treatment
of diferent categories of
people or things, esp. on the
grounds of race, age, or sex.”
Self-discrimination occurs
when a minority in a situation
separates itself from the
majority. For instance, on the
frst day of class two minority
girls freeze before sitting in
opposite corners of the room.
If not the corners, then the
back of the room, separating
themselves from the majority.
Another example: Mrs. E’s.
I’m by myself, searching the
bustling room for a place to
sit and eat. Some people look
at me, others don’t. Finally, I
fnd a seat in the corner. What
do I do? Well, I do what most
lone diners do: I take out my
phone. I always wonder what
people would think if they saw
me checking the weather 15
times. Several times I’ve seen
other students do the same
thing. I’ve watched student
afer student walk by without
giving a glance toward a lone
diner. Tey may think, “Tey
look like they don’t want to
be bothered.” Well if you were
sitting by yourself with only
the weather app to accompany
you, wouldn’t you look a little
melancholy?
Naturally, minorities feel
hesitant to integrate with the
majority and the majority
feels hesitant to blend with
minorities. Tis results in
isolation and separation. From
the observations I’ve made
on campus, minorities are
mainly sitting in the corners.
Some people may not want
to be bothered or may be
shy, but essentially the issue
is our constant struggle to
understand diferent cultures.
Discrimination starts with
you and me—inside our
minds. Racial boundaries
and tension still only exist
because our minds allow them
to. Tere aren’t any Jim Crow
laws, dictators, or constitutions
that institutionalise separation.
You never will know what that
person would’ve said if you sat
and ate with them unless you
try.
Yes, there will be times you’ll
be rejected. Some people will
not want you to integrate
yourself into their group. You’re
afraid to try, and that teaches
you that there are intangible
boundaries that must never
be crossed. Discrimination
doesn’t have a preference. All
that matters is you. It doesn’t
matter if you are the minority
of the situation; don’t be afraid
to reach out.
Crystal Bradshaw is a
freshman studying English.
By Crystal Bradshaw
opinion@kansan.com
CULTURE
Self-discrimination
leads to isolation
By Chris Ouyang
opinion@kansan.com
E
nergy independence
is the idea that the
U.S. can be energy
self-sufcient. You might
have heard clamoring about
it before. Perhaps political
unrest aficts oil-rich region
X and then the price of
gasoline at the QuikTrip on
23rd Street rises. If only the
U.S. didn’t need those pesky
other countries that can’t
seem to be politically stable;
if only the U.S. was energy
independent!
See, I’m all for oil and gas
exploration and production,
but proclaiming the potential
for energy independence is
equivalent to advocating some
extreme environmentalist
position that the world
will run exclusively on
solar power. Setting energy
independence as a goal is
even more preposterous, yet
some leading politicians and
oilmen do it anyway.
Te idea that the U.S. will
be energy independent is just
rhetoric. People use the fears
of past oil price shocks and
even the American distrust
for the Middle East to fuel
their agenda. Perhaps some
actually believe U.S. energy
independence is on the
horizon.
Let me be clear: barring
some unimaginable
technological feat, I doubt
energy independence is going
to happen. Tis is especially
true given the environmental
pressures on hydrocarbon
resources. Tere is too much
demand, and given ever
tightening regulations, not
enough domestic supply.
Tere are strong arguments
that energy trade isn’t all bad,
even stabilizing international
relations. I won’t get into that
here, but Roger Howard’s
2008 “An Ode to Oil” in the
Wall Street Journal is a must-
read.
But frms and people in
power continue to talk about
“energy independence,”
which confuses the public
and stirs up an ugly version
of nationalism, as if it’s un-
American to be realistic
about trade. In a world
complete with sophisticated
exchanges and complex trade
channels, claiming that one
day the U.S. won’t need oil
from other countries is a pipe
dream.
Ten how can the U.S.
protect itself from dominant
oil suppliers? How can we
guarantee, when we graduate
from the University, that our
quality of life will continue to
improve (demanding more
and more energy)?
Te simplest answer is
that we cannot, at least not
completely. Tat’s scary, but
it’s the truth, unlike promises
of energy independence.
As energy authority
Daniel Yergin once claimed,
energy security — a certain
resilience and adaptability —
is a much more reasonable
goal. Changing that one
word, independence, to
security, has signifcance. It’s
not a matter of semantics;
rather, there is this implied
understanding that trade
is not evil, and a diversity
of suppliers is what secures
the energy future. Pursuing
hydrocarbons domestically
is fne, just don’t use “energy
independence” rhetoric to
gain supporters.
Chris Ouyang is a senior
from Overland Park studying
petroleum engineering
and economics.
By Rob Pyatt
opinion@kansan.com
ENVIRONMENT
US should pursue energy security, not independence
FOR ONLINE CONTENT
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014
E
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AH, VALENTINE’S DAY…
Whether you love it or hate it,
it comes around every
February 14th. Flowers, choc-
olates, cupids, greeting cards,
kisses, lovebirds, hearts and
lace, they all represent this
complicated holiday steeped in
fascinating history and mytho-
logical mystery.
If you’re the type who is “in
love with love,” you’ll go all out
on this special day.
If you’re the type who’d rather
skip the whole month of Febru-
ary, you’ll just need to grin and
bear it!
But if you have to acknowl-
edge Valentine’s Day, before
you head out for a high-priced
dinner of campus, consider en-
joying a special Valentine’s Day
meal with KU Dining, and put
the dollars you’ll save toward
movie tickets, a bouquet, or a
nice sensible gif, like a singing
teddy bear!
KU’s three campus dining
centers—Mrs. E’s in Lewis
Hall, Oliver Dining in Oliver
Hall and North College Café in
GSP—will be serving a special
menu for dinner on Friday,
February 14th. Created with
care by the chefs in KU Dining,
you don’t want to miss out
on a great line up of foodie
favorites: grilled KC strip
steak, golden brown butterfy
shrimp, baked potatoes, fresh
sautéed veggies, and a boun-
tiful salad bufet.
Afer dinner, impressive
dessert bars will round out
the meal at each of the dining
centers: chocolate fondue
with fresh fruits, pretzels,
marshmallows and brownie
bites at Oliver Dining; fresh
strawberry pie and decadent
chocolate chunk cookies at
Mrs. E’s; and Tiramisu, fresh
strawberries and an ultimate
chocolate mousse cake at
North College Cafe.
Tose who have a KU meal
plan or KU Cuisine Cash are
set. Guests of our residents
can use a “guest pass,” a
beneft of those who have
dining plans, or they may pay
the $9.50 door price, which is
still one great deal.
What!? No valentine?
Even if you don’t have a spe-
cial someone this year, KU
Dining wants you to be their
valentine and join them for
dinner, made with love!
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Lawrence is ofen considered
to be one of the best places in
Kansas for live music and 2014
is shaping up to be a great year
for concerts. With the sheer
volume of bands that come to
Lawrence, it can be difcult
to fgure out which shows are
worth seeing. Well don’t worry,
here are just a few picks of
shows that are guaranteed to
be great.
First up, at the Granada,
located at 1020 Massachusetts
St., on Feb. 18 will be the
soulful styling of Mayer
Hawthorne. Hawthorne
may not look like the kind
of guy you would normally
see singing neo-soul but
once he opens his mouth all
preconceived notions are
thrown out the window. If
you’re a fan of ‘70s style soul
music with a modern touch,
you will not want to miss this
show.
Also at the Granada on
March 7 will be progressive
metal group Between the
Buried and Me, if you’re
looking for something a little
heavier. Te Granada has
hosted plenty of great metal
bands over the last few months
and this show should be no
diferent. Between the Buried
and Me are known for their
complex rifs and eclectic
instrumentation that can go
from intense to melodic in the
span of ten seconds. Tis show
is sure to be one that metal
fans will not want to miss.
For fans of indie music,
on March 10 at Liberty Hall,
located at 644 Massachusetts
St., Dr. Dog will be
performing. Dr. Dog’s music
features a unique blend of
power pop melodies with
crunchy ‘60s style guitars.
I hate to use the term
“Beatlesque” because I feel it
gets overused but I would say
that that is an apt description
of Dr. Dog’s music. Whether
you’ve heard all their songs
before or you’re a new fan,
Dr. Dog will have you singing
along with all of their songs.
Finally, for fans looking for
something a little more local
check out SXSW Bound, I
Heart Local Music’s Lawrence
showcase to raise money
to send bands down to the
South by Southwest festival in
Austin, Texas. SXSW Bound
takes place over the course of
two days on Feb. 21 and 22 at
the Jackpot Music Hall located
at 943 Massachusetts St. Tis
event features Lawrence
musical staples such as lo-f
artist CS Luxem, garage
rockers Psychic Heat and
hip-hop star Approach, among
others. Tis event is sure to be
a great time for lovers of local
music and helps support these
artists’ eforts to expand.
— Edited by Alec Weaver
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is an 8
Group projects go well now and
for the next three weeks with
Mercury in Aquarius. Don’t sweat
the small stuff right now. Cuddle
up with a loved one and make
some magic. What could you
create together?
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7
Resume your leadership role.
Schedule more carefully for the
next three weeks, as tests and
challenges can arise with Mercury
in Aquarius. It’s easier to get
distracted. Maintain an active
social schedule, and stay in
communication.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is an 8
Increase the level of organiza-
tion. Discuss philosophical ideas
and make long-range plans.
The communication style could
change abruptly. For about three
weeks with Mercury in Aquarius,
you’ll be good at finding ways
around problems.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 9
Financial planning provides
power. Figure out prices, and send
invoices. Track your earnings and
revise your budget. Review state-
ments for errors. For about three
weeks with Mercury in Aquarius,
discover new sources of revenue.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 9
Ask for counsel from a master.
Team communication reaches a
new level. For about three weeks
with Mercury in Aquarius, let your
partner take the lead. Negotiate
creatively. Many views give a
broader picture.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 7
Put technology to work in new
ways over the next few weeks.
Discussions take on a more
logical form. For three weeks with
Mercury in Aquarius, your work
gets more interesting, and your
cleverness shines.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is an 8
Work on creative writing, art or
music over the next three weeks
with Mercury in Aquarius. You’ll
learn new games and computer
programs quickly. Study with
talented friends. Play together,
and gain new chops.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is an 8
Make up a list of intended im-
provements. Make choices around
style, color and size or scale.
For three weeks with Mercury
in Aquarius, you’ll do your best
thinking at home. Communicate
virtually, rather than traveling.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 9
Things seem easier to under-
stand for the next few weeks,
with Mercury in Aquarius. Writing
flows. You get fascinated by
complexities, and entranced in
analysis. Review the stats. Con-
sider how they affect business.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is an 8
Thoughts become more logical,
and there’s lots of money to be
made over the next three weeks,
with Mercury in Aquarius. Devise
an earning strategy, and plot your
course. Move ahead confidently,
with bold action.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 9
You’re more objective over the
next three weeks with Mercury in
Aquarius, and learn quickly. Begin
a logical, rational cycle. Tell your
personal story. Get your partner
involved. Discuss the direction to
move forward.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 9
Take more time for quiet contem-
plation over the next three weeks,
with Mercury in Aquarius. Com-
pletion is top priority. Your dreams
are trying to tell you something.
Take notes on realizations and
insights. Meditate.
MUSIC
2014 brings promising
live music to Lawrence
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HOLLYWOOD
Film, TV industry’s
diversity doesn’t look like
America’s, study says
Hollywood still isn’t reflecting
the nation’s diversity in its
entertainment products, and that
omission is costing the industry
considerable amounts in lost
revenues.
That’s the main conclusion of
a comprehensive report about
diversity in the film and TV industry
released Wednesday by UCLA’s
Ralph J. Bunche Center for African
American Studies.
The study, which is titled “2014
Hollywood Diversity Report:
Making Sense of the Disconnect,”
finds that minorities and women
are represented far below their
corresponding percentages in the
general population.
“The fact is that America is
becoming more and more diverse,
but the Hollywood industry hasn’t
kept up,” said Darnell Hunt, the
lead author of the report and the
center’s director. “There’s been a
little progress, but it’s been at a
glacial pace. Hollywood is woefully
out of touch with an emerging
America.”
Hunt said that while executives
at Hollywood studios and networks
repeatedly maintain that diversity
is important, there seems to be
little progress.
“They don’t see diversity as being
good for the marketplace,” said
Hunt. “They only address it when
there’s protest and the cage is
rattled.”
The report analyzed more than
1,000 TV shows on 68 different
cable and broadcast networks
during the 2011-2012 season, and
also 172 American-made movies in
2011. Researchers examined the
level of diversity in front of and
behind the camera, the rosters of
Hollywood’s most prominent talent
agencies, and the winners of
Oscars, Emmys and other honors.
The year in film in 2011 seemed
to typify the underrepresentation
of minorities. In that year,
minorities had lead roles in just
under 11 percent of the 172 films
considered. Meanwhile, according
to the latest data from the U.S.
Census, non-white minorities
account for about 36 percent of the
nation’s population.
— Associated Press
By Jacob Waters
entertain@kansan.com
At 9 p.m. on Tuesday, Te
Studio in Hashinger Hall
was jamming, but not with
its everyday usual customer
conversation, the hum of
blenders, MTV blaring on the
television, and the noise of
cards being called out over the
intercom. No, tonight it was
the original jams of Lawrence’s
own CS Luxem and Dean
Monkey and the Dropouts.
Dean Monkey and the
Dropouts took the stage frst.
Being a group of eight members
allowed them to steal a second
glance from those who walked
by, but once their music started
playing many were forced by
the power of good tunes to sit
down and listen. Te mixture
of the two female voices along
with the male lead singer
gave Dean Monkey and the
Dropouts a very appealing and
warming quality. Te fact that
not just one person sang each
song was very entertaining and
gave them an edge that many
other up-and-coming bands
lack. With their do-op style and
quirky eight members, Dean
Monkey and the Dropouts set
the tone right for a night of fun,
upbeat music.
As Christopher Luxem (the
leader of the band CS Luxem)
took the stage, a transformation
had occurred. During
interviews the Christopher
presented wore a red beanie
and rounded out eye-glasses
that one would see from the
‘60s era. But as Christopher
mounted the stage, both of
those accessories were gone
and in their place was a square
box that was covered in rugs
sitting right beside him. Te
box is actually a machine that
gives Christopher the ability to
alternate and distort his vocal
patterns through his songs,
giving his music a psychedelic
efect. Te music that came
from him and his three other
band members ranged so
extreme it was hard to keep up.
From partly screamo at times
to very indie, there was never
a dull moment during the
performance.
Te concert was most
defnitely a success. By the
amount of foot tapping,
humming along and complete
concentration on the music
coming from the stage, the
students of the University, as
well as the other guests who
came to support, enjoyed the
show and not only embraced
these not so normal styles of
music but thoroughly enjoyed
them as well.
INTO THE MINDS OF
MUSICIANS
Te Studio at Hashinger Hall
hosted two local Lawrence
bands this past Tuesday,
Feb. 11, Dean Monkey and
the Dropouts along with CS
Luxem. Not only did these
fne musicians bring their
skill and musical talent, they
also provided a good insight
into the minds and thought
processes of a local musician.

DEAN MONKEY AND THE
DROPOUTS
Dean Monkey and the
Dropouts is a quirky, wacky,
yet brilliant band that consists
of eight members, six males
and two female singers. Out
of these eight members, four
of them are KU graduates. Te
band was formed in 2011 and
has undergone drastic group
member changes as well as
genre changes over the course
of three years. Te questions
listed below were answered by
the band’s very own Max Yoder
and Sam Michie.

Q: What do you enjoy most
about playing for small crowds?
What makes it worth it?
A: I like to see people dancing
and singing along with us- Sam
We seem to force people to
react in some way and that’s
a key part of what we do. I
used to hate going to concerts
and just see people standing
around. – Max

Q: What makes you diferent
from other local bands?
A: We take ourselves a little
less seriously than we should.
We dress up in costumes a lot,
too, like superheroes and on
Halloween we were the nativity
scene. – Sam

Q: Since there is such a big
group of you, do you all have
any band rituals or things that
you do before you go on stage?
A: We used to applaud for each
other. Not on stage but during
rehearsals. – Sam
It was kind of like an ego boost
for one another – Max
Q: Do you have any advice for
aspiring musicians who one
day hope to be performing like
you?
A: It’s really helpful to be a
part of a community of bands,
it’s also helpful to integrate
yourself in the community.
– Max

CS LUXEM
CS Luxem is a group of four
whose lead singer’s name is also
the name of the band. What CS
Luxem lacks in size it makes
up for in variety. Ranging from
mild screamo to funky indie all
tied together for a psychedelic
kick, along with technology
that allows Christopher
Luxem to bring sound efects
to his voice that one can
get in a music studio, to the
stage. Christopher provided
the answers to the following
questions.

Q: What do you enjoy the
most about playing in front of
crowds?
A: I like playing for rooms the
most. Exploring how to fll the
space. I love music but I like
sounds the most.
Q: Where do you hope to see
yourself in fve years?
A: I’ll perform till I die. Tere
are various degrees of success.
Te idea of celebritism isn’t
appealing to me because it
becomes all about gossip. Tere
really is no end goal for me.

Q: What advice would you give
to the kids who one day want to
be musicians such as yourself
one day?
A: Te most important thing
is just to do things and not be
discouraged. It’s important
to do as much as you can, the
more you do the better you get.
Q: What makes you diferent
from other local bands?
A: Te idea of the sounds we are
creating. Te type of sounds we
choose and where we decide to
take those sounds specifcally
recorded and live, especially
with vocal exploration.
Lawrence is home to
hundreds of artistic souls just
waiting for their time to shine.
For Dean Monkey and the
Dropouts as well as CS Luxem,
they are just a few of the many
stars waiting their turn. Until
then they will continue to
bring great music to the college
students of the University as
well as to the town that made
them who they are.
— Edited by Brook Barnes
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6A
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RELATIONSHIPS
SINGLE ON V-DAY
Not all single people dread Valentine’s Day
For those who assume their
single counterparts spend
Valentine’s Day indulging in
emotions, carbs and self-pity,
you’re very wrong. Although
Valentine’s Day has been
glorified in the media as a
holiday for single people to
dread, that is simply not the
case for single Jayhawks. This
year, students will do a lot of
different things to celebrate,
but being sad isn’t one of
them.
Steve Hetro, senior from Overland Park
“Everyone should be with people that they enjoy being around on
Valentine’s Day. Just because you are not dating anyone doesn’t
mean that you have to spend the day by yourself,” Hetro said.
“Go out and ask someone who is close to you and spend the day
with him or her. Valentine’s Day is a day where everyone should
make someone the focus and make them feel special.”
Hetro
Lawrence restaurants don’t expect to see a huge difference in traffic on Valentine’s Day, possibly
just more couples. Kristen Indihar, a waitress and bartender at Lawrence’s On the Border, hopes to
see an increase in single Jayhawks Friday night.
“I think we are going to see a wide variety of people on Friday,” Indihar said. “We’re nice enough
to be a date spot, but we get a lot of friend groups, too. Plus, who can deny good queso and margs?”
By Mac Leander
entertain@kansan.com
Students have plenty of options for celebrating the day of love, whether it’s with friends, family,
at restaurants or local bars, it’ll be an evening of fun for both couples and singles. For Jayhawks,
Valentine’s Day is not for exclusively loving a significant other, but loving all the important people
who make up their lives.
— Edited by Katie Gilbaugh
Erin O’Sullivan, senior from Chicago
“I think the real idea of the holiday is to
demonstrate and tell those you care about that
they mean so much to you, whether they are your
significant other or just a close friend or family
member,” O’Sullivan said. “These are important
people in your life, so why not make the day?” O’Sullivan
Clayton Anderson, senior from Wichita
“It’s just like any other day to me right now.
Love is no more important on the 14th than
any other day. If someone wants affection,
I’d give that to them because I want to, not
really to prove anything about Valentine’s
Day.” Anderson
Jayhawks wanting to go out this Friday should check out how local bars are accommodating
singles. Zach Kuipers, manager at Tonic & Mass St Pub, is excited to celebrate Valentine’s Day with
singles by serving drinks in a diaper and handing out a free item to signify whether an individual
is looking for love or taken.
“It has been said that 1 out of every 5 relationships start at Tonic, but I base this off no research
whatsoever,” Kuipers said. “Yours truly will be serving up Cupid’s potion drinks all night long in a
diaper.”
Cassidy Beckham, sophomore from Wichita
“I definitely don’t think single people should feel
bad on Valentine’s Day,” Beckham said. “To me
it’s about celebrating those you love and those
that love you. It doesn’t necessarily have to be a
boyfriend or girlfriend.”
Beckham
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Barbie to feature in this year’s SI Swimsuit issue
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Afer 50
years of debate over her
unattainably perfect fgure,
Barbie now is unapologetic
about her tiny waist and
endless legs.
To prove it? Te doll,
which is made by Mattel,
is faunting her frame in
Sports Illustrated Swimsuit’s
50th anniversary issue that’s
hitting stands on Tuesday.
She’ll be featured alongside
supermodels like Christie
Brinkley and Brooklyn
Decker as part of a campaign
called “unapologetic.”
“As a legend herself, and
under constant criticism
about her body and how she
looks, posing ... gives Barbie
... and her fellow legends
an opportunity to own who
they are,” Mattel said in a
statement.
Te campaign is a departure
for the 55-year old doll,
which has been both beloved
as a plaything and criticized
as an unrealistic standard of
beauty for decades.
In fact, Barbie has faced
scrutiny for everything from
her chiseled facial features
and disproportionately small
waist to her “life choices.”
And last year, an artist
renewed controversy over
Barbie’s efect on body image
afer an artist posted pictures
of the more meaty physique
the doll would have if she
had the fgure of an average
19-year-old.
Mattel has tried to change
Barbie with the times. Te
doll has gone through several
reinventions, including
150 careers, from architect
to lifeguard, and a brief
publicity-stunt breakup with
her boyfriend Ken.
But this latest move, which
again sparked online debate
on Wednesday about body
image issues, comes as Mattel
tries to revive interest in the
doll icon. Barbie is worth an
estimated $1.3 billion in sales
for the toymaker and she’s the
No. 1 toy brand.
But Barbie has lost some
popularity in recent years
to edgier toys like Mattel’s
Monster High dolls with their
tattoos and neon hair. In fact,
Barbie has had declining sales
in fve of the last six quarters,
with sales falling 13 percent
in the most recent quarter.
Mattel hopes the
“unapologetic” campaign will
boost Barbie’s image.
As part of the campaign,
there will be a collector
Sports Illustrated Barbie
doll, an event at the Sports
Illustrated Swimsuit Beach
House on Monday, a billboard
in New York’s Times Square
and @Barbie tweets with
the hashtag “unapologetic”
on Twitter. Barbie also will
appear on the cover of 1,000
issues in an advertising “cover
wrap” for the New York Toy
Fair, which starts Sunday.
Spending for the campaign
was undisclosed.
“Unapologetic” is a word
that Mattel executives
use internally, said Lisa
McKnight, the senior vice
president at Mattel. But she
said this is the frst time the
company is “engaging in a
conversation publicly.”
Sports Illustrated Swimsuit
editor MJ Day said Barbie fts
in with the swimsuit issues’
“message of empowerment”
for women.
But Allen Adamson, a
branding expert, said he’s
not sure a feature in Sport’s
Illustrated’s swimsuit issue
is the right strategy for the
brand.
“Te Sports Illustrated
swimsuit issue is one
step away from Playboy
magazine,” he said. “It is
potentially sending the wrong
message to girls.”
ASSOCIATED PRESS
This image provided by Sports Illustrated on Tuesday shows the cover-wrap of the magazine’s 50th anniversary
annual swimsuit issue.

“The Sports Illustrated swim-
suit issue is one step away
from Playboy magazine.”
ALLEN ADAMSON
Branding expert
TELEVISION
‘Dads’ may retain spot in Fox lineup after racist joke
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LOS ANGELES — On Fox’s
Stage 20 in Century City,
tension was building during
a rehearsal of the television
network’s freshman comedy
“Dads.”
Te disharmony had
nothing to do with the cloud
that has hung over “Dads”
since even before its launch
last September when it
was savaged by a plethora
of national TV critics and
bloggers who declared the
Seth MacFarlane series
humorless, not to mention
misogynistic and racist.
Instead, this brewing
confict was internal and
of a comic nature. David
(Peter Riegert), one of the
politically incorrect titular
fathers, and Edna (Tonita
Castro), his rotund Mexican
housekeeper who speaks in
broken English, were fghting
over the remote control. He
wanted to watch “Homeland,”
she wanted to tune into “Real
Housewives of Guadalajara.”
“’Homeland’ — always the
same,” said Edna in her heavy
accent, as she made loopy
gestures around her head
in reference to the show’s
troubled heroine Carrie
Mathison. “’I crazy. I crazy.’
KA-BOOM!”
Eventually, the “Homeland”
joke was cut, but surprisingly,
given the social media
frestorm that greeted it
weeks before its fall premiere,
the series has not been — yet.
Despite a rocky start, the
program, which wrapped up
its frst season Tuesday, is still
alive and has not been ruled
out for a slot on next season’s
schedule.
Tough whether
“Dads” returns won’t be
announced for months, Fox
Entertainment Chairman
Kevin Reilly, who gave the
series a full season pickup
soon afer it premiered,
continues to be a cheerleader
for the series.
“I think ‘Dads’ has come
a long way,” Reilly told TV
reporters and critics last
month. “If you’ve actually
watched the show — and
secretly I know some of you
are because I’ve heard from a
few people who have quietly
admitted that it’s actually
kind of funny — it is funny.
Te cast is as good as any on
television. It makes me laugh.
... Tey’ve smoothed out
some of the choppiness that
they had in the pilot.”
Since its return midseason
break in January, the comedy
has performed steadily,
scoring its highest ratings in
the last three weeks since its
premiere and maintaining an
audience around 3.8 million.
(In December, however, the
network announced it was
reducing the show’s back
order of episodes from nine
to six, making its frst season
19 episodes, not the usual 22.)
At least publicly, the
network’s executives express
support for the show
built around a couple of
thirtysomething men whose
lives are upended when their
cranky fathers move in with
them. “We really like the
material and what’s being
done,” said Suzanna Makkos,
Fox’s head of comedy.
Tat’s welcome news to the
show’s producers, who blame
the initial outcry against
the show at the summer TV
press tour for undercutting
its ratings. Tey say a mob
mentality among critics and
bloggers mischaracterized the
show as perpetuating racial
stereotypes and ofensive
humor.
“It hurt the show,” said
executive producer Alec
Sulkin. “We were surprised
and unhappy that the show
got that response. Racism is
such a tricky word, and once
that fnger has been pointed,
it’s easier for a group to agree
than for someone to disagree,
and there are people out there
who still have that perception
about us.”
Te reaction stunned
executives, particularly
because the show hailed from
network favorite MacFarlane
and two of his key writers,
Sulkin and Wellesley Wild.
Te tone of the live-action
program, if anything, was
relatively subdued compared
with MacFarlane’s popular
animated “Family Guy”
series, in which jokes
involving races, ethnicity, sex
and religion are routine.
Much of the initial uproar
was directed at the show’s
premiere episode, in which
a character played by Brenda
Song dresses like a giggly
Asian schoolgirl — complete
with uniform and knee socks,
but with unbuttoned blouse
— for a business meeting
with Chinese investors. Of
the gathering, the show’s
other father, played by Martin
Mull, said: “Te Chinese are a
lovely and honorable people,
but you can’t trust them —
there’s a reason Shanghai is a
verb.”
“’Dads’ is so racist, and
so tremendously unfunny,”
wrote Alyssa Rosenberg,
features editor of the
TinkProgress website, who
was one of the more vocal
critics of the show. She labeled
the series “reprehensible” and
“morally wrong.”
Some of the show’s insiders
have been bewildered by the
onslaught, particularly when
other series that dabble in
ethnic stereotypes, such as
CBS’ “2 Broke Girls” and
“Mike and Molly” and ABC’s
“Modern Family” — seemed
to have escaped similar
criticism.
“I don’t quite understand
why this has happened,” said
Riegert. “But this is as much
fun as I’ve ever had working
on a project.”
MCCLATCHY TRIBUNE

“It hurt the show. We were
surprised and unhappy
that the show got that
response.”
ALEC SULKIN
“Dads” executive producer
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8A
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POLICY
Judge hears challenge of Texas’ gay marriage ban
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN ANTONIO — A lawyer
representing Texas asked a
federal judge Wednesday
to reject pleas from two gay
couples to suspend the state
constitution’s defnition of
marriage as between one
man and one woman, calling
the legalization of same-sex
marriages “a more recent
innovation than Facebook.”
Mike Murphy, an assistant
Texas solicitor general, told
District Judge Orlando
Garcia if he lifed the state’s
voter-approved ban on
gay marriage he would be
injecting himself into a social
and political debate that
should be lef to lawmakers.
“Tese questions are
political questions, not
constitutional rights,” he
told the court. “Same-sex
marriage is not included in
the fundamental right of
marriage ... it is a more recent
innovation than Facebook.”
Garcia scheduled
Wednesday’s hearing, which
he noted was on President
Abraham Lincoln’s birthday,
to consider a motion by two
couples for a preliminary
injunction immediately lifing
the Texas gay marriage ban
pending a trial later this year.
Garcia did not immediately
rule or give an indication
when he might release a
written decision but predicted
this case, or one of 22 similar
ones in other states, “will
make its way to the Supreme
Court.”
Te case before Garcia is
the frst of its kind in Texas,
and in the conservative
5th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals. Mark Phariss
and Victor Holmes fled a
federal civil rights lawsuit
complaining that Texas’ ban
unconstitutionally denies
them the fundamental right to
marry because of their sexual
orientation. Te other lawsuit
was fled by Cleopatra De
Leon and Nicole Dimetman,
who argue that Texas ofcials
are violating their rights
and those of their 2-year-
old child by not recognizing
their marriage license from
Massachusetts.
Holmes and De Leon are
both U.S. Air Force veterans
who served in San Antonio,
though both couples have
since moved away.
Texas Attorney General
Greg Abbott, a Republican
running for governor, opposes
legalizing gay marriage and
has vowed to defend the
law. But civil rights groups
recently won injunctions
against similar bans in Utah
and Oklahoma relying on the
same argument being cited in
the Texas case — that banning
gay marriage violates the
equal protection clause of the
14th Amendment.
Neel Lane, an attorney for
the two couples, dismissed
the state’s argument that
their rights were not violated
because they are free to marry
members of the opposite sex.
He said that’s like holding
someone’s head underwater
and saying the person is free
to breathe, just not air.
He also rejected Murphy’s
argument that lawmakers
did not exclude homosexuals
by passing the ban but were
trying to promote responsible
procreation.
“If marriage is good for
children, then it is irrational
to prohibit homosexual
couples who could have
children from being married,”
he said, pointing out that gays
may adopt children in Texas.
While Garcia listened to
arguments, another federal
judge decided Wednesday
that Kentucky must recognize
gay marriages performed
in other states. In a 23-page
ruling, U.S. District Judge
John G. Heyburn II concluded
that the government may
defne marriage and attach
benefts to it, but cannot
“impose a traditional or faith-
based limitation” without a
sufcient justifcation for it.
In his comments from the
bench, Garcia mentioned
key civil rights laws passed
afer the end of the Civil War
and pointed out that racial
segregation and bans on
interracial marriage were part
of American tradition until
federal judges declared them
unconstitutional.
Attorneys general in other
states have taken mixed
approaches to court challenges
to bans on gay marriage. Utah
and Oklahoma are fghting
rulings lifing their bans.
In Nevada and Virginia,
attorneys general have chosen
not to defend them.
Te couples denied that
they are trying to redefne
marriage or carve out a new
constitutional right.
“Marriage is something
when two people who are
committed to each other,
who love each other and
who want to demonstrate
that commitment,” Holmes
said. “I think that is what the
tradition is about and that
tradition should apply to us.”
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mark Phariss, left, holds the hand of partner Victor Holmes, center, as they leave the U.S. Federal Courthouse on Wednesday in San Antonio. District
Judge Orlando Garcia said Wednesday he would issue a decision later after the two Texas men filed a civil rights lawsuit seeking permission to marry,
and a lesbian couple sued to have their marriage recognized.

“If marriage is good for chil-
dren, then it is irrational to
prohibit homosexual couples
who could have children from
being married.”
NEEL LANE
Attorney
CRIME
Woman found guilty in cut-from-womb killing
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WORCESTER, Mass. — A
woman accused of killing her
pregnant friend three months
afer her own miscarriage
was convicted Wednesday of
beating and strangling her,
then cutting the baby from
her womb and passing the
child of as her daughter.
Julie Corey sobbed as a
Worcester Superior Court
jury found her guilty of the
2009 murder of 23-year-old
Darlene Haynes. Sentencing
was scheduled for Tuesday.
Prosecutors said Haynes was
eight months pregnant when
Corey attacked her and cut
the baby out of her body. Tey
told the jury that Corey had
been pregnant, too, but had
a miscarriage three months
earlier and told her boyfriend
and family that Haynes’ baby
was her own.
Corey’s lawyers contended
that police failed to follow
up on leads that could
have implicated other
potential suspects in the
killing, including Haynes’
ex-boyfriend. Tey also
suggested that Haynes’ ex-
boyfriend had given Corey
and her boyfriend, Alex Dion,
the baby. Dion denied that on
the witness stand.
Corey, 39, did not testify
during the trial.
Haynes’ body was found
in a closet in her apartment
on July 27, 2009. She had
been beaten in the head and
strangled with an electrical
cord. Her abdomen had been
cut open, and her baby was
gone.
Corey, Dion and Haynes’
baby were found two days
later at a homeless shelter in
Plymouth, N.H. Her lawyers
acknowledged that she was
found with the baby but said
she played no role in Haynes’
slaying.
Dion testifed that Corey,
whom he believed was
pregnant at the time, called
him on July 23, 2009, and told
him she was giving Haynes
a ride to a store. Later that
night, Corey called him to say
her water had broken and a
friend was taking her to the
hospital to give birth, Dion
said.
A couple of hours later,
Corey called him again
and said, “We had a baby,”
Dion testifed. Dion said
Corey arrived home the next
morning with a baby girl he
believed was his daughter. He
said he and Corey introduced
the baby to family and friends
over the next couple of days.
Te girl, now 4, lives with
her biological father.
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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 9A
HEALTH
Study disputes value of routine mammograms
ASSOCIATED PRESS
A Canadian study that many
experts say has major faws has
revived debate about the value
of mammograms. Te research
suggests that these screening
X-rays do not lower the risk
of dying of breast cancer while
fnding many tumors that do
not need treatment.
Te study gives longer
follow-up on nearly 90,000
women who had annual breast
exams by a nurse to check for
lumps plus a mammogram, or
the nurse’s breast exam alone.
Afer more than two decades,
breast cancer death rates were
similar in the two groups,
suggesting little beneft from
mammograms.
It’s important to note that
this study did not compare
mammograms to no screening
at all, as most other research
on this topic has. Many groups
have not endorsed breast
exams for screening because
of limited evidence that they
save lives.
Critics of the Canadian
study also say it used outdated
equipment and poor methods
that made mammograms look
unfairly inefective.
Te study was published
Wednesday in the British
journal BMJ. Many
studies have found that
mammography saves lives,
but how many and for what
age groups is debatable. It
also causes many false alarms
and overtreatment of cancers
never destined to become life-
threatening.
In the U.S., a government-
appointed task force that gives
screening advice does not
back mammograms until age
50, and then only every other
year. Te American Cancer
Society recommends them
every year starting at age 40.
Other countries screen less
aggressively. In Britain, for
example, mammograms are
usually ofered only every
three years.
Te Canadian study has long
been the most pessimistic on
the value of mammograms.
It initially reported that afer
fve years of screening, 666
cancers were found among
women given mammograms
plus breast exams versus 524
cancers among those given the
exams alone.
Afer 25 years of follow-up,
about 500 in each group died,
suggesting mammograms were
not saving lives. Te similarity
in the death rates suggests that
the 142 “extra” cancers caught
by mammograms represent
overdiagnosis — tumors not
destined to prove fatal, study
leaders concluded.
Te work was immediately
criticized. Te American
College of Radiology and
Society of Breast Imaging
called it “an incredibly
misleading analysis based
on the deeply fawed and
widely discredited” study.
Mammograms typically fnd
far more cancers than this
study did, suggesting the
quality was poor, the groups
contend.
In a letter posted by the
medical journal, Dr. Daniel
Kopans, a radiologist at
Harvard Medical School,
described outdated machines
and methods he saw in 1990,
when he was one of the experts
asked to review the quality of
mammograms used in the
study.
“I can personally attest to
the fact that the quality was
poor,” he wrote. “To save
money they used secondhand
mammography machines”
that gave poor images, failed
to properly position breasts
for imaging, and did not
train radiologists on how to
interpret the scans, he wrote.
Te study leader, Dr.
Anthony Miller of the
University of Toronto, said
it was “completely untrue”
that inferior equipment or
methods were used.
Still, the study highlights the
fact that mammograms are
an imperfect tool that lead to
many false alarms, needless
biopsies and treatment of
many tumors that would never
threaten a woman’s life.
“Overdiagnosis is not an
anomaly in the study from
Canada. Tis has been
compellingly demonstrated
in research from the U.S. and
Europe,” said another study
leader, Dr. Cornelia Baines of
the University of Toronto.
Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, a
professor of medicine at the
Dartmouth Institute for Health
Policy and Clinical Practice
in New Hampshire, spoke on
the issue at the San Antonio
Breast Cancer Symposium in
December.
“Screening is a choice, not
a public health imperative.
Tere are trade-ofs here,” he
said.
“Te people who stand to
gain the most from screening
are the people at greatest risk
of the disease” — older women
who are more likely to have
breast cancer and those not
too old that they are likely to
die of something else, he said.
Death rates from breast
cancer have fallen mostly
because of dramatic
improvement in treatments,
he and other doctors have said.
“Te better we are at treating
clinically evident disease, the
less important it becomes to
fnd it early,” Welch said.
A big caveat: Te Canadian
study was on routine
mammograms to screen
healthy women. No one
doubts the value of diagnostic
mammograms — more
detailed X-rays when a
problem is suspected or afer a
lump has been found.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Thursday, May 6, 2010 file photo, a radiologist uses a magnifying glass to check mammograms for breast cancer in Los Angeles. A Canadian
study published on Wednesday in the British journal BMJ has revived a debate about the value of mammograms. The study suggests that screening
X-rays do not lower the risk of dying of breast cancer while finding many tumors that do not need treatment. Critics say the researchers used outdated
equipment and methods that made mammograms look unfairly ineffective.
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@KansanNews
on Twitter
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Ft. Leavenworth Series
Decisive Battles
3 p.m. First Tursdays, Feb. 6-Nov. 6
Te 2014 series will discuss lesser known clashes of arms that
were arguably just as signifcant
as those in the history books.
10th Anniversary Series
Presidential Lecture Series
Te First Ladies: Intimate Sacrifce,
Honored Post
Richard Norton Smith examines the private lives and the
public roles of the First Ladies.
Te Presidential Lecture Series is sponsored in part by the
William T. Kemper II Charitable Trust and Commerce Trust
Company and Bob Loyd, Co-Trustees.
I. Prisoners of State
4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 16
Smith examines the early First Ladies, many
of whom experienced personal tragedy and
paid a heavy price for their husband’s ambition.
II. Mary & Her Sisters
7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 17
Te Gilded Age First Ladies, including Mary
Todd Lincoln, Lucy Hayes and Frances Cleveland, made
some fascinating contributions to the nation.
III. Te Wilsons & the Roosevelts
7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 26
Eleanor Roosevelt is credited as inventing the modern
position of First Lady as we know it, but Edith Wilson cer-
tainly paved a unique path of
her own.
IV. Trailblazers & Traditionalists
7 p.m. Tursday, Feb. 27
Te First Ladies of the recent past, Jackie, Lady Bird, Betty,
and Nancy, really gave the title infuence and prestige, as role
models, style icons and champions of great causes.
Spring 2014 Study Group
Te Brave New World of Political Commu-
nications: Lessons from the Obama Cam-
paigns with Dole Fellow Mark Sump
4 p.m. Wednesdays
Feb. 19, 26; March 5, 12, 26; April 2, 9
Tis spring, Dole Fellow Mark Sump, delves into recent
strategic political communication methods
and reveals how they resulted in two Obama victories.
Innovations Series: Drones
Te new Innovations Series will focus on the crossroads
between science, technology and public policy. Join us for
our inaugural two-program event on drones.
I. Unmanned Drones: Soldiers
without Uniforms
7:30 p.m. Tursday, March 6
Retired Naval Admiral Timothy Beard and Scott Winship,
both currently of global security company, Northrop Grum-
man, will discuss the technological development, military
history, future capabilities and ethics of drones.
II. Branching Out: Exploring
New Uses for Drones
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 11
Dr. Kurt Barnhart, director for the Applied Aviation Re-
search Center of Kansas State University, and another expert
(TBA) will discuss applications of drone use that range from
disaster relief to search and rescue, environmental studies
and agriculture.
An Evening with Cindy McCain
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 25
Cindy McCain, wife of ’08 Presidential contender, Sen. John
McCain, discusses her experiences as Chair of Hensley &
Company, her work with major charity organizations, and
some stories from the campaign trail.
“Double Down: Game Change 2012”
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 8, Dole Institute
Authors, Mark Halperin and John Heilemann, discuss the
All above programs are FREE, open to the public and held at the Dole Institute.
Dole Institute of Politics, University of Kansas, West Campus
2350 Petefsh Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045
785.864.4900
www.DoleInstitute.org
book that bared the secrets of the 2012 campaign and pro-
vided a 360-degree account of this hard-fought, momen-
tous election.
10th Anniversary Series
America’s Heroes: Medal of Honor Recipi-
ents from the Civil War to Afghanistan
3 p.m. Tursday, April 10
Author and director of the Military History department at
the Army Command and General Staf College, Dr. James
Willbanks, will discuss Medal of Honor recipients who
stood courageous in the face of grave danger and risked, or
sacrifced, their own lives for the lives of others.
Charlie Cook Knows Elections
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 15
Editor, publisher and political analyst, Charlie Cook, will
handicap the upcoming midterm elections and share some
personal observations about Sen. Bob Dole.
10th Anniversary Series
Te Hidden Hungry: Ending Senior Hun-
ger with Enid Borden
7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 23
Bob Dole has fought for better nutrition his entire political
and post-political career. Enid Borden has fought that
same fght for seniors for more than 20 years. Under
Borden’s leadership as President and CEO, the Meals On
Wheels Association of America grew from a small trade
association to a leading national charity.
Archives Visiting Fellow
Innovation in Plain Sight: Transforming
Our National Security Landscape with
Museum Collections with Amy Herman
7:30 p.m. Tursday, May 1
Amy Herman, founder of Te Art of Perception, hones law
enforcement, medical, and counterterrorism professionals’
powers of observation. Studying art, curing disease, solv-
ing crime: join us for a fascinating glimpse into Herman’s
innovative approach.
DOLE INSTITUTE
SPRING PROGRAMS
Your classes come to life at the Dole Institute!
Volume 126 Issue 77 kansan.com Thursday, February 13, 2014
By Mike Vernon
mvernon@kansan.com
COMMENTARY
Jayhawks need
to loosen up
B
efore the party on Mass
Street, before Mario’s
Miracle and before the
banners, there was a saying
the 2008 Kansas basketball
team used. It remained un-
known until the day before the
Championship game.
Kansas’ senior forward
Darnell Jackson was asked
about the team’s chemistry
and getting that far in the
tournament.
“We just say ‘let your nuts
hang,” Jackson said to Rustin
Dodd of the Daily Kansan.
“Just let them hang. Just have
fun because this is it for most
of the guys, and we’re just
having fun with it.”
Te current Jayhawks aren’t
playing with that mentality.
Before we go there it’s
important to realize the
line ‘let your nuts hang,’ is
both funny and true. Really,
it makes no sense. None
whatsoever. Yet everyone
knows what it means. It’s a
fgurative phrase used in a
joking way to tell a team to
play both free and tough.
It also provides some insight
as to what that championship
team was all about and shows
a little of what this current
team is missing. Te nuts
aren’t yet hanging.
Te 2008 team had fun,
they played loose and they
carried an attitude with them
that would ofen overwhelm
their opponents. Te fact that
their jerseys had “Kansas” on
the front mattered to them. It
meant their opponents were
about to lose.
“Tey had a little bit of a
‘we’re better than you and we
know it kind of vibe,’” Dodd
said. “Teir guards kind of
had a swagger about them. A
good arrogance about them. A
productive arrogance.”
In short, they let their
nuts hang. Tis Kansas team
is young. Tey’re the tall,
lanky 14-year-old kid that
dominates at times, but will
still trip over his feet that are a
little too big for his body. Te
coordination isn’t all there.
But you can still see he’s going
to be a monster athlete soon.
In one way or another,
what they need is to “let ‘em
hang.” Embrace the hilarity
of the line and play with
the confdence and freeing
attitude the motto embraces.
It’s similar to the “Risky
Business” line, where Tom
Cruise is worried about
messing up his future. His
friend tells him, “Every now
and then say what the f***.
What the f*** gives you
freedom. Freedom gives you
opportunity. Opportunity
makes your future.”
Afer Kansas beat Oklahoma
in its conference opener,
Bill Self said his team had
been playing handcufed
earlier in the season. Against
Oklahoma, Self said the
Jayhawks let go.
Tey did what Jackson said.
Tey did what Tom Cruise
was told. Tey played with the
attitude and mentality that
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
S
Te Kansas baseball team
will get the 2014 campaign
underway Friday against
Brigham Young University.
Te teams will play a four-
game series in Peoria, Ariz.
Kansas is happy to go on the
road to start of the season,
especially due to the weather
at home in Lawrence.
Junior Wes Benjamin
will be the Jayhawks’ likely
starting pitcher for the season
opener against the Cougars.
Benjamin is a 6-foot-1 lef-
hander from St. Charles, Ill.
He is going to be the Friday
night starter for Kansas all
season, and is crucial for
Kansas’ success.
“If we’re going to make
the NCAA tournament,
(Benjamin) is going to have
to win us 10 games on Friday
night,” coach Ritch Price said.
“Tat’s his goal, and if he
gets that done, our team
will complete its’ goals as
well.”
Wes Benjamin is
projected to be drafed
between the third and
seventh round in this
year’s upcoming draf.
Te Jayhawks were
picked to fnish ninth in
the Big 12 this season and
plan to use this weekend
as a starting point to prove
doubters wrong. Kansas is
embracing the underdog role,
as some players have already
hung up that prediction in
the locker-room.
“Being underdogs is fun,”
senior pitcher Jordan Piche’
said. “And we proved last year
that we can beat the big guys.”
Te Jayhawks made it
all the way to the Big 12
championship game last
season and plan to have
similar if not better success
than last year.
“Our main goal is to make
a regional (playof),” said
junior outfelder Michael
Suiter. “Tat is a huge goal for
not only myself, but the team
as well.”
BYU senior captain,
Desmond Poulson will get
the start against Kansas on
Friday. Poulson is coming
of of a tremendous junior
season, posting a 7-2 record
with a 3.24 ERA. Poulson is a
big-game pitcher.
“Teir Friday night starter
is one of the best in the
country,” Price said. “He beat
some really good teams like
LSU, and we were fortunate
enough to open against
Nevada, who had a frst-
rounder and we beat him
there.”
Price explained that the
beneft of facing a team with
an ace, is the abundance of
scouts on hand. Tere were
close to 100 scouts at the
Nevada game, and there
will be nearly as many in
Peoria. Tis is benefcial for
Benjamin and the rest of the
Kansas roster.
Kansas has been a
historically strong starting
team. Tey are 72-54-1 all-
time in their season opener
and 7-4 under Price. Price
and the Jayhawks hope that
success will carry over to
Peoria. Following the series
in Arizona, Kansas will travel
to Port Charlotte, Florida to
compete in the Snowbird
Classic.
“Te mentality in the locker
room is hungry,” senior
captain Ka’iana Eldredge
said. “We deserved to be in
the tournament last year.”

— Edited by Brook Barnes
and Julie Etzler
BEN FELDERSTEIN
sports@kansan.com
SEE VERNON PAGE 3B
SOFTBALL PREVIEW
PAGE 3B Kansas prepares for weekend tournament
KANSAS 62 - TCU 53
COMEBACK VICTORY
EVAN DUNBAR
sports@kansan.com
AMIE JUST/KANSAN
Junior forward Chelsea Gardner posts up on TCU’s Latricia Lovings (21) on Wednesday. The Jayhawks defeated
the Horned Frogs 62-53 with a 12-point, 15-rebound effort from Gardner.

“The mentality in the locker
room is hungry. We deserved
to be in the tournament last
year.”
KA’IANA ELDREDGE
Senior catcher
Jayhawks prepare for four-game series
BASEBALL
Up by nine with just over
four minutes lef to play in
their home matchup against
TCU, the Kansas women’s
basketball team couldn’t
help feeling a bit of deja
vu. Afer all, they found
themselves in the exact
same situation when the two
teams met earlier this season
in Fort Worth. Te Jayhawks
(12-13, 5-8) ended up losing
that game by two.
So it was no surprise when
they visibly played their
toughest basketball over the
fnal minutes of their 60-
52 win against the Horned
Frogs (14-10, 5-7) on
Wednesday night in Allen
Fieldhouse.
“We were more positive
about it [as opposed to last
time], we’re not going to let
that happen,” senior guard
CeCe Harper said. “We were
telling each other to have
that killer instinct.”
Initially, things didn’t
look promising for Kansas.
For the second consecutive
game, the Jayhawks held
their opponents scoreless
in the game’s opening four
minutes. Unfortunately,
for the second consecutive
game, they were unable to
capitalize as they still played
much of the half from
behind.
Sparked by TCU
sophomore guard Zahna
Medley, TCU went on a
10-0 run midway through
the frst. Medley did it all for
the Horned Frogs, draining
a couple shots from behind
the arc as well as converting
an array of mid-range
foaters. She fnished the
half with 13 points on 5-10
shooting.
Additionally, coach Bonnie
Henrickson said her team’s
ofense was “abysmal” in
the frst half on their way to
just 24 points. It only began
to show signs of life in the
waning minutes behind the
strong play of sophomore
guard Natalie Knight.
With just over two minutes
remaining in the frst,
Knight sank a 3-pointer,
came up with a steal on the
opposite end and promptly
took it back down for
another three. It was the
ofensive spark that the
Jayhawks were searching for
all night as they headed into
half down fve.
“Tis was a game we
needed to win,” Knight said.
“No matter how much we
got down, we still needed to
fght.”
Kansas’ second half play
supported this sentiment;
they scored the frst 11
points of the half and didn’t
trail for the remainder of
the game. Junior forward
Chelsea Gardner was kept
relatively quiet early, but
made her presence felt in the
second half. She played well
on both ends of the court.
fnishing with 12 points and
15 rebounds for her tenth
double-double of the season.
Kansas experienced more
success guarding Medley in
the second half as well. She
was held to only 3-13 from
the feld afer intermission
as open looks were few and
far between.
“I thought CeCe did
a good job on Medley,”
Henrickson said. “Got in on
her, stayed with her, didn’t
give her separation.”
TCU made things
interesting late by pulling
within a single possession
with just over two minutes
lef. But the Jayhawks
recorded a couple key stops
and hit their free throws
down the stretch to keep the
game out of reach.
Currently seventh in
the Big 12 Conference,
Henrickson knows her
team will need more
performances like the
one she got from them
Wednesday if they want a
shot at the postseason.
“We had to win,” she said.
“We have to get on a little
run here.”
— Edited by Blair Sheade

“It’s a cool nickname and it fits us.
We go out there and play hard. We
do, however, have more than just two
of us. I’m surrounded by players who
play physically. We have a lot more
people to add to that nickname.”
— Tarik Black on his and
Jamari Traylor’s nickname
“the Bruise Brothers”
Source: KU Athletics
This week in athletics
?
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
Q: What is Tarik Black’s season
high for points in a game?
A: 17 vs. Georgetown
— ESPN.com
!
FACT OF THE DAY
Black has played in four NCAA
Tournament games in three years
with Memphis.
— ESPN.com
Tarik Black shows improvement, leadership
QUOTE OF THE DAY
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 PAGE 2B THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
By Farzin Vousoughian
sports@kansan.com
A
lthough senior Tarik Black
averages 4.2 points and three
rebounds per game this sea-
son, those numbers do not refect on
how big of an asset he’s been for the
Jayhawks in the past three games.
Joel Embiid’s scoring average has
dropped to 7.3 points per game
during this three-game stretch.
However, the Jayhawks know that
they can rely on their bench if an
impact player is having an of night.
Tat is the beauty of a Bill Self-led
basketball team.
Black, a transfer from Memphis, is
making his presence known. Against
Baylor, West Virginia and Kansas
State, Black averaged 8.3 points
and 6.7 rebounds per game. His
aggressiveness against West Virginia
even led him to sink his frst free
throw since connecting on seven of
them on Dec. 21 against Georgetown.
Afer playing for 20 minutes in
only two games earlier this season,
Black has seen more action in games,
playing more than 20 minutes in
each of the Jayhawks’ previous three
contests.
But it’s not just his activity on
the hardwood foor that helps the
Jayhawks.
Despite being a transfer, Black’s
leadership comes of as if he’s been
at Kansas for four years. He is vocal
on the foor and on the bench, and
he’s been an educator to many of the
young players on the team.
Even when being asked about
playing Kansas State prior to
Monday’s defeat, Black sat between
freshmen Andrew Wiggins
and Wayne Selden and
referred to that match as
“personal” because it’s an
in-state rival. It’s a rare
comment you hear from
transfer seniors, and the
Jayhawks own the gif
of having a mature and
astute senior in Black,
even if he’s only at Kansas
for one season.
Afer having little to
no impact coming of
the bench for most
of the season, he’s improved
over the last three games. His recent
performance could not have come at
a better time.
With seven games lef in the regular
season, college basketball teams are
inching closer to the postseason,
where the room for error becomes
smaller. For Kansas, it can rely on
Black when in need of a player to
come of the bench to help fll a void
or keep
a hot run
going.
Self has
praised Black
for leadership
in practice, and
fans are fnally
starting to see
that translate into
games.
Coming of a bitter
overtime loss to in-
state rival Kansas State,
Black will motivate his
teammates and challenge
them to rebound this Saturday
when the Jayhawks will host TCU.
By the time Kansas prepares for
the Big 12 and NCAA tournaments,
Black will continue to come of the
bench, and continue to earn minutes
in relieving Embiid to give Kansas a
lif in March Madness.
— Edited by Alec Weaver
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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 3B
AMIE JUST
sports@kansan.com
SOFTBALL
Tournament brings new opponents for Jayhawks
Tis weekend the Kansas
Jayhawks head to Charleston,
S.C., to participate in the
College of Charleston Classic.
Kansas faces fve diferent
opponents over the course of
the tournament.
Kansas will play Fordham
University in the frst game of
the tournament. Fordham went
to the University of Central
Florida Invitational back
on Feb. 7, but the matchup
between the Jayhawks and
Fordham was canceled due
to weather. Fordham went
2-1 in that tournament,
defeating Chattanooga and
LIU Brooklyn while falling
to the host team UCF. Senior
catcher Gabby Luety and junior
pitcher Michele Daubman were
named Atlantic 10 Conference
player and pitcher of the week,
respectively.
Rounding out the double-
header for Kansas, the
Jayhawks will take on Ole Miss.
Te Ole Miss team is coming
of of a tournament hosted by
Florida Gulf Coast. Its record
for the season is 2-3. Two of
its losses came in dramatic
fashion, as the team lost to
Western Kentucky and Florida
Gulf Coast 3-2 in both games.
Te Jayhawks will face
Western Carolina in the
tournament, which is West
Carolina’s frst tournament of
the season. Last season, the
Catamounts went 20-36. One
of their postseason highlights
was beating heavily favored
College of Charleston in the
frst round of the Southern
Conference Tournament.
Western Carolina sophomore
frst baseman Taylor Sigmon
was named to the Southern
Conference preseason second
team. She led the team in home
runs, RBIs and doubles last
season.
Te fourth game will be
against the tournament host,
College of Charleston. Te
Cougars are 0-2 on the season,
despite having a 37-20 record
last year. Tey return eight
starters to this year’s Cougar
squad.
Te last team on the Jayhawks’
schedule for the weekend is
DePaul University. Te team
is 3-2 on the season, coming
of a tournament in Miami on
Feb. 7. Senior pitcher Kirsten
Verdun was named Big East
Conference Pitcher of the Week
this past week. Verdun posted
a 0.64 ERA in her three starts
while striking out 28 batters in
22 innings.
Over the past three seasons,
Kansas hasn’t played any of
these fve teams, but is ready
to take on the competition in
South Carolina.
— Edited by Blair Sheade
FILE PHOTO/KANSAN
Kansas sings the Alma Mater after the softball game against the UMKC Roos on April 18, 2013. Kansas heads to South Carolina this weekend for the College of Charleston Classic where it will face five unfamiliar teams.
TORI RUBINSTEIN
sports@kansan.com
No. 70 Kansas hopes to
continue winning season
TENNIS
Tis week, the tennis team
will look to continue its
undefeated record when they
travel to Texas to take on the
Houston Cougars. Tings
are coming together for the
Jayhawks, who are of to a
perfect 5-0 record and broke
into the Intercollegiate Tennis
Association’s top-75 team
rankings at No. 70 this week.
Te Cougars come into
Friday’s match undefeated and
are tied for the No. 66 spot
in the ITA rankings. Te two
squads have already met once
this season when Houston
hosted a tournament during
the fall slate. In that meeting,
Kansas fell to the Cougars,
sufering four singles losses.
However, Kansas did win two
out of three doubles matches.
Houston has two extremely
strong singles players.
Freshman Despoina Vogasari
and sophomore Maria
Cardenas are both undefeated
so far this season. Te Jayhawks,
who have snatched the doubles
point in every single one of
their matches so far, will need
to have another strong doubles
performance to have a chance
at winning.
“I think our girls really enjoy
playing doubles and we have
good chemistry in our three
doubles teams,” frst-year coach
Todd Chapman said. “We have
actually worked on doubles less
than I would like so far this
spring in practice, so I have
been very pleased with our
results.”
With success comes
expectations and Chapman
said the girls are handling the
pressure of being a ranked
team very well. Chapman
also stresses that having high
expectations from others means
that you are doing things right.
“We talk about pressure being
a privilege,” Chapman said. “If
you have pressure, that means
you are doing things that are
important.”
Te Jayhawks will fnish the
weekend back in Lawrence
against the UT-Arlington
Mavericks who are currently
3-2. Matches begin at noon on
Sunday at the Jayhawk Tennis
Center.
— Edited by Katie Gilbaugh

“We talk about pressure
being a privilege. If you have
pressure, that means you
are doing things that are
important.”
TODD CHAPMAN
Coach
FRANK WEIRICH/KANSAN
Kansas senior Dylan Winhom returns a volley during a set against her
UMKC opponent. Kansas held two meets on Sunday the 9th, playing
against Eastern Michigan and UMKC
Kansas teams of the past were
known for. And that attitude
has shown moments of
bursting out for the Jayhawks
on a regular basis, but they
aren’t there yet.
Tat doesn’t mean they
won’t get there. In fact, they
probably will. But in Kansas’
last two losses, on the road
to Texas and at Kansas State,
even in its win at home
against West Virginia, the
Jayhawks didn’t appear to let
go. Tey haven’t been playing
free lately, and it’s cost them.
Te smiles and laughter
have disappeared. Te belief
that, because they’re wearing
a Kansas jersey, they’re going
to beat you has diminished.
In the long run, it most likely
won’t matter, but for this
stretch in February, it appears
the nuts aren’t yet hanging.
By the end of the season,
though, by March, these
Jayhawks will most likely
be playing free. Tey’ll be
playing loose. And they’ll be
“letting them hang.” Right
now, however, this team could
use a little more of what the
2008 team prided itself on.
— Edited by Blair Sheade
VERNON FROM PAGE 1B
WE JUMP
HIGHER
WE JUMP
HIGHER
KANSAS VS. TEXAS CHRISTIAN - FEB. 15, 2014
Follow the next chapter in KU basketball history all season long
@KansanSports, @KansanNews, Kansan.com and The University Daily Kansan
9
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6B
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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7B
Naadir Tharpe, guard
Tharpe played the best five minutes this season at the end of
regulation against K-State. He found open shooters, hit clutch
shots and defended well. Up until the last five minutes, Tharpe
was playing the opposite. He couldn’t guard K-State’s leading
scorer Marcus Foster and forced turnovers. Tharpe won’t face
anyone like Foster on TCU, but needs to step up his defense
pressure. On offense, Tharpe has to continue to distribute the
ball and record double-digit assist games for Kansas because
Kansas’ offense succeeds when Tharpe succeeds.
★★★★★

Wayne Selden, Jr., guard
The turnaround for Selden will be well under watch.
Selden’s season-low two points didn’t help the offense,
and he didn’t make it to the free throw line once. His
game is using physical play to draw contact inside the
paint. Selden is starting to become too comfortable
with his perimeter game, and needs to get back to his
aggressive ways. Look to Selden to have a bounce back
game against TCU.

★★★★✩
Andrew Wiggins, guard
The Jayhawks have relied on Andrew Wiggins on both
sides of the ball. Wiggins guards the opponent’s best
scorer and takes the game-tying shot, even though
he air-balled the game tying shot against K-State
on Monday. The free-throw line was a struggle for
Wiggins against K-State, where he shot 8-15. He has
six straight double-digit shooting attempt games, and
scored 27 points on Jan. 25 against TCU.

★★★★★
Perry Ellis, forward
The breakthrough game for Ellis came in the loss
against K-State. After scoring eight points in 21
minutes against West Virginia, Ellis posted a 19-point,
11-rebound game against K-State. Ellis led the team
with shot attempts (13) and made free throws (9). Fans
of the Jayhawks would love to see Ellis continue his
offensive dominance, but he was forced to take a lot
more shots than usual with Joel Embiid on the bench
for majority of the game. After the game, K-State head
coach Bruce Weber said that Perry Ellis is the best
player in the Big 12 conference.
★★★★★
Joel Embiid, center
This might be a toss up if Embiid even plays against
TCU. According to Jeff Goodman, an ESPN college bas-
ketball analyst, Bill Self said that he was uncertain
if Embiid will play on Saturday due to his lingering
back and knee injuries. The 7-footer played only 18
minutes against K-State due to his injuries and might
take a game off against TCU. If Embiid doesn’t suit
up, look for senior center Tarik Black to take his spot
in the lineup.
★★★✩✩
STARTERS
?
TCU hasn’t won a Big 12
conference game yet in the
2013-14 season, and already
encountered a 22-point loss in
Fort Worth this season. History
shows that TCU doesn’t play
well in Allen Fieldhouse. Last
season, after losing in Fort
Worth, the Jayhawks defeated
the Horned Frogs 74-48. This
season, the Jayhawks can’t
play soft and the game is al-
ready in the bag against TCU.
Wayne Selden, Jr.

Coming off a terrible game
against K-State, watch for
Selden to have a redemption
game against TCU. Selden’s
averaging 10 points per game,
but only scored two against
K-State. Watch for Selden to
become more aggressive by
driving the ball more and get-
ting to the free-throw line more.
TCU will try to double team Wig-
gins, which will leave Selden
open, and he needs to hit his
open shots.
Will Joel Embiid play on
Saturday?
Embiid has lingering back
and knee injuries and Bill Self
told ESPN’s Jeff Goodman that
he was uncertain of Embiid’s
playing status. Self told Good-
man that he knew Embiid was
going to take some time off, but
doesn’t know how long he’ll be
out for.
3
Kansas’ loss to K-State gives the
Jayhawks six losses this season,
which is the third straight season
with six losses or more
6
Andrew Wiggins has six straight
games with double-digit shooting
attempts

69
Kansas is shooting 69 percent from
the free-throw line this season,
which is seventh in the Big 12
conference
Kansas can shoot 50 percent or
better. The Jayhawks are 14-1 when
shooting 50 percent or better, and
Kansas is coming off a 41 shooting
percentage game against K-State.
If Embiid doesn’t play, Kansas will
have to rely on its shooting and fast
break points, which might lower the
team’s shooting percentage. TCU is
giving up 69 points per game, and
Kansas is scoring 79 points per
game.
— Edited by Alec Weaver
?
Nothing has gone right for TCU
against Big 12 opponents.
The team has yet to win a
conference game, and it is very
likely that the Horned Frogs
will finish 0-18 as a difficult
schedule remains. The Horned
Frogs are held back on the
offensive end as they rank last
in the Big 12 in scoring and
field goal percentage. TCU was
competitive in its last game
losing to second-place Texas by
five points at home.
Karviar Shepherd
The 6-10 freshman only played
18 minutes against the Jay-
hawks in Fort Worth due to foul
trouble. The Horned Frogs don’t
have much size or depth, so
Shepherd will need to stay on
the floor to clog up the paint.
This would be a little easier if
Embiid sits out.
How will TCU stop Andrew
Wiggins?
Wiggins scored 27 points
against the Horned Frogs
in Fort Worth and got to the
free-throw line often. TCU will
have to find ways to make him
a shooter and keep him from
driving to the basket.
31.5
Rebounds per game, worst in
the Big 12
65.2
Points per game, worst in
the Big 12 and 308th in the
country
3
Road wins this season
The offense struggles. Kansas shot
poorly against Kansas State on Mon-
day including 3-for-17 from 3-point
range. While the offense doesn’t
need to be great to beat TCU, it
would help the team’s confidence
moving forward.
— Edited by Alec Weaver
KANSAS VS. TCU
FEB. 15, 3 P.M., ALLEN FIELDHOUSE, LAWRENCE
KANSAS
TIPOFF
TCU
TIPOFF
BASKETBALL GAMEDAY
The Jayhawks prepare to host the Horned Frogs
Prediction: Kansas 91, TCU 54
BLAIR SHEADE
sports@kansan.com
BRIAN HILLIX
sports@kansan.com
AT A GLANCE AT A GLANCE
PLAYER TO WATCH
PLAYER TO WATCH
QUESTION MARKS QUESTION MARKS
BY THE NUMBERS BY THE NUMBERS
BABY JAY WILL CHEER IF BABY JAY WILL CRY IF

No. 8 KANSAS
(18-6, 9-2 Big 12)

TCU
(9-13, 0-10 Big 12)
Kyan Anderson, guard
The junior point guard has been TCU’s most consistent player this
season. He is coming off a solid performance against Texas where
he tied a season-high with 27 points and dished out eight assists.
A three-year starter, he is a capable shooter but is also effective at
drawing fouls, which was evident against Kansas in Fort Worth when
he went 8-for-8 from the foul line. Anderson’s 15.7 points, 4.9 assists
and 1.3 steals per game lead the Horned Frogs.
★★★★✩
Jarvis Ray, guard
He scored in double figures in six of his first nine games of
the season but has eclipsed that mark just once in his last
13 games. Ray is coming off two shaky performances as
he went scoreless against Texas in 30 minutes, scored four
points and committed three turnovers against Iowa State on
Feb. 8.

★✩✩✩✩
Karviar Shepherd, center
The freshman did an adequate job of guarding Joel Embiid
in Fort Worth before fouling out with nine minutes remaining.
Shepherd injured his left hand in the first half against Kansas
on Jan. 25 forcing him to undergo surgery and miss the Texas
Tech game on Feb. 1. He seems to have recovered and has
averaged 25.5 minutes in the team’s last two games. The
Dallas native leads the team in rebounding and ranks fourth in
the conference averaging two blocks per game.
★★★✩✩
Amric Fields, forward
Fields leads the Horned Frogs in field goal attempts and is
second in scoring and rebounding. Despite his 44.1 field-goal
percentage this season, Fields has struggled in Big 12 play
and has shot over 40 percent in only four of the team’s 10
conference games. He has still managed to score in double
figures in all but two of those games.
★★★✩✩
Brandon Parrish, forward
One of his best conference games came against Kansas in
Fort Worth where the freshman scored 15 points on 6-for-11
shooting before fouling out. Parrish leads the Horned Frogs
in 3-pointers made and attempted. He does a good job of
protecting the ball and has the fewest turnovers among the
starters.

★★✩✩✩
STARTERS
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8B
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MEN’S BASKETBALL
Ennis’ 35-footer keeps No. 1 Syracuse undefeated
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH — Tyler
Ennis made a 35-footer at the
buzzer to help No. 1 Syracuse
remain unbeaten with a 58-
56 win over No. 25 Pitt on
Wednesday night.
Syracuse (24-0, 11-0
ACC) remained one of two
undefeated teams in Division I
along with Wichita State.
Trailing by one with 4.4
seconds lef, Ennis caught the
inbounds pass and dribble up
the court before hitting the
shot over two defenders.
Talib Zanna, who led Pitt
(20-5, 8-4) with 16 points and
14 rebounds, had given Pitt a
56-55 lead with 4.4 seconds
remaining afer he hit two free
throws.
It was Pitt’s frst loss at home
to a top-fve team in the 12-
year history of the Petersen
Events Center, their on-
campus arena. Te Panthers
(20-5, 8-4) had been 9-0
against top-fve teams and
13-1 against teams ranked in
the top 10.
C.J. Fair led Syracuse with 14
points.
Pitt had a 54-48 lead with less
than two minutes remaining,
but Fair made a 3-pointer
with 1:40 to go. He then hit a
jumper to make it 54-53 with
51 seconds lef. Afer Pitt
missed on the other end, Ennis
made two free throws with 10
seconds lef to give the Orange
the lead.
Pitt led 27-24 at halfime
and built its lead to nine in the
early stages of the second half
when Lamar Patterson made
a 3-pointer to make it 37-28
with 15 minutes remaining.
Syracuse stormed back with
a 17-8 run and tied the score
on a Trevor Cooney 3-pointer
with 6:53 to go, but Pitt
regained control afer Zanna
converted a three-point play
and freshman Jamel Artis sank
two free throws for a 50-45
lead.
But it was all Syracuse afer
that. Pitt’s only points in the
fnal 1:59 came from Zanna’s
two free throws, and the
Panthers were outscored 10-3
in the fnal 1:59.
Syracuse had to play
without backup center Baye
Moussa Keita, who sat out
with a sprained knee. Tat
forced sophomore forward
Jerami Grant into duty as the
backup center behind Rakeem
Christmas.
Pitt had injury issues of
its own. Senior forward and
leading scorer Lamar Patterson
had the thumb on his right
hand wrapped for a second
consecutive game. Afer
going 1 for 9 in his previous
outing against Virginia Tech,
Patterson scored 13 points.
Pitt led by as many as seven
in the frst half. A Patterson
3-pointer with 4:30 to go
before halfime capped a 10-3
Pitt run and gave the Panthers
a 24-17 lead. It was the third
3-pointer of the half for the
Panthers, who also had their
way on the ofensive glass
against Syracuse.
Te Panthers outrebounded
Syracuse, 18-11, in the frst
half and scored seven second-
chance points from nine
ofensive rebounds.
Syracuse was able to keep it
close and got some unlikely
scoring from sophomore
guard Michael Gbinije, who
led the Orange with seven
points. Gbinije, who entered
the game averaging only 3.3
points per game, tallied seven
points in his previous four
games combined.
Syracuse needed Gbinije’s
production because 3-point
specialist Tervor Cooney was
held to three points in the frst
20 minutes on 1 for 3 shooting
from behind the arc.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Syracuse’s Tyler Ennis (11) shoots a 3-pointer between Pittsburgh’s Cameron Wright (3) and Josh Newkirk, left, in the final second of an NCAA college
basketball game Wednesday in Pittsburgh. The shot went in and Syracuse won 58-56.
MEN’S BASKETBALL
Wichita State’s Ron Baker helps Shockers stay perfect
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Illinois State guard Paris Lee (1) reaches in to defend against Wichita State guard Ron Baker (31) during the
second half of an NCAA college basketball game at Redbird Arena, Wednesday in Normal, Ill.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WICHITA — All those
sages who claim there are
valuable lessons to be learned
from a loss have never met
Ron Baker, the mop-haired
sophomore guard for No. 4
Wichita State.
You see, the Shockers are
riding a perfect start to the
season, pushing their record to
26-0 with a 78-67 victory over
Southern Illinois on Tuesday
night. But people seem to
forget that the Fabulous Baker
Boy was actually hurt during
much of their Final Four run
a year ago.
So that 30-9 record that
Wichita State had last season?
Six of those defeats came with
Baker on the bench, trying
desperately to recover from a
stress fracture in his foot.
“I didn’t realize that until
you mentioned it,” he said. “I
wouldn’t say it’s because I’m
on the foor, though. I think
the teammates I’m around
kind of help put that record
together.”
Nevertheless, Baker has had
a big part in it. He returned
from his injury in time for the
Missouri Valley tournament,
where the Shockers lost to
Creighton in the title game,
and was a big reason why they
advanced to the Final Four,
losing to eventual champion
Louisville.
His only other loss came in
an early visit to Tennessee last
year.
Tis season, Baker is the
Shockers’ second-leading
scorer at nearly 13 points per
game, and he’s also second
on the team in assists and
arguably their best perimeter
defender.
Being the star is nothing
new, though. Neither is
winning.
Baker averaged more than
20 points as a senior for tiny
Scott City (Kan.) High School,
leading the Beavers to a 25-1
record. Te three-sport star —
he was a standout quarterback
and accomplished baseball
player — poured in 26 points
in the Class 3A championship,
including the buzzer-beating
putback that gave Scott City
the title. His knack for seizing
the moment has continued at
Wichita State.
Te Shockers were
struggling along against the
Salukis until Baker heated up
Tuesday night. He wound up
hitting three 3-pointers in the
second half, part of his game-
high 19 points, lifing Wichita
State to a tougher-than-
expected victory that kept
their perfect record intact.
“I like that kid a lot. I kind of
drif toward shooters — you
can tell, because we don’t have
a lot on our team,” Salukis
coach Barry Hinson joked.
“And you can see he’s having
fun.”
He wasn’t having a whole
lot of fun midway through
the game, when Wichita State
coach Gregg Marshall got into
his face on the sideline. Te
sophomore was passing up
open looks and instead trying
to make the remarkable play,
and Marshall wasn’t very
happy.
Teir one-sided
conversation played out
within earshot of hundreds of
fans seated courtside.
“I told Ron that for whatever
reason, I think he’s going at
least one dribble too far at
times,” Marshall said. “He’s
trying to make a spectacular
play or a spectacular pass,
but he’s open of ball screens.
Shoot the basketball! Tat’s
what you do. You’re not Magic
Johnson, not yet. Just shoot
the ball instead of trying to
make these home-run plays.”
Baker clearly listened to his
advice, popping of a series
of open jumpers with an
efortless shooting touch. By
the time he hit his fnal 3 in
the closing minutes, the game
was well in hand.
It wasn’t easy, not by a long
shot, but it kept the Shockers
undefeated. It also kept
Baker’s near-perfect career
just as impressive as it was at
the beginning of the night.
“At this point, you have to
learn from winning, which is
tough for a lot of teams,” Baker
said. “For us, we haven’t had a
chance to learn from losing.
We don’t want to, either.”

“At this point, you have to
learn from winning, which
is tough for a lot of teams.”
RON BAKER
Wichita State guard
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Lookin’ for your Valentine?
Join the Kansan at Quinton’s
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Friday February 14th
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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 10B

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